Aloe Vera for Psoriasis

Aloe Vera for Psoriasis
4.43 (88.7%) 46 votes

Aloe gel is put to the test head-to-head versus steroids against the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease that affects about one in 40 people, making it “one of the most frequent chronic skin diseases worldwide.” There’s lots of drugs for it, some of which cost more than $100,000 a year to get a response. There are cheaper drugs like cyclosporine, but it carries the “long-term risk of [kidney damage], hypertension, and malignancies.” The drug can cause cancer; kidney toxicity in “more than 50% of the patients” treated long-term; and, in terms of risk of malignancies, up to 42 times the rate of cancer. And, it doesn’t even work that well, keeping the disease at bay in a little more than half of patients over a four-month period. There’s got to be a better way.

What about plants? “Topical botanical agents for the treatment of psoriasis.” Well, aloe vera gel is said to possess “anti-inflammatory, anti-[itching], and wound-healing properties.” Yeah, but as I described before, when it was put to the test for wound healing, it actually made things worse. “[T]he exploitation of aloe preparations has been accompanied too often by misinformation and exaggerated claims,” but there is some “impressive” evidence. For example, to test its anti-inflammatory properties, it was tested head-to-head against steroids for mustard gas exposure.

Mustard gas is probably the most popular chemical warfare agent, starting in World War I. The last widespread military use was in the 80s during the Iraq-Iran war, with more than 100,000 exposed and many “still suffering from the long-term complications,” predominantly itching. Even decades after surviving a gas attack, 70% to 90% are still suffering.

Topical steroids are the most frequently administered medications, and they help. But long-term use “is not recommended, and is associated with” a variety of side effects. Therefore, how about safer agents, like aloe vera?

“Sixty-seven…chemical warfare-injured [vets] were randomized to apply an [aloe] vera/olive oil cream” or the steroids, and the aloe vera mixture appeared to work as well as the drug.

Okay; well then, let’s give it a try for the management of psoriasis. By the end of the month-long study, the aloe vera cream had cured 83% of the patients, compared to the placebo cure rate of less than 10%, “resulting in significant clearance of the psoriatic plaque” skin lesions.

All right, but that’s compared to an inactive placebo. How about compared to steroids? Aloe was found to be “more effective…in reducing the clinical symptoms.” Like taking this nasty belly button and clearing the itchy, scaly rash away.

Here’s another beautiful sequence of before-and-after pictures, but in this case, this may have very well been the placebo treatment. In this “double-blind, placebo-controlled study of a commercial Aloe vera gel in the treatment of slight to moderate psoriasis,” things got better in 70% of the aloe-treated sites, but 80% of the placebo-treated areas improved. The placebo beat out the aloe. “[T]he high response rate of [the] placebo [gel] indicated a possible effect in its own right.” The placebo was just basically xanthan gum and water, and they were like, hey, instead of aloe failing, maybe xanthan gum just works, too!

All in all, the “[r]esults on the effectiveness [of aloe vera] for psoriasis are contradictory.” But applying it on the skin appears safe, so I figure why not give it a try.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Lovesevenforty via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease that affects about one in 40 people, making it “one of the most frequent chronic skin diseases worldwide.” There’s lots of drugs for it, some of which cost more than $100,000 a year to get a response. There are cheaper drugs like cyclosporine, but it carries the “long-term risk of [kidney damage], hypertension, and malignancies.” The drug can cause cancer; kidney toxicity in “more than 50% of the patients” treated long-term; and, in terms of risk of malignancies, up to 42 times the rate of cancer. And, it doesn’t even work that well, keeping the disease at bay in a little more than half of patients over a four-month period. There’s got to be a better way.

What about plants? “Topical botanical agents for the treatment of psoriasis.” Well, aloe vera gel is said to possess “anti-inflammatory, anti-[itching], and wound-healing properties.” Yeah, but as I described before, when it was put to the test for wound healing, it actually made things worse. “[T]he exploitation of aloe preparations has been accompanied too often by misinformation and exaggerated claims,” but there is some “impressive” evidence. For example, to test its anti-inflammatory properties, it was tested head-to-head against steroids for mustard gas exposure.

Mustard gas is probably the most popular chemical warfare agent, starting in World War I. The last widespread military use was in the 80s during the Iraq-Iran war, with more than 100,000 exposed and many “still suffering from the long-term complications,” predominantly itching. Even decades after surviving a gas attack, 70% to 90% are still suffering.

Topical steroids are the most frequently administered medications, and they help. But long-term use “is not recommended, and is associated with” a variety of side effects. Therefore, how about safer agents, like aloe vera?

“Sixty-seven…chemical warfare-injured [vets] were randomized to apply an [aloe] vera/olive oil cream” or the steroids, and the aloe vera mixture appeared to work as well as the drug.

Okay; well then, let’s give it a try for the management of psoriasis. By the end of the month-long study, the aloe vera cream had cured 83% of the patients, compared to the placebo cure rate of less than 10%, “resulting in significant clearance of the psoriatic plaque” skin lesions.

All right, but that’s compared to an inactive placebo. How about compared to steroids? Aloe was found to be “more effective…in reducing the clinical symptoms.” Like taking this nasty belly button and clearing the itchy, scaly rash away.

Here’s another beautiful sequence of before-and-after pictures, but in this case, this may have very well been the placebo treatment. In this “double-blind, placebo-controlled study of a commercial Aloe vera gel in the treatment of slight to moderate psoriasis,” things got better in 70% of the aloe-treated sites, but 80% of the placebo-treated areas improved. The placebo beat out the aloe. “[T]he high response rate of [the] placebo [gel] indicated a possible effect in its own right.” The placebo was just basically xanthan gum and water, and they were like, hey, instead of aloe failing, maybe xanthan gum just works, too!

All in all, the “[r]esults on the effectiveness [of aloe vera] for psoriasis are contradictory.” But applying it on the skin appears safe, so I figure why not give it a try.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Lovesevenforty via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

Here’s the video I referred to: Is Aloe Effective for Blood Pressure, Inflammatory Bowel, Wound Healing, and Burns?

I’ve got a bunch of others, as well, as part of my extended series on aloe. The most amazing one is probably Can Aloe Cure Cancer?

There’s also Is Aloe Vera Gel the Best Treatment for Lichen Planus? and Aloe for the Treatment of Advanced Metastatic Cancer.

What about eczema, another inflammatory skin disease? See:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

67 responses to “Aloe Vera for Psoriasis

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  1. I’ll give it a try but I need to trust which commercially available Aloe Vera gel brands actually have real aloe in them first… Isn’t that an issue?

    1. Aaron,

      Yes, that is an issue!

      You have to research for a lab-tested one.

      Though I wonder if Walmart and CVS and Target and Walgreens changed suppliers since the big fail.

      Do you think they would just hear that theirs had no aloe in it and ignore it and keep selling it?

      Yes, they probably would.

      Do you think Walmart is still using child slave labor?

      Probably.

    2. This might help. What I do is buy a fresh aloe leaf (those huge ones from the grocery store) and scoop out all of the gel inside, blend it with my hand held food processor, then pour it in an ice cube tray. Once the pieces freeze I just move them to a freezer safe bag and use one as needed. Lasts forever and you cant get any puree than that!

  2. “So I figure why not give it a try.” ????? What happened to ‘putting it to the test’ before telling people to spend money on what may be nothing? One day you make a video saying to not waste time or money even when the item in question is a food eaten by millions for centuries, then on another day you say, “So why not give it a try.”

    There are many other MD’s and DO’s out there that also teach alternative medicine. NONE of them I have encountered in 30 years of experience so commonly contradict themselves with such inconsistent methodology.

    1. I am the kind of person who appreciates advise like that. Aleo is very easy to grow as a house plant, it requires little water so does not create a lot of mold in the pot. It forgives easily the harvest of a leaf and heals the damage quickly. My husband used to have bad dandruff. Somewhere I read that aleo was good for that so I used fresh gel from my own aleos and put it in his hair all over his scalp. He left it there for about an hour before washing his hair. It worked. Didn’t cost me anything, didn’t smell bad or feel bad, so why not give it a try? It’s not dangerous or foolish.

      1. Sara,

        My mother always had an aloe plant in the bathroom.

        I was always amazed by how well it worked with some things.

        Good to hear of your experience with it.

          1. My mother just had it there because it added a nice decorative touch to the bathroom and because it was near the medicine cabinet and because it was near water so she would remember to water it.

            We were in a family business where my parents thought child slave labor was good for children’s character.

            Our plants in the living room often were neglected but the one in the bathroom was remembered.

    2. Jimbo,

      Now that was much nicer than other times.

      I know Dr. Greger doing this part frustrates you and I am glad that you have found a way of communicating without injuring him.

      I am here because Dr. Greger does his topics with his eye for gold standard double-blind studies.

      That being said, I don’t mind that he does topics like this with looser standards.

      I feel like he does it with topics where there aren’t good solutions and where he is consistent is that he points out when the studies he is using are lower quality studies. Most doctors don’t do that part of his process. That to me is why I don’t get frustrated with him. He isn’t claiming a weak study is a strong study. Most doctors don’t differentiate. Dr. Greger does and that makes him even more valuable to me.

      I remember when he did the turmeric study for Pancreatic Cancer and people who have that condition have such a low survival rate and he pointed to Turmeric, which only shrunk the tumors in two cases and only one of the two patients lived. That study would go against his main mode of operation but it was potentially useful information for desperate people who don’t have many options.

      1. Jimbo,

        I question you on “none of them” are inconsistent.

        I could go down the list of all the famous doctors on the internet and could start naming examples of them being inconsistent.

        I could also mention how many times I got burned by listening to them when they had presented a weak study as if it was a strong study and didn’t even mention the study. They just would give a list “What aloe is useful for” is how Dr. Axe or Mercola or Dr. Oz or The Doctors or Internet Doctor after Internet Doctor does.

        It is usually that I come here and find out that it might make a little bit of difference in a certain percentage of people. I used to get tricked all the time and my friends and family still get tricked so something has changed and that change is that I found PubMed and doctors like Dr. Greger.

        And I do acknowledge that he isn’t always consistent, but I have found that he generally has a logic behind it.

        1. Dr. Amen, Dr. Hyman if I remembered all of their names, I could genuinely tell you how many times I almost was injured by taking people’s advice without looking up studies.

          1. Jimbo

            One of the things which came to me is that almost all of the doctors cover the same topics eventually.

            Most of them just say, “There are studies” and don’t differentiate.

            I say that, because I have spent 2 years reading every doctor I can find on almost every topic and it isn’t just the doctors. I have gone to sites like self-hacked and to holistic doctors and naturopaths and chiropractors and most of them just say that things are good for a condition or bad for a condition. Dr. Greger is actually using the words of the studies themselves so that we can analyze it ourselves.

            I have relatives who go to naturopaths and chiropractors and dermatologists and specialists and they go to dieticians and get nutritional counseling from professionals and I have learned more of the nuances on this site than they have learned from those specialists and they are paying big bucks and I am getting free information and the links to PubMed from the studies used. Pretty cool.

            I feel like the frustration for all of us is that there are so many topics which are not resolved yet.

            My cousin has spent years trying to deal with psoriasis and I got some around the same time and I got rid of mine and his is still there after going to every type of specialist. Go figure.

            Anyway, I already told him to try WFPB and he won’t. He might try aloe if I buy him a plant. It might be his Christmas present.

                    1. I was baptized a Christian (Catholic) at birth, but if I need to “label” myself as anything (we do love our labels), I’d say I was “A Seeker of Spiritual Wisdom.” :-)

              1. Thanks Darwin!

                Yes, he is a treasure to me!

                I value him and this site highly!

                I don’t mind the debates, but I always want to respect the man who gives us this amazing gift!

                It has genuinely changed my life and may save the lives of the people I love someday.

                My best friend gets a biopsy tomorrow. This man has me keeping my dog alive to the point that my father stopped making fun of me for doing this.

                He told me not to tell the vet what I am doing because the vet would get mad but that already happened but my dog is still alive and I am still learning how to help him.

                15 weeks tomorrow and this site has kept me so encouraged.

                Hooray for Dr Greger!

    3. Oh Jimbo, you just want to lash out it seems, it’s like your MO. I believe he explained it clearly… The evidence shows positive results but the placebo did even better in one circumstance where they weren’t sure if it was due to placebo effect or the ingredients used for the placebo. But placebos can be so effective that it’s been pondered if doctors should actually prescribe them. So if aloe vera works, awesome… if aloe very works as a safe placebo… awesome. It would be nice to know for sure though. Also, a lot of people keep aloe plants in their house so no money would necessarily need to be spent if someone wanted to test it out and in any case, I’m sure people suffering with psoriasis have already spend lots of money on crap that didn’t work.

    4. Jimbo

      You may have left a few details out in your comment:

      ‘One day you make a video saying to not waste time or money even when the item in question is a food eaten by millions for centuries, then on another day you say, “So why not give it a try.”

      Details like for exmple the food in question increases your risk for heart attack, cancer or whatever? You are making a false equivalence here. It’s not like Greger is actually saying things that are contrary to mainstrean nutritional conclusions eg

      “At least one-third of early deaths could be prevented if everyone moved to a vegetarian diet, Harvard scientists have calculated.”
      https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/04/26/third-early-dea/ths-could-prevented-everyone-giving-meat-harvard

      Just because people have been eating something for centuries doesn’t mean it promotes healthy longevity. People have been doihg all sorts of things for centuries, like human sacrifice, killing witches, body piercing, tattooing and cannibalism. That doesn’t mean thet they are automatically the right thing to do or the healthy thing to do, or even a safe thing to do. It is a weak argument. But if it is the only one you have, then it is the only one you have and you have to use it, I suppose.

    5. Jimbo, I don’t think that’s a fair criticism. It’s all about the risk-reward tradeoff. Dr Greger is being totally transparent: the evidence that Aloe really works is weak, but there are no side effects. So what’s the downside of giving it a try?

      The placebo effect is still an effect.

      Yes, you could argue don’t waste your money without better evidence. But that feels like a decision we each need to make for ourselves.

    6. Hey, if the placebo effect worked (see the pictures!!!) why not try it? I don’t have psoriasis, but I HAVE successfully used it, (yes, this is anecdotal,) for sores near my nose in the winter. I use a plant that I water, (when I remember,) and it works for me.

      So whether it’s the aloe or the placebo effect, I don’t care–especially since it works!

      There is no better place to get both information AND ideas than NutritionFacts.Org!

  3. Psoriasis has been a life-long battle for me. I have also had to deal with psoriatic arthritis in recent years. My aunt swears by aloe vera for her psoriasis. I haven’t tried it yet for my psoriasis. I have tried methotrexate and Enbrel for my psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, but I stopped because I didn’t want to increase my risk of kidney damage or cancer. Clobetasol (a steroid) used to help, but its effectiveness has decreased a lot over time for me. Long-term, the only treatment that has worked for both my psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis has been a whole food plant-based diet. I can almost literally cause my psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis to get worse or get better depending upon how well I stick to a WFPB eating pattern. Turmeric has especially done wonders for the psoriatic arthritis. Psoriasis now covers only parts of my leg and small patches on my scalp, whereas before, it covered probably two-thirds of my body. The arthritis also rarely bothers me anymore when I stick to WFPB eating. It feels amazing not to be depressed, hopeless, and ashamed about my condition, to wear t-shirts during the summer and not have friends ask about my psoriasis patches, and even to be confident enough to go to the beach. The aforementioned medicine definitely helped, but it’s WFPB eating that has sustained my progress. Many thanks, Dr. Greger.

    1. John Pham, wow! What a wonderful testament to enjoying a whole foods diet ! I never tire of reading about how just eating plants can reap such positive changes in a person’s life. Though I do not suffer psoriasis myself, I was searching about leaky gut at Dr Klaper’s website and found this page :

      https://doctorklaper.com/answers/answers07

      It has some useful info about autoimmune conditions, leaky gut, and an outline of the paddison program elimination diet protocol. I tried it successfully for a very painful inflammatory condition.
      I have watched many videos on interviews with people who recovered from autoimmune conditions, and I include a link to one who suffered psoriasis, here:

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=djyDI-l-7hc

      1. Barb,

        You took the words out of my mouth:

        John Pham, wow! What a wonderful testament to enjoying a whole foods diet! I never tire of reading about how just eating plants can reap such positive changes in a person’s life.

        I never tire of it either! Pure inspiration!

    2. What a great testimonial, John Pham! Thanks for sharing it with us. I wish you continued success with the WFPB diet and hope that you will one day soon be completely rid of psoriasis without any other side effects or complications!

    3. John Pham, I’m a life-long psoriatic as well and will be 60 in a few months, so I’ve tried many a natural substance on my plaques. My experience echoes yours. WFPB is the way to go, turmeric/curcumin (I take a supplement and eat the natural root) is very helpful, and going gluten-free cleared me completely for the first time in 40 years and got rid of my beginnings of psoriatic arthritis. I can cause plaques by eating a small amount of cheese. During some temporary periods of being almost WFPB in my younger days, I noticed that conventional medical treatment worked a lot better. So even if people need conventional treatment for psoriasis, I urge them to go WFPB. When your diet is crap, nothing will work very well.

      Dietary and natural topical things tried that failed to improved anything: aloe vera, black cumin seed, Dr. Gundry, Paleo Autoimmune, slippery elm tea, avoiding nightshades, vitamin D (I take it for other reasons, but it wasn’t a cure).

      I do best following Dr. Fuhrman’s autoimmune advice, with minor modifications. Normally, I eat 100% plants.

      So glad to hear that someone else is doing as well as I am!

      1. Anne, great info! I want to emphasize to everyone that removing GLUTEN from your diet completely cured your psoriasis and beginnings of psoriatic arthritis.

        Also curious if a turmeric paste helps sooth psoriasis, since I’ve seen several comments on how ingesting turmeric helps.

          1. VegGuy – I left turmeric paste off the list of “didn’t work.” Turmeric paste made my skin yellow, but didn’t clear any plaque. Neem is another one that did not work. Also tea tree oil. Coconut oil didn’t cure psoriasis, but it proved to be the best moisturizer I’d ever used, so I continue using it (topically only).

            However, there is an OTC herbal ointment called Sorion that contains turmeric, neem, Indian Madder (Rubia cordifolia), and Sweet Indrago (Wrightia tinctoria) that DOES work on my plaque. I used it to clear my last remaining plaque patch, and use it on stray scales that appear from time to time (like when I’ve eaten cheese). From comparison to another OTC herbal cream I tried, I think the effective active ingredient is the Wrightia tinctoria, a shrub that has been used for psoriasis in India for centuries. However, since I discovered it after clearing 99% already, I can’t speak for how well it might have worked for me in the bad old days when as much as 30% of my body was covered.

            Note on the gluten-free: My joint pain rapidly disappeared within a month, but it took a full year of gluten-free for my skin to clear. Also, I am not a genetic celiac according to 23andMe. And was pretty darned skeptical when the rheumatologist suggested going gluten free. Trendy is sometimes true.

            1. Anne, thanks for sharing about Sorion! I bought it off of Amazon after I read your tio and I have started using it on the psoriatic lesions on my right leg. For comparison purposes, at the same time, I also started using aloe vera on the large lesions on my left leg and minor lesions on my scalp. I used neither aloe vera nor Sorion on the small lesions on my elbow. After four days of usage, I am seeing that the aloe vera has helped my scalp, but not the lesions on my left leg. The Sorion has led to major improvement on the right leg lesions–even better than some of the prescribed medicine that I have used in the past. There were no changes to the elbow lesions (the “control group” ) . I think I will try this informal, personal experiment for another week and see how it goes.

              1. John, I’m so glad Sorion is working for you! I agree, it worked better – and quite differently – than any of the prescription topicals I’ve used in the past. The really nice thing was that there was no rebound effect like you get with cortisones. I used it for a while after the patch cleared, then stopped using it. And stayed clear.

                I’d love to see some studies done on Wrightia tinctoria and psoriasis. There are a few in Indian journals but they seem to be small studies. There is an herb that heals psoriasis for many people, but I don’t think it’s aloe vera.

  4. Well, I’m always amazed we can almost never get a whole plant study-test done. Why can’t we use a real plant-gel from real aloe plants. Oh ya, it’s not scientific. We argue that we should eat a whole food, or use the whole food, but most of the science is based off a store bought or processed obscure extract at best. Is this why results are always so weak.

    However, I am glad you point out how crappy store bought aloe is. Next agenda is to get a aloe plant for the house.

  5. It looks to me that magic (placebo effect?) is working as well as other attempted treatments. I suggest we do some more research on the role of magic since it seems so effective in healing us.

    1. Brian,

      You have to be a glass half full guy!

      Optimists love placebo effect!

      I lift my placebo effect soy green tea latte to you and say “May you become an equol producer!”

    2. Brian Anthony Kraemer, the placebo effect is indeed fascinating. I saw an episode of “The Nature of Things” about it, in which “the placebo effect” itself was the drug used to treat Parkinson’s patients. They happened upon the effect by accident, by discovering that the hope of getting a drug that would treat their condition would actually cause people with parkinson’s to secrete more dopamine in their brains and drastically change their symptoms, for example going from barely being able to stand to being able to walk with ease. At first it was merely a monkey wrench in their experiment, before they switched gears to study the placebo effect as treatment itself. They were able to design a new experiment and actually quantify the effect, by telling different groups of people that they had e.g 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% chance of getting the “real drug” (there wasn’t one) vs “the placebo”. Everyone got placebo. But as their alleged “probability” of getting the drug went up, dopamine levels secreted by their own brains increased accordingly. Interestingly though there was a dropoff at 100%, which they described as the “christmas morning” effect. Where if you had peeked at your presents beforehand and knew exactly what you were getting, your brain wouldn’t drum up quite as much excitement in anticipation.

      Parkinson’s is a special case, considering dopamine is a standard pharmaceutical used to treat it and not all diseases or injuries would respond to it the same. But still an amazing feat of the human body to create its own drug and treat itself, and surely there are other avenues to explore similar effects.

  6. 1 in 40 people! I would not have guessed that high.

    Some of the drugs cost $100,000 to get a response?!?!?!

    Or take something cheaper and get cancer and kidney failure?!?!

    Yikes!

    My uncle had psoriasis on his face, then got cancer very near the same spot.

    Pondering that it could have been the psoriasis treatment contributing to the Cancer.

  7. I suffered from psoriasis from age 12 to 24. Tried prescribed corticosteroids and smelly tar-based ointments with little to no effect. Highly visible on my elbows, I was always offered home remedies sometimes by total well-meaning strangers, none of which helped much until – someone suggested Vitamin E oil. Not only did my symptoms disappear within three weeks, but I remained effectively cured. That was thirty years ago. As, the good doctor says, it can’t hurt to try.

    1. Cool story, Pepe!

      My great-grandmother always used those smelly tar-based ointments.

      My uncle and cousin used prescriptions.

      None of them improved on any of it.

  8. Hi, I had psoriasis on both elbows and got rid of it completely using organic extra virgin olive oil and exposing my arms to sunlight for c. 20 minutes a day during the summer. I’ve since been taking 5000 iu of D3 daily. And I continue massaging the olive oil on my elbows. The psoriasis, which I’d experienced for years, has not returned.

    1. Barb

      I used infrared light. I had mine in the Winter.

      I had tried every store bought cream, but the light therapy worked!

      My cousin still has it all over his body. Head to toe. I want him to take Beta Glucans to see if he can boost his immune system.

        1. Thanks Tom.

          I was just looking at PubMed and it said: In patients with diabetes state psoriasis appears to be more recalcitrant to conventional tar treatment.

          I ended up looking up xanthan gum and it has quite a few studies.

          1. For autoimmune, do you start at leaky gut?

            Sounds like it.

            Cabbage juice and Broccoli Sprouts for a few weeks before anything else.

            He texted me tonight and he was just admitted to the hospital again. Every few weeks for him and every few weeks for one of my best friends.

            He started having problems during dialysis and they sent him in, so psoriasis is not at the top of his list right now.

  9. I had life long skin issues until I stopped dairy 5 years ago. Within about a week it started healing and by 3 weeks gone never to return! What’s frustrating is I had been tested for dairy allergy (both scratch tests and blood tests) and was told I was on the “normal zone” and wasn’t allergic.
    However it was only I gave up dairy completely (for ethical reasons) was when I found it was the only thing that worked. Eggs too seem to flare my skin up too. (I was a vegetarian and had no luck until I went full vegan) So I think of you have skin issues then give it a try. My face used to be a mess, but I could go out in public again! I’ve had clean healthy skin ever since.

    1. Brendan Rob, I am so glad you figured it out, even if inadvertently. Another great testimonial. Thanks so much for sharing your experience!

  10. Plant based diet is the solution plus getting enough sun
    45 years ago I had my first psoriasis outbreak tried many things nothing cured it
    Changed to a plant based diet and had sun walking, surfing, sailing sea water also helps a lot
    It’s very important to avoid any animal fat
    That means diary too(all of them)
    Also avoid pinneapple , less tomatoes and aubergine.
    Liver is the weak point
    Starting with this diet outbreaks will slow down in winter too. For me, 3 years later they were completely gone
    So about 40 years with no Psoriasis!
    By the way raised 5 kids plant based all doing fine, surfing, winning bike competitions…
    Please give it a try!
    Thanks!

  11. CBD Oil might also help against psoriasis. I don’t have psoriasis, but a 5 cm big spot of Lichens Sclerosus – which is also an autoimmun disease. My dermatologist prescribed me some mometasone furoate creme against it. But it doesnt help much, makes me feel worn out and very thirsty. A few months later I went on a WFPB diet, lowered my suggar intake, and dropped alcohol because my cholesterol was very high, and after a few weeks my lichens got much better. But when I eat lots of sweets, some meat or drink a beer or whine, it will start itching the next day.
    Somehow Ive seen a video about CBD oil and its anti inflamatory effect and a claim that it helps against psoriasis. I though I give it a try and ordered a creme with 1% CBD oil (it also contains coconut oil, rapeseed oil, hemp extract, hempseed oil, laurel oil and immortelle oil). The first two days I applied it, the lichens spot felt very hot, the days after I felt no effect. But after a few more days my skin got much better and I can have a drink now and then or eat some sweets without pain the next day. No meat, no fish, no eggs, no diary and this CBD oil works for me.

    1. There is probably by my read, as much in the way of science to represent CBD as a treatment for inflammatory response as there is for aloe vera. Its a shame we cannot try this as these conditions can be so disruptive. It being still illegal in many states. Many docs probably consider it to radical a treatment to ensue and will not even explore the potential.

      1. If one is not a research gate member to read the full study,(in the links) a cut and past of the title of the study put in search, will quite often result in a PDF form of the document.

  12. Just did a quick research of xanthan gum as an antioxidant. It appears that it can potentially work that way at least in ophthalmic solutions:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24832134

    Also as a surface preparation, Xanthan gum in its crude, purified and modified form has shown antioxidant activity by scavenging DPPH radicals and total phenolic content presence was also confirmed because of its antioxidant activity:
    http://www.currentscience.org/index.php/CS/article/view/172

    Could the placebo in the aloe trial accidentally stumbled on something potentially useful?

  13. I inherited psoriasis from my mother. After fiddling with creams and the like, after some years I began to notice that it became more acute with stress, meaning the stress due to how I handle life. Worrying, analyzing, over managing, etc. I started to meditate and did other mind things and the impovement was noticable. No drug did that and I don’t use them anymore. When I do get caught up in worrying too much I will use drug store hydrocortisone cream. But I know full well that calming down is the only thing that keeps it at bay permanently. Those of you who over think will know who you are. I strongly recommend becoming aware of how an unrestrained mind impacts the severity of your psoriasis and your health in general. When someone first told this to me I was annoyed to say the least, so I expect some push back here. But maybe one person will have an aha moment and it will be worth it. Thanks.

  14. I suffer from palmoplantar psoriasis. It’s apparently one of the most treatment resistant forms of this disease . I would paint myself blue and climb a mountain naked in the moonlight if I thought it might provide some relief. It’s that bad. Trying aloe vera seems like a relatively low-risk gamble with a potentially huge pay off from where I’m sitting.

    1. Thanks for your comment,

      I understand you must be experiencing some major discomfort from palmoplantar psoriasis. While the data presented in the video above on Aloe treatment for psoriasis is mixed, it is very low-risk like you mentioned, so may be worth a try in your case. If you do decide to go that route and experience some relief from it, please let us know!

      Matt

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