What Not to Eat for Stroke Prevention

What Not to Eat for Stroke Prevention
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What is the relationship between stroke risk and dairy, eggs, meat, and soda?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The large majority of the available evidence is in favor of a protective association between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of stroke. The worst foods appear to be meat and soda. Eating, like, a burger for lunch and a pork chop for dinner, two breakfast sausage links, and a typical 20-ounce bottle of soda may increase stroke risk by 60%. Reviewers suggest the meat effect may be the saturated fat or cholesterol, the iron-mediated oxidized fat or the salt, but it could also be the TMAO. The carnitine in meat and the choline in dairy, seafood, and especially eggs is converted by our gut bacteria into trimethylamine, which is oxidized by our liver to TMAO, which may then contribute to heart attacks, stroke, and death.

And indeed, in a 2019 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association following tens of thousands of Americans for a median of about 17 years, up to a maximum of 31 years, found that “higher consumption of dietary cholesterol or eggs was significantly associated with higher risk of incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, in a dose-response manner.” Meaning those who ate more eggs or consumed more cholesterol in general appeared to live significantly shorter lives, on average, and the more the eggs, the worse it was––and this includes egg consumption and stroke. But that’s not what a meta-analysis funded by the egg industry found.

It turns out such meta-analyses have evidently been flawed by major methodological drawbacks; so, to eat or not to eat? It would seem moderation of egg consumption is called for, along with other sources of dietary cholesterol, given the new study data, which had the advantage of a “longer follow-up than the majority of the previous studies and may [therefore] have provided more power to detect associations.”

Similarly, with meta-analyses of dairy, no apparent link emerged, but evidence of publication bias was found––meaning there appeared to be missing studies, potentially shelved by industry-funded researchers for not showing funder-friendly effects. Researchers studying the relationship between funding sources and conclusions in studies of sugary drinks and milk found that studies funded by the likes of Coca-Cola or the Dairy Council had over seven times the likelihood of coming to funder-friendly conclusions than independent research––which is twice as bad as drug companies. Big Pharma only seems to be able to get away with a three-fold bias. Of particular interest, not a single one of the interventional studies looking at soda or milk ended up with an unfavorable conclusion.

The bottom line is that yes, dairy fat may be better than other animal fats, such as those found in meat, but something like whole grains would be better still––though swapping dairy out for refined grains or added sugar wouldn’t be doing you many favors. When it comes to stroke risk, vegetable fat is better than dairy fat, meat fat is the worst, whole grains are better, and fish fat, added sugars, or refined grains are statistically about the same.

In terms of dietary patterns and stroke, most of the studies on plant-based dietary patterns have found a protective effect against stroke, whereas those looking at Westernized patterns, those based more on animal foods and added sugars and fats, found a detrimental effect of the adherence to Westernized patterns. African-Americans are five times as likely to die from a stroke in middle age, a black/white disparity largely driven by the fact that they’re just having so many more strokes. In this population, a Southern-style diet, characterized by a lot of fried foods and meat, may be playing a role in increasing the risk of stroke, whereas adherence to more plant-based diets may reduce stroke risk.

Yes, wrote the director of the Stroke Prevention & Atherosclerosis Research Centre, “learning to make vegetarian meals every other day is a tall order for most North Americans, but is feasible given tasty recipes and a positive attitude.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The large majority of the available evidence is in favor of a protective association between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of stroke. The worst foods appear to be meat and soda. Eating, like, a burger for lunch and a pork chop for dinner, two breakfast sausage links, and a typical 20-ounce bottle of soda may increase stroke risk by 60%. Reviewers suggest the meat effect may be the saturated fat or cholesterol, the iron-mediated oxidized fat or the salt, but it could also be the TMAO. The carnitine in meat and the choline in dairy, seafood, and especially eggs is converted by our gut bacteria into trimethylamine, which is oxidized by our liver to TMAO, which may then contribute to heart attacks, stroke, and death.

And indeed, in a 2019 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association following tens of thousands of Americans for a median of about 17 years, up to a maximum of 31 years, found that “higher consumption of dietary cholesterol or eggs was significantly associated with higher risk of incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, in a dose-response manner.” Meaning those who ate more eggs or consumed more cholesterol in general appeared to live significantly shorter lives, on average, and the more the eggs, the worse it was––and this includes egg consumption and stroke. But that’s not what a meta-analysis funded by the egg industry found.

It turns out such meta-analyses have evidently been flawed by major methodological drawbacks; so, to eat or not to eat? It would seem moderation of egg consumption is called for, along with other sources of dietary cholesterol, given the new study data, which had the advantage of a “longer follow-up than the majority of the previous studies and may [therefore] have provided more power to detect associations.”

Similarly, with meta-analyses of dairy, no apparent link emerged, but evidence of publication bias was found––meaning there appeared to be missing studies, potentially shelved by industry-funded researchers for not showing funder-friendly effects. Researchers studying the relationship between funding sources and conclusions in studies of sugary drinks and milk found that studies funded by the likes of Coca-Cola or the Dairy Council had over seven times the likelihood of coming to funder-friendly conclusions than independent research––which is twice as bad as drug companies. Big Pharma only seems to be able to get away with a three-fold bias. Of particular interest, not a single one of the interventional studies looking at soda or milk ended up with an unfavorable conclusion.

The bottom line is that yes, dairy fat may be better than other animal fats, such as those found in meat, but something like whole grains would be better still––though swapping dairy out for refined grains or added sugar wouldn’t be doing you many favors. When it comes to stroke risk, vegetable fat is better than dairy fat, meat fat is the worst, whole grains are better, and fish fat, added sugars, or refined grains are statistically about the same.

In terms of dietary patterns and stroke, most of the studies on plant-based dietary patterns have found a protective effect against stroke, whereas those looking at Westernized patterns, those based more on animal foods and added sugars and fats, found a detrimental effect of the adherence to Westernized patterns. African-Americans are five times as likely to die from a stroke in middle age, a black/white disparity largely driven by the fact that they’re just having so many more strokes. In this population, a Southern-style diet, characterized by a lot of fried foods and meat, may be playing a role in increasing the risk of stroke, whereas adherence to more plant-based diets may reduce stroke risk.

Yes, wrote the director of the Stroke Prevention & Atherosclerosis Research Centre, “learning to make vegetarian meals every other day is a tall order for most North Americans, but is feasible given tasty recipes and a positive attitude.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Does Diet Soda Increase Stroke Risk as Much as Regular Soda? Check out the video!

For more on TMAO, see:

What are some better dietary choices? That was the subject of my last video: What to Eat for Stroke Prevention.

But wait; what about those headlines suggesting vegetarians were at higher risk? I explore that in my next video, Do Vegetarians Really Have Higher Stroke Risk?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

132 responses to “What Not to Eat for Stroke Prevention

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  1. Paragraph 3 in the transcript confuses me. I don’t know which meta-analyses are flawed. The paragraph begins with this sentence:

    It turns out such meta-analyses have evidently been flawed by major methodological drawbacks;

    If the statement is to be taken seriously (and not a sarcastic poke at the claims of the egg industry funded study), what is it referring to in the previous paragraph? Is it referring to the 2019 JAMA study (and others) or to the ones funded by the egg industry (last sentence)?

    Which meta-analyses are flawed?

    1. Wavesurfer,

      When the industry pays for their own studies, they design them to succeed.

      Dr Greger has another full video on the egg industry studies.

    2. Wavesurfer,

      Agreed.

      For me – this video provided too much information, tossed into too complex a salad.

      The much more important JAMA article information at the beginning gets lost in the much longer interweaving of funder-biased studies following.

      More focus is needed to be effective.

      It probably would have been best to present the separate information in separate videos – or to have a clear introduction explaining the intent of the ensuing mixed approach.

      I know that I have the same problem as Dr. Greger – too much informationitis.

      This requires forcing focus and a whole lot of editing a buncha neat stuff out when making formal presentations.

      Clarity must rein.

      In presentations – ya wanna get one major point across very clearly, with supporting information – not muddle several points together.

      Still – Dr. Greger’s best work is extraordianry.

      Perhaps next time –

      Vivamus

        1. Socalstew,

          There was probably an unconscious pun in there, as in rein = “a restraining influence.”

          Thank you for your kind correction.

          Vivamus

      1. When the evidence is neither clear nor conclusive, trying to make it clear in order to fit a pre-conceived agenda runs the risk of misrepresentation.

        Personally, I’d rather have the warts and all analysis.even if it is potentially confusing. This, after all, is supposed to be a site about the science rather than a site about cobbling together studies to justify a particular position.

      2. Are You ? actually Serious ?
        Dr.Gregor…is ‘Far and Above, WAY MORE OF a Genius, than to be judged in the school-marm way, You immediately leapt into !’
        He Couldn’t BE More qualified, on the subject, but, You leap into ‘something Else ? to judge Him ?’
        Go back and Find the Point of the whole exercise ?

    3. I almost had a stroke when I found out my neighbor re named his dog Egypt…
      because he leaves a pyramid in every room.
      That dog loves meat. Maybe people shouldn’t have pets?

    4. Have any of the studies separated the egg white from the whole egg? I have read that egg whites don’t contain cholesterol and so are okay to eat.

  2. This one is packed full of information. I love this series!

    The same tricky techniques are being used during covid all across the country and around the world.

    I was reading about NJ intentionally switching back to the tests that produce more false negatives and causing the test results for the bulk of the recent tests to also be delayed so they can decide when to give the data.

    A much easier way of flattening the curve.

    It seems everybody knows how to manipulate statistics.

    Iran had its data center leak that they really may have 42,000-ish deaths versus 14,000-ish.

    I think they are all studying how the illusionists do it..

    1. All over the country public health officials are looking at 5 days or more for test results. Most people will not isolate for that long without test results saying they have covid, so counties are having to either call them all positive until the test results arrive, then readjust the numbers.

      I could not find anything from any search engine saying NJ was as a state switching tests. Like all states they follow the CDC and HRSA guidelines.

      1. I was reading it either late last night or early this morning.

        They had gone back to the type of test that recorded more false negatives and 100,000 tests were delayed at sending to the lab or something like that.

        I will try to Google it again, but I was on my phone when I saw it and now I am on my computer and what I know is that you have to type in the exact way of saying it to get the articles.

        1. F/F several hundred years or so.
          See how much This ‘Faking the Stats of covid affects The confidence, in the rigid belief, in Facts & Stats, and Science !
          See ?
          “Everything…Can be, Whatever You Want Them to Be !
          Depending on…..
          Humans Are Weird.
          Trust & Absolute Honesty ?
          Pfttt…..

      2. Looking for it, I didn’t find the article, but I did find a potential explanation almost immediately.

        “This is a national surge of cases that has really eaten into the reagent supply,”

        Looks like there are widespread delays of the more accurate test. That is probably why they went back to the test with more false negatives.

      1. Blair,

        In the end, every single hospital patient and morgue body and nursing home patient is being tested and those numbers are the ones that count in the end.

        The patients don’t get their doctors co-pays and meds paid for without a test being done and that costs thousands of dollars.

        The funeral homes need the bodies tested before handling them, for safety and the nursing homes are the most vulnerable.

        Plus, with tests, the tests themselves have way more false negatives from the virus not necessarily always being in the nose or mouth.

        The experts such as the CDC and WHO say that because most people won’t even go to get tested, the rates of infection are more likely to be tens of thousands higher every day.

        There were deaths that have been re-adjusted afterward but it was that they tested positive and killed themselves or had a car accident and because the dead body tested positive they had been marked as positive, but each and every death certificate is being debated and those are being adjusted.

        Places like Texas were keeping the antigen tests in a separate category and those are often accurate, and are what states have to use sometimes apparently because of the scarcity of testing reagents and things like that, but those people are only put in the positive category when they have symptoms, PLUS, a covid antigen test. The data being handled that way has been debated in several states.

        Florida also fired their data person and that person said that they were told to make the state appear more favorable because they wanted to open. That person still has their own data site which matches up more closely with the health sites that she had been getting her numbers from.

        In the end, it would be one great big insurance scam to cheat on the tests and I don’t believe that the hospital administrators are ordering their people to fake COVID tests.

        There is a misunderstanding that comes because some people who have been hospitalized have refused to be tested and when that happens, they have to put them on a COVID floor and treat them as patients as if they are positive, but they aren’t getting counted as positive, because that would be an insurance scam. It is a treatment reality that doctors are trying to protect the other patients but by law they can’t force people to get tested.

        That process, when the doctors tell the patients that they have to be treated as if they are positive, are the cases Dr. Popper keeps quoting, but those people aren’t in the COVID counts and insurance companies would balk if they were.

        1. Most places, COVID is reported twice, not counted twice.

          That is part of the double-checking process and the Medical examiners double-check the double-checking.

          For instance, in Florida, BOTH hospitals and family members are required to report these deaths to medical examiners. Medical examiners are also reviewing death certificates and investigating if there are any discrepancies in information before confirming a death was related to COVID-19.

          Hospitals are required to report numbers to the state AND to a medical examiner’s office. But they are not counted twice. They are reported twice by the hospitals and they are reported twice to the Medical examiners and then the numbers have to match up at the end and that is done case by case.

          I am not saying that it isn’t possible to make mistakes or have some rogue person cheating, but it would be hard to cheat because it would have to be corrupt hospital employees, corrupt family members and a corrupt medical examiner on top of a corrupt person at the state government level to pull it off.

          1. Regarding that specific place, they said that it wasn’t that the numbers were falsified, it was that they had not manually lowered the now-recovered-cases because they had too much work to do to get it done quickly. They said tha the numbers would be manually entered and will be correct as of Monday. I guess that is today.

            “To be perfectly honest we’re working that and we’re working it like crazy,” he said. “On Monday, we’ll have accurate numbers for you and everything, but they are significant.”

  3. I have never seen such a wishy-washy analysis from Dr. Greger, filled with “may be”, “might be, “could be”. HIs conclusion seems to be that whole plant foods could be better at preventing stroke than meat or eggs, but it is not clear. Is this because all Dr. Greger’s other articles stressing the benefit of whole plant foods deal with heart attack and not stroke?

    1. Peter,

      It is because morally they can’t force people to keep eating meat or eggs or drinking soda to put it to the test.

      Plus, there are multiple mechanisms and there are different theories about why each thing increases strokes, plus, there are industry studies that make it harder to just declare the data of independent reviews without acknowledging the other studies.

      The EPIC-Oxford study does show that the people who eat animal products have much more ischemic strokes, but it doesn’t prove which food they ate caused the strokes to happen.

  4. If I only had a dollar for all of the vegans I have known who died from strokes who also loved their salt way too much.

    Also this study from last year found that people who eat vegan and vegetarian diets have a lower risk of heart disease and a higher risk of stroke.
    https://www.bmj.com/content/366/bmj.l4897

    Those on plant-based diets had a 20% higher risk of stroke. The researchers suggested this could be linked to low vitamin B12 levels but said more studies were needed to investigate the connection.

    1. That Epic Oxford study showed that, while there were 3 extra stroke events among vegetarians/’vegans’, there were 10 fewer heart attack events for a net 7 fewer cardiovascular events in vegetarians/vegans compared to meat eaters. Hardly an argument justifying eating meat I would think.

      In any case, a more recent study published in March this year identified a significantly decreased risk of stroke among non-meat eaters compared to meat eaters.

      ‘As shown in table 4, vegetarians (vs nonvegetarians) had only about half of the risk of overall stroke throughout various models.’
      https://n.neurology.org/content/94/11/e1112

      The authors of this later study noted that

      ‘Nearly 80% of vegetarians in the EPIC-Oxford study drink varying degrees of alcohol but most participants in our studies avoid alcohol (about 6% of nonvegetarians and fewer than 1% of vegetarians were current drinkers at baseline). Alcohol consumption (as measured by γ-glutamyl transferase) has been suggested in a previous cohort study to modify the effect of low serum cholesterol (typical of vegetarians) on hemorrhagic stroke risk.37 The EPIC-CVD case cohort study also found a clear trend between increased alcohol consumption and stroke risk.38 While Western vegetarians use ample amounts of garlic and other allium vegetables, Asian Buddhist vegetarians avoid these vegetables. Allium vegetables are major sources of alliin/allicin, known to inhibit platelet function and induce bleeding.39 Whether these differences drive the discrepant findings warrants further investigation.’

      1. Mr Fumblefingers,

        Thank you for the article:

        Vegetarian diet and incidence of total, ischemic,and hemorrhagic stroke in 2 cohorts in Taiwan – “supported by a grant . . . from Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital” (neat!)
        https://n.neurology.org/content/neurology/94/11/e1112.full.pdf

        The material on fish consumption in the Discussion is of interest – it certainly has me thinking. Something to keep in mind.

        The material on B12 in the Discussion – more complex than I would have thought. It looks like the people putting this study together are real thinkers – more so than I. The B12 material is, again, something to keep in mind.

        Excellent study!

        Thanks again –

        Vivamus

  5. Is it the sugar content in soda that adds to the risk of strokes or a combination of carbonated water and sugar? If carbonation plays a role in strokes, what about Kombucha? Should that be considered a risk factor in strokes despite providing probiotics?

    1. david, Dr Greger has videos on carbonated water, and about kombucha – see the links below. Studies did show (plain) carbonated water effective for stomach upset etc. but he is not a fan of kombucha.

      https://nutritionfacts.org/2019/10/22/sparkling-or-still-water-for-stomach-upset-and-constipation/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-kombucha-tea-goodfor-you/

      He also has videos about our microbiome – about changing it with the food we eat, and what foods to eat to cultivate a healthy system. Use the search feature, above, to find links to the topic.

  6. As Dr Greger points out, there are a lot of stroke deaths and disabilities caused by eating too much meat, eggs and dairy. In fact, according to the CDC:

    “Stroke kills about 140,000 Americans each year—that’s 1 out of every 20 deaths.
    Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds. Every 4 minutes, someone dies of stroke.
    Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. About 610,000 of these are first or new strokes.”

    https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm

    And if one looks at Heart Disease and Cancer, the latest CDC data (2017) shows:

    Heart Disease = 647,457
    Cancer = 599,108

    https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/dvs/lcwk/lcwk3_hr_2017-a.pdf

    Now that’s a lot of deaths! And that doesn’t even count the disabilities caused by the these diseases.

    My rhetorical questions is: Why are our politicians and media focused so hard on Covid-19? If they really cared about saving people’s lives, wouldn’t they be focusing on these diseases instead? And how they can be prevented and even reversed in some cases. Dr Greger and other WFPB doctors have shown that diet is a significant factor in these deaths, specifically, meat, eggs, and dairy products.

    Why aren’t the politicians and mainstream media going after the meat, egg, and dairy industry as hard as they are going after Covid-19? If the Governors are going to be using authoritarian measures to close schools, shouldn’t they be closing down the meat, egg, and dairy operations instead of schools? It seems to me that would save many more lives!

    Something to ponder, isn’t it?

    1. Darwin,

      I agree that they are not doing enough to prevent heart disease deaths and cancer deaths.

      COVID, however, does make it more likely that people in those specific categories will die this year, versus other years.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-usa-risk/heart-disease-diabetes-significantly-raise-risk-of-hospitalization-death-from-covid-19-u-s-study-idUSKBN23N2HS

      People with underlying health conditions such as heart disease and diabetes are six times more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 and have a risk of coronavirus-related death 12 times higher than otherwise healthy individuals, a U.S. study found.

          1. The athletes have heart tests after. The 80% of asymptomatic Americans with COVID-19 might not know that it damaged their hearts or kidneys or pancreas or that it caused Diabetes.

    2. DG,
      Profiteers of the pandemic do not yet have their lobbies in place. That is why there is a hurry-up for a fix on the pandemic. If you want to go after big pharma, tobacco, factory farming, pollution, auto safety and any number of ills that plague society, you better settle in for long, expensive battles. The halls of congress, presidents and judges are bought and paid for.

      1. Profiteers: I spoke to quickly. Factory farming has a huge lobby. An Oklahoma Attorney General ran for governor several years ago—on the platform he was going to clean up a river by shutting down factory chicken operations. He was soundly defeated by big chicken. The wet farms in China probably remain open because of strong political connections.

      1. Blair,

        Yes.

        And we should be doing something about that. The fact that we could solve it and that it wouldn’t even take all that much, food should be a human right.

        But the people that I know who are in the Third World as missionaries care just as much about COVID.

        Those same people who will die from hunger are having the biggest horror stories in this pandemic.

    3. Darwin, the bbc health pages has run articles in recent weeks about the government’s plan to tackle obesity
      https://www.bbc.com/news/health-53532228

      Because obesity and all the problems associated with it complicate covid 19 infections and recoveries, the government in the uk is focussing on nutritional education and exercise programs. The prime minister Boris Johnston himself experienced difficulties with his covid illness due to excess weight.

  7. Darwin,

    I do agree that more effort should have been being made already to lower heart disease and diabetes and cancer.

    I just do not believe that the USA would have been better off if we had experienced the Northeast level of disease at the same time we experienced what the south and west have been experiencing.

    If we look at the Titanic, they did a whole lot of things wrong, but once you hit the iceberg, that is what you have to deal with.

    1. While I’m on a pondering streak, here’s another rhetorical question:

      We had the Worldwide Swine Flu pandemic (H1N1 virus) in 2009 and the Worldwide MERS-Cov epidemic in 2012. These were stern warnings that more pandemics were just around the corner.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_epidemics

      Why didn’t our Government develop a plan for handling pandemics such as these and have it ready to go whenever something like this hit the USA? If a plan had been developed back then, there wouldn’t be so much turmoil such as we have now. And it could have saved many lives.

        1. Thanks, Deb.
          As you can see, I like to look at the “Big Picture”.
          It’s so easy to get bogged down with details at times like these … “can’t see the forest for all the trees”, as the saying goes :-)

          1. Darwin,

            I appreciate that.

            I do try to look at the “Big Picture” too and I do try to not use my brain problems as an excuse for not understanding.

            I use my brain problems as a tool to understand how hard it is for people to understand what is going on.

            I honestly think the media confuses me more than it confuses most of you and that means that I have to work twice as hard to get to a place where it makes sense and I do think it has been useful as another brain plasticity exercise and I think it is also useful because all of these groups are going to work harder and harder and harder to confuse everybody.

            Might as well work those confusion muscles in the brain.

          1. Sure. It’s all Fauci’s fault. It’s the politicians who have the power and make the decisions but, when something goes wrong, we should blame blame appointed officials like Fauci.

      1. Darwin, – Your question is correct. The answer is that our government DID produce a complete pandemic plan during the Obama administration complete with experts to handle such a re-occurrence of pandemic. It especially saw the need after helping out with ebola which, if it had made it to our shores, would have been devastating to our country. The excellent handling of that disease kept our Citizens safe despite a couple of cases making it ashore if you recall.
        The current administration decided that it did not need the office of pandemics nor its experts nor its handbook detailing how to handle a pandemic and dismantled the entire program.
        Our country WAS prepared. The current administration dismantled that good work and now hundreds of thousands of people have paid for that error in judgment with their lives.

  8. I was listening to the sports channel debating about college football and they were saying that colleges made decisions to open the campuses in order for the colleges particularly to make sure the multi-billion dollar football season happens.

    1. Just college football involves that amount of money.

      Can’t we invent a feed the world sport?

      We could have teams from all around the world.

    2. Deb, You may be interested in this news that I just ran across:

      “The suppression of hydroxychloroquine by the media, politicians, and much of the medical business establishment is one of the greatest scandals of all time. Among the first to propose the use of hydroxychloroquine was Dr. Zev Zelenko who established a protocol of hydroxycloroquine, azithromycin, and zinc. Because You-Know-Who recommended this treatment, Dr. Zelenko was smeared in much of the media. Well, someone who most definitely qualifies as an expert, Dr. Harvey Risch MD, PHD, and Professor of Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health, just wrote a powerful op-ed in Newsweek blasting the suppression of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19.”

      https://www.citizenfreepress.com/breaking/dr-zelenko-explains-extreme-hostility-towards-hydroxychloroquine/

      1. Thanks, Darwin, I am genuinely interested.

        If they really have done a huge political maneuver against this drug, they have succeeded at such a high level.

        I do keep looking at things about it, but it has affected the people around me who have Lupus.

        The concept of whether the drug is safe for them at all has added so much stress to their lives.

        Some people have stopped taking it for Lupus because of the news coverage.

      2. Darwin Galt,

        Information from the ICU – not from the paranoia industry.

        They tried hydroxycloroquine. It didn’t work. They stopped.

        Vivamus

        1. Vietnam has halted the use of hydroxychloroquine Reason: it doesn’t work.

          Pretty simple.

          No ideology involved. Just simple clear reality.

          An update: Vietnam has now seen eight dead from Novel Coronavirus as of this writing – out of a population of 96 million.

          U.S dead now stands at ~158,000 – out of a population of 330 million.

          You do the math.

          Looks like Vietnam beats us, again.

          But hey, we’re Americans – we’re used to that.

          Vietnamese religious groups are backing down from in-person religious services.

          Religious groups in a Communist country? Yup. Around 24 million (estimates vary) out of a population of 96 million Vietnamese identify as religious – a mix of mostly Buddhist and folk and religions that I have never heard of – hey, Vietnam is very much a multi-cultural society – and Christian (Catholic > Protestant), with healthy mix of other also-rans.

          But – but what about all that stuff about no religion in Communist countries?

          If you believe that, you been a victim of your country’s propaganda.

          You silly goose.

          Go back to square one.

          Unlike the U.S, however, I have not heard of any of one Vietnamese religious group being stupid enough to push for the right to assemble and get the Coronavirus going rampant in their congregations. Not one.

          That particular deathwish is currently reserved for the people of the United States of America.

          The rest of the world looks on in wonder at our mishandling of the Coronavirus Pandemic – at every turn.

          Life certainly is interesting –

          Vivamus

          1. Vivamus, Sounds like Vietnam is a paradise! Why aren’t all the migrants flocking there instead of invading Europe and the USA? Just curious.

            1. Darwin Galt,

              Not a paradise. And they do not claim to be.

              Vietnam is just like any other place, really.

              Only more so. ;-)

              Migrants are migrating to Vietnam as much as they are migrating anywhere else. And for the same reasons.

              Economics.

              It has been an ongoing issue for many decades.

              Does the following sound at all familiar?

              “Illegal immigrants in Vietnam are mostly individuals who have worked or studied on a tourist visa/non-immigrant visa waiver, persons who entered the country without proper authority, and persons who overstayed their visas or entered with false documents. Many illegal immigrants from nearby countries make the dangerous boat journey across the sea to Vietnam.”

              ——————————————

              “Several cases of Chinese breaking into Vietnam illegally have been detected in Vietnam in recent days, prompting public worries about the implications including the spread of Covid-19. ”
              https://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/two-women-arrested-for-smuggling-chinese-nationals-into-vietnam-4137482.html

              https://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/vietnam-arrests-10-chinese-illegal-immigrants-4137093.html

              http://hanoitimes.vn/vietnam-arrests-chinese-ringleader-of-illegal-immigration-313493.html

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_Vietnam

              Darwin Galt.

              Best regards,

              Vivamus

              1. Vivamus, Yes, the spread of Covid is a very good reason why immigration should be done legally in all countries. I think it’s great that people can choose which country they wish to live in. If done legally, immigrants can be checked for all kinds of infectious diseases.

  9. association is not causation. he blithely ignores the fact that hominid diets included meat, fish, and poultry, and eggs (basically eating whatever they could get their hands on) for at least a million years before homo sapiens arrived and that whole grains, myriad vegetables and fruits are late comers to our diet. double blind randomized studies are proving that lowering cholesterol and avoiding meat increase stroke and heart attacks. it is becoming more evident that sedentary lifestyles, sugar intake and resulting high insulin levels are responsible for the complications arising from the western diet. whole grains lose their value when they are highly processed. some but not all legumes spike sugar levels, and too much fruit puts a heavy burden on our livers, especially if you are diabetic and/or overweight.

    1. It’s always useful to think about these things and check the evidence instead of just believing people selling carnivore/keto/low carb/Atkins diets (or whatever cool name they are being marketed under this year).

      Just because somebody marketing a diet claimed that humans lived on meat, eggs, fish etc long before they started eating whole grains, vegetables and fruit, doesn’t make it true. In fact that is almost certainly baloney. Given that savannah dwelling baboons eat whole grains, it’s hard to believe that our savannah dwelling ancestors did not do so also.

      Your beliefs are based on marketing fantasies and falsehoods eg the claim that ‘double blind randomized studies are proving that lowering cholesterol and avoiding meat increase stroke and heart attacks.’

      Instead of believing internet marketers telling people what they want to hear, why not check out the evidence for yourself?

    1. Steve

      Gee …… you could have just found the evidence by clicking on the ‘sources cited’ box instead of making an incorrect accusation that Greger’s statement was ‘unsubstantiated’. Incidentally, sugar sweetened beverage (SSB) = soda.

    1. They stopped googling Keto.

      I honestly do google Whole Food Plant Based and vegan no oil and related searches every day.

      It matters.

      Global decisions are made based on those search engine results.

  10. Hi Dr Greger,
    Could you speak more to other causes of stroke aside from poor dietary habits. I’m vegan and follow your recommended diet. I tried to go off my meds of aspirin25mg/dipyridamole200mg after being on a plant based diet for 3 years. Big mistake because I then had a stroke plus a TIA! I was diagnosed with a cryptogenic stroke so they don’t know what causes me to be stroke prone although we do know it’s not my diet! Drs seem reluctant to test me because the meds I’m on control me so well and most other causes have no remedy. I’m sure there is more literature available but what I have found is pretty sparse. Can you make suggestions as to where I can look? Thank you!

    1. Sandra,

      Maybe it is a good time to get a second opinion to make sure they didn’t miss a cause.

      I looked it up and they gave a list of potential things like Occult Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation, patent foramen ovale, aortic arch atheroma, mitral valve strands, and prothrombotic disorders.

      Also, since you are plant-based, the usual suspects:

      B-12 and making sure you don’t have high homocysteine https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/strokeaha.110.608356

      Vitamin D https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4920062/

      Dehydration and stroke https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450136/

      Cold weather and stroke https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5544452/

      Circadian rhythm and sleep disorders and stroke https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1087079218300856

      Sleep apnea and stroke https://www.sleepapnea.org/untreated-sleep-apnea-and-stroke-stroke-awareness-month/

      Too much sodium (That video is coming)
      Too little potassium https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1161/strokeaha.113.004282
      Too little magnesium https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2727202/

      Did they check your cholesterol, blood pressure, sodium levels, etc,?

      Anyway, they probably did, but a second opinion seems like it might be a good thing.

      1. I didn’t put nuts and Omega 3 on those lists, but Omega 3 level would be another I personally would check and walnuts did lower stroke levels for people on Mediterranean diet by 25%, but that would be debated up and down in the WFPB community and I am not a doctor nor do I play one on tv.

    2. Sandra Bayes,

      I echo Deb’s suggestion in regards to getting a second opinion.

      You are trying to obtain a second opinion from Dr. Greger. Dr. Greger’s field of interest is nutrition – you are asking him to go outside of his area of expertise.

      You might be best served getting a second opinion in person from a Board-Certified M.D. Internist and/or Neurologist.

      Just a thought.

      Good luck to you –

      Vivamus

    3. Hi, Sandra Bayes! I am sorry to learn that you had a stroke and TIA after stopping your medications. Even with the healthiest diet, it appears that you still need medication. Please don’t stop taking it! That doesn’t mean your lifestyle changes are not helping. Your risk would likely be even higher with a standard American diet and lifestyle. You can find everything on this site related to stroke here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/stroke/ The lists of studies featured in the videos may be accessed by clicking the “Sources Cited” links below each video window. I hope that helps!

      1. The fact that they are looking through obituaries rather than having hospitals report it to the CDC separately is seriously wrong.

  11. Deb,

    Thank you for sleuthing the Health Care Worker information. Much appreciated. Please keep it up!

    It may help me make a difference in what I do.

    It has been obvious that this information – along with a lot of other information about the Coronavirus Pandemic – is being suppressed in the U.S.

    Business concerns are prioritized over health concerns.

    Such information is much more widely available in the International Press.

    ——————————–

    We do our bit, here – offering PPE to health care workers to whom we have a personnel connection.

    So far – one E.R. doc, one Orthopod, two Internists – along with support staff.

    About half decline – “thank you, we’re covered.” With direct eye contact and a nod – always the same.

    About half accept. There is gratitude. No need.

    One of the tales that seems to affect the support staff most powerfully is one from a news report from one of the nurses who travelled to help out in NYC during the peak.

    She stated that the ward she was on had recently had one doctor or nurse death (I forget which) before she got there – and three housekeeping deaths.

    Three.

    It is not just not the doctors and nurses who are at risk.

    It is also the guy pushing the vacuum cleaner. The ward clerk. Dietary . . .

    It is everyone in the building.

    ——————————-

    As far as primary care personnel being more affected than hospital-based personnel – this is new to me.

    Most interesting.

    I will start asking around.

    Thank you.

    It may give the following a little greater import:

    ———————————-

    February 10. I remember it well.

    I asked an Internist of my acquaintance – one of the best – boarded X3 – what he thought of this coronavirus thing.

    I knew that he had underlying health issues and I figured I would do what I could for him. I hold him in the highest regard.

    You do what you can for the people you care about.

    “Oh” said he, “It’s just political! Just the flu.”

    I briefed him on the situation. No wasted words. I had prepared the appropriate literature for him – hard copy – the sort of stuff that Internists live for.

    I explained the aerosol spread to him. I explained the need for him to open the windows.

    He looked around the room we were in. There were no windows.

    I had already looked through the building – no openable windows.

    Such is the wisdom of modern health care architecture.

    I figured I would check up on him later that week – but later that week he was no longer coming to the office.

    As far as I know, he hasn’t been back there since.

    Some people learn quickly.

    Others take more time.

    Another task accomplished. So many more to do.

    You do what you can for the people you care about.

    Deb.

    Take care –

    Vivamus

    1. Vivamus,

      You are doing your part.

      I have that “the flu” conversation too often.

      And I do understand it because people are terrified about the economy and want to get back to normal.

      The primary care situation tells me that masks very likely do save our lives, as well as protecting others from us.

      The hospital doctors had better PPE.

      The primary care doctors do see the patients earlier in the process, likely when they are more infectious.

      But it has to be devastating to people. The primary care doctors are the ones they are bonded to.

      Yes, the janitors and receptionists and people making food in the hospitals. All of them are at risk.

      The fact that the new meds are so promising and so is the convalescent plasma and they are going to be trying manufactured antibodies in a few weeks. All of those may significantly lower the death rate from COVID and those can happen soon.

      It can’t be soon enough for the world.

      1. Deb,

        Keep your hopes – and your guard – up!

        “The fact that the new meds are so promising and so is the convalescent plasma . . .”

        The ICU reports that the convalescent plasma doesn’t work.

        “All those patients are dead.”

        Careful what you believe about what you read.

        There is a lot of optimism in the press that I am not seeing on the ground.

        You decide for yourself. But –

        We are prepared for the long haul.

        You wrote:

        “I have that “the flu” conversation too often.”

        It happens.

        If such people are worth saving – we do what we can.

        If not – we just change the subject.

        Sports is a good neutral topic: “Do you favor the Marlins or the Cardinals?”

        Or politics – I mention how highly I regard Herman Cain. Like the Martyred Catholic Saints – or Sir Thomas More – or Becket.

        Herman Cain died – without complaint – for what he believed in.

        And that is the ultimate in integrity. I think it is probably as good a definition of courage as any you ever will find.

        And, you know – every time I hear of anyone following Herman Cain’s example – my admiration for such people just grows and grows.

        I think they make the world a better place.

        Deb.

        To quote Dr. Pangloss:

        We live in the best of all possible worlds –

        Vivamus

          1. XXXVIII

            Oh stay at home, my lad, and plough
            The land and not the sea,
            And leave the soldiers at their drill,
            And all about the idle hill
            Shepherd your sheep with me.

            Oh stay with company and mirth
            And daylight and the air;
            Too full already is the grave
            Of fellows that were good and brave
            And died because they were.

            Housman
            Last Poems
            1922

  12. I am going to post the UNICEF starving children link here.

    Mostly, we can give money and save lives.

    The USA is a country where college football is a multi-billion dollar industry and so is professional football. We have sports players who make 45 million dollars and entertainers who make so much more than that and so do tech people and silly websites.

    I finally did give some money to the starving last night.

    https://www.unicef.org/press-releases/unicef-additional-67-million-children-under-5-could-suffer-wasting-year-due-covid-19

    The thing is, I do watch people spending so much money on fancy cars and fancy houses and fancy lives and then I go to missionaries sites and Unicef and I hate US. I hate US. We have so much and don’t give back. So many people around me have so much and 67 million children could die this year and I listen to the sports radio that my coworker loves and we are going to care so much about that and not care if the cost is teachers dying and more medical people dying and we are going to give our money to all the wrong things all of our lives.

    When I went home Friday night, I flipped through the channels and they were selling Christmas things on the shopping channel and what came to mind was how much the song from BandAid affected me when it got to the line, “Tonight, thank God it’s them, instead of you.” and the thing is, yes, that is how we are. So offended when it is us. So careless when it is “other”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjQzJAKxTrE

  13. Feed the world, let them know it’s Christmastime.

    The thing is, it is obvious that I am pro-not having people take risks during COVID, but I am definitely also a “feed the world” person.

    I know that I will have to give every month until Christmas because kids really will die this year.

    Tens of millions of kids will die this year.

    Let it not be hundreds of millions of kids.

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjDUfl8CDJo

      Deb,
      So RUTF is a peanut paste with added nutrients. The peanuts are grown in Sudan. Seems like a good strategy. Peanut butter, depending on how it is made, can be shelf stable, or wrapper stable, is nutritious and kicks hunger back.
      Just peanuts, store well and I use them for a hunger fix. I keep several jars on hand. They can be stored for years probably.

  14. I have sometimes speculated that a possible cause of stroke in vegetarians/vegans is the apoplexy caused by reading the often outrageously stupid comments posted by people who have fallen for the carnivore/keto/low carb/Atkins nonsense.

      1. I feel like, if school waited until the spring, the meds and convalescent plasma might be ramped up enough to not have us end up with thousands and thousands of orphans.

        It feels like we are so close to being able to stop 90% of the people from dying, but we aren’t mobilized for it yet.

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r94kAatnm9E

      People over six feet tall may be twice as likely to get virus.

      Q: If a male is 2.4 X’s as likely to get the virus, and he is over six feet tall, does that mean he is 4.4 X’s as likely to get the virus? If over 60 years old, that bumps probability up maybe 2 X’s more, totaling a 6.4 X’s increased probability.

      1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxG8cM7qyX0

        Some Sars CoV2 co-morbidities:
        I might add that a co-morbidity could be any condition that compromises one’s health, such as:
        –air polution
        –severe stress
        –depression
        –poverty
        –poor nutrition
        –population density
        –ignorance of others or oneself of how the virus spreads
        –being male
        –being over 6′ tall
        –being over 50
        –a long, long list of other things

      2. Dan,

        How many elderly people do you know who are tall?

        I wonder if it is an IGF1 thing?

        See Dr Greger’s videos on iGF-1 and cancer.

        Hey, there might be a way to prove the benefits of a Plant-Based diet via IGF-1 that you just found! That is so cool!

        1. Deb,
          I’ve known some tall, older people. It is common knowledge that bigger animals, in the same species, die sooner. Tall people maybe have compromised circulation. I’m not seeing an insulin-like growth factor-1 connection yet. I will watch the videos. We all start off XX chromosomal and half of that splits to XY which seems to compromise things.

  15. From the statistics I checked this morning, the mean age of those who contract the disease is 68. The mean age of those who die from it is 86 (or around that age.. ) There has been no difference in male or female except in
    the very elderly, often women out-live the men, so there are more women in the elderly population to start with.

    For comorbidities, it appears here to be obesity, diabetes or prediabetes (uncontrolled blood sugar), high blood pressure, copd, heart/lung disease, among others.

  16. Dan C, sounds to me like you are doing as well or better than the rest of us :) You eat a healthy plant based diet, get lots of exercise with your work, cycling, running/walking etc, maintain a healthy weight and get lots of fresh air and relaxation too. All good!

    I am finding relaxation a tad difficult tbh, but cycling helps, and a daily meditation session is something I now look forward to.

    1. Barb.
      Current events aligned with my lifestyle. I was already a bit of a recluse. I’m not interested in large crowds. I live rural. At 60 my health is declining but I’ve always exercised and have been interested in healthy living, including optimal nutrition. My head game is good. I’m where I want to be in life. I find relaxation in walking, keeping up with blogs like this one; I enjoy nature and have plenty of time to meditate. Laying in bed for an hour before dozing off is a form of meditation. It’s nothing to be impatient about. Life is a meditation. I like recovering thoughts from different eras in my life. It’s amazing how this can happen.

      1. Dan,

        Good for you.

        Today, I was on the phone sitting Shiva with a woman who was talking about how COVID helped her to find serenity after losing both her husband and and mother.

        I replied the same as you.

        There was a time in my life when I was out every night but my brain problems alienated me from some people and, honestly, my being neutral alienated me even more.

        They are passionately keto and radical either Trump followers or Trump haters and I am someone who wants to step outside of politics and figure out how to get things done.

        But it is so much easier to live a quiet life now.

        Tonight, I spent time with my 90-year-old relatives.

        None of us have power, but I made sure they had food and light and company.

        It could be over a week before we get power back.

        Easier still to get quiet.

        1. “They are passionately keto and radical either Trump followers or Trump haters and I am someone who wants to step outside of politics and figure out how to get things done.”

          Same here.

          Whenever I hear politics on TV, I just walk past. I have learned not to even be interested.

          Electoral politics has (have? where is a grammarian when you need one?) no importance until a day or two prior to sending in the absentee ballot. Everything before then is floss. On the day I fill out the ballot – I check out the web sites and learn the positions of the different candidates and see who makes the most sense to me and I vote. No need for the divisiveness and outrages and negativity and cacophony of politics and conflicting polls for three years prior. All done in less than a day.

          No need to pay any attention to political advertising. No need to pay any attention to endorsements. Phone “surveys” – “please put me on your do-not-call list.”

          Or whenever someone wants to rant about the outrage of the day – whatever they have been manipulated to care about – bless their hearts – sorry, not interested – but “what’ve you been up to?”

          Same with crazy diets. “How’re the kids?”

          Life works much better without taking the burden of other peoples’ daily outrages or foolishnesses in any way seriously.

          But to look for the good in the people, instead.

          If people persist – one can just explain to people, with confidence and authority that politics is bad for the digestion. Raises blood pressure. Makes people (beat) itch – have you (beat) noticed? (done properly, they may well start scratching at this point or soon thereafter – such is the power of suggestion – done really well they may stop bringing such things up because it always seems to bring on a spell of itching and scratching – it’s a beautiful thing to watch). And most importantly – politics distracts people from real life – so, what’s up?

          “None of us have power, but I made sure they had food and light and company.”

          Now that is real life!

          Candlelight?

          How are you handlin’ food without power?

          Bridge? Charades? Parcheesi?

          Or – dare I say it – conversation?

          Deb.

          Enjoy real life –

          Vivamus

          1. Vivamus,

            I have a lot of battery-operated lanterns and, yes, we had amazing conversations.

            They are the best conversationalists that are still alive in my life.

            They laugh easily and are endlessly grateful and have already lived long enough that they have lived through everything and don’t sweat the small stuff.

            They don’t avoid the politics either. I actually can talk politics with them and when I said that I watch it from both sides, they said, ”So do we.” ”Trump sure can be a son of a gun sometimes” would be as negative as they get and that is about the pandemic.

            They are being worked to safety tomorrow. I contacted all of their sons and said that there are so many trees down that the police say that it could take several days.

            Not sure if there was a tornado or what. There was a warning and then the trees came down and one landed on the power lines in front of my house and my coworker had one tree fall in front of his car while he was driving and then he stopped and another tree fell behind his car. It took him hours to get home and my brother and cousin we’re each dealing with their own fallen trees.

            I had just bought cooling towels and they are helping tonight. I don’t know how long it takes for people to die in a heatwave.

            I forgot to check the weather.

            Guess I have to do that.

            1. The cooling towels I got are worth every penny.

              I tried one the first night and said, ”i will probably never even use these and it is just like a cool wet towel.”

              Not all that comfortable but it stayed cool even in my hot car and I bought long ones that can be wrapped to use as a mask.

              And here I am tonight draped in all of my cooling towels saying ”i love these things” and I already got to use them.

              They literally cover my whole body like a blanket and I am thinking of velcroing them together and making a night when out of them.

  17. Hi , I’ve just started a plant based diet and was wondering if frozen plant based foods are bad for you as I try am do 3-4 fresh meals a week but it’s hard to always do with child and work commitment s so would it be bad having a frozen chickpea kebab one night for example like mixing the diet with 50% fresh plant based food and 50% frozen plant based food?

    Also my partner family suffer with Huntingdon disease which is a rare genetic issue and she has 50% chance of getting it from her mother , there is not enough research in this disease as it is rare but I was wondering after reading how not to die , is there any diet changes or things to avoid to
    Try prevent the symptoms coming on or even making them weaker when they do.

    Thanks
    Gerard

    1. Gerard, it’s a great thing you are doing in serving up healthy meals for your family! While I can not answer your question about Huntington’s disease, (perhaps a NF health support volunteer can help ) I would like to share a link to one of my fav short ‘shopping videos’ from Jeff Novick. He is a registered dietition, wfpb, who has many talks on youtube you might enjoy. Frozen fruit and veg are great nutritionally and for convenience. Use them often, and see in some of Jeff’s videos how he puts healthy tasty meals on the table quickly.

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PXi998JX8YM

      1. Barb,
        Thanks. Great link. I subscribed to Jeff Novick’s channel. He is a great presenter. I marveled at how he pulled endless food products out of his cart, and did a review of each.

    2. Gerard,

      The frozen plant based foods are called ”transition foods” and many people do use them as part of the process.

      Dr Barnard said to look at the fate content and I think he said to look for the number 9 or 10.

      The three things to look at on the box are the fat, sodium, and sugar.

      The disadvantage of using transition foods is that you don’t get the same improvement in tastebuds.

      Batch cooking and freezing extra of your own meals is one way to do it.

      Dr Greger has a webinar coming up on those foods based on studies and he said that he was surprised with the data.

      Looking forward to the webinar.

    3. Gerard,
      It seems you are stretched a bit thin, time wise, with various commitments. Also that you want to do your own cooking. Also that you want to add an element of fresh food. Fruit is fresh and ready to eat–bunches of bananas, bags of apples, bags of citrus (oranges, grapefruit). I eat food right out of pop-top cans: corn, chick peas, green peas, beans, beets——-and this stuff is already cooked, shelf stable and inexpensive, if you buy the economy brands. I buy flats of these canned foods and stack the flats in my cubboards.
      I cook a BIG (several quarts) stock pot of stew once a week and store it in serving containers in the freezer. This starts with beans soaked over night and cooked on low the next morning. Add all kinds of veggies: cabbage, carrots, spinach, rice, corn. frig leftovers, etc.
      Bread freezes and can easily be eaten frozen. Nothing wrong with putting some peanut butter on this for a quick meal. Frozen bags of fruit are ready to eat. Toss some on a bowl of oatmeal. Walmart has 16 oz bags of Great Value, mixed fruit for less than $2. I buy the economy brand of whole oats for lots less than the name brand. This cooks in less than two minutes in the microwave or can be soaked over night in the frig. Economy jars of peanuts can be bought for less than $2. Eat, eat often, eat well, eat convenient, eat cheap.

  18. Gerard,

    Frozen is fine. Unprocessed whole foods much better than processed foods (less fat, salt, sugar and oxidation).

    A thought for you in this extraordinary era – various veggie and fruit operations have had coronavirus running through their processing plants, with workers in close proximity to each other working at high speeds – similar to the situation more commonly associated with the pork and poultry industries. And it looks like SARS-CoV-2 remains active more-or-less indefinitely in the frozen state – freezing actually preserves SARS-CoV2 over room-temperature storage. If you are being cautious of such maters, you may wish to handle frozen foods cautiously and cook all frozen veggies/fruit in order to inactivate the virus. You may wish to consider avoiding frozen fruit -> fruit smoothies fresh from the freezer bag without first cooking.

    As far as Huntington’s disease – that is a hard row to hoe. My hat is off to you. I am sure that you are familiar with the difficult choice in regards to the diagnostic option and with the limited treatment available. When I think what I would do in that situation – I change my mind every half hour until the idea thankfully goes away on its own. It is a difficult choice with no right or wrong answer. I think of the Guthrie family – those who have followed Arlo Guthrie’s career over time have been greatly relieved to see that he has done well. If anything, a healthy lifestyle is probably the best way to go – but whether or not that will actually have a significant effect on Huntington’s? Perhaps someone else knows.

    Gerard.

    All the best –

    Vivamus

  19. Gerard noon –
    I see you got lots of good suggestions from folks on this site. I agree with all of them and will add just a bit.
    Many on this site have an instapot pressure cooker that cooks lots of food items in a fraction of the time. Instapots are also programmable so that you can have a meal ready when you get home or cook other items on a time line. They are very helpful. I don’t have an instapot but I use the heck out of my slow cooker. I will cook plain beans or throw together a stew and cook them at night when I go to bed. They are ready in the morning and can be eaten at any time or refrigerated. I’ve also mentioned on this site that I use my slow cooker out on my back deck in the summertime when it’s too hot to cook indoors. Also, I roast potatoes in large quantities in my counter top oven. I often throw a whole tray of potatoes in to cook at night and go to bed. I set the time for an hour and the potatoes cook while I snooze. I eat them in the morning for breakfast or toss them in the fridge for later. I keep bowls of potatoes on hand for when hunger creeps in. Plain cold potatoes with vinegar, salt and pepper on them are a wonderful snack.
    Hope all these ideas from this great group of people is helpful to you and your family. The link to Jeff Novick is spot on – I’ve used many of his ideas. Stick with it and things will get easier and fall into place.

  20. Phytohaemagglutinin:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytohaemagglutinin

    —————————–

    From the FDA “Bad Bug Book” – page 254:

    “For Consumers: A Snapshot

    Beans are a great deal, nutrition‐wise
    and cost‐wise – but be sure to cook
    your kidney beans well. If you eat
    them raw or under‐cooked, they can
    cause you to have extreme nausea,
    severe vomiting, and diarrhea. They
    contain a protein that’s found naturally
    in many plants (and animals, including
    humans), where it performs important
    functions. But when it reaches high
    levels in some plants, particularly
    kidney beans, the protein can act as a
    toxin. Cooking the beans properly
    destroys the toxin. Don’t use slow
    cookers (the kinds of pots that you plug
    in and that cook food at low
    temperatures for several hours) to
    cook these beans or dishes that contain
    them. Slow cookers don’t get hot
    enough to destroy the toxin in kidney
    beans. Studies done by British
    scientists suggest that beans should be
    soaked in water for at least 5 hours,
    the water poured away, and the beans
    boiled in fresh water for at least 30
    minutes.”

    https://www.fda.gov/media/83271/download

    ————————————————————–

    https://www.nebraskahealth.com/crock-pot-dried-beans.php#bean-toxin-crockpot

    ————————————————————-

    A possible concern with B12:

    “Rats fed a diet containing 6% PHA exhibit weight loss, associated with malabsorption of lipid, nitrogen and vitamin B12”

    “A raw, red kidney bean can contain up to 70,000 hemagluttinating units (hau). Most lectins are reduced by moist, but not dry heat. Therefore, steaming or boiling causes a significant reduction in concentrations of lectins in beans. Boiling for at least ten minutes has been shown to reduce hau in beans by 200-fold. Because cooking temperatures under 176 °F do not destroy lectin, use of slow cooking and/or a crockpot is not advised for cooking beans”

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3153292/

    Bon Appétit –

    Vivamus

  21. Seems like if food costs are going to be killing over 6 million people that they aren’t going to be able to hand out enough peanut butter packets.

    Potatoes seem like they would be cheaper because people could eat some and use some to grow their own.

    I am not sure if they will listen if people contact them but things like carrots where you can eat most of it and grow more carrots from the tip seem the way to go.

  22. Assistance please!…Like a lot of people I was worried by the comments of Dr Derbyshire concerning the Choline deficiency on a Vegan diet. I thought I would play safe and purchased a supplement (300mg Alpha GPC per day). However, upon researching further and based on information on this website it seems that even one eggs worth of Choline has negative health effects. So, I’m wondering which way to play this, take the supplement to guard against any future brain health issues or don’t take it for fear of any Cancer implications! I am vegan, eat a good whole food diet and follow Dr Gregor’s daily dozen as closely as I can but looking at the suggested Choline requirements I would struggle to get the RDA of 550mg without supplementation.

    1. The important thing to remember is that among the longest lived human populations on this planet, the clinical research clearly shows that eating a WFPB diet provides the lowest risk of disease and premature death. There are no studies that show that taking a choline supplement improves on this. Its easy to get lost in theory and number, but the chemistry of our physiology is too complex to boil down to taking a supplement, hence the need to focus on “hard clinical endpoints” (such as death) which is the REAL evidence as to what is best, which is simply a WFPB diet, nothing else.

  23. I’ve been eating a whole food plant based diet for years now. My blood work always looks healthy.
    But in the past three years, I have had both cancer and a severe stroke. Age was my only risk factor
    for the cancer I confronted, and after months of monitoring, it was determined that I have silent Afib.
    Please don’t be misled into thinking that a healthy diet keeps you safe from deadly diseases.
    There are many other factors that affect our bodies.

    1. I agree with you Bet that a whole food plant based diet will not guarantee health. I do believe, however, that we are most likely better off and generally healthier than if we were not eating this way.

    2. Bet,

      I’m sorry to hear of your health issues. And I agree with you fully.

      There are many considerations and confounding factors that influence our bodies functionality. Our exposures both environmentally and mentally along with adequate nutrient density, which many never achieve, regardless of our diet are all part of the puzzle of health.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

      1. Dear Dr Kaddish, Just as an added questionable history as Bet presents, I also have questions.
        I’m a 78 year old moderately active, female in good general health.
        History of TIA’s 2010 and 2011 and a TIA plus cryptogenic stroke on 1-6-19 four months after I slowly stopped taking the Aggrenox I had been prescribed. (I had cut the dose in half 2 years earlier In consultation with my Neurologist, then over a period of 6 months tapered off). I started a Whole Food Plant Based Lifestyle SOS on 8-15-17. The stroke was very mild and did not leave me with any noticeable effects. My doctor, who is himself a vegan, stated that it was probably my diet that prevented more severe effects from the stroke. My stroke was not due to high cholesterol levels and the etiology is unknown. 9 years ago I had a LP(a) test done.
        My level was 81, slightly higher than the 75 norm although not thought to be the cause of my problem because the level is not high enough. My diet is exactly as Dr Greger prescribes and I plan to continue to follow it along with the Aggrenox medication. I am still very puzzled by what the cause(s) of the TIA’s and stroke and will pursue that after a vaccine for Covid-19 has been developed and I don’t have that to be so concerned with. Dr Greger has not mentioned that there is at least 20% other or unknown causes for TIA’s and strokes.

  24. I found a $50 smart watch that says it can check your heart rate, blood pressure, pulse ox and can do an ecg on you.

    Called the loyal watch

    Don’t know if it is a scam or not but that is so much cheaper than an Apple watch and if those functions actually work, it would be an amazing gadget.

    If it isn’t accurate, it would be a scam.

    But in the days of COVID, heart rate could tell whether you have an infection.

    Pulse ox tells whether to seek medical care.

    Blood pressure and ecg would be life saving information.

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