Fasting to Naturally Reverse High Blood Pressure

Fasting to Naturally Reverse High Blood Pressure
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A whole food plant-based diet can be used to help lock in the benefits of fasting to kickstart the reversal of high blood pressure.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Medically supervised water-only fasting in the treatment of high blood pressure. A hundred seventy-four consecutive patients were treated in an inpatient setting. First, a few days of fruits and vegetables. This is to clear out the gut so they don’t become constipated, followed by 10 or 11 days of water-only fasting, before transitioning them back to a whole-food, plant-based diet: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, which are beans, split peas, chickpeas, and lentils, and nuts and seeds with no animal products, processed foods, or added salt, oil, or sugar.

They all came in hypertensive, over 140/90, but 9 out of 10—89%—walked out with pressures under 140/90. The average reduction in systolic blood pressure was 37 points, which is remarkable compared to other interventions, including drugs. And that was just the average drop. Those that came in with really high pressures, like over 180, experienced a 60-point drop. “This is [arguably] the largest effect ever published in the scientific literature.” And that was after they had all stopped all their blood pressure medications!

They conclude that “medically supervised water-only fasting appears to be a safe and effective means of normalizing blood pressure.” I explored the safety in a previous video, and yes, extraordinarily effective, but for how long? I mean, fasting is the least sustainable diet out there. Interestingly, when they resumed feeding them, their blood pressures dropped even further, suggesting fasting could be used to kickstart the normalization of blood pressure, and then you could keep it down from then on with a healthy-enough diet.

They were able to track down a few dozen patients much later, and, on average, their pressures remained down. We don’t know what happened to the rest, but it shows that, at least, it can provide more lasting benefits for some. A subsequent smaller study followed up people up to a year later, and the blood pressure reduction seemed to hold, along with the weight loss; so, presumably, they stuck with the healthier diet. Now, no one should be fasting for more than a day or two unsupervised. So, this treatment certainly carries a cost, but the entire cost appears to have been recouped within the first year just from decreased medical care costs alone.

An alternative is the Buchinger method of fasting, popular in Europe, where instead of water only, people get like 300 calories a day of fruit juice and vegetable broth. It still needs to be done under professional supervision, but at least people don’t have to take time off of work. People are randomized to seven days of that, and then followed up four months later. After four months, you’d think any benefit from the one week quasi-fast would have disappeared, but their blood pressures ended up fifteen points lower than the control group.

“Although long-term follow-up of these subjects has been sporadic, the available data suggest that these large reductions in blood pressure can be conserved in patients who remain compliant with the follow-up diet – in other words, a ‘cure’ for hypertension may be feasible;” though, of course, if they resumed the original diet that had made them hypertensive in the first place, that would presumably lead to a resurgence of their blood pressures. And, the fast may actually help with that. The preliminary fast may help people stick to healthier “diets that would ordinarily have little appeal to people accustomed to meretriciously salty and greasy meals”—that is an SAT word if I ever saw one. I had to google that one: “apparently attractive but having in reality no value.” Sounds about right.

The secret to long-term benefits may be in helping kickstart the healthier diet by cleansing our palate, which has been so deadened by hypersweet, hypersalty, hyperfatty foods. After not eating for a week, your regular, normal, healthy real food tastes good again. Like the ripest peach in the world would taste sour after a bowl of Fruit Loops, but fasting may re-sensitize our taste buds, such that you can enjoy something like corn on the cob without the added butter and salt; so, you get the best of both worlds: tastes great and less killing.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Gribanov via adobe stock images. Image has been modified.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Medically supervised water-only fasting in the treatment of high blood pressure. A hundred seventy-four consecutive patients were treated in an inpatient setting. First, a few days of fruits and vegetables. This is to clear out the gut so they don’t become constipated, followed by 10 or 11 days of water-only fasting, before transitioning them back to a whole-food, plant-based diet: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, which are beans, split peas, chickpeas, and lentils, and nuts and seeds with no animal products, processed foods, or added salt, oil, or sugar.

They all came in hypertensive, over 140/90, but 9 out of 10—89%—walked out with pressures under 140/90. The average reduction in systolic blood pressure was 37 points, which is remarkable compared to other interventions, including drugs. And that was just the average drop. Those that came in with really high pressures, like over 180, experienced a 60-point drop. “This is [arguably] the largest effect ever published in the scientific literature.” And that was after they had all stopped all their blood pressure medications!

They conclude that “medically supervised water-only fasting appears to be a safe and effective means of normalizing blood pressure.” I explored the safety in a previous video, and yes, extraordinarily effective, but for how long? I mean, fasting is the least sustainable diet out there. Interestingly, when they resumed feeding them, their blood pressures dropped even further, suggesting fasting could be used to kickstart the normalization of blood pressure, and then you could keep it down from then on with a healthy-enough diet.

They were able to track down a few dozen patients much later, and, on average, their pressures remained down. We don’t know what happened to the rest, but it shows that, at least, it can provide more lasting benefits for some. A subsequent smaller study followed up people up to a year later, and the blood pressure reduction seemed to hold, along with the weight loss; so, presumably, they stuck with the healthier diet. Now, no one should be fasting for more than a day or two unsupervised. So, this treatment certainly carries a cost, but the entire cost appears to have been recouped within the first year just from decreased medical care costs alone.

An alternative is the Buchinger method of fasting, popular in Europe, where instead of water only, people get like 300 calories a day of fruit juice and vegetable broth. It still needs to be done under professional supervision, but at least people don’t have to take time off of work. People are randomized to seven days of that, and then followed up four months later. After four months, you’d think any benefit from the one week quasi-fast would have disappeared, but their blood pressures ended up fifteen points lower than the control group.

“Although long-term follow-up of these subjects has been sporadic, the available data suggest that these large reductions in blood pressure can be conserved in patients who remain compliant with the follow-up diet – in other words, a ‘cure’ for hypertension may be feasible;” though, of course, if they resumed the original diet that had made them hypertensive in the first place, that would presumably lead to a resurgence of their blood pressures. And, the fast may actually help with that. The preliminary fast may help people stick to healthier “diets that would ordinarily have little appeal to people accustomed to meretriciously salty and greasy meals”—that is an SAT word if I ever saw one. I had to google that one: “apparently attractive but having in reality no value.” Sounds about right.

The secret to long-term benefits may be in helping kickstart the healthier diet by cleansing our palate, which has been so deadened by hypersweet, hypersalty, hyperfatty foods. After not eating for a week, your regular, normal, healthy real food tastes good again. Like the ripest peach in the world would taste sour after a bowl of Fruit Loops, but fasting may re-sensitize our taste buds, such that you can enjoy something like corn on the cob without the added butter and salt; so, you get the best of both worlds: tastes great and less killing.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Gribanov via adobe stock images. Image has been modified.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

If you’re interested in natural approaches to treating hypertension, be sure to watch the previous two videos: What the New Blood Pressure Range Guidelines Mean and How to Lower Blood Pressure Naturally with Lifestyle Changes.

A few months ago, I did a three-part webinar series on fasting. Some of those videos are out already, and the rest will be coming out over the next couple years (but if you want them all now, you can get them on digital download here).

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

62 responses to “Fasting to Naturally Reverse High Blood Pressure

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  1. Fasting also interrupts, and allows us space to examine, our habitual eating patterns, which may have been unconsciously acquired over many years of exposure to the “meretricious” messages of the processed food industry. It is empowering to assert our control over appetite and move toward rational health-oriented choices, something we have never believed we could do.

  2. ““…may have never believed”, I meant to write.”

    I hate when that happens…;^).. Hope everybody stays well in these uncertain times.
    m

    1. Mitch,

      You stay well, too.

      I visited my friends from Starbucks and saw the empty store and no customers and talked with them and they all said that they think they had it back in December into January, too. My family members had said the same thing. They all had dry cough and fever and body aches and tiredness.

      I wonder how many of the assumptions of science are wrong about it all.

  3. May I please ask, what about blood pressure changes following a 1 or 2-day water fast? Or a 1-2 day juice and water fast. Any significant change?

    Thank you.
    Charles

    1. My (educated) guess is that most of the effect is due to flushing sodium out of body stores, rapidly. A 1 or 2 days fast will achieve some of this, too, but maybe not as great. Note that the subjects in the study went on a diet with no added salt when they returned to eating. If you did this, your pressure would lower, too. People who fast long enough go into ketosis, which causes more urination, so you might have to fast long enough to deplete your glycogen stores to get a rapid, dramatic effect. However, if you just went on a salt-free diet (not sodium-free, that would be dangerous and nearly impossible) and gave it some time (especially with exercise), you’d achieve a similar effect. Check out the Kempner Rice Diet–he treated extremely high blood pressure with a very low sodium diet of rice and fruit and got extreme reductions in BP too, without fasting.

  4. Why does one have to be ‘medically supervised’ to do a water fast? I have done countless short term (1-2 days) water fasts with no supervision. In fact, I don’t have a doctor and I am in rigorous health. I trust my intuition completely.

    1. Why does one have to be ‘medically supervised’ to do a water fast?
      ——————————————————————————————–
      It’s a lawyer thing… someone out there is gonna have an underlying condition and even something as benign as a water fast is going to have a bad result. Ergo, the disclaimer “ask your doctor if x medicine is good for you.”

      Our litigious society has probably cost trillions of dollars for unnecessary medical tests and doctor visits because sharp lawyers and friendly juries have caused large awards for the miniscule numbers of actual at-fault suggestions or recommendations offered in good faith.

      1. Also Lonie, this video features a study conducted by Dr Goldhamer (chiropractor) and associates at their facility that is set up on the principlavof water fasting. . Dr Greger has included studies on other topics from the other plant based doctors where he could. Dr Ornish, Dr Jenkins, Dr Barnard, Dr McDougall, Dr Longo, are some of the others that I recall.

      2. Lonie,

        It is also a “people get crazy and do things their body can’t handle” thing.

        People do die. Not often, but they do die.

        People don’t know their own blood pressure or blood sugar or an underlying heart condition.

        Usually, supervised fasting is recommended when people do a fast over 2 days, but people with certain conditions can get in trouble faster than that.

        1. It is also a “people get crazy and do things their body can’t handle” thing.

          People do die. Not often, but they do die.
          —————————————————————————————————
          I probably should have studied as a statistician. (I’m not one, but sometimes I think like one.)

          That is, we waste probably billions on tests that are unnecessary. True those many unnecessary tests may find a life threatening condition that would have otherwise gone unnoticed until more symptoms became evident… but look how much good health for large numbers could have been bought with the money from those unnecessary tests.

          And yes, some would die but statistically speaking, are those outliers worth perhaps a million dollars worth of extra testing on hundreds of thousands of people that were unnecessary?

          Right now there are people in Italy and the U.K. that will have to die because the health system is not capable of seeing after everyone. If the extra testing money had been spent preparing the health system for the inevitable (and yes, it has been reported for years that a pandemic was/is inevitable) maybe fewer of those being marginalized now would more than make up for the numbers who may have died because they did not get the costly test-to-protect-against-litigation that was given to so many that didn’t need it.

          1. Lonie,

            I think that is what WFPB is about.

            There is a cardiologist. I think it was Dr. Kim Williams who said that if people didn’t change their diets and get off blood pressure meds that Medicare will go bankrupt in a few years.

            But, still, no doctor would tell people to do extended water fasting without having things like blood pressure and blood sugar monitored and that would be irresponsible and immoral and illegal if they did recommend it and they would get sued if anything went wrong, but they probably would recommend not doing it unmonitored because of how many things could go wrong.

            1. My point (sorta) is that different religions preach fasting. I assume without one-on-one monitoring.

              Not only that… there is better information on the Internet in re: to fasting. And I suspect the Internet information is much more useful than any advice a doctor would give. All the info I’ve ever gotten from a doctor is that it is dangerous and I may be putting my self at risk.

              It is true… I put myself at risk of getting healthier!

              Anyone thinking of fasting without knowing much about it should just do their due diligence.

    2. 5 out of 6 people who play Russian Roulette survive the experience with no ill effects too. It doesn’t prove that Russian Roulette is risk free. Nor does your experience prove that unsupervised water only fasting is safe.

      It’s about the people/cases where harm does occur. heart problems are one possible risk of water only fasting. In fact the drop in blood pressure may be a marker for the heart no long being able to pump blood efficiently

      ‘Consuming fewer calories than you need means that the body breaks down its own tissue to use for fuel. Muscles are some of the first organs broken down, and the most important muscle in the body is the heart. Pulse and blood pressure begin to drop as the heart has less fuel to pump blood and fewer cells to pump with. The risk for heart failure rises as the heart rate and blood pressure levels sink lower and lower.’
      https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/health-consequences

      Many people believe in trusting their intuition. Ask any professional gambler though and they will tell you that it’s a mugs game in the long run..

      1. 5 out of 6 people who play Russian Roulette survive the experience with no ill effects too.
        ——————————————————————————————————————–
        So Tom, you are saying that one out of 6 people who fast die?

        Oh, just for the record… in the movie “The Deer Hunter” Christopher Walken’s character did not survive his many experiences with no ill effects, in the end.

          1. Everything has a degree of risk, including doing nothing, staying overweight, not seeing a doctor on a regular basis, high blood pressure, etc etc. I don’t recall when I have seen headlines about someone dying from a water fast…. If it was so risk-filled I doubt ridiculously expensive spa-like settings (like True North) would succeed as a business model, supervision or not. If it is then the heart failures and near-deaths should be published too.
            A person’s own physician should be able to supply guidence for water fasting. My own doctor ok’d 5 days, no problem.

        1. No Lonie. All I am saying is that a small risk is still a risk.

          That said. I think the advice about ‘under medical supervision’ applies to water fasting >2 days.

    3. As I recall from the webinar the risk for death goes up after 2 day fast. I believe because of electrolytes, low sodium?? Sorry I don’t have more information at this time but it convinced me not to go beyond a 2 day fast.

  5. Why no green tea during the 300 cals fast? Green tea is supposed to help reduce blood pressure, so wouldn’t it be a good thing to drink?

    1. I wondered about the exclusion of green tea in their fasting also, but remembered that caffeine exacerbates hypertension. I’ve never had to fast to lower high blood pressure, so I don’t necessarily eliminate green tea in my fasting. However, the polyphenols in teas can prevent the commencement of autophagy, so I only consume them during the eating window if intermittent fasting, and not at all during a water only fast.

  6. I first would like to thank you for all what you do. My question is slightly off topic but still about intermittent fasting. I have recently watched Valter Longo, Ph.D. say on the Rich Roll’s podcast that people who practice intermittent fasting for more than 12h per day on long term, risk to have gallstones accumulation and have their gallbladder removed.
    I am vegan, I try to eat mostly whole foods, my eating pattern isn’t very organized, but I mostly eat once a day, in a tight window during the afternoon/evening (something like 16:8 or 20:4 Intermittent Fasting). Physically, I am mostly non active, and I have a fair bit of fat on my body that I do not seem to be losing (not overweight, just bulky). What risks am I facing because of fasting for more than 12h a day every day? Had I been active and actually losing weight, will my risk of gallstones increase due to the burning of fat? Should I do like Dr. Longo suggests and eat twice a day with a 12h window between each meal? Thank you in advance.

    1. I would not be worried about your fasting, I would be worried about your lack of exercise! If you don’ use it you lose it.
      This is the way a lot of retired people die early, they slow down so much they cannot support there body functions, with an inevitable result.

  7. Very interesting. I would like to know the mechanism by which this works. My normal BP is around 145/95 unmedicated, and when I first went on about a 90% SOS free diet, my BP dropped to around 115/70. It tends to fluctuate +/- 10 points in both cases. However after some months it just crept up again to 145/95. Same with Cholesterol. Started at 200, dropped to 145, then went back up to around 170 where it has stayed for the past couple years. My diet is actually more SOS free than when it was tested at 145! To be exact, I am completely free of any SOS that is not inherent in WFPB diet, with the exception of about 1 pint per week of 1/2&1/2 in my coffee. When Cholesterol was 145 I was still weaning myself off of a crappier diet, meat, eggs etc.

    1. Ron, same thing happened to me. My cholesterol droed about 35% in the first 60 days doing wfpb. Then slowly crept back up. Same with blood pressure, though it can still be low (below 112/64) fairly often. I thought it had to do with initial weight loss. I lost about 25 lbs at the start but was thin to start with. My diet is far better now than it was then, but my cholesterol is high, and my blood pressure is on the high side often.

  8. 10-11 days is a long fast! Is there a number of days at which benefits are substantial, before reaching the full 10-11 days ? It would be great to not require medical supervision.

    1. @ John, I agree 10 to 11 days seems a little like over-kill.

      Most of what I’v read (mostly from Valter Longo) is that it takes ~ 3 days to use up all our stored glucose, and around this time we have cleaned up the damaged immune cells and are burning our fat and turning that into ketone bodies. My last fast lasted 5 days and I felt like I was losing muscle. My decision on whether or not to do a fast in the immediate future will depend on the results of my next lab work.

      1. Lonie,

        Looking forward to hearing whether it was worth it or not.

        Mentally, I am having a harder time focusing on things like fasting right now.

        Laughing.

        I think it was all of the bare shelves that caused me to think that someday fasting might be necessary.

        I talked to the man at a grocery store in town tonight and he said that, right now, it is mostly that they don’t have enough trucks or workers to re-fill every single store at once.

        I know that Amazon is hiring 100,000 new people and is giving $2 raises because they are overworking everybody.

        I know a few of the drivers and lots of cases of toilet paper are shipping out.

        I watched Dr. McDougall showing his dehydrated foods and I am going to get a “pantry pack” of their soups. Not because I am afraid of not having food, but because I was looking for soup concepts and they have a pack with 12 dehydrated soup flavors. I find the whole prepping world interesting, but I have to taste things before I store them. I will store rice and beans because I understand those.

        Mostly, I see that the grocery stores haven’t re-stocked almost at all yet. It sounds like it will take many weeks to fill the shelves and I do have “many weeks” of food, but a storage system seems like wisdom and vegetables was a concept I didn’t really have, but 12 different soup combinations seems like a good concept for me.

        I found several companies that sell dehydrated vegan meals and bulk products.

        Does anybody buy them? I also saw tomato powder, mushroom powder, and carrot and beet powder and I would use tomato and mushroom often, but the carrot and beets, I am not sure.

        Is anybody else doing what Dr. McDougall is doing?

        1. Looking forward to hearing whether it was worth it or not.
          ————————————————————————-
          Deb, for me anyway, it was definitely worth it.

          I don’t want to leave the impression that it was the only thing that has gotten me where I am… but it was definitely the catalyst that started me on my road to better health.
          _____________________________________________________
          Mostly, I see that the grocery stores haven’t re-stocked almost at all yet. It sounds like it will take many weeks to fill the shelves and I do have “many weeks” of food, but a storage system seems like wisdom and vegetables was a concept I didn’t really have, but 12 different soup combinations seems like a good concept for me.

          I found several companies that sell dehydrated vegan meals and bulk products.
          ——————————————————————————————————————–
          Deb, a well-respected area grocer (HEB) put out a message that said don’t worry about it if you can’t find what you are looking for… we’ll re-stock in the morning. I shopped there yesterday and found everything I wanted except oats and some oatmeal cookies I snack on.

          However, this was the same time I shop every week and this time the parking lot was almost full, so I guess there will be shortages for another couple of weeks.

          No probs… I’ve cut down on my eating lately anyway so it is business as usual for me.

          Oh, if you are wanting to stock up so you can share with your friends… check with some of those survivalist sites. They’ve been stocking up for decades so there shouldn’t be a run on their stocks. ‘-)

          1. That’s encouraging, Lonie.

            The shelves were still empty today.

            And the store managers don’t know when they will be restocked yet and I asked.

            Maybe next week.

            What worries me is that, in America, it is way more young people being hospitalized, not just elderly.

            A lot of 20 through 50 year olds.

            That makes me think there will be instability.

            We might have a version of it closer to Spanish flu which did affect young people.

            https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2020/03/18/health/coronavirus-young-people.amp.html

            1. What worries me is that, in America, it is way more young people being hospitalized, not just elderly.

              A lot of 20 through 50 year olds.

              That makes me think there will be instability.

              We might have a version of it closer to Spanish flu which did affect young people.
              ———————————————————————————————————————–
              Deb, this is not a prediction… just a hope.

              But I remember reading in the early days of the outbreak that the virus is continually mutating. They did make the statement that it could actually mutate into a less deadly version.

              Perhaps the virus has mutated to include younger persons now.

            2. What worries me is that, in America, it is way more young people being hospitalized, not just elderly.

              A lot of 20 through 50 year olds.

              That makes me think there will be instability.

              We might have a version of it closer to Spanish flu which did affect young people.
              ———————————————————————————————————-
              Deb, below is a link that may explain why more of the elderly have more serious cases… it has to do with Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). And since many younger people are getting problems that were once considered older people’s problems, this could explain why a younger person might be susceptible to the same risk as an older person.

              For me anyway, this suggests an older person without these underlying problems may be better protected against the virus.

              https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-03/lsuh-aia032120.php

  9. Dr Greger,

    America is going to have young people affected.

    We don’t know what percentage of them will die but if any of them do, we are going to need every doctor on-topic.

    What specifically is going on that our young people are more vulnerable?

    1. . 99% of patients killed by coronavirus in Italy had existing illnesses, new study finds
      . Research into 355 deaths found that only three (0.8%) had no other illnesses
      . Nearly half of them – 48.5% – already had three or even more health conditions
      . Another 25.6% had two other ‘pathologies’, while 25.1% had one other illness

      https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8130479/99-patients-killed-coronavirus-Italy-existing-illnesses-study-finds.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490

      1. I checked that study (the Italian original) and it seems to state pretty clearly that their results are based on studying only 17.7% of the people who died (Questo dato è stato ottenuto in 355/2003 deceduti (17,7% del campione complessivo). Not sure that’s a large enough sample to draw any conclusion, really. Also, when you look at the underlying health conditions, many of them (dementia!) are common in older people – not that younger people can’t or don’t get those illnesses (especially the SAD population), but it’s not hard to see in the Italian report that they are talking about people over age 60. Here are the diseases they mention (the ‘underlying pathologies’):

        Ischemic heart disease Atrial fibrillation Stroke Arterial hypertension Diabetes mellitus Dementia Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Active cancer in the past 5 years Chronic liver disease Chronic renal failure

        Translated from the Italian regarding the age of people in the sample: The average age of deceased and COVID-19 positive patients is 79.5 years…. The median age of the patients COVID-19 positive deaths is more than 15 years higher than that of patients who contracted the infection (median age: patients who died 80.5 years – patients with infection 63 years).
        Women who died after contracting COVID-19 infection are older than men (median ages: women 83.7 – men 79.5).

        After reading through the report, I came to the conclusion that they are a basically saying that of 17.7% of the people who had died to date, most of them were ELDERLY people with a fairly expected array of illnesses that typically affect the elderly (especially the SAD elderly, but that’s my observation). I’m not sure what the point of the study was, then. To tell people, ‘Don’t worry about COVID-19, because the people who died from it had one (or more) foot in the grave already? Or to tell us that it mostly affects old, sick people (like any other flu, pretty much)?

        I’d like Dr Greger’s take on the Italian study, because it seems to me to be non-news. Maybe I’m just missing something in translation here.

  10. I am not sure about the opening image for this video.

    When I saw it the words “Michael Greger chicken strangler’ popped into my head.

    Of course, whether this is more of a comment on the way my mind works or on the image itself is open to debate.

    1. I am not sure about the opening image for this video.

      When I saw it the words “Michael Greger chicken strangler’ popped into my head.
      ——————————————————————————————-
      Heh, the thing that popped into my mind was a joke a friend told about a guy in Las Vegas who got on an elevator with a couple… the female having rather large breasts. The guy being a little inebriated over heard the couple arguing over money.

      He was staring at the lady’s breasts and said aloud “I’d give a thousand dollars to fondle those.”

      The couple was indignant at first but after further discussion decided it wasn’t that degrading and they really could use the money… so they agreed. The lady bared her breasts and the drunk guy leaned toward her with hands open, much like Dr Greger’s in the opening picture of this video. As he leaned forward he groaned “Ohhhhh…” before pulling back.

      After doing this two or three times he groaned “Ohhhhh… I wish I had a thousand dollars!”
      _____________________________________________________________________
      Of course, whether this is more of a comment on the way my mind works …
      ——————————————————————————————————
      Uh, oh. ‘-)

  11. If the young people start dying, which we will find out in the next week or two, since so many are hospitalized, your videos, which I love very much, will be so out of step with what people are thinking about. I say it with love, but this format may not be responsive enough for global pandemic.

    I don’t know if it is important for you to be a voice in every thing in the universe, but in the society around me, every non-essential part of society is closed. I couldn’t get a hair cut or go to a movie or a sports event if I wanted to. Our family friend can’t have a funeral. Sports radio has been talking Covid-19.

    Dr McDougall just entered the equation but your process is so slow that we might hear everything you have to say from Mic the Vegan.

    I don’t know if it is because of the video making process, but, next week, it could be young people dying and you still aren’t on-topic.

    Peace.

  12. I was healthy except being overweight. I went against the grain and did several water only fasts and lost 30 pounds and dropped BP to 110/70. Do this at your own risk, but it helped me greatly to change my fat, sugar and salt intake which I avoid completely, except if I dine out. I’m going to take this Covid-19 opportunity to conduct a 10-14 day water only fast again. It’s much easier to do when you don’t have to work.

  13. There’s some chatter on Rhonda Patrick’s Twitter account about avoiding catching the Covid-19 virus by taking Vitamin D and Vitamin C. There is debate about how much to take and some quote an occasional person who says Vitamin D actually increases ones chances of catching the virus.

    Personally, I’m siding with the ones who say extra Vitamin D is prophylactic.

    I’m eating those little tangerine type fruits all during the day… I get Vitamin C and nobiletin. This is my new best food. ‘-)

    1. Thanks, Lonie.

      I think the Vitamin D debate we had around here the last time, Vitamin D prevents infections, but someone posted it might be that you are less likely to get one, but it might take longer to get over things.

      I was just listening to a doctor on the radio and she started crying and couldn’t talk anymore. She said that the doctors don’t have enough things like the masks they use because of prepper-hoarders buying everything. She said that she worked with ebola, but has never seen doctors working something like this being less protected.

      It is interesting to me because preppers aren’t technically the ones to blame for every single thing. They were watching this coming from decades away and had already been getting ready years ago. I watched a man open a 22-year-old container of rice to see how well his methods were performing and it worked well.

      The preppers were so much more prepared than the professionals.

      So were the people who buy everything to re-sell on places like Amazon. They were saying to themselves, “Oh look, a pandemic will be arriving in a few months from now, if we buy up all of the hand sanitizers, we can make a fortune.” And if they hadn’t jacked the prices so much they really would have been able to make a fortune but some of them got greedy.

      Either way, those people ALSO looked and started gathering supplies and got ready faster than the professionals.

      Even people like me were saying, “Okay, I have a ton of things to learn about disinfecting and storing food long term, but I had better do something.”

      I still have 20 rolls of toilet paper and I haven’t started eating any of my rice or dried beans yet but I know that I am not fully prepared if the young people get sick and we end up with anywhere near the types of restrictions China has.

      I listened to them taping people into their apartments for quarantine and they have been dealing with that for months.

      I might be ready for a few months, but I am not fully organized in a way that I can see the math and know that I have enough.

      I am not in Dr. McDougall’s category where I can say, “I have 100 pounds of food in storage.”

      I have a packed full freezer and fridge and I do have pounds of dried foods. I think I could make it through a few months already, but boy, I might not have everything to make some recipes and I might not be happy if I suddenly have to close down work and if I don’t pay myself next month.

  14. Deb, on the one hand I’m not sure if I qualify as someone to comment on the current situation since I haven’t lived a “normal” life in more than a decade.

    But on the other hand, my not living normally means I have adapted to live within my means outside of said “normal” way of living… including living in a somewhat deprived state.

    Don’t get me wrong… I’m not complaining. I have chosen my path in order to achieve things eventually. That is, hoping to self-fund my own little movie by saving monies that would ordinarily be spent on comfortable living. Having lived this way has given me insight in how to live within my means with no expectations of “deus ex machina” (Greek morality play vehicle of saving the day… literally, God from a machine) swooping in to save my bacon.

    It has taught me self reliance. It has also seen me doing things like not repairing my home (pinholes in hot water pipe for instance, where I cut the pipe above the leak and sealed it off… then utilized a work-around like buying a small water boiler to furnish enough hot water to fill a bowl or wash a dish as I use them. (Hot water heater was overloaded with mineral build-up anyway)

    I’ve watched over the years as business, science, etc. has progressed by doing things by committee. When in a no contact situation such as we are in now, that makes things harder to get done. I applaud govt. for trying to manage from the top, but for me I’m better off doing for myself I think.

    I’ve got more than a hundred gallons of distilled water in gallon glass jugs. But I didn’t distill that water and store it for something like this… I did it so I would have pure water to drink during the summer months.

    And having fasted in times past, I did that for health reasons. But I learned from doing that, that I can get by on little food for an extended period of time, so I don’t feel I have to rush out and mortgage my future by buying large amounts of food so I can eat as I once would have normally.

    But like I said I may not be qualified to comment about what we are going through, mainly because my location in the world isn’t being asked to shut down like many others. We simply are being asked to “shelter-in-place” so to speak… nothing mandatory yet although many eating places are voluntarily closing dining rooms and sports venues are shutting down.

    For me anyway, adaptability is my “anti-viral” going forward. It will be interesting to see what normal looks like after this is over.

    1. That is interesting Lonie.

      Right now, I think it is more that I am looking at the grocery stores not having re-stocked in a week and I am looking at America having so many young people hospitalized.

      Logic shifts. If young people start dying, society will restrict further and, here, it already is.

      Every single day there are more announcements of other things closing indefinitely and this is the beginning of the process.

      If too many companies start going out of business or the US economy crashes, that is when I turn out to be not prepared enough.

      Whole countries go bankrupt. They muddle through, but I remember listening to WNPR interviews with people in those countries a few times and food shortages happen when that happens.

      I am not an “end of the world” type prepper person and agree with you that I don’t want to mortgage my house to store food which might not even be necessary.

      I mostly am feeling like I can incorporate food storage into the bigger process that I have been doing and just have years of dried foods that I can eat if there is ever inflation or an economic depression or if there are other pandemics that force us to have stricter processes.

      I also agree with you about having to make decisions on what is important to spend your money on.

      My friends have either spent money on their house maintenance or their “dream” or their “health” or “beauty” o “luxury” or gadgets and only the wealthier people spend it on all of those. My elderly relatives saved the money to give something called an inheritance. That doesn’t happen very often anymore. My house is pretty much done. I haven’t spent anything at all on health except for food and my handful of gadgets. I don’t spend money on any of the beauty or status things. But I am going to slowly transition to water-only cleaning, except during pandemics. And I am so likely to become a dried food hoarder.
      But I don’t have all that much else.

      When I die, my relatives who divide the property will say, “She was one of those preppers” but, well, if the country goes bankrupt before then, I will give them some beans and rice.

  15. Lonie,

    Saying all of that, I think I am afraid of the economy and food is so expensive and bulk obviously seems the way to go, but being one person, it just seemed wasteful and it is unless I vacuum seal it and rice can last 100 years if sealed properly is what one site said and I saw a man eat it after 22 years, so rice made the list. So did oatmeal. So did dried beans. That’s a start. I am just struggling with the logic.

    There is a bible verse about knowing the times and the seasons and I feel like food will be cheaper now than a few years from now so I maybe will have less to worry about if I can cover the basics in a working, revolving prepper pantry. I am not going to hoard everything. Enough so that if I ever don’t have money or ever can’t leave my house, I will have dehydrated vegetables and dried beans and rice and soups and dehydrated potatoes and oats and enough extra garbanzo beans to make hummus and probably peanut butter powder. I may do a slow-stockpile and just trust God that He is leading me now and I will be ready if anything happens. I do believe that He provides. I also believe that He provides wisdom. Sometimes it is figuring out which He is asking of me.

    1. I may do a slow-stockpile and just trust God that He is leading me now and I will be ready if anything happens. I do believe that He provides. I also believe that He provides wisdom. Sometimes it is figuring out which He is asking of me.
      ——————————————————————————————————–
      Deb, I’m not really a religious person… to me the only way to know the truth is to die so I am not that curious to know. However that hasn’t stopped me from including religious themes in some of my writings. ‘-)

      Seriously, I have respect for many who have faith as for the most part they (you) are good people with good intentions and work for and with your fellow *man*. I’m happy you have guidance.

      I suppose my deity is simply called Good. I believe that even if Germany had won World War II (what if Hitler had gotten the bomb first) eventually Good would have conquered the German People to the point that those who came after Hitler would have changed the narrative to good.

      I’m confident the world will be fine and will survive until the sun goes super nova. ‘-)

  16. My house is pretty much done. I haven’t spent anything at all on health except for food and my handful of gadgets. I don’t spend money on any of the beauty or status things. But I am going to slowly transition to water-only cleaning, except during pandemics. And I am so likely to become a dried food hoarder.
    But I don’t have all that much else.

    When I die, my relatives who divide the property will say, “She was one of those preppers” but, well, if the country goes bankrupt before then, I will give them some beans and rice.
    —————————————————————————————————————————–
    Actually, I think your plan is a sound one.

    But I think it should be tempered to include a very likely scenario that is played out in the link below. That is, I’ve been reading for quite some time now that eventually we are going to have to provide a living stipend to our citizenry due to the unemployment that robotics will cause.

    But we won’t do without due to printing machines that will quickly print out just about anything we need or want.

    I know this sounds futuristic, but in many ways, the future is here now.

    https://singularityhub.com/2020/03/19/coronavirus-may-mean-automation-is-coming-sooner-than-we-thought/

  17. Lonie, we are a lot alike in some ways maybe. I am very resourceful, and doing ‘ without ‘ does not scare me. I do always take care of the pets though and take no chances there. But being hungry is not scary. I may fast a few days per month or more from the getgo just to stretch the food supplies. My goal is not to maintain my lifestyle, but simply to be able to eat most of the time, keep a roof over our heads, and do our best to avoid getting really sick or getting others sick. We’re helping elderly neighbours out a bit too…. they most need a friend to help source out cleaners, TP or maybe some canned/frozen dinners for themselves, or special cat food for their pet….by far this has been the most rewarding activity of past weeks. We will get through this, and I hope we have a few happy stories to tell when we’re done.

  18. Barb,

    That is great that you are helping your neighbors. I am trying to do that, too.

    I think for me, I see so many elderly people who can’t drive anymore and can’t go out shopping. And I have already been watching so many stores around me closing.

    I am probably going to stock up one 20 pound bag of one thing at a time.

    I am aware that when I get older even getting the 20-pound bags and boxes to store might be too hard.

    It just seems like a good year to figure it out.

    1. Yuall,
      I’ve been reading your existential conversations about prepping and what the affects of the quarantine are for you. I find your experiences informative in my effort to figure some of it out for myself. I was a bit of a prepper but I did not forsee a quarantine scenario. I thought it would be a financial collapse and I hope this does not happen. I did experience hoarding via long lines at the gas pumps on 9-11-2001 and thought it to be kind of strange or surreal.
      I prepped with canned goods and have several flats of beans, corn, peas, chickpeas, veggies and several canisters of oatmeal. I saw the president of the National Grocers Association give a report on the news this evening and this guy came off crack, smack, bang, powie. . assuring everyone that the supply chain will deliver what we need. I did not see the image of Captain America on his suit, but he was real convincing.
      Our world has lots of problems and we need solutions. We will be seeing more and more change. Here is some upbeat prose (4-1-2000):

      Dream

      If existence comes from dreams,
      Then, “what is” must be a creation,
      An expression it seems,
      Of vivid imaginations,
      No beginning, no end, and a lot of room,
      To play with what you bring,
      Dream

  19. As usual Dr. Greger is spot on.
    I’m a follower for almost 2 years. I started to follow the Plant Based Diet and the Daily Dozen since reading his first book How Not to Die was published.
    I was already on One-Meal-a-Day in the late afternoon/early evening for a daily 22 hour intermittent fasting but got off when Dr. Greger recommended eating most of the calories in the morning. It didn’t worked well for me because the power of my habit to eat late added some extra calories.
    So I switched to One-Meal-A-Day in the morning trying to eat all my daily calories between 8:00am-10:00am. That worked great to start to lose weight even though in some busy morning, my last eating for the day is noon.
    However, the biggest shock was trying fasting to reduce blood pressure.
    I had 135/75 two weeks ago and then I fasted first for 31 hours and a few days later for 36 hours, just drinking water and decaffeinated coffee and teas.
    My blood pressure dropped to 110/66. I couldn’t believe it. I measured 3 times to be sure.
    That’s unbelievable!
    Since I have been practicing 20 hour daily intermittent fasting for quite a while now, the extension of the fasting was easy and I could have continued for longer period but I didn’t want to lose muscle.

    The best way to get there is exactly as Dr. Greger recommends. Eat most of the high calorie foods during breakfast – nuts, beans, lentils, grains, fruit, avocado, etc. and eat the vegetable, tofu, etc for lunch and dinner.

    The second step, to have dinner every few days an hour earlier, until ultimately it merges with lunch.

    Third, strat to have lunch earlier. Until breakfast, lunch and dinner, become one big feast to complete before noon.

    Find what works for you but it’s incredible how the science works!

    Thank you Dr. Greger.

  20. Michell- Your question brings up a few questions that would need to be answered to say whether fasting is beneficial for those with chronic disease. Are you referring to “just water fasting?” as described in this video or other types? Generally that most extreme fasting would not be used with folks who have diabetes or other serious health conditions, such as heart disease, because they are already in a more medically fragile state and such extreme fasting could potentially cause more harm. At the least as you suggest they would need to be under medical supervision so their meds could be carefully adjusted and they would be carefully monitored. If the chronic condition were obesity or blood pressure, these conditions might be more amenable to drastic fasting, although still with the precautions listed above.
    Since Dr. Greger has described several forms of fasting, certainly an daily intermittent fast could work for those with chronic conditions, as long as they again are being monitored carefully. The benefits- as Dr. Greger says, a kickstart to a long-term improvement or even reversal of the chronic condition. With that being said, there are some folks who just shouldn’t attempt fasting and those with chronic conditions should do so with caution Avoiding eating constantly throughout the day and eating earlier in the day, two of the stepstones of timed restricted eating, may be a good start to intermittent fasting that could work.
    Do review the NutritionFacts videos on this kind of fasting for more exploration of this approach.

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