Does Sugar Lead to Weight Gain?

Does Sugar Lead to Weight Gain?
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The sugar industry’s response to evidence implicating sweeteners in the obesity epidemic.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The obesity epidemic may just be the tip of the iceberg in terms of excess body fat. It’s been estimated that 91 percent of adults—9 out of 10 of us—and 69 percent of children in the United States are quote-unquote “overfat,” “defined as excess body fat sufficient to impair health” that can occur even in “normal-weight” individuals, often due to excess abdominal fat. The way to tell if you’re “overfat” is if your waist circumference is more than half your height. What’s causing this epidemic? One primary cause may be all the added sugars we’re eating.

A century ago, sugar was heralded as “one of the cheapest [forms of calories] in the dietary.” Just ten cents’ worth of sugar could furnish thousands of calories. “Harvard’s sugar-pushing nutritionist” bristled at the term “empty calories.” The calories in sugar were “not empty but full of energy.” In other words, full of calories, which we now are getting too many of. “The excess body weight of the US population corresponds to [about a] 350–500 [calorie] excess [daily caloric] intake on average.” So, to revert the obesity epidemic, that’s how many calories we have to reduce. Okay, so which calories should we cut? That’s just how many calories the majority of Americans who fail to meet the Dietary Guidelines’ sugar limit get in added sugars every day. 25 teaspoons is about 400 calories.

Even the most diehard sugar defenders, like James Rippe, who was reportedly paid $40,000 a month by the high-fructose corn syrup industry, on top of the $10 million they paid for his research. Even Dr. Rippe considers it indisputable that sugars contribute to obesity. “It is also [indisputable] that sugar reduction should be part of any weight loss program.” And, of all sources of calories to limit, since sugar is just empty calories, contains no essential nutrients, reducing sugar consumption is obviously the place to start. And again, this is what the researchers funded by the likes of Dr. Pepper and Coca-Cola are saying. The primary author, Richard Kahn, is infamous for his defense of the American Beverage Association—the soda industry. He was chief science officer at the American Diabetes Association when they signed a million-dollar sponsorship deal with the world’s largest candy company. “Maybe the American Diabetes Association should rename itself the American Junk Food Association.” What do you expect from an organization that was started with drug industry funding?

The bottom line is that “randomized, controlled trials show that increasing sugars intake increases calorie intake,” and this leads to “body weight gain in adults, and…sugar reduction leads to body weight loss in children.” For example, when researchers randomize individuals to either increase their intake of table sugar or decrease their intake, the added sugar group gained about three and a half pounds over 10 weeks, whereas the reduced sugar group lost about two and a half pounds. A systematic review and meta-analysis of all such “ad libitum diet” studies (meaning real-life studies where sugar levels were changed but people could otherwise eat whatever they wanted) showed that reduced intake of dietary sugars resulted in a decrease in body weight, whereas increased sugars intake resulted in a comparable increase in weight. The researchers conclude that “considering the rapid weight gain that occurs after an increased intake of sugars, it seems reasonable to [advise people to cut down.]”

Findings from observational studies have been more ambiguous, though, with an association found between obesity and sweetened beverage intake, but failing to show consistent correlations with sugary foods. Most such studies rely on self-reported data, however, and obese people tend to under-report sugar-rich foods. One can measure trace sucrose levels in the urine, however, to not only get an objective measure of actual sugar intake, but to exclude contributions from other sweeteners, such as high-fructose corn syrup. When researchers have done this, they discovered that sugar intake is indeed not only associated with greater odds of obesity and greater waist circumference on a snapshot-in-time cross-sectional basis, but in a prospective cohort study over time. “Using urinary sucrose as the measure of sucrose intake,” those in the highest versus the lowest fifth for sucrose intake had more than a 50 percent greater risk of being overweight or obese.

 “Denying evidence that sugars are harmful to health has [evidently] always been at the heart of the sugar industry’s defense.” But when the evidence is undeniable, like the link between sugar and cavities, they switch from denial to deflection, like trying to switch attention from restricting intake to coming up with some kind of “vaccine against tooth decay.” We seem to have reached a similar point with obesity, with the likes of the Sugar Bureau switching from denial to deflection by commissioning research suggesting obese individuals would not benefit from losing weight, a stance contradicted by hundreds of studies across four continents involving more than ten million participants.

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Image credit: congerdesign via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The obesity epidemic may just be the tip of the iceberg in terms of excess body fat. It’s been estimated that 91 percent of adults—9 out of 10 of us—and 69 percent of children in the United States are quote-unquote “overfat,” “defined as excess body fat sufficient to impair health” that can occur even in “normal-weight” individuals, often due to excess abdominal fat. The way to tell if you’re “overfat” is if your waist circumference is more than half your height. What’s causing this epidemic? One primary cause may be all the added sugars we’re eating.

A century ago, sugar was heralded as “one of the cheapest [forms of calories] in the dietary.” Just ten cents’ worth of sugar could furnish thousands of calories. “Harvard’s sugar-pushing nutritionist” bristled at the term “empty calories.” The calories in sugar were “not empty but full of energy.” In other words, full of calories, which we now are getting too many of. “The excess body weight of the US population corresponds to [about a] 350–500 [calorie] excess [daily caloric] intake on average.” So, to revert the obesity epidemic, that’s how many calories we have to reduce. Okay, so which calories should we cut? That’s just how many calories the majority of Americans who fail to meet the Dietary Guidelines’ sugar limit get in added sugars every day. 25 teaspoons is about 400 calories.

Even the most diehard sugar defenders, like James Rippe, who was reportedly paid $40,000 a month by the high-fructose corn syrup industry, on top of the $10 million they paid for his research. Even Dr. Rippe considers it indisputable that sugars contribute to obesity. “It is also [indisputable] that sugar reduction should be part of any weight loss program.” And, of all sources of calories to limit, since sugar is just empty calories, contains no essential nutrients, reducing sugar consumption is obviously the place to start. And again, this is what the researchers funded by the likes of Dr. Pepper and Coca-Cola are saying. The primary author, Richard Kahn, is infamous for his defense of the American Beverage Association—the soda industry. He was chief science officer at the American Diabetes Association when they signed a million-dollar sponsorship deal with the world’s largest candy company. “Maybe the American Diabetes Association should rename itself the American Junk Food Association.” What do you expect from an organization that was started with drug industry funding?

The bottom line is that “randomized, controlled trials show that increasing sugars intake increases calorie intake,” and this leads to “body weight gain in adults, and…sugar reduction leads to body weight loss in children.” For example, when researchers randomize individuals to either increase their intake of table sugar or decrease their intake, the added sugar group gained about three and a half pounds over 10 weeks, whereas the reduced sugar group lost about two and a half pounds. A systematic review and meta-analysis of all such “ad libitum diet” studies (meaning real-life studies where sugar levels were changed but people could otherwise eat whatever they wanted) showed that reduced intake of dietary sugars resulted in a decrease in body weight, whereas increased sugars intake resulted in a comparable increase in weight. The researchers conclude that “considering the rapid weight gain that occurs after an increased intake of sugars, it seems reasonable to [advise people to cut down.]”

Findings from observational studies have been more ambiguous, though, with an association found between obesity and sweetened beverage intake, but failing to show consistent correlations with sugary foods. Most such studies rely on self-reported data, however, and obese people tend to under-report sugar-rich foods. One can measure trace sucrose levels in the urine, however, to not only get an objective measure of actual sugar intake, but to exclude contributions from other sweeteners, such as high-fructose corn syrup. When researchers have done this, they discovered that sugar intake is indeed not only associated with greater odds of obesity and greater waist circumference on a snapshot-in-time cross-sectional basis, but in a prospective cohort study over time. “Using urinary sucrose as the measure of sucrose intake,” those in the highest versus the lowest fifth for sucrose intake had more than a 50 percent greater risk of being overweight or obese.

 “Denying evidence that sugars are harmful to health has [evidently] always been at the heart of the sugar industry’s defense.” But when the evidence is undeniable, like the link between sugar and cavities, they switch from denial to deflection, like trying to switch attention from restricting intake to coming up with some kind of “vaccine against tooth decay.” We seem to have reached a similar point with obesity, with the likes of the Sugar Bureau switching from denial to deflection by commissioning research suggesting obese individuals would not benefit from losing weight, a stance contradicted by hundreds of studies across four continents involving more than ten million participants.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: congerdesign via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Whoa, what’d you think of this new video style? Let us know in the comments!

For more on the sugar industry’s influence, check out Sugar Industry Attempts to Manipulate the Science.

Here are my popular sugar videos for more:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

183 responses to “Does Sugar Lead to Weight Gain?

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    1. I agree with most people here about the awesome new intro and Dr. G. being super distracting in this video. At one point, I finally just had to look down and listen. Way too much affectation for the delivery of science-based information.

      1. Frankly, I don’t pay much attention to the format. I’m just happy to receive the content. Kudos to Dr. Gregor for ‘outing’ the shameful behavior of the Diabetes Association.

  1. Great video, but on my pc the timing is out between sound and motion.. was with the last one too :(

    Where I live, I don’t notice the sugar consumption so much, though I personally loveee sugar! Here, it’s the pizza, and the fat-filled gooey hamburgers, and sugar-free pop.

    1. Barb,

      How do you use sugar? Baked goods? Sugar in coffee?

      Just curious.

      I hear the sentence, “I personally loveee sugar!” and I wonder what that looks like.

      I was a junk food junky and had candy and cookies and cake and ice cream.

      I don’t eat those things anymore and haven’t used sugar at all since I started this process. Maybe 1 spoonful of date sugar in a recipe in almost 2 years.

      I did start using honey in my unsweetened yogurt, which I was only eating as a way to eat blueberries every day, but I am not even using honey anymore.

      I ask because I honestly wonder what you are using it on.

      1. I don’t use sugar Deb. I do eat a lot of fruit. That does not change the fact that I really do love sugar, unabashedly. Throughout my lifetime I have not noticed sugar impacting my weight. Fat plus refined carbs do… in the blink of an eye. I have had very few things like pizza, spagetti or other pasta, doughnuts, ever. Not that I wouldn’t like them, I just don’t eat them. Fattening.

        1. Okay.

          That helps me understand.

          I don’t consider fruit sugar.

          I think it is people who are eating the empty calories who do notice the weight gain from sugar. Holidays are when most people gain weight and that is usually baked goods and desserts and candy.

          1. Around me, the people who are overweight tended to eat junk food and drink soda. (Either regular or diet)

            So I bear witness that people eating donuts and Oreos and Ding Dongs and Ice Cream and cake and candy, even if it is mostly from Halloween through New Years, gain weight by the end of the year.

            Yes, they also eat meat and dairy and cook with olive oil and eat butter, but it is the sweets they binge on.

            They go out to a place like Friendly’s and get a hot fudge sundae with Reese’s pieces on it and 3 toppings. The meat is probably a more moderate portion and the olive oil may just be used in the pan for cooking or baking, but the desserts are what they eat even when they are already full.

            1. Holidays are when even people who are pretty good at maintaining their weight often gain.

              I found the study results about the 10 weeks perfect. I could mentally insert the holidays into those 10 weeks.

              “For example, when researchers randomize individuals to either increase their intake of table sugar or decrease their intake, the added sugar group gained about three and a half pounds over 10 weeks, whereas the reduced sugar group lost about two and a half pounds.”

    1. Yerky, don’t know about Richard A Overton, but a lot of that can do with genetics. Someone who lives to 112 could have excellent genetics that help to withstand a poor diet that would shorten another’s lifespan with not-so-excellent genetics. Not always a good idea to go by the ‘I knew a woman who smoked into her 90’s and never got lung cancer!’ guidelines.

    2. YR,

      Yes, if we are going to learn from him, he smoked cigars and ate ice cream.

      I was eating a lot of ice cream and I am still alive, but I feel so much healthier after going off of it.

        1. Laughing.

          Yes, once I scroll down to type the comment, I lost everything except the letter, “Y” at the beginning.

          Sorry to both of you.

          1. A few threads ago, Fumbles (where is he?) and I were discussing name changes. He suggested that I change my name to “Latrine,” from the movie Robin Hood: Men in Tights. I told him I sort of liked the sound of Latrine, and that I was an extra in that movie.

            I had suggested he change his name to something equally as snarky. However, he never did so.

            https://search.aol.com/aol/image?p=Latrine+Robin+Hood+Men+in+Tights&s_it=img-ans&v_t=comsearch&fr=comsearch&imgurl=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.com%2F_jlFRW0aFhQQ%2FTIXDBRmQsXI%2FAAAAAAAAAPU%2F71eeFWRtrzk%2Fs1600%2Frobin1.bmp#id=0&iurl=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.com%2F_jlFRW0aFhQQ%2FTIXDBRmQsXI%2FAAAAAAAAAPU%2F71eeFWRtrzk%2Fs1600%2Frobin1.bmp&action=click

            1. You were an extra in that movie? Where do you come in? Can you give a scene?

              My friend was an extra in In the Line of Fire. He was writing a screenplay at the time and was not trying to make it as an actor and what I remember was that the actor wannabes raised their hands and volunteered eagerly and they all became background people and he was just doing it for a paycheck and was the one leftover at the end who was chosen to walk across the screen in front of Clint Eastwood, while everybody else stood out in the fake rain.

              1. I played “Gentry.” Regal and all that. :-) They gave me the appropriate costume. My sister was chosen to be a “peasant.” :-)

                We were to chant from the bleachers. Yeah, the camera might have caught my mug here and there, but my sister can be seen catching a bag of peanuts. It was great fun. Got “scale” and a baseball cap with the title of the movie on it. We had to board a bus very early in the a.m….it was filmed in a forest in L.A., if I remember (1993, I think).

  2. Excellent, love the new content and amazing evidence backed by science dedicated to telling the life saving truth to people about nutrition by the amazingly intelligent Dr Greger!

  3. No no no! Dr. Greger, I don’t like this new style of video’s. While my previous assertion that you should use a voice over was obviously a cheerful joke, from me, probably your biggest fan out there, this time there is truth to my assertion.

    One of the biggest benefits of Nutritionfacts videos was the yellow marker highlights being the core business of the educational character. Now adding you in front of the video with some smallish unreadable papers in the background is wrong for multiple reasons;

    * you are obviously physically standing in the way of the texts you are highlighting
    * there is no added benefit of you standing in front of the research doing generic gestures, following a course by you in real life is alot of fun but these short dry videos don’t lend themself towards such an immersive experience.
    * the format creates a sort of podcast experience instead of the visual expience that a video should offer
    * the new intro is good though

    So maybe revert towards the text based style that made Nutritionfacts popular troughout the years where above all else the research was number 1…

    1. I agree, as much as I love Dr. G, I found having a video of him talking to be very distracting. I would rather have the content with the voice over, too.

  4. I prefer the old style because it makes it easier to scan the documents being presented and gain a bit more context from the text surrounding the highlighted areas. Focusing on the text helps keep the focus on the facts!

    1. I agree that a focus on the texts is critical for this site, but it is nice to see the good doctor, too. So how about a compromise? Why not begin and/or end each video with Dr. G and his fabulous ties, but make the bulk of each video the usual text with voiceover?

      1. I agree with Maureen Okun also. I think it would be nice to see Dr Greger at the very beginning and possibly at the end but any more than that (as is the case with this video) is a distraction. I found myself staring at Dr Greger rather than focusing on the content in the highlighted text displayed on the inset. Very distracting.

  5. Meh never mind. I’ll probably just get a backlash of opposition with my opinion here. But you should know not all people following the videos are posting their comments beneath in this forum. So maybe I’m not alone in thinking this way. I don’t care anyway I was here before 99% of current visitors anyway.

    Read the video text summary if this format keeps on, as with the blog format. More people should check out the blogs I think. They are a good source for updates on a lot of current events and previous videos.

  6. Aha! Thanks Ed. I actually found someone who is like minded. Yes, previous format was easier to scan and gave a bit more background because the entire research papers were being shown.

    1. Netgogate,

      You are right that it makes it harder to read the articles.

      And, S, is also right that those of us who also connected to this doctor and watch a whole lot of his free information, appreciate seeing his face and ties now and then.

      Mostly, I applaud Dr. Greger and his crew for mixing thing up and listening to feedback and trying new things. I know that as his diet book comes out, he becomes a personality again, beyond this site. Thousands and thousands of people who have never heard of him will be dropping in and seeing his face will help them understand who he is.

      But, I also liked being able to read the journal articles, so I remain fairly neutral, and highly, highly appreciative to Dr. Greger for all of his hard work.

      Dr. Greger, this is a refreshing style in some ways, but you compete with the topics for focus and you have enough presence that I had to watch the video twice to get the information. That is my two cents. And, I really enjoy your voice and your presence in your videos, but I do get easily distracted and have to start over.

  7. Love the new video style and love your shirt and tie, btw. I do wish you would have stressed more the difference between added sugar and additional sugar in a diet via whole plant foods such as fruit. There are still a lot of people who think in terms of ‘sugar is sugar’ and continue to argue that fruit consumption should be limited due to sugar content despite the evidence which most don’t know about.

    Here’s an excellent video for anyone who has heard and believes that all sugar is created equal: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-much-fruit-is-too-much/

  8. Sugar lead to weight gain indirectly because of the calories added and tis case the fat we ate will be stored as body fat but in the human body carbs rarely turn into fat in significant amount…

    1. Julot – Before I knew about WFPB, Dr. G, et. al., I followed the USDA food guide pyramid that suggested the base of calories should be carbohydrates. I ate whole grain pasta, whole grain bread, rice, wheat, etc., all sorts of carbs. And I put on 40 lbs. Carbs absolutely will make one fat.

      But because of this site and other WFPB individuals – we all know who they are (Esselstyn, Barnard, McDougall, et. al.) – I now know to limit and balance my whole food carbs with green vegetables, salads, soups. My overweight is now normal weight. But I had to learn my lesson that carbs (and I hate that generic term) absolutely will make one fat.
      To add a little bit more information for anyone else struggling with this concept, Craig McDougall, M.D., John McDougall’s son who practices for Kaiser in Oregon, posted a video (which I now cannot find) where he advised that if one is following a WFPB diet and is having trouble maintaining or losing weight that they should reduce the starches in the diet and increase green and yellow vegetables until the amount of weight loss is achieved. He is not saying eliminate starches; he is saying that the starchy foods need to be balanced with the nonstarchy.

      1. “I ate whole grain pasta, whole grain bread, rice, wheat, etc., all sorts of carbs. And I put on 40 lbs. Carbs absolutely will make one fat.”
        – – – – –

        Ruth, the Keto people would agree with you. Those who follow that diet can lose weight pretty rapidly. (Whether to stay on that diet, is something else again.)

        1. “Ruth, the Keto people would agree with you. Those who follow that diet can lose weight pretty rapidly. (Whether to stay on that diet, is something else again.)”

          Yeah, they lose water weight and lean muscle mass, haven’t you been paying attention, YR? There’s a whole series on it. In fact, the keto people were shown to lose LESS fat than those on a carbohydrate based diet.

          1. Actually, no I haven’t “been paying attention,” Ms. S. I have no interest whatsoever in the Keto Crotch diet, so I haven’t checked the series.

            I like the diet I have been following…works for me in many ways.

      2. “Before I knew about WFPB, Dr. G, et. al., I followed the USDA food guide pyramid that suggested the base of calories should be carbohydrates. I ate whole grain pasta, whole grain bread, rice, wheat, etc., all sorts of carbs. And I put on 40 lbs. Carbs absolutely will make one fat.”

        Many of those items mention have hidden fats, sugar and salt [SOS] so yes, they do add weight to millions unaware of the hidden ingredients. Many “whole grain” products when refined into flour end up having SOS added to make the recipes. There are many on WFPB, myself included, stay away from as much processed foods (vegan foods) as possible and lose that extra weight because we do. I think the key is “whole food”, not “processed” whether starchy or not. On the McDougall plan they still advocate “breads, pasta, nut butters,” etc that people with diabetes can’t tolerate when trying to become insulin sensitive. Until they do become sensitive, they have [or should] stay away from processed carbs.

        1. Jackie B – No – I ate whole wheat kernals, cooked. Whole rice kernals cooked. Whole wheat pasta, cooked. Did not add oil, etc. I followed McDougall and ALL of his instructions. But – I ate more starch as my main food. And I put on weight.
          The point I am making is that if you do not balance your whole grain no added fat carbs with green vegetables – as Dr. Craig McDougall states – carbohydrates CAN add weight. Even Fuhrman agrees – in his book Eat To Live he states that if your triglycerides are high on a WFPB diet to eliminate carbohydrates (whole food carbohydreates) and go to a Greens and Beans diet. He also recognizes that even whole food carbohydrates CAN (not will), but can add weight.
          I took issue with Julot who stated that carbohydrates cannot add weight. They can and do. If that’s all you eat.

      3. Ruth, Just out of curiosity? Were you adding butter to your bread, or oil to your pasta, or covering your “cabs “ in various forms of fat delivery system?
        Potatoes, often are smothered in butter fat, sour cream (fat) and bacon (fat ) and cheese-fat and most people use carbs as a fat. I often here that carbs make us fat, but I see most people using carbs as delivery for extra sugar and fat?
        I never gained wait until
        I started adding butter to my rolls.

        1. Omg , how is it possible that the order of this some of text above is not what I typed. I had made a correction and it went in a totally different location than when I typed it on my phone. Or I’m losing my mind. Sorry it doesn’t make sense face palm

        2. David Armstrong, pardon me for jumping in with my 2 cents worth here,.. but I saw your comment re butter on the rolls. This is what I was trying to say near the beginning of the thread. There are 2 situations under which I can gain weight easily. One is if I eat carb/fat combinations such as potatoes, rolls, rice, with fat added. (or built in, like ice cream, yorkshire pudding, bread pudding, cake)
          The other situation is sweets containing high fructose corn syrup…. and they are putting it in everything, including beans !!
          Just regular sugar, cane sugar, or honey doesn’t seem difficult to burn off.

          1. Barb, I tend to agree with you there. The hidden sugar is everywhere. I haven’t eaten pastries or cakes in years, but I see it in things ( as you said ) like salad dressings, beans, Catsup, and even pimento cheese, and just about every sauce imaginable.

            End

        3. David Armstrong – The answer is no. I haven’t eaten dairy since I was 10 – 50 years ago. I do not add oils, salt etc. to my WHOLE carbohydrates. I do not eat bread – a processed food. I am, however, post menopausal. And like many women in my category we find maintaining our weight a little more challenging. Even Dr. McDougall states to eliminate breads, bagels and processed whole food starches when using his Fast WEight Loss program.
          The point I’m attempting to clarify is that if one eats lots/mostly dense calorie starches (as per Jeff Novick’s calorie density information), one can gain weight. It’s misinformation that one can eat whole starches only and not put on weight. I realize some people can do this but not everyone. Too much calorie dense starchy food can – and may – add weight.

          1. Thanks for the clarification Ruth. I hope I didn’t come across aggressive, that was not the intent.
            I am one of those people who can eat carbs all day long and do not gain weight, but, I have to be careful with inflammation so I try to avoid overly processed carbs too.

            I have to be carful if oils are added to any food those increase my weight. But whole plants high in oils (nuts, avocados ) do not seem to increase it.

            Cheers.

            End

      4. Ruth, whole grains do not make people put on weight, in fact, they’re very likely to help you lose weight in a number of healthful and interesting ways. What you may have had been consuming a lot of is processed whole grains such as flours. When a grain is ground up into a flour, with the exception of pasta, it’s metabolized very quickly and can cause blood sugar spikes. Dr. Greger stresses the importance of intact whole grains. And certainly refined grains such as white rice and white flours can easily contribute to weight gain. Moreover, those with a wheat allergy or an intolerance of some kind can also put weight on by eating it.

        As for starches, a lot of people have lost a substantial amount of weight from taking the starch route. But I go more with Dr. Greger’s recommendations because I think the variety of all the food groups is so important for optimal health.

        1. S, Ruth already clarified that no, she ate whole grains. I am the same… grains and starchy veg like potatoes cause me to gain weight. It’s slim pickin’s around here I tell ya. I dont usually put beans in soup either… maybe a few lentils but no potatoes. I eliminate everything except oatmeal to lower cholesterol. Some people can eat like crazy, but not me… and not Ruth apparently!

  9. One vote for the old format! I found the flashing back and forth from Dr. Greger to journal article distracting, making it difficult for me to follow the content. I kept wanting to block Dr. Greger out (sorry, nothing personal).

    When the screen concentrates only on journal articles, and Dr. Greger’s voice offers further explanation, I can really get into what he is saying and take it all in.

    1. I absolutely agree. I love the Dr G videos “in the kitchen” but the science ones should show just the highlighted articles. I, therefore, vote for the old format although I do prefer the new music in the intro. Thank you for ALL you do!!!

      1. By the way, I always get a kick out of it when he pokes his head into the video from the treadmill. It was a rare treat that he usually used to highlight some absolutely ridiculous meat/dairy/egg industry conclusion. Loved that.

      2. I too like the “in the kitchen” format but prefer the “dry old format” for the more scientific presentations because of ease to see the articles/the dates of publications/et cetera.

      3. I agree with AR. Dr Gregor visible in the kitchen videos is great but please reduce the appearances in these regular videos. It’s distracting from the highlighted content.

    2. Julie,

      As we get older, our brains get overwhelmed with too much visual information.

      Brain Games had a video where they showed that you miss so much information, I can’t find it, but I found this one, which by the end is about things you missed seeing because your brain had to choose what to focus on. I agree that when Dr. Greger wasn’t on-screen, I could listen to his own voice better. When he was speaking on-screen, I had to choose between the visuals and listening to him and half the time it was him and half the time I was trying to figure out, “What is that map doing there?” There were actually 3 competing images at many times and Dr. Greger was the most dynamic, but it is easy to miss everything else.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiEzf3J4iFk

  10. I really dislike the new video format, as for me it takes away from the scientific message that Dr. Gregor is communicating. Instead of focusing on the actual research papers, the videos visually diminish their importance by making them very small and often partly behind Dr. Gregor’s image. With the old video style, I often would pause the video to read other parts of the paper that showed up – can’t do that now for most of them!! I found myself watching the video with my hand covering Dr. Gregor’s image – not that I don’t like him!! It’s his gesturing that takes away even more from me being able to concentrate on the content. And after all, the content is what’s important!! If this format continues, I regretfully will have to stop watching the videos at all – I used to so enjoy them.

  11. Sweeteners, sugar specifically, has been in the human diet since the dawn of time… the problem is NOT sugar, it is the sedentary lifestyle together with the glutton mentality prevalent in today’s society… Shut your electronic devices off and put them away for awhile… Start cooking at home instead of going/ordering out… Shut the TV OFF!!.. Get your butt off of the couch and go do SOMETHING!~ Build something in the garage… go outside… garden, work in the yard, go for a walk… DO SOMETHING OTHER THAN SIT AROUND ON YOUR ASS EATING!… and the “Obesity Epidemic” will end.

    1. And on another note that others are commenting quite a bit on… I too much, Much MUCH prefer the old format of your videos with the “research papers” shown and highlighted… I could pause the video and record the title/authors of the papers and then look them up and read them for myself… this provided for a more comprehensive understanding… Please go back to the previous format for your videos, Dr. G… Thanking you in advance.

    2. But people are openly ENCOURAGED TO BE ‘FOODIES’ BY MEDIA AND SOCIETY, aka fatties. Food has become the new legal drug and most people CLAIM to watch what they eat, as they have daily ‘cheat’ days because it is a ‘Monday’ or (insert day here).

      Most cookbooks, even America’s Test Kitchen, are all Paula Dean type food based on flavor/texture only.

      1. I agree Jimbo ! It’s a lethal environment we’ve got that is fuelling our (my) addictions. I like really good food… food that tastes exceptional, is attractive, cooked properly and is healthy too. If wfpb eating was just about slapping a potato on the plate and munching a salad alongside all the time there would be zero draw for me. But as it is, the possibilities are just about endless.

      2. Jimbo, I am in complete agreement with you, Sir!~ And I’m not claiming that our “Western Diet” isn’t a major contributing factor to not only obesity, but an entire host of modern illness and a leading cause of untimely mortality… what I AM claiming is that a regiment of increased daily activity will offset the majority of the ill effects of what we intake from our undeniably unhealthy diet of fatty/salty/sweet foods.

    3. Anthony,

      I think Dr. Greger was referring to ADDED sugar, in the form of refined sugar, leading to health problems.

      As others have noted here, sugars found naturally, such as in fruit and even veggies such as sweet peas, sweet corn, carrots, etc, are fine to eat.

      As an aside, I discovered in the past that exercise alone did not cause any weight loss for me, even after a year — though I didn’t gain any weight, either. But when I changed my eating habits, practicing portion control and making healthier choices, in addition to exercising, I lost weight. Probably the most important parts were cutting back on processed foods and sweets, and eating more produce. And eventually, more whole grains and beans.

      1. Dr. J… I agree with you to a point, Sir… specifically wrt to the natural sugars found in whole foods. And again, I am not claiming that we as Americans are by large eating a healthy diet… to the contrary, we are NOT! But our diet is not that far removed from other western nations either… take the Scandinavian countries for instance, or even Western European nations such as France, Germany, the Netherlands, etc. etc… All of them consume added/refined sugar in their diets… (Perhaps there’s not Corn Sugar in everything they eat… DAMN Corn Sugar!!!~) Compare their diet with their national propensity to obesity… ??? Now compare their “REGULAR” level of physical activity… NOT “Exercise”, mind you… but Physical Activity… to their national propensity to obesity…. !!!~ There is a BIG difference between regular “Physical Activity” and “Exercise”… (biking instead of driving to daily activities… be it daily to work, or in the evening to the bistro for a sandwich and a beer… ;-), just as one example)… A BIG Difference!

  12. My husband and I prefer the old style reporting . I like seeing the reports . And while we love you .. you are distracting in these videos .

  13. Agreed, the new format distracting, I can absorb the information much better without the screen switching back and forth so quickly and just focusing on Dr. Greger’s voice and the text on the screen. I appreciate the team efforts to switch things up, and acknowledge people respond differently to various approaches, but this method seems too jarring and not conducive to the transmission of facts. I will continue with reading the transcripts…thank you so much for providing them!

  14. People on here are acting somewhat gullible to topics posted. Silly considering all of them are at the internet and can use it to become better informed.

    I NEVER trust so called ‘texts’ within anyone’s videos on any website because one can be drawn up by anyone with rudimentary computer knowledge and made to look real. If I want to CONFIRM something being said I enter the topic into a search engine then immediately after typing the words add “-.com” (without the quotes) then press enter. This gives me websites of .edu, .gov…..where most actual studies can be found.

    I seldom actually watch the videos as well but will listen to it as I read the transcript.

  15. The information and new format is superb! For more than 2-years, I have been on a whole-food, plant based diet with zero added sugars. I lost 35 lbs and have successfully maintained a healthy weight. I was surprised how my tastebuds adapted to omitting sweeteners (table sugar, honey, maple syrup…) which add calories with minimum nutrition. Whole foods are naturally delicious. Thank you Dr. Greger!

    1. It’s remarkable. I went vegan and lost 55 pounds. This was on a pretty crappy Americanized vegan diet. Then I started reading food labels and discovered that almost all processed food, vegan or not, contains refined sugar. Shortly thereafter discovered this site and the WFPB movement and switched to a “Starch Solution” style, WFPB diet. Dropped another 30 pounds. Now my taste buds have adapted so I can’t even tolerate the taste of refined foods or added sugar. Love my cranberry juice in the morning. 1 pound of cranberries, 1 liter of water, in the blender.

  16. Another vote for the old format. Nice intro graphics and the entire presentation is full of content, tight, and polished. But I found Dr Greger in front/along side the study he was talking about made the print too small to do me any good. Also, some light was flashing in his glasses lenses and his consistent head bobbing and weaving was also distracting… in a large forum, it doesn’t bother me and even works to animate what could be a boring lecture, but uptight in a head shot is too much.

    All that said, I’m grateful for the literally live-changing and life-saving information he’s given me over the years and appreciate that he’s always on the hunt to improve things.

  17. I aim to watch a nutritionfacts.org video every day for motivation, perspective, and education. I appreciate you testing new formats and asking for feedback.

    I like the new format as it is more engaging. Seeing the eyes of the good Doctor who fights for the truth in health and bravely goes against the (processed) grain gives me hope and encouragement. I also appreciate the transcripts in addition.

    Bringing in a new format often gets resistance from established fans because it is human nature to resist change. Yet, I think we tend as a society towards being more and more visual. “Kids these days” are used to rapidly switching screens. While it is all about the content, really, seeing a face may make the research more relatable, the videos more exciting and may end up drawing in a new audience.

    Thank you for all you do!

  18. I love watching the videos and appreciate all the work that goes into them. However, I agree that it is distracting to see Dr. Greger’s image so much. Maybe it would be nice to see him at the beginning to introduce the video and at the end for the summary, but otherwise go back to the old format where the research is the focus.
    Thank you so much for this website! I have recommended it to so many people.

    1. April,

      I like your suggestion, to see Dr Greger at the start and end of the video, but to otherwise go back to the old format. Because I too agree with other commenters in that I like to look at the text surrounding the highlighted portions (often, I can only access the abstracts of the cited publications).

      And I also do as you do: Recommend this website to other people, at every opportunity. Because I find it one of the best. Thank you, Dr. Greger and your team for doing an excellent job! Please keep up your good work!

  19. Green “? Support” button blocks the “Full Screen” control on my PC screen; could you move the button up just a little bit to make it easier to view the great videos in full-screen mode? Thank you!

  20. If I’m not mistaken, the video transcripts used to contain links or references to the studies being mentioned in the text. It no longer does that. It’s just text without references and then the sources.

  21. I really like the opening graphics with the vegetables. The original opening format used to blast my ears! This one is much better. I’m not sure about the current format with Dr. Greger in front. I like seeing him and it’s better without walking on a treadmill as he sometimes has, but it may be a tad distracting, especially since it is a new format and not what we expect. I’d suggest we all watch a bit longer and more familiar with what to expect.

  22. I am a retired MD who worked in the USA, but now live in a Blue Zone, Nicoya, Costa Rica. When I visit the USA, I am always surprised by the degree of obesity in humans, although I intellectually know it, but what I can not understand why pets are so obese. Does this make obese humans feel better. As you know, a recent study showed 25% better survival post heart attack if you were a dog owner, and even more beneficial if you were living alone with a dog. But why kill the dogs by over feeding them? Is there sugar in dog food. I raise my dogs to like dog-safe fruits and vegetables, and, despite my 70 year old creaks, they get me to walk, even today where we have had over a foot of rain in the middle of rainy season. With a WFPBD, no refined sugar, I eat until I am stuffed, feel full, and am 168 pounds at 5’11”. I have lost food craving without sugary, fatty, salty snacks. It is a relief. We must make sure schools are free of junk food and all parents are educated on nutrition. There needs to be a core program of life skills in schools including such things as nutrition, banking, paying taxes, vaccination, etc..

    1. Robert Haile,

      I most recently had 2 cats and 2 dogs, and 1 of each were “nibblers” — they would never over eat, even when food was left out for them all day — and 1 each were “foodaholics” — they would inhale their own food, then rush over to the nibbler, push them aside, and inhale their food, too! By the time I realized that, I had an overweight cat and dog, and a skinny cat and dog. So, I separated them at mealtimes, gave them all measured amounts of food, and fed them 4 times per day (to allow the nibblers time to eat), and gradually the two overweight pets lost weight back to normal, and the two skinny pets gained weight back to normal. And this was all done with commercial pet kibble (I was a busy working single mom). To me, it seems all about how much people feed their pets. Even the “snacks” I gave my pets were rationed, and as a reward for desired behavior.

      Now I have one surviving nibbler, aged 16-17 (he was a rescue mutt, just like the other one) (the little female dog died early from mammary tumors, but outlived her life expectancy by at least 3 years), and the two cats lived to 15 and 17), and I have switched him to vegan kibble (commercial), supplemented by some home-made vegan “glop,” such as sweet potato puree and a food mix cooked in an electric pressure cooker. He has always been thin.

      I think that pet owners simply feed their pets too much food. Resulting in overweight to fat pets. Many have admitted to doing it. I don’t understand that. I have heard various psychological explanations as to why individuals overeat — but why do they overfeed their pets? It’s easy enough to feed them measured amounts of food.

  23. Preferred the voice over rather than having you in the forefront. It makes the highlighted material seem much less important and impressive.
    The intro is captivating.

  24. It seems like the new format is trying to have broader appeal by presenting a much busier and flashier visual experience. Yeah, maybe it’s a bit slicker, but I agree with those who find it distracting. It detracts from the overall message and comes across more as promoting Dr. Greger than presenting the (nutrition) facts.

  25. I love Doctor Greger! I love seeing him in the kitchen, and at conferences. Aaaand, in the videos, I prefer hearing his lovely voice, and simply viewing the highlighted articles. Perhaps for the same reason I like online recipe videos to simply include the ingredients being prepared. Appreciate trying out this option. I just prefer the prior format. Thank you, Nutrition Facts!

  26. I would have run with the title “Does Added Sugar Lead to Weight Gain?” I’ve had too many discussions with people deathly afraid of eating fruit to not make this distinction at every opportunity.

    I personally don’t care between “talking head” and “disembodied voice”, so long as I have enough time to read the titles and quotes, but I do think “talking head” may help get through to some new viewers, as this is now the conventional format for informational videos on YouTube. I’m very glad Dr. Greger briefly stepped off of his treadmill for this, though, that would be distracting.

  27. The new format is not an improvement: Dr Greger is exciting to listen to—but too animated and too ‘hard’ to watch. I cannot focus on the content. If this is the new permanent format, please remove me from the distribution list. I truly enjoyed (and learned much) while the original format lasted.

  28. I did want to give a round of applause to the opening artist.

    Genuinely fabulous!

    I love the eye and the magnifying glass. Charming and old-fashioned with the magnifying glass and pencils and pie charts. Perfect choices of just enough shine and motion to make it special. Colorful, bright, friendly, cheerful. The heart adds that loving passionate touch. I love the nuts and the carrots and broccoli and shiny tomatoes on the vine. Pleasant and not at all distracting or jarring. I don’t mind the sparkling sounds at all. (Laughing, yes, it is the visuals which are seriously fun, the sounds are standard, but I appreciate the softer swishes versus the hard booms.) You nailed the visuals.

  29. I found the image of Dr. Greger distracting. I was focused on his facial expresions and gestures and not as much on what he was saying. I didn’t like it at all.

  30. As a medical professional, I have recommended and emailed your videos and blogs to literally hundreds of clients. The thing that I stress to them is that the focus on your videos and blogs is on the science. The new format puts the focus on you as a person. Although truly respect and admire you and the work that you do, I believe that the journal articles and the data (inc. detailed charts, graphs, and tables) should be the stars of the show. They are what sets you apart, and what gives you more credibility than any other site out there. Please go back to the old format, and keep the focus on the “facts” from nutritionfacts. org! Keep up the great work!

    1. “The new format puts the focus on you as a person.”
      – – – – –

      Neil, Dr. G. is a frustrated actor. :-)

      We’re talking Show Biz!….Hollywood!……Broadway shows!

    1. Yes, me too. I’m surprised to see so much opposition, although I suppose it’s as with most things — we’re all more likely to speak up when we dislike something than when we like something.

  31. Great information. Would this apply to non “sugar” sugars as well, like maple syrup and date syrup? Aside from a tiny amount of sugar in the tiny amount of vegan dark chocolate I eat most nights, I already cut sugar out long ago. I’ve been strictly whole foods, plant based for the last 8 months. I’m still having no success shifting the excess 5kg that I carry around though. After watching this, I’m thinking I might do well to cut down date syrup in my smoothies and cut out the maple syrup in my salad dressings!

    Love the new format by the way, and love seeing Dr Gregor in the video.

    1. Emma,

      My experience has been that the closer I am to a desired, healthy, or “ideal” weight, the slower any weight loss.

      I think that exercise may also help; when I only exercised, I didn’t lose any weight (though I didn’t gain any). But when I changed my eating habits (practicing portion control and making healthier choices), I gradually lost weight. But it was so slow (about 25 lbs over about 18 mos) that I was genuinely surprised when my pants wouldn’t stay up without a belt! And I continued exercising through this period, and to the present day (though I fall off the wagon every now and again; so I just try to get back on it).

  32. I too love seeing Dr. Greger’s presence in this video style. From a marketing standpoint it helps solidify his connection to NutritonFacts.org and gives a face to the message. He has tons of people supporting and helping behind the scenes but he is still the voice, face, and foundation of this great source of go-to information. Now. Having said all that, I found that he quickly became distracting as another element on top of the already fast-paced visuals and voice-overs. As a solution, I’d have Dr. Greger appear as bookends: the first and last 10 seconds or so doing setup and wrap up.

    1. I agree with Julia Ryan. A short visual of Dr Greger in the intro and at the end would be a plus but anything more than that is a distraction from viewing the content. But the new graphic display and music used in the opening is a nice improvement.

  33. I like the new format of Dr. Greger being seen during the video. It’s like having him in the room with me. The topic of too much sugar in the diet is very important but my suggestion would be for him to first clarify what “sugar” he’s talking about. For people following a very healthy WFPB lifestyle know exactly what he’s talking about, but I know people who think all “sugars” / carbs are the same, calorie for calorie. I share his videos on social media and many don’t know who he is or his background. I love this website and will continue promoting the wonderful information to my circle of friends/family. Keep up the great work!

    1. Yes, it is like having him in the room with me, too.

      It is interesting how evenly divided the argument is.

      It probably does depend on whether you are trying to examine the visuals or not.

      My guess is that people-oriented, extroverts will prefer looking into Dr. Greger’s eyes while he speaks and analytical people who are more detail-oriented will prefer looking at the studies.

      I listen to a lot of doctors who don’t use any visuals at all, so I don’t mind just listening, but I prefer also having visuals. It helps me to learn better.

      1. I did an experiment of turning the sound off and watched the video without sound and what I found was that even without sound, the way the screen is divided, if you have been watching the videos as a “word reader” while listening to Dr. Greger speak, the visuals in the background and foreground competed with each other even without focusing on Dr. Greger.

        I couldn’t read the title of the image in the background by the time the words were appearing in the foreground and those words were gone before I got through the first sentence.

        When it is like that, people tend to not pay attention out of not being able to keep track of the flow of the information. Again, that was not looking at or listening to Dr. Greger – it was just the 2 competing word-based images were already too much and I put it on full-screen and on full-screen, I could see the print on the back image, but it didn’t matter because the minute the front image came up, my eyes would abandon trying to figure out what the back image was trying to communicate.

  34. Dr. Greger,
    Why have a standard format? I’ve enjoyed most of the different formats over the years. It’s okay to mix-it-up, format wise, depending on the content, i.e. serious or light hearted. I appreciate your creativity, your humor, and it’s nice to see your bearded mug.

  35. I prefer the older style videos, Dr. Greger’s huge image takes up a lot of screen space which could be used to show more scientific papers (larger font maybe), data, graphs, etc.. If you really want to show his image, maybe a tiny, tiny image in the bottom left hand corner + make it transparent so I can read the paper text thru it, OR, make it optional so I could click on a button/link to enable/disable display of the image

    1. Summerfest did the version where he was in the corner while his video was showing and I really, really enjoyed it for that format.

      It was fun to watch him interact with his videos. That was a blast. I have friends who are filmmakers and who do video work and being behind the scenes in the creative process is the real fun part for me.

      However, he was showing videos, which I had already seen, so I wasn’t trying to examine the information as closely.

      I feel like the competing text was part of it. If you can’t read the titles on the graphs and charts, those become less valuable and people either get frustrated or tune them out and just listen to Dr. Greger.

      If I go mentally over to his interviews and Q&A’s, I enjoy listening to Dr. Greger.

      I did not enjoy trying to read the text in this video.

      I can go through image by image and know that I started trying to read the titles of the charts, abandoned that process and moved toward trying to read the foreground texts, but a few times I didn’t finish even a single sentence, so I abandoned that process. Then, I had the thought, I am not going to learn unless I start over and do this properly, but properly meant reading the transcript first to understand exactly what Dr. Greger was going to say, then, pausing at the charts to see the titles and try to get some information of why they were chosen. Then, pausing again to read the words in the foreground to double-check whether Dr. Greger was saying those.

      I am trying to learn and don’t mind doing extra processes. I pause the Amoeba Sister’s videos and start over all the time, so I don’t mind it, but my feedback to the video people is that they are not trying to follow the information. Slow the transitions down a tiny bit. It would probably only take a few extra seconds to make the transitions more comfortable and satisfying.

  36. I love Dr Gregor and yet I can’t stand the new video format. I used to watch/read the daily blog to keep myself motivated. Now I just can’t make myself. His affect is extreme and distracting. I’ve referred dozens of people to the site and in the past many have told me they found his mannerisms off putting. This is even worse.

    1. Rosalind,

      If you can separate your thoughts from your emotions, you could communicate in a way that is less hurtful.

      You find the new format distracting is constructive criticism.

      Public personalities can change some things, but not others, and knowing the difference is where you can do constructive criticism versus bullying.

      I am trying to figure out how to not do the “I find your mannerisms in how you comment off-putting because they are so mean-spirited” to you. I don’t want to word it that way. I just know that Dr. Greger is under a microscope and I see someone who is working so hard at this process and he is someone who takes criticism and who tries to use it.

      I have watched very old videos of his – ones from before this site and he has become so much more polished and so much more entertaining and more playful and confident, but he is still who he is and if you met some of my Italian or Greek friends you would find their mannerisms (culture) off-putting, too. Same with my Jewish friends.

      If you met my young male workers, you would find their mannerisms off-putting, too. If you met my friends from Hollywood, you would find some of their mannerisms off-putting, too. The same for my friends from the South – the Redneck culture can be off-putting, too.

      There is so much diversity in the world and most of what we are turned off by is cultural.

        1. Lola, yes, BUT, people are entitled to express their opinions here without being bullied or jumped on for it. NutritionFacts was asking for feedback. Deb, you, and everyone should be able to have their say without being attacked. Inappropriate remarks will be removed by moderators. just sayin’

  37. The “put Dr. Greger down for being Dr. Greger” comments are less constructive. There are lots of doctors out there and Dr. Greger is doing a special service to humanity putting this free site up and putting such high-quality information on it.

    Some of you can just walk away. It is better than putting hurtful comments.

    1. A good communicator knows when to be animated and when to not get in the way of the message. Dr. Greger is not being put down. He has a valuable message, which we all appreciate, but the message should be the focus. I can walk away because I have heard enough to understand a healthy lifestyle but where do I send people who are new to the message for “scientific” nutrition facts. Not to a site where the moderator gets in the way of the message because of excess energy.

      1. CP,

        Dr. Greger has worked so hard on his message and on the content and on reading all the studies and on writing the books and on translating the books and on giving a million interviews and on the speaking engagements and on every single thing there is to being famous and to having to constantly be entertaining and to constantly have to fight the diet wars, etc.

        He will not be the doctor everybody chooses to learn from, but I have done work on film and video projects and even on plays and public speaking and trying to be perfect at all of it at the same time never happens. He is seriously 1000 times better at communicating than when he started and has to choose what to focus on.

        He is to being put down. I find your mannerisms off-putting when he isn’t doing something different than normal is a personal insult. He didn’t look any different when he spoke to the dietary guidelines. Yes, he is someone with a lot of energy and it is more than okay to say in a polite way that his high energy distracted your focus away from the message and people have said it politely and Rebecca below did a good job of not putting Dr. Greger down.

        Good job, Rebecca.

      2. I agree cp. Part of people’s irritation I believe lies in the fact that this is not the first time NF tried this…. and got the same reaction then, as now. The series of introductory videos had our Dr G explaining things. There was also a trial where Dr G played with software and he popped up during the video with a comment. Did not go over well as I recall.

        Seems to be human nature to mess with what isn’t broken.

  38. You have a great voice, Dr. Gregor, but I’d rather watch the research than a face (trying not to make that personal). So much energy is distracting. Thank you SO MUCH for the information and the effort you put into these informative videos.

        1. YR, Good question … It probably wasn’t a WFPB diet! But I guess the culture back then found full-figured women pleasing to look at, as opposed to the culture today. Personally, I value personality and attitude far more than physical appearance :-)

          1. Darwin,

            You just gave the exact same answer I would give as a woman talking about males.

            I do know a few males who would say that and genuinely mean it.

            I think culture is changing.

            What makes the issue complicated is that women have been looking at size zero models and girls start dieting before they are 10 years old and millions of women develop eating disorders related to having their self-esteem and value as human beings destroyed.

            Add the suicide rates and the rates of women who end up in abusive relationships to the eating disorders and immediately my internal math demands that all human beings be valued and not bullied and not have their self-esteems driven by superficial things which can change in a moment.

            Health is the reason to do this lifestyle.

            The people who are obese were mostly abused as children. They were also being fed the wrong foods, but the one semester I briefly had an eating disorder, I remember the stat that 80% of morbidly obese people were sexually abused.

            They were also fed wrong, but in both of those cases, they need extra dignity, not less.

            1. The culture is changing because there are things like heavier models and actresses now. A lot of ads aimed at women aren’t using women who look like models anymore.

              Dove is one, but there are a lot more commercials like theirs where they emphasize that women come in all sorts of shapes and sizes.

              I believe strongly in human dignity. All humans.

  39. In some early videos Dr. Greger made, he suggested the use of Erythritol, a healthy sweetener that is also an antioxidant. It tastes very much like sugar. I use a few spoonfuls of it when something just can’t be eaten normally without sugar, such as cocoa, which is in itself a healthy food that shouldn’t be passed up.

    1. Ron,

      I have never seen it in stores or in recipes.

      Does it really taste like sugar?

      I will have to watch the video again.

      His newer video recommends date sugar and that is what I bought when I needed sugar for a recipe in the Spring.

      It doesn’t taste like sugar exactly but it sweetens.

  40. Sorry I do not like the new video style. I am so used to really paying attention to the spoken word as well what is on the screen, I find Dr. G. image very distracting. I much prefer voice over. Just saying.

    1. Laughing my head off!

      Yes, I am still agreeing with both sides.

      Enough people used the word, “Distracted” that he should change it, but I will add “refreshing” and “light” to the side of me which enjoyed it.

      I think the triangular foreground and background text was the bigger problem.

      It wasn’t about showing Dr Greger, it was keeping him there competing with the text and then having the text triangulation with each competing. That triangle is when Dr Greger wins the attention versus the text and graphs and maps because he is fidgety and in editing it is motion which attracts attention most.

      Watch an old movie where suddenly a character actor steals the scene away from the leads, usually it is because they are moving.

      1. You don’t have to watch a movie. Watch a commercial and your eyes will follow everything that moves.

        If nothing moves, you will look at human forms and color. If there aren’t human forms you will look at sources of light.

        Fidgety man with the vibrant ties bests moving text.

  41. I am a physician, a dermatologist for 40 years, and I’m a big fan of Dr. Greger. I tell all of my new patients about nutrition and I specifically encourage them to sign up for nutritionfacts.org. I prefer the old format. I love seeing the actual study and the highlighted sections. I frequently hit the pause button to read the entire abstract or as much as I can in the short period of time between articles. *The published scientific facts are the real core of nutritionfacts.org.* So I prefer the voiceover and then quick focus on the actual published articles. Dr. Greger’s talking head is distracting and makes me look at him talking rather than the actual articles which are harder to see because they’re frequently behind him. I do love the new introduction and I’m not opposed to seeing his face but I think the older format is preferred for those of us who are into science and who really want to see the references. Thank you Dr. Greger!!

    1. I agree with the constructive comments on the new format and I hope Dr Greger does not take any of these comments personally in a negative manner. We love Dr Greger and all of the absolutely great work that he and his organization are doing.

      If Dr Greger is going to be on the videos, he needs to stop bouncing his head and torso as the constant body movements are distracting. It is like his whole body is doing a nervous twitch and he moves his head back constantly perhaps as his nerves flare up. We saw these distracting behaviors in another staged You Tube re-run presentation with Dr’s Dean Ornish and Colin Campbell. Dr Greger kept bouncing his leg in a nervous twitch. He also bounced his head and torso a lot when answering questions. Maybe he is used to releasing his energy in talks while walking on his treadmill.

      If Dr Greger wants to be on some of the videos or be more effective in his presentation delivery, he needs to calm his body down when he presents. His personality and enthusiasm are very appealing and the material is top notch, but he just needs some basic presentation coaching. Keep the enthusiastic positive presentation energy in the mouth, arms and hands, not by bouncing the head back and moving the torso. It takes practice and coaching. And relax and don’t feel like you have to act like a serious doctor sometimes by changing to a deeper tone in your voice.

      Perhaps we can get a highly respected executive presentation coach to help you? This will help the organization grow in leaps and bounds, especially when you start doing your new book tour. You can be yourself and share your attractive energy without all of the distracting body bouncing. Thanks again Dr Greger for the great work!

  42. We all love Dr. Greger!
    However, the new video format is somewhat distracting.
    I found myself looking away from the video and just listening to the information, in order to avoid distraction.
    Dr. Greger’s previous format duplicated what we see at Scientific/Medical conferences.
    The emphasis is on the data, not the image of the presenter.
    I would suggest returning to the scientific format previously utilized.
    If it is not broken, do not fix it!

  43. The intro is great. I prefer the old style – find it to be easier to focus on the info. This new style I find to be distracting.

  44. I personally get distracted by Dr. Greger in the Video, three times I lost track of what was actually said (I’m not a native English speaker but that never happened with the old format). As introduction or ending it’s surely nice to see the Dr. But while it’s about all the studies being presented it’s just more clear and easily to follow when I see slides and can read without distraction.

  45. Nice new way to present the videos. After this episode, I think it should be good to do one on arrificial sweeteners. Show what they really do to the body os those who use it.

  46. I think the new format is ok. I love the science format, but it puts off a lot of people that I know. I was wondering if you could get a documentary made about all the info you’ve collected. In the UK, a series on the BBC would be the way to break into the mainstream. I try to share you’re “how not to die lecture” with friends and family, but most don’t want to watch a lecture.

    1. YR,

      That was interesting.

      Woodstock would have likely had a worse incidence of coliforms than Austin CIty Limits and the fact that nearly every single surface of the whole Austin City Limits site was swabbed to find fecal coliforms except for the scooters, already makes me laugh. Woodstock would have been so much worse.

  47. Hi there. This is the 3rd intro I’ve seen over the years and they all seem good. I’m not a huge fan of seeing Dr. Greger those as it can be rather distracting.

    Thank you for the content of the information. It has certainly made me more conscious of my food choices.

      1. I think if the images weren’t so text driven, it might have worked. People are watching on cell phones and tablets and fast text and small text doesn’t work as well.

        The old format was perfect on my PC, I could read the title, scan the authors and some of the surrounding text and I got so much out of that process.

        The charts, I usually still had to rewind to study the data, but I could always read the title and see which category was which and general comparisons.

        Dr Greger, I don’t mind you being an animated person, but I will say that I have watched you in the documentaries and interviews and when you are in a more natural mode of answering questions, you become someone less controversial.

        The interview I watched recently with the man who wouldn’t look at the camera, you were perfect.

        The same with the beans beans episode you posted with us.

        I think it is someone else directing you, rather than you trying to figure out how to be entertaining. You are in a different mental space is what I mean.

        1. It could be the mode you go in when you memorize a script or are reading one.

          I can tell you that when you move out of presentation mode and focus on the topics and are just your natural self, it is your best side so to speak.

          I know from reading scripture publicly during church gatherings that it is easy to keep trying to make things more interesting vocally or add hand gestures or expressions and I am telling you that your scientific mind is already so interesting that you don’t need to do anything else but present the data and not talk too fast.

          Maybe do deep breathing or binaural beats or meditation before things to be the calmer confident version of who you are.

          1. When I was helping on films, there was a man who wasn’t an actor, but he was naturally perfect for the bit part, except that every time the camera turned on, he would stop being his natural self and then the camera would turn off and he would be perfect again over and over again wasting film. Finally, my friend who was directing it had the camera person keep rolling after cut. Mentally that man was so camera-focused that he couldn’t do it.

            You might need to have your wife or child stand next to the camera man, except you might perform even more.

            Whatever the process the documentary directors do would help you not end up with all of these comments. You do excellent in those formats.

            1. I am sorry that I give too much feedback.

              I know that you need to know that you don’t have to perform. Even the people posting snarky comments about you, come here every day because what you are doing is so interesting.

              Honestly, it is just calming down and being yourself for the group who don’t just already love you either way.

              1. You have already pleased the people who didn’t make snarky comments, just by putting up the site with all of the topics, and we are going to be fine pretty much in any direction you take it. The more high maintenance people need your attention.

  48. Although it’s great to see you doc, you are…well, a distraction! I like the older format better. Hey, you asked for the truth! :)

  49. I’ve always wondered if sugar has a higher risk of weight gain, due to that it can be converted more easily to glycerol, that is component of triglycerides, in adipose cells….
    If so maybe it would be less weight gaining to not have fat and sugar together in the same meal? Just one, or the other, but not both together, so you wouldn’t have both components of triglycerides available at the same time….

    1. David L, that’s the comment I made a couple of times, above, and David Armstrong made the same comment. Just from my own experience, sugar is ‘ burnt off’ fairly quickly. Fat plus sugar or refined carbs as in foods like doughnuts, cookies, ice cream, cake, scalloped potatoes, yorkshire pudding etc is deadly!

      1. Hi Barb, yes thanks for those comments about the carb+fat combination as a risk! It implies just eating fat without carbs wouldn’t be as weight gaining.
        But that doesn’t sound to appetizing! I like carbs and will try to have them with minimum fat.

  50. I have watched a ton of NutritionFacts.org video content in the past, and I recommended video material to others. But I would not recommend this video. It was as if my brain was confused. Do I focus on the thing on screen that is making a ton of gestures and movement, a person that seems as if he is talking to me? Or do I focus on the words from scientific articles that he is wanting me to take in? What is remarkable is that in the end, I actually focused less (or not at all) on both (both Dr. Greger and the words highlighted on screen) given that my brain was constantly being asked to make a decision as to what to pay attention to. And so it sort of switched off and decided that it would ignore both rather than having to constantly make a decision as to which one to pay attention to. My brain was not being asked to constantly make that judgment call with the previous format, and so I was free to focus on the content. I can say that, if this had been the format for all previous NutritionFacts.org videos, I would have watched or listened to far, far less NutritionFacts.org YouTube material. Dr. Greger, I love what you have done in the past, but this new format will really hinder the spread of NutritionFacts.org’s message compared to your previous format.

  51. People need to wonder why are they prone to addictions like sugar, alcohol, cigarettes, opiates and so on. Not technically, that is well explained and documented. But in essence, why do we need to feel ‘high’, why are we not more rational and controlling addiction(s). Yes, it’s a good feeling, but in a moment it is good, later it take’s it’s negative toll. Can’t people realize and understand that. Why not. It goes on for centuries, it’s not just media and propaganda in last hundred and so years. I believe it’s something deep(er) in us that ‘kills’ our rational reasoning. Would like to see such a research.

  52. Listening to Dr. Greger–the whines, the moans, the vocal fry–was annoying enough without also having to watch him. It adds nothing to the otherwise good information. Thank goodness for the transcript.

  53. Neshas,

    Although I have no definitive answer with a scientific numeric, I’d like to suggest one look at the environment, in toto. Consider the overt toxicity of exposures daily especially during the late 1900’s forward. Living in a toxic (chemically speaking ) environment is a clear way to “poison the well” and literally be fed and powered by contaminated fuel….. just one of the many issues all of us face. In a chance conversation yesterday we (another doc and I) were discussing the epigenetic issues of how many generations of people exposed to military materials, most of which are clearly known toxins. Couple that with lax regulatory oversight of literally tons of pollutants that we all consume (think microplastics/etc.) and it’s less than surprising that our bodies fail to function optimally.

    When we do toxic evaluations of people’s homes it never ceases to amaze me how many times clear and present danger lurks under a cupboard or in a closet or the home is mis-constructed with poor air quality, etc.

    Now for some good news. As more people recognize and make changes this wayward course of action can be slowly corrected. Couple that with clean fuel (WFPB and organic fare) and perhaps after a few generations we will indeed see natural selection and the healthier will survive and strive.

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  54. When we are home and eating a plant base diet (with a rare share of a root beer with the wife), we both lose weight. Usually a pound or more a week and I get within 5 lbs of what I was in high school, I’m 71 now. But eating out too much with friends is a killer as is vacations, especially cruises, those cute little deserts call out to us, and then it’s back to eating better when we get home. These videos are very inspiring and keep us on the path.

  55. Agree with the many who LOVE Dr Greger but prefer the old format. Agree with the comment: “So how about a compromise? Why not begin and/or end each video with Dr. G and his fabulous ties, but make the bulk of each video the usual text with voiceover?”

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