Foods that Help Headache & Migraine Relief

Foods that Help Headache & Migraine Relief
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Plant-based diets are put to the test for treating migraine headaches.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Headaches are one of the top five reasons people end up in emergency rooms, and one of the leading reasons for which people see their doctors in general. One of the things you can do to try to prevent them is to identify the triggers and avoid them. Common triggers for migraines include stress, smoke, hunger, sleep issues, certain trigger foods, like chocolate, cheese, and alcohol, your menstrual cycle, or certain weather patterns.

In terms of dietary treatments, the father of modern medicine, William Osler, suggested trying “a strict vegetable diet.” After all, the nerve inflammation associated with migraines may be reduced by a strictly plant-based diet, as many plant foods are high in anti-inflammatory compounds and antioxidants, and likewise, meat products may have pro-inflammatory properties. But it wasn’t put to the test for another 117 years.

Among those given a placebo supplement, half said they got better; half said they didn’t. But when put on a strictly plant-based diet, they did much better, experiencing a significant drop in the severity of their pain. Now, “it is possible that the pain reducing effects of the [plant-based] diet may be, at least in part, due to weight reduction”—they lost about nine more pounds in their vegan month.

Even just lowering the fat content of the diet may help. Those placed on a month of consuming less than 30 grams of fat a day, like less than two tablespoons of oil a day, experienced highly significant decreases in headache frequency, intensity, duration, and the need to take medications––a six-fold decrease in the frequency and intensity. From three migraine attacks every two weeks down to just one a month. And by low-fat, they didn’t mean SnackWells; they meant more fruits, vegetables, beans. Before the food industry coopted and corrupted the term, eating low-fat meant like eating an apple, not Apple Jacks.

Now this was a really low-fat diet, like 10% fat, for someone eating 2,500 calories a day. What about just less than 20% fat, compared to a more normal, but still relatively lower-fat diet than average? Same significant drops in headache frequency and severity, including a five-fold drop in attacks of severe pain. Since the intervention involved at least a halving of saturated fat intake, mostly found in meat, dairy, and junk, the researchers concluded that a reduction of saturated fat intake may help control migraine attacks. But it’s not necessarily something that they’re getting less of. There are compounds present in live green real veggies that might bind to a migraine-triggering peptide known as CGRP. Drug companies have been trying to come up with something that binds to it, but the drugs have failed to be effective, and are also toxic, a problem you don’t see with cabbage.

Green vegetables also have magnesium. Found throughout the food supply, but most concentrated in green leafy vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. It is the central atom to chlorophyll. So, you can see how much magnesium foods have in the produce aisle by the intensity of their green color. Magnesium supplements do not appear to decrease migraine severity, but may reduce the number of attacks you get in the first place. You can ask your doctor about starting 600mg of magnesium dicitrate every day, but note that magnesium supplements can cause adverse effects, such as diarrhea. So, I recommend getting it in the way nature intended.

Any foods that may particularly help? I’ve talked about ground ginger. Combining caffeine with over-the-counter pain killers like Tylenol, aspirin, or ibuprofen may boost their efficacy––about 130 milligrams for tension-type headaches, and 100 mg for migraines, about what you might expect to get in three cups of tea. Though I believe it is just a coincidence that the principal investigator was named Lipton.

Note: you can overdo it. If you take kids and teens who have headaches, drinking one and a half liters of cola a day, and cut the cola, you can cure 90% of them. Though, this may be a Coca-Cola effect rather than a caffeine effect.

And finally, one plant food that may not be the best idea is this innocent-looking fellow: the Carolina Reaper, the hottest chili pepper in the world… so mind-numbingly hot it can clamp off the arteries in your brain, and you can end up with a so-called thunderclap headache, like this 34-year old man—why am I not surprised it was a man?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Headaches are one of the top five reasons people end up in emergency rooms, and one of the leading reasons for which people see their doctors in general. One of the things you can do to try to prevent them is to identify the triggers and avoid them. Common triggers for migraines include stress, smoke, hunger, sleep issues, certain trigger foods, like chocolate, cheese, and alcohol, your menstrual cycle, or certain weather patterns.

In terms of dietary treatments, the father of modern medicine, William Osler, suggested trying “a strict vegetable diet.” After all, the nerve inflammation associated with migraines may be reduced by a strictly plant-based diet, as many plant foods are high in anti-inflammatory compounds and antioxidants, and likewise, meat products may have pro-inflammatory properties. But it wasn’t put to the test for another 117 years.

Among those given a placebo supplement, half said they got better; half said they didn’t. But when put on a strictly plant-based diet, they did much better, experiencing a significant drop in the severity of their pain. Now, “it is possible that the pain reducing effects of the [plant-based] diet may be, at least in part, due to weight reduction”—they lost about nine more pounds in their vegan month.

Even just lowering the fat content of the diet may help. Those placed on a month of consuming less than 30 grams of fat a day, like less than two tablespoons of oil a day, experienced highly significant decreases in headache frequency, intensity, duration, and the need to take medications––a six-fold decrease in the frequency and intensity. From three migraine attacks every two weeks down to just one a month. And by low-fat, they didn’t mean SnackWells; they meant more fruits, vegetables, beans. Before the food industry coopted and corrupted the term, eating low-fat meant like eating an apple, not Apple Jacks.

Now this was a really low-fat diet, like 10% fat, for someone eating 2,500 calories a day. What about just less than 20% fat, compared to a more normal, but still relatively lower-fat diet than average? Same significant drops in headache frequency and severity, including a five-fold drop in attacks of severe pain. Since the intervention involved at least a halving of saturated fat intake, mostly found in meat, dairy, and junk, the researchers concluded that a reduction of saturated fat intake may help control migraine attacks. But it’s not necessarily something that they’re getting less of. There are compounds present in live green real veggies that might bind to a migraine-triggering peptide known as CGRP. Drug companies have been trying to come up with something that binds to it, but the drugs have failed to be effective, and are also toxic, a problem you don’t see with cabbage.

Green vegetables also have magnesium. Found throughout the food supply, but most concentrated in green leafy vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. It is the central atom to chlorophyll. So, you can see how much magnesium foods have in the produce aisle by the intensity of their green color. Magnesium supplements do not appear to decrease migraine severity, but may reduce the number of attacks you get in the first place. You can ask your doctor about starting 600mg of magnesium dicitrate every day, but note that magnesium supplements can cause adverse effects, such as diarrhea. So, I recommend getting it in the way nature intended.

Any foods that may particularly help? I’ve talked about ground ginger. Combining caffeine with over-the-counter pain killers like Tylenol, aspirin, or ibuprofen may boost their efficacy––about 130 milligrams for tension-type headaches, and 100 mg for migraines, about what you might expect to get in three cups of tea. Though I believe it is just a coincidence that the principal investigator was named Lipton.

Note: you can overdo it. If you take kids and teens who have headaches, drinking one and a half liters of cola a day, and cut the cola, you can cure 90% of them. Though, this may be a Coca-Cola effect rather than a caffeine effect.

And finally, one plant food that may not be the best idea is this innocent-looking fellow: the Carolina Reaper, the hottest chili pepper in the world… so mind-numbingly hot it can clamp off the arteries in your brain, and you can end up with a so-called thunderclap headache, like this 34-year old man—why am I not surprised it was a man?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

I’ve previously covered ginger and topical lavender for migraines. Saffron may help relieve PMS symptoms, including headaches. A more exotic way a plant-based diet can prevent headaches is by helping to keep tapeworms out of your brain.

Though hot peppers can indeed trigger headaches, they can also be used to treat them. Check out my wild video on relieving cluster headaches with hot sauce.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

127 responses to “Foods that Help Headache & Migraine Relief

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      1. But nutritional yeast itself is high in vit B12 so it should prevent hi homocysteine levels if what you say is correct. And if this is so, then nutritional yeast should not be a trigger food…

        1. My understanding is that nutritional yeast does not contain any B12 (unless it is a brand that has been ‘fortified’ with B12)

  1. I grew up with a mixture of migraines and sinus infection and congestion headaches. Both were often debilitating. I medicated and was taken to doctors and spent many days in darkened rooms trying to sleep them off whilst life when on without me.

    Then later in life when dairy was inconvenient (spoiled before it was consumed, so bought less and less of it), I noticed I never had sinus problems. Took more years to figure out why. It was clearly the dairy. But I still had migraines and they were yet debilitating.

    FFWD to five years ago when I changed to WFPB living and I’ve had ZERO migraines since then. Absolutely none. If you know migraines you might know the aura that often (for me always) precedes them. I -have had the aura- but it never progresses into a headache at all. It passes. One day in the last year or so I had very strong aura (a visual distortion/impairment) while driving, making driving unsafe. I stopped and bought a caffeinated beverage (the least offensive I could find) because I knew that caffeine has a powerful effect on these things (If, and only if you don’t consume caffeine with any regularity).

    I turned up the bottle for a big swig of “medicine” and my vision cleared up AS I SWALLOWED that swig. I swear my vision cleared as I was lowering the bottle from my lips. I took another small sip and resumed my journey. Caffeine is a strong drug, use with caution.

    I don’t mind aura now and then, especially since caffeine is one of our culture’s must popular addictive substances-and readily available.

    Convenience stores I now call “addiction supply centers” with: caffeine, nicotine, alcohol, sugar, chocolate, greasy/salty foods, and gambling (lotto) at every one. The petrol is just a gimmick to get you into the store. I hardly visit them any more.

    The moral of my story is WFPB fixed my migraines, and would have fixed my sinus problems had I yet been a dairy consumer. Proper food fixes most things. Thanks to Dr. G here and many many other fine men and women of the Evidence-Based Medicine movement for helping me make the decision to try a better way of living. It has been wonderful. WP

    1. Please also note that that the frequency of my aura is far reduced from the frequency I used to have migraines-which was as many as one or two in a month. I may have had aura three or four times in five years. A WIN as I tally the score.

    2. Wade TN,
      Interesting. Not sure what kind of visual aura you get but I have been getting scintillating scotomas for 4 decades (my father also got them). They are unpredictable but I suspect they are stress related (they only last about one minute; they start as a small spot in my visual field and grow in size as they move across my visual field; they appear like “fractured glass of various translucent colors”). Switching from a lacto-pesco-vegetarian diet some years ago to a 100% WF diet did not reduce their frequency, which ranges from 3-4 in a year to about 12 (they seem to come in clusters). No pain ever, fortunately. I don’t worry about them and neither has any doctor.

        1. Thanks, YR.
          The only trigger relevant to me on that list is: stress , anxiety , relaxation after a period of stress

          Interestingly, I have thought they tend to occur **after** being stressed.
          Very interesting to see that on the list.

          I am also abnormally sensitive to sound – what seems normal to most usually seems very loud to me. However, my hearing is actually very good, despite having a mild case of tinnitus, also stress related I am quite sure as it comes and goes. Well, now the cat’s out of the bag. I’m a bit of a nutty person.

          1. I am also abnormally sensitive to sound – what seems normal to most usually seems very loud to me. However, my hearing is actually very good, despite having a mild case of tinnitus … I’m a bit of a nutty person.
            —————————————————————————————
            For many years I too was abnormally sensitive to sound… also with good hearing and a mild case of tinnitus still. Plus I was super sensitive to smells of man made chemicals and volatile organic compounds.

            Over the past decade or so I’m no longer sensitive to sounds… a passing truck at night with my windows open don’t even register with me anymore if I’m concentrating on something else.

            The VOCs don’t bother me either, possibly because since living alone I no longer have any chemicals around to bother me. (When looking after my mother, when she would come out of the hair dressers I could hardly stay in the car due to the smell of the hair spray… finally got her hair dresser to order some odor free spray to use on her hair.)

            1. Lonie,
              I remember that hair dresser smell when looking after my mom. I think it has something to do with perms and is toxic. I have sensitivity to sound and turn the TV way down. I live alone and like it quiet. I have minor tinnitus, but, at 60, my hearing is very good. I do not have ocular auras or any headaches.

              1. Hey Dan, sounds as though you are on a similar track as me.

                It was very hard for me when my mother was alive as she took great pleasure in oil painting. But the oil paints and the turpentine and other brush cleaners and paint thinners were toxic to me. I even refused to let my sister put down new carpet due to the formaldehyde vapors I would have had to live with.

                I really hated having to go against things that would have been o.k. with my mother but making life miserable for me. I finally convinced her to switch over to water colors and she was able to continue painting and I was able to spend more time in the house. Some of the worst part of the whole experience was when this was going on with me, my older sister and brothers did not understand my sensitivity.

                This led to a period of mutual disapproval due to our opposite stance of “better living through chemicals.” Not a problem now as I have fewer chemical sensitivities due to not being around them and my brothers who are left (two) and I get along fine.

  2. Thanks Deb.

    Hey Site Managers: I cannot get the video to play here. I went through and killed my anti trackers, popup blockers, ad blockers all one by one to see if it was on my end. I did everything but try a different browser (in Mozilla now).

    Went to YT and it plays fine there. I still haven’t gotten it to play here. I’ve never had this problem before. Ever-and I’ve literally watched 95% of the videos Dr. Greger ever published at NF.O.

    Someone might know what is up or want to look into it. Momento, I’ll try another browser. Yeah, it played there–and I got the AGGRAVATING POPUP! GAWD I HATE POPUPS.

    nevermind.

      1. Today the video plays just like normal on my usual browser, as they always did.

        I have no idea what changed since yesterday. I didn’t reboot or clear caches/cookies. Thanks for the reply.

    1. Wade, in Firefox there should be an option for Private browsing. Maybe try getting here with that?

      Personally I use duck duck go on Firefox and Google chrome. I notice that once the video has played when on one of them, the screen has other you tube videos available to choose from… so I guess that browser is showing a you tube version.

      1. Ditto. Makes me wonder who has the right to what. If we had pop-ups on our car windshields we would be screaming bloody murder.

  3. Just a quick fact-check: As a long-term severe migraine sufferer, I’m all ears when it comes to a plant-based diet keeping me healthier. Currently, I take a drug that binds to CGRP — a monthly injection (CGRP antagonist). It’s been HIGHLY effective and life-changing for me (and for many people). So, your statement in this video caught my attention: “There are compounds present in live green real veggies that might bind to a migraine-triggering peptide known as CGRP. Drug companies have been trying to come up with something that binds to it, but the drugs have failed to be effective, and are also toxic, a problem you don’t see with cabbage.”

    This class of drug is not toxic, and it’s highly effective, if not life-changing for some people. So I think that your statement is inaccurate. I wanted to point that out, since you pride yourself on scientific accuracy, and we also count on you for that. Thanks!

    1. Rebecca, ty for your comments. I will ask my doctor about the injections.

      I get migraine with blinding aura… have to pull off the road and wait it out if I am driving. I also started having focal seizures last year. For me, hormones have something to do with it (menopause), some foods, high pressure weather systems (clear and sunny), and dehydration.

      I dislike the mar rizatriptan and rarely take it. Cambia is a powder (diclofenac potassium) that you mix with water. It has been effective the occassions I tried it.

    2. Hi Rebecca.

      I just wanted to second your comment. I experience a great deal of relief from the CGRP antagonist monthly injection that I take for chronic migraine. It has reduced the frequency and pain level of these headaches. My physician has not indicated that these drugs are toxic, and I would like more evidence to be provided to this effect. These drugs have been life-changing for me, and I feel confused by the comment that they are ineffective and toxic.

      Best,
      Rachel

    3. Thanks for pointing this out Rebecca. I’m also on a CGRP antagonist and just watched a webinar for the Migraine World Summit yesterday (happening now) on the class of drugs. The doctor on there showed concern that we don’t know long-term effects of the drugs, but also expressed that no adverse health effects showed up in the clinical trials. So I’m not sure where the liver toxicity statement by Dr. Greger came from. If there is evidence of that, I really need to see it.

      1. Hannah — It’s probably true that we don’t know the long-term effects given that it’s a new drug. That said, no risks have been identified to me — even hypothetical ones. It’s probably a good idea that we keep examining this issue, though — keep asking our physicians as time goes on. I, too, would love to understand what prompted Dr. Greger’s reference.

        1. The sources attached to the video are interesting to read – thank you – but unfortunately do not address the idea that CGRP antagonists are “toxic.” Also, they are a “biologic” medicine — not a typical drug or chemical compound. I imagine that makes a difference. I plan to continue researching this issue.

  4. Your list of triggers for migraines doesn’t include aspartame (found in sugar substitutes) and MSG. Both are known to cause brain damage and are recognized as being migraine headache triggers. And you have not responded to inquiries about discussing the toxic effects of MSG on Nutrition/Facts.org. I find these facts unsettling.

  5. Great video- thanks! I will definitely try to move more towards a WFPD diet as possible (although during this epidemic I believe the stress is the worst migraine trigger for me!) Love your videos, as always. <3

    1. I hate to put myself in the same boat but I too never get headaches much less migraines. And there are no triggers for me…… other than ice cream headaches but they are a different beast altogether.

      1. I do not get headaches but have lived with tinnitus (ear ringing) for most of my life. Tinnitus surely is not as bad as headaches. White noise helps block the ringing. My hearing is good though and tinnitus is just a minor hiccup I live with.

      2. Yes, Fumbles….especially if the ice cream is directly from the freezer, right? :-) I avoid ice-cold water or really cold food for the same reason.

        I should amend my comment to say that I might get an occasional “stress” headache, but at least I know where it came from. So, I do the “take deep slow breaths” thing, and it disappears.

        (Also, if I go too long without eating a meal I might get a headache — which is why I have no interest in those long fasts, other than what I’m doing now.)

  6. I realized nutritional yeast was a trigger food for my migraines and included return of one sided intestinal pain. Otherwise going strictly vegan has reduced my migraine number and severity so significantly it is amazing. So even with the stress related to the COVID 19 pandemic and spring seasonal allergies in California that use to be a trigger my migraines are rare.thank you. Luckily I had added the nutritional yeast later in my vegan diet and was able to figure out why my migraines had come back all of a sudden. So that is why I am leaving a comment in case anyone else might have this issue. Bonnie Nordby RN, PHN

  7. There are other triggers besides food for me – my biggest were huge fluctuations in barometric pressure (as in before a storm), strong sunlight, quick changes in altitude (driving up a mountainside), and cigarette smoke. These all came to light after I did my own research after being told I was “high strung” and given tranquilizers – doctors are great but they don’t know everything and don’t always have the time to research for reasons behind YOUR particular problem. I’m fortunate in that food didn’t play a big part in my migraines. I’ve been practically migraine free since doing this research.

        1. YR,

          You just meddled sweetly in my love life. The man I fell in love with used to sing that song to me. That and Please Come to Boston.

          When I met him he told me he was a loner but he was the type of loner who was class President, Prom king, most popular but the loner torn between many locations was also very true. Sweetest, shyest, extrovert ever. He tricked me into falling in love with him before I found out that he was not at all like shy introverted me.

  8. Reduce your blood pressure, and maybe a headache with Paul & Lucky: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdMgVkp4OXI

    Groceries are supplied here in NE Okla. In today’s local, “The Paper,” a health department worker commented that 80% of the population will get Covid 19 and some will not have symptoms. For those who are symptomatic, they can expect two weeks of sickness. Quarantine is in place though and public places are shut down for now.

  9. The halos that came with my migraine headaches were so bad, I had to just sit and listen to music or something until it passed. I tried drinking water, aspirin, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, caffeine, and even sleep. No matter what I did or didn’t do, the migraines would last pretty close to an hour…so frustrating. Once I started down the path of ‘The Daily Dozen’, …bonus! Along with shortness of breath, hypertension and joint pains, my migraines went away.

    The Daily Dozen is no joke! (High fives Hippocrates)

    But…high fives for Hippocrates is joke; a terrible, terrible joke lol.

    1. Wade Johnson, my experiences with migraine were different, but my results from eating WFPB (Daily Dozen is a great tool) gave me the same results you got. EVERYTHING is better and migraines are thing of the past–I feel safe in saying now that I’ve not had one in the entire five years of WFPB living.

  10. amazing how similar hemoglobin molecule is to chlorophyll; wow just changing Fe in hemoglobin and MG in plants; hemoglobin traps oxygen and chlorophyll turns light into energy somehow; just a comment

    1. I watch MedCram and a few other sites like that.

      The CDC has announced that Vitamin D can help, which those sites and Dr Greger already posted.

      I have been thinking about it because things like flu decrease in the Summer and Someone talked about how it could be heat, humidity, being outdoors or Vitamin D.

      With COVID-19 hotter and more tropical climates have still been having it spread so heat and humidity are crossed off the list.

      Vitamin D and not being indoors are interesting concepts at that point.

      Though I guess air conditioning might be a factor some place like Florida.

  11. While researching the health effects of honey vs raw honey (looks like Dr Greger only researched processed honey from what I can see).

    I came across this interesting claim;

    “One tablespoon of honey contains 64 calories, yet it has a healthy glycemic load around 10 for one tablespoon, which is a little less than a banana. Raw honey does not cause a sugar spike and elevated insulin release like white sugar.”

    Unfortunatly I cannot see the citations that need to accompany this claim. Source of the quote is this website;

    https://draxe.com/nutrition/the-many-health-benefits-of-raw-honey/

    1. I’ve seen reports that honey can cause sugar spikes too and that it causes insulin to spike more than sugar does eg
      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15117561/

      According to this following study sugar has a GI of 60 while honey has a GI of 58. That doesn’t seem like a significant difference to me.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5817209//

      The following article suggests that honey may be the best option among added sugars (I’d suggest that this is perhaps in part because unlike table sugar etc it contains water) ………….. but consuming the best of a bad bunch isn’t necessarily helpful.or healthful. The US dietary guidelines class honey as an added sugar and advise that added sugars be limited
      https://health.gov/our-work/food-nutrition/2015-2020-dietary-guidelines/guidelines/chapter-1/a-closer-look-inside-healthy-eating-patterns/

      Axe isn’t an MD but he is a wonderful marketer, telegenic, plausible and charming. However, RationalWiki is less complementary – its views about Axe are positively savage.
      https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Josh_Axe

      Personally, I wouldn’t trust any of his statements.

  12. I think it’s a bit unfortunate that we have to research this ourselves. I guess Dr. Greger only featuring research about processed honey and not bothering including research about unprocessed honey could be somehow related to his vegan ethos at the exspense of us getting the information at all?

    (Dr. Greger is a lifelong member of the vegan society, I only found out recently)

    1. Perhaps because he can only report the research that exists?

      Speculation and claims by alternative health practitioners and people selling stuff doesn’t count as scientific research.

      I’ve seen research that suggests that honey, raw or not, is better than other sweeteners. To my mind, that isn’t the same thing as demonstrating that adding honey to a healthful diet that otherwise contains no added sugars, would provide a health benefit.

  13. Now I couldn’t care less wether raw honey was suited for muslims, jews or vegans.

    The conclusion I had drawn in my book was that the only honey that could still be considered healthy was the one certain tribes extract from the jungle if it was done 5 minutes ago… Thus wild raw fresh honey.

    But reading statements like the one above, I am open for any new information or research.

    Greetings

  14. I wish Dr. Greger would give us some firm guidelines about how to observe social distancing while trying to get groceries and other needed supplies. What exactly to do? Go to store during dedicated senior hour? Wear mask? Have groceries delivered to your home and left outside? Do we need to wipe down every item that is delivered to us? I can’t find really consistent information on this and hoping Dr. Greger will provide some much needed and trustworthy information.

    1. Am thinking Dr. G. would not be the one to ask about this. He’s probably wondering himself.

      Maybe you could carry a yard stick with you, for starters. Make sure you don’t get too close to other shoppers. :-)

      1. Make sure you don’t get too close to other shoppers. :-)
        ————————————————————————–
        It’s actually a little devious (and probably belongs in a sitcom) but lay hands on a hazmat suit to wear and walk swiftly through a store with a gurney (with sideboards) motioning people aside as you fill your gurney/shopping basket with items. If you come upon an empty TP shelf, collar a stocker and tell them you need x number of rolls, STAT!
        ‘-)

        1. Or you could give them the squinty-eyed Clint Eastwood look and whip out your pistol — saying, “Don’t you dare come close to me, you vermin!”

    2. Hi, Jennifer! I understand your concern, and Dr. Greger is working on materials about Covid-19.
      Unless you are an older person, you should not go shopping during senior hour. That time is designed to protect the most vulnerable people from contact with others.
      Meanwhile, the best sources of information that I know of are WHO: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public and CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html I hope that helps!

      1. Christine, thank you. I disagree with YR that Dr. Greger is not the person to ask about this and I am glad that he is working on that issue and look forward to his advice. Thank you for providing those links.

      2. Well I still haven’t found the answer there to my immediate concern. I am avoiding going to grocery stores despite being of the age to make use of the dedicated hour for seniors. I am thinking of having grocery deliveries to my front door but am wondering how important it is to somehow wipe down or spray each item before bringing it into the house. I have no disinfectant wipes or spray because they have been unavailable for purchase. Any information on my question? Thanks.

        1. ” I am avoiding going to grocery stores despite being of the age to make use of the dedicated hour for seniors.”
          – – – –

          I too am of a certain age. But the reason I wouldn’t go is because I can’t get my butt out the door at such an ungodly hour. Plus, I have to depend on bus service.

          And once I get there, will theyeven have what I want? I was going to get some Wyman’s frozen blueberries yesterday from S&S, but there were none. Not even other brands of blueberries, or any frozen fruit, for that matter. I doubt if they would have been available an hour or two earlier.

          Maybe your best bet is have the supermarket deliver groceries to your door. It would cost a small delivery fee, of course.

          1. YR, yes I believe I mentioned doing that but do you have any accurate info on whether all items need to be wiped down, disinfected before bringing into the house? Egads, I can’t face doing all that.

            1. Jennifer, I agree, the task of going forth to get food sure isn’t what it used to be! It can be a daunting experience.

              The last few trips I have made were early in the morning, and guards at the store ensured each shopper knows the rules.

              I buy salad greens in clear plastic boxes or bags, plastic bags of grains, beans, rice, cans and most of these get wiped down before going into the fridge or cupboard. Today I bought oranges.. I washed those in vinegar and water, rinsed and dried them before storing in the fridge.
              Fasting is starting to look more appealing all the time.

              I do not have links for evidence or discussion re wiping everything down. I do it because a notice was posted in the store.

              1. Barb, since I cannot get wipes or spray anywhere, can you suggest another wipe of wiping down the grocery items? I did make a spray solution of bleach and water from a source read online but hesitate to saturate some items for fear it will ruin them or affect the taste. Cans are easy but other items not so.

                1. ok, I don’tvhave many wipes, so for the sealed plastic bags of beans, tortillas, plastic tubs, cans, I dampened a cloth, applied some cleaner like Lysol, and wiped away. For apples and oranges, peppers and the like, I sprayed them with vinegar and scrubbed them before rinsing and drying. You can make a solution of vinegar and water,
                  but I thought this method of spraying strait vinegar would be better. Dr Greger has recipes for veggie washes around here somewhere… I will have a look.

                  1. Ok Jennifer, this is Dr Greger’s post on fruit and veggie washes. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/flashback-friday-how-to-make-your-own-fruit-vegetable-wash/
                    I was surprised to read there about 2 key notes on removing pesticides. Pesticides are not virus, I understand, but the current advice on hand washing may offer insights as well in that it is scrubbing action, suds, and 20 seconds that all make a difference.

                    When I got home yesterday, I washed my hands and put on clean rubber gloves, ran the water, and started scrubbing. A tiny amount of dish soap sudsing away might work too idk, but I used straight vinegar in a small spray bottle on the apples. I would probably use dish soap/water/ rubber glove idea on bananas, zuccinis, melons, tomatoes maybe. Salt and baking soda solutions were discussed also.

                    The list of cleaners includes many common everyday products that many of us have already. I hope this helps until firther info is forthcoming. I dont have wipes, but just put some cleaner on a wrung out wet clotth.

                    https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2020/03/05/prepare-for-coronavirus-epa-disinfectants-list-covid-19/4966691002/

      3. I know Dr. Greger is having a webinar on April 8th (I already signed up), but can’t he consider having something sooner, maybe just a Q/A. Things are changing so fast I think in 2 weeks things will be either way worse or the social distancing may start help flattening the curve.

        Thank you,
        Brian

        1. Hi Brian, I know it feels like a long way away! Dr. Greger is reading thousands of new studies right now, as he wants to be sure to get appropriate information out. However, on Friday we will be posting an old video of his – a presentation on pandemics in general and where they come from. That will help provide some background information. In addition, we are posting some information on our social media pages as he sends snippets of updates, and soon we will have some “pantry item” type recipe posts on social media, also. Hope that helps a bit!

          1. Thank you I have already watched the whole video. It was so scary that he called it 12 years ago. Only it was not influenza but it is so much more contagious. So scary that this probably won’t be the last time we see something like this in our lifetimes.

    3. Jennifer,

      Dr. Greger will be doing his webinar, but there are a lot of studies discussed on YouTube by med sites.

      Grocery stores are being helpful and they read the studies from what I saw.

      Whole Foods and Stop & Shop both put up plexiglass windows between the cashiers and customers and they are wearing gloves and the conveyer belts that the food are placed on are being cleaned so often that they shine right now. Whole Foods is only allowing a certain number of people to shop at any one time.
      I think they said 50 people. They also marked the floor with how far apart you are supposed to be waiting in line. The stores also close at 8 pm to sanitize the store and have the early morning hours for people who are vulnerable. If you think about it, the virus only lasts 3 hours in the air, so first thing in the morning will be the cleanest. The virus lasts 24 hours on cardboard. If you get boxes, you can wait 24 hours to open them or spray them with clorox spray and wait for a while to open them or use a steamer for 60 seconds. The virus lasts 3 days on stainless steel and plastic.

      It doesn’t last all that long on copper, so if you have copper pans or copper trivets or copper jewelry, this might be a good time to use them.

      Though I think it is even better to leave it all off for a few weeks.

      They don’t think it lasts long on food, but that is the officials speculating and the fact that eating animal products is what started this whole thing, the fewer animal products the better.

      Dr. Barnard said to lower your fat intake during this time to help your white blood cells to function better and we know that too much fat also is part of the fatty liver and insulin resistance problem.

      I will tell you that I have been craving fat and it is food cravings, not looking at fatty foods and wanting them. It might be about stress? I am mentally monitoring it. It has been happening for the past few months, but it was so sneaky that I would eat too much hummus and then stop eating that and immediately start craving peanut butter and stop eating that and immediately crave refried beans. I hadn’t been eating fats, and I grew up a sugar addict, who maybe didn’t even know that it might have been the oil in the baked food I was craving rather than the sugar.

      Peanut butter cups come to mind. I am not eating them, but they circle around and try to come in if I watch television. Is it the peanut butter is more addictive than the chocolate. I can still do without chocolate, but chocolate and peanut butter or chocolate and mint are the combination flavors that are more powerful than chocolate itself. Girl scout thin mints would be my other addictive food. I haven’t had them in years, but they have a food memory for me.

      1. Deb,
        Thank you for your informative reply. No clorox spray or other disinfectant available. Trying to actually stay out of stores and have delivery to my front door but unfortunately not only can I not get many of the veggies and fruits I ordered but the “picker” does not do a very discriminating job of selection. Some of the “fresh” items I received looked well past their prime (from Whole Foods) and of course I am not going to venture out to return them.

        So, doing the best I can and hopefully it will be enough. I would love for others on this forum (seniors especially) to provide insights on how they are handling items brought into their homes, whether mail, packages or groceries. I have done a good deal of googling and find there is no unanimity of opinion from “experts.”

  15. I had migraines since I was 8 yrs old at least 1 a week, after going plant based a few yrs ago my migraines have dropped to 4 or 5 a year. I was considered a healthy eater with a minimal amount meat in my diet before going plant based so no one considered that my headaches were diet related.

  16. Looking at videos from Dr. Greger from 12 years ago he was pretty fat and puffy…

    What happened right there?

    Wasn’t he fully vegan back then? Would be interesting to know what food had fattened him up that much?

    See the video on my twitter @netgogate or at @nutrition_facts posted today. It’s about Dr. G talking 90 day quarantines and toilet paper… But also look at his puffyness. I wonder.

    1. Vegans can be horribly unhealthy because wholeness of foods is not a requirement for “vegan foods”. I’ll never use that term because it includes horribly processed/unhealthy foods.

      What I do might appear vegan to the untrained person (99.7%) of this America, but it’s not. WFPB is how I eat and it works for me. Michael Gregor helped me find this way and for that I’ll ever be grateful and never question his personal life.

      Everyone grows and learns and has his own ideas of perfectionism. No one is perfect because we are human and imperfection is universal.

    2. I watched the video but don’t have any comments about that part.

      I was very interested in the graph where the infectious disease rates went back up.

      I was also interested that the government already had a plan in place that people should be prepared to shelter in place up to 90 days. If there was a plan in place, it is amazing that things didn’t just quickly and easily transition into the plan.

      It is always as if we are re-inventing the wheel.

      Smiling that Dr. Greger already told everybody to pre-panic buy versus panic-buying.

      I found another pack of toilet paper that I had, so I have over 30 rolls right now.

      Plus, that much at work.

      I am working on my prepper food supply currently.

      Yes, I am not sure what the economy will be like at the end of this process, so having a supply of less expensive foods in case the global economy hits a bump in the road still seems like a good idea.

      I got a whole bunch of Ball glass containers and something to vacuum seal them. So far, I am not buying 20 to 50-pound quantities of any foods, just 5-pound bags of everything because I am not organized enough. Getting there.

      I have more than 5 pounds of every bean and lentil and a few kinds of rice and oatmeal – both steel cut and rolled oats. I got cacao and peanut butter powder and some brazil nuts and seaweed and lots of spices and broth.

      Still on the waiting list for dehydrated vegetables and dehydrated potatoes.

      This is all going to be my long-term storage food, meaning that I won’t be eating it unless there is a 90-day quarantine or a serious recession/depression.

      I still might do some 5-pound containers with the mylar bags, but only if I put something else as a liner to the mylar bags because of the aluminum. Some people leave the foods in the original packaging and just put that in the mylar bags. I haven’t figured out the logic yet, but it seems like I am going to have several Ball containers of each thing and eventually maybe a few 5-gallon pails of things like rice and oats and potatoes. Probably not beans for that because beans change texture if they are stored too long.

      The people around me think that I am crazy for doing this. My coworker who wanted me to get rid of the “buy 4 get 1 free” stockpile doesn’t understand that I have been able to help people because I did that and if I can re-organize, I can have my symbolic pantry cake and eat it, too, and figure out a system for rotating the stock so that nothing has to stay for 20-years or maybe just have one or two rice, potato, and oats that I do leave in long-term storage and not use until I am older.

      I don’t know how to think like a prepper and the people around me don’t want me to pay attention to it at all or prepare for it. They are more, “You just have to be flexible and deal with things as they happen.” people and I technically was both a girl scout and boy scout, not out of gender identity confusion, but out of having a mother who was a boy scout leader who didn’t have a babysitter. I even got an official card saying that I was a boy scout and a girl scout, so I like to be prepared.

      1. I am wondering how many people did the “get rid of all of the products that don’t bring you joy” process and now they are stocking their shelves with things they got rid of and some of those companies won’t be in business anymore at the end of this whole thing.

        I don’t know the logic yet, but the logic really is that confusing.

  17. This is very interesting. I used to take daily medication for migraines because once I got one, which was frequently, nothing helped. Since I have been plant-based I have stopped the medication and haven’t had a migraine in nearly four years, but had no idea what part of my old diet was the culprit. Very interesting!

    1. I used to get regular headaches and I just completely stopped getting headaches when I simply began easing TOWARD WFPB. I think among other things, for me it was a magnesium deficiency.

  18. Just looking at diet I had the least amount and the shortest migraine attacks when I ate meat and lots of sweets. The worse the attacks became the cleaner my diet (around premenopause). Have been on several elimination diets and could never find any correlation to food or drink. My triggers are odors of many kinds, and changes in barometric pressure. Have been a wfpb for around 15 years. A few years ago my diagnosis changed from classic migraine to migraine with aura with or without head pain. I can go weeks with very few normal days. Most days there is some aspect of aura or postdrome. The wfpb lifestyle helps me to be physically healthy.

      1. Deb & S, I appreciate your intent to help. I have researched about migraine for years. My comment was only to reflect that changing to a wfpb diet isn’t the answer for everyone with migraine. Migraines often change over time. That is just the nature of the beast. My blood levels are fine.

        Tried to post a link to interesting information about migraine but it won’t post. But if you are interested put this together
        makethislookawesome. blogspot .com 2011/11/ what-is-migraine.html

    1. cc, I would worry about underlying causes. I’m sure you’ve gotten check out and all that. Like Deb said, make sure you’re supplementing with B12. And eating enough calories. People can be WFPB but not necessarily eating the variety they should of beans/legumes, fruits, veggies, grains, nuts and seeds and could still fall short of calories or magnesium or anything because like a plant based diet can technically be a diet of marshmallows, so can a WFPB diet technically be a diet of lettuce and pine nuts or something.

    2. cc, my story is similar to yours though noise, strong sunlight/ weather clearing change is often the trigger. Food doesn’t affect the migraine at all, though the neurologist thought the diet and bloodwork are excellent.

      In years past (starting at menopause) I would just get aura and be noise and light intolerant. Last year I started getting more headaches after the aura. The doctor said it was not unusual for the pattern to change somewhat over the years.

      1. Barb, do you browse through migraine.com? I have found it interesting and informative to read others journeys. My eyes have always been light sensitive just much more so during an attack.

        if you are interested put this together
        makethislookawesome. blogspot .com 2011/11/ what-is-migraine.html

  19. Dr Greger already mentioned magnesium but vitamin D, omega 3, and Zinc are all ones to check along with B12 and whether you are eating enough foods with folate.

      1. Deb, when and where did Dr. Greger mention vegetarians are often low in zinc, omega-3’s and vitamin D? Obviously we all need to supplement with B12 but that isn’t so for the other foods. In fact Dr Greger points out in one video how meat eaters are often too high in zinc and copper which is bad for the brain whereas it isn’t dangerous in plant form. Whole plant foods are incredibly rich in zinc, especially beans and nutritional yeast. We get vitamin D from the sun and no one needs more than 2,000IU if they aren’t getting adequate sunlight, and plants are the richest forms of omega-3’s and the only source of the heart healthy omega-3’s ALA. It’s simply that fish contain the long chain EPA and DHA omega-3’s who get it from algae which is why he suggest an algae oil supplement for those interested or for pregnant/nursing women. But there is actually not a lot of good data out there on the importance of getting EPA and DHA. So on the contrary, meat eaters tend to be extremely low in ALA and can get too high levels of zinc, copper, and iron.

        1. In a recent Q&A someone asked Dr. Greger about foods for healing an injury. While commenting that he wasn’t aware of any evidence of a particular food increasing healing of mentioned injury, he mentioned how nutrients such as zinc plays a role in healing but stated that there’s no reason to believe getting more than you need would speed up the process and that if you’re eating a diet built up of his daily dozen that you’ll be getting all you need.

            1. S,

              Vegans tested low in things. If you aren’t testing low, then don’t worry about things.

              But a lot of the causes of migraines are deficiencies which are common to vegans and those can be corrected with supplementation or, in the case of zinc, by eating zinc-rich food, plus onions and garlic and not drink coffee too close in time to the foods.

              1. Where are you getting “a lot of the causes of migraines are deficiencies” from Deb? That sure isn’t what my doctor had to say!

                If we eat the daily dozen, we’ll be good. Get some b12 or be tested.

              2. Deb and S, Vitamin B12 aside, It seems to me that discussing most of these issues at such a high level of generality (“vegans test low in …” or “vegans get plenty of …”) is counterproductive. (Overgeneralization — ***either way*** — is one of my pet peeves.).

                Regarding zinc, while it is true vegans can test lower than nonvegans, in some study or other (no primary source handy), their blood levels compared to consumption levels were found to be higher than might be expected, i.e.
                it seems bodies can adjust. But of course, this does not mean the body can work magic and create zinc from something else. The devil is in the details.

                The way for vegans to deal with these issues is simply to eat a ***sensibly planned*** vegan diet along with whatever supplementation makes sense (cf.
                Dr.Greger’s recommendations).

                https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2013/199/4/zinc-and-vegetarian-diets

                “Summary

                Well planned vegetarian diets can provide adequate amounts of zinc from plant sources.

                Vegetarians appear to adapt to lower zinc intakes by increased absorption and retention of zinc.

                Good sources of zinc for vegetarians include whole grains, tofu, tempeh, legumes, nuts and seeds, fortified breakfast cereals and dairy products.

                The inhibitory effects of phytate on absorption of zinc can be minimised by modern food-processing methods such as soaking, heating, sprouting, fermenting and leavening.

                Absorption of zinc can be improved by using yeast-based breads and sourdough breads, sprouts, and presoaked legumes.

                Studies show vegetarians have similar serum zinc concentrations to, and no greater risk of zinc deficiency than, non-vegetarians (despite differences in zinc intake).”

                1. It is a shame the corona virus test kits don’t also do complete blood and urine work-ups. Through testing is where we learn where we need to adjust diet (or in my case, supplements ‘-)

  20. Funny with the man thing at the end. But why would extreme spiciness clamp over the arteries in your brain? That is alarming, sounds more serious than the headache that follows and I’d like to know why. Is this something extremely spicy food can do as well, or is this something that only occurs from the reaper pepper?

  21. Deb said:

    “…..and the fact that eating animal products is what started this whole thing, the fewer animal products the better.”
    – – – – –

    Can you post a link saying this is a “fact”?

      1. Pretty soon it will be a status symbol to have been tested positive. :-( Fortunately, most people do NOT die from this.

        History will show that we are now living during that fateful time when a tiny virus wields power over multitudes of humans; people are urged to fear one another. :-(

  22. Corona virus leads to Alzheimers? Let’s connect the dots.

    There is a test, smelling peanut butter, that supposedly will foretell if one is succeptible to Alzheimer’s.

    It has been revealed that Corona virus will cause us to lose our sense of smell (not sure if this is permanent or even partial loss) Now, what if all flu viruses have been doing the same?

    There is research that postulates the cause of Alzheimer’s has a viral or bacterial component.

    https://neurosciencenews.com/microbes-alzheimers-neurology-3826/

    And since smell is based on the brain as well as the nose, one might suspect the brain is being negatively affected by something like the flu.

    If this is what’s going on, the article in the link above suggests controlling one’s iron stores may be a treatment.

    Not offering this as fact… rather just raising the question for further exploration.

  23. I used to get migraines when I was younger, and then I found out by accident that if I had a small glass of soy milk at least once a week, I didn’t get the migraines any more because mine was hormone related. Now that I’m postmenopausal I don’t get migraines at all. I only get headaches if I don’t drink enough water, am overly tired, or actually sick with something.

  24. Thanks to all the migraine sufferers for posting your symptoms and what works for you. Here’s me:

    I was a migraine sufferer. I too have VERY sensitive hearing – I hear the lights (oh, you didn’t know that the lights in many houses make a sound? I’m not talking about the fluorescent tube-light buzz every one can hear, I mean residential light fixtures), I hear the stove (when it is plugged in, but not turned on), I hear my own heart beat, I can hear you chewing your food from 20 feet away, I hear hear the heating element of the toaster oven the moment the thermostat turns it off – from the living room, I hear that something is wrong with the car engine well before there is any other indication, I hear the one instrument at the symphony that is out of tune. When my eyes are closed and I hear a noise, the noise creates a color blast behind my eyes. If I squeeze my eyes shut really tight (like if you are expecting something to splash you in the face), I hear the sound of the contracting face muscles for the duration of the squeezing. And that is when I do NOT have a migraine.

    Smell/taste: I also have a keen sense of smell which I also “taste” when smelling. Like a bloodhound, I have been able to find a co-worker at my hospital by following the smell of her deodorant down the corridors and into the room. I can smell in my husband’s breath his “hungry” smell and his “about to come down with a cold” smell. I can smell coming from myself a “hormone” smell that alerts me to my cycle approaching. In college, I could smell when my diabetic friend’s blood sugar was not right. I can smell the chemicals or animals being carried by a train that is 6 blocks away. I had to stop swimming, because even after multiple showers, I could still smell and TASTE the chlorine for days afterward. Needless to say, we do not use many chemical or scented products in our house! The worst thing is when you walk into a fart cloud and you actually TASTE it. Thank God hubby’s farts are 80% better after switching to WFPB!!

    I am only sensitive to light (but terribly sensitive) when I’ve got a migraine.

    I suffered with migraines from age 17-44. It my teens and 20’s the migraines would make me throw up so hard that the capillaries around my eyes would burst leaving me with speckled red dots on my eyelids and under my eyes. As I got older, I discovered pseudoephedrine and caffeine helped reduce the duration (esp if I caught it early) and stopped the vomiting, but I still had to stop my life and lay down in a dark, quiet room with my eyes covered and an ice pack on the back of my neck and forehead lying motionless, using my made-up “visualization” pain distraction technique (eyes closed, I imagined looking at mountain peaks or clouds, continuously looking at the next furthest one, then the next and next), praying for sleep or death. This was several times a week. Even when the migraine finally went away (sometimes lasted for 2 or 3 days), I would feel exhausted and in a daze the following day.

    Due to my husband’s health, we switched to a WFPB diet when I was 44 [big thank you to Dr. Gregor’s site!]. One day I realized that it had been a good while since I had had a migraine! We’ve been WFPB for 6 years now (with cheating allowed during holidays and birthdays, and daily dark chocolate), and I never get the knock-down-drag-out migraines anymore. I occasionally get a headache with weather changes (when it’s about to rain) or tension, but it’s just a headache. You can function; you just hurt while you function.

    We were vegetarian for a year before we were WFPB. I did not get the relief until we were WFPB. So it wasn’t the meat, for me. I still don’t know exactly what was causing it, but I would never go back to that horrid life. I would rather give up things unnecessarily (maybe it was just one food causing it) than to experience that ever again. When we became WFPB, we added a lot of new foods or MUCH higher quantities of certain foods than we ever had before. Specifically: ginger, garlic, turmeric, nutritional yeast, all kinds of exotic spices, hibiscus tea, green tea, soy milk, tofu, kale (hubby didn’t even know kale was edible – he thought it was just for decoration) and all kinds of nuts. These days, I’ve begun having a visual aura – things look pixelated – which I never used to have. It is not followed by pain, and it goes away in a little while. I don’t know if this is age, eyes, or brain. Whatever – as long as it’s not a migraine!!!!

    Big, big thank you to Dr. Gregor and team for giving us this site. Without it, I would still be suffering so much.

  25. but I still had to stop my life and lay down in a dark, quiet room with my eyes covered and an ice pack on the back of my neck and forehead lying motionless, using my made-up “visualization” pain distraction technique (eyes closed, I imagined looking at mountain peaks or clouds, continuously looking at the next furthest one, then the next and next), praying for sleep or death. This was several times a week. Even when the migraine finally went away (sometimes lasted for 2 or 3 days), I would feel exhausted and in a daze the following day.
    —————————————————————————————————–
    RV, I can only imagine what you’ve been going through (except for hearing the lights and being unable to go to sleep sometimes because of distant machinery running at night.)

    I have a brother who once suffered from cluster headaches. He would go to a Dr and get some sort of shot or another and would not have them for awhile, before starting up again. They started in middle age but eventually he just stopped having them.

    Happy to hear you no longer have migraines but for anyone who currently has them, it occurred to me that virtual reality might help. That is, identify a scene that can make a migraine more manageable, and put on the goggles when they feel it starting.

  26. My daughter has just been Diagnosed with AVM. I’m trying to convince her to embrace a WFPB diet, will the food you suggest for migraines be helpful for her.

  27. I have never posted on the site before
    My daughter has just been Diagnosed with AVM. I’m trying to convince her to embrace a WFPB diet, will the food you suggest for migraines be helpful for her.

    1. Hello Stel,

      The information on Nutritionfacts.org is simply a highlight of the latest research on the topic of nutrition. While AVM can cause migraines, and the foods listed here have been shown to be effective with migraines, does not guarantee that they’ll help in your daughter’s case, but certainly might. It is up to you to look at the evidence presented and discuss with your healthcare providers about whether or not it’s worth a try.

      I hope this helps,
      Dr. Matt

  28. I have found that the way to control my migraine in by keeping my blood sugar levels stable, eating complex carbs at each meal to stabilise my blood sugar levels and avoid processed sugar ( it isn’t the sugar spike that causes the problem but the blood sugar crash later). If I skip a meal I get the buzzing in my head that is the warning of an impending migraine.
    I am photo-sensitive so my triggers are flashing lights and the TV, I have not found any food triggers that affect me.

    I have spoken to other migraine sufferers who have experienced the same link between blood sugar levels and migraine attacks.

    There doesn’t seem to be any research regarding blood sugar levels and migraines.

  29. How I cured my migraines (instant cure): a daith ear-piercing. Used to suffer at least 1 migraine per week. I’m not really into piercings so I got a discrete stainless-steel bar which is barely even noticible. Was effective immediately – migraine actually disappeared during the piercing procedure. In 3 years since the piercing, I’ve had one migraine aura which only lasted around 10 minutes and with no headache.

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