NutritionFacts.org

processed foods

The typical American diet is high in processed foods. Processing can remove nutrients from grains and even tea. Processing may remove fiber, leaving relatively empty calories with low nutrient value, and may add in trans fats. A much better choice is to eat unrefined plant foods (especially a varied plant-based diet).

Processed foods may be harmful to one’s health, including carrot juice, coconut milk, coconut oil, mangosteen juice, white bread, corn syrup, sugar, sodas, food coloring, and a certain red dye. However, two sweeteners do have significant antioxidant content.

Some processed foods have health benefits, including peanut butter, blueberry jam, homemade cranberry “juice,” apple juice, grape juice, soy products (but not tofu from Indonesia processed with formaldehyde), popcorn (but not with butter flavor), and cocoa (but not chocolate). Gum Arabic can be considered harmless.

Topic summary contributed by Mahnoosh Assadi and Bob.
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