Is Aloe Vera Gel the Best Treatment for Lichen Planus?

Is Aloe Vera Gel the Best Treatment for Lichen Planus?
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We should never swallow aloe vera, but what about topical use for a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease compared to steroids?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Lichen planus is a “chronic autoimmune disease,” typically of our moist membranes, such as the inside of our mouth, but can also affect other body surfaces. And, it’s not that rare, around 1%, making it “one of the commoner conditions seen in oral medicine clinics.”

“Current treatments…are not curative but [rather palliative,] aimed at relieving pain.” We’ve tried steroids, antibiotics, chemotherapy, and surgery, and none appear to be particularly effective. So, even for palliative pain relief, we don’t have great options; that’s why case reports like this are so exciting. Here’s the before, and here’s the after: one month, then two, three, six, seven months later, after drinking two ounces of aloe vera juice a day and applying aloe topically as well, with these kinds of before-and-after cases leading to journal articles with titles like “Aloe Vera as Cure for Lichen Planus.”

But, is ingested oral aloe vera a “potion or poison?” “Internal use of aloe may cause acute hepatitis”—liver inflammation—as well as electrolyte imbalances, and you should definitely not inject aloe. “[B]ut oral use also is not recommended,” either.

This is primarily because of case reports of aloe-induced hepatitis. Aloe is, ironically, “presented as a detoxifying product,” but can actually end up causing liver damage—like in this guy who was trying to protect his liver and ended up in the hospital. How do we know it was the aloe, though?

The assessment of suspected herbal-induced liver injury is challenging, because there’s hundreds of things out there that can damage your liver. Here’s the kind of checklist you have to go through as a doctor to rule out other causes before you blame it on the plant. Do you have some kind of viral hepatitis, or other kind of liver infection? Or, it could be various drugs or toxins and diseases. So, maybe it was one of these other things, and it was just a coincidence that the problem started after drinking aloe. The gold standard, in terms of trying to prove cause-and-effect, is a “positive re-exposure test”—that’s how you can diagnose drug-induced liver injury. Liver inflammation disappears when you remove the drug, and then reappears when you add the drug back, which is rarely done, for obvious reasons.

Well, has there ever been a re-challenge case published for aloe? Yes. Aloe-induced toxic hepatitis that shot up again after stopping then restarting aloe ingestion.

Aloe consumption has also been “linked to thyroid dysfunction.” A women with lichen planus started swallowing two teaspoons of aloe vera juice a day. She started feeling “unjustifiably tired.” Lab work showed her thyroid function was low, but she perked right back up after stopping the aloe, and her thyroid function returned to normal. What if, instead of swallowing, though, she just swished the aloe around in her mouth to try to help the lichen planus, and then spit it out? We didn’t know, until it was put to the test.

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial: 54 patients randomized to a topical aloe vera gel or placebo gel for 8 weeks. 81% in the aloe group got better, compared to just 4% in the placebo group. “Furthermore, two patients treated with [aloe] had a complete clinical remission.” That’s rare. It’s considered a chronic condition; yet, a few weeks applying aloe, and the nasty erosive lesions disappeared.

How about compared to a steroid ointment? Topical aloe vera gel was superior—”more effective” than the steroids, a significant difference appearing within two weeks. So, “[a]lthough corticosteroids are still [considered] the gold standard, aloe vera shows promising results especially with no adverse effects [when applied topically] compared with various adverse [side] effects of corticosteroids.”

That’s for oral lichen planus, though. What about the efficacy of aloe vera gel in the treatment of lichen planus of the genitals? Lichen planus of the vulva “is quite common, affecting 1-2% of the population,” and it may be even harder to treat. “There are flares and partial remission but no tendency for complete remission.” And, indeed, that’s what they saw in the placebo group. One woman had a good response, but most had little or no response, but applying aloe vera gel instead, and nine out of ten responded, and one woman had a complete clinical remission. They conclude that “[a]loe vera gel [is] a safe and effective treatment.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Cari Corbet-Owen via Unsplash. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Lichen planus is a “chronic autoimmune disease,” typically of our moist membranes, such as the inside of our mouth, but can also affect other body surfaces. And, it’s not that rare, around 1%, making it “one of the commoner conditions seen in oral medicine clinics.”

“Current treatments…are not curative but [rather palliative,] aimed at relieving pain.” We’ve tried steroids, antibiotics, chemotherapy, and surgery, and none appear to be particularly effective. So, even for palliative pain relief, we don’t have great options; that’s why case reports like this are so exciting. Here’s the before, and here’s the after: one month, then two, three, six, seven months later, after drinking two ounces of aloe vera juice a day and applying aloe topically as well, with these kinds of before-and-after cases leading to journal articles with titles like “Aloe Vera as Cure for Lichen Planus.”

But, is ingested oral aloe vera a “potion or poison?” “Internal use of aloe may cause acute hepatitis”—liver inflammation—as well as electrolyte imbalances, and you should definitely not inject aloe. “[B]ut oral use also is not recommended,” either.

This is primarily because of case reports of aloe-induced hepatitis. Aloe is, ironically, “presented as a detoxifying product,” but can actually end up causing liver damage—like in this guy who was trying to protect his liver and ended up in the hospital. How do we know it was the aloe, though?

The assessment of suspected herbal-induced liver injury is challenging, because there’s hundreds of things out there that can damage your liver. Here’s the kind of checklist you have to go through as a doctor to rule out other causes before you blame it on the plant. Do you have some kind of viral hepatitis, or other kind of liver infection? Or, it could be various drugs or toxins and diseases. So, maybe it was one of these other things, and it was just a coincidence that the problem started after drinking aloe. The gold standard, in terms of trying to prove cause-and-effect, is a “positive re-exposure test”—that’s how you can diagnose drug-induced liver injury. Liver inflammation disappears when you remove the drug, and then reappears when you add the drug back, which is rarely done, for obvious reasons.

Well, has there ever been a re-challenge case published for aloe? Yes. Aloe-induced toxic hepatitis that shot up again after stopping then restarting aloe ingestion.

Aloe consumption has also been “linked to thyroid dysfunction.” A women with lichen planus started swallowing two teaspoons of aloe vera juice a day. She started feeling “unjustifiably tired.” Lab work showed her thyroid function was low, but she perked right back up after stopping the aloe, and her thyroid function returned to normal. What if, instead of swallowing, though, she just swished the aloe around in her mouth to try to help the lichen planus, and then spit it out? We didn’t know, until it was put to the test.

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial: 54 patients randomized to a topical aloe vera gel or placebo gel for 8 weeks. 81% in the aloe group got better, compared to just 4% in the placebo group. “Furthermore, two patients treated with [aloe] had a complete clinical remission.” That’s rare. It’s considered a chronic condition; yet, a few weeks applying aloe, and the nasty erosive lesions disappeared.

How about compared to a steroid ointment? Topical aloe vera gel was superior—”more effective” than the steroids, a significant difference appearing within two weeks. So, “[a]lthough corticosteroids are still [considered] the gold standard, aloe vera shows promising results especially with no adverse effects [when applied topically] compared with various adverse [side] effects of corticosteroids.”

That’s for oral lichen planus, though. What about the efficacy of aloe vera gel in the treatment of lichen planus of the genitals? Lichen planus of the vulva “is quite common, affecting 1-2% of the population,” and it may be even harder to treat. “There are flares and partial remission but no tendency for complete remission.” And, indeed, that’s what they saw in the placebo group. One woman had a good response, but most had little or no response, but applying aloe vera gel instead, and nine out of ten responded, and one woman had a complete clinical remission. They conclude that “[a]loe vera gel [is] a safe and effective treatment.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Cari Corbet-Owen via Unsplash. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Is Aloe Effective for Blood Pressure, Inflammatory Bowel, Wound Healing, and Burns?  Great question! Check out the video. :) Also see Aloe for the Treatment of Advanced Metastatic Cancer and Can Aloe Cure Cancer?.

I think this is only the second video I’ve done about lichen planus. Check out the older one, and I’ll keep an eye out for additional promising approaches: Diet & Lichen Planus

Have a few other recent videos on topical alternative therapies:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

57 responses to “Is Aloe Vera Gel the Best Treatment for Lichen Planus?

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  1. Hello, Thank you for the video.
    What are your thoughts on Kidney Filtration ? It’s when you see the sediment or cloudiness in your urine. Dr. Robert Morse says it’s cellular waste filtered from the lymph system through the kidneys. But most people don’t have it and it’s hard to get kidneys to filter this waste. I am working on that and starting to get this sediment in my urine. I can provide send you some pictures.
    What are your thoughts on that ? Maybe I can make some tests to verify what exactly is that sediment ?

    Thank you.

    1. Hi I’m a RN health support volunteer. Do you have some reason to suspect you have some kidney issues? If you don’t have evidence that your kidneys are not properly functioning- high blood potassium level, high creatinine, protein in the urine etc. I would be too concerned about the appearance of your urine. In general, we typically do not want cloudy urine. This is Dr. Greger’s information on kidney function and kidney health:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die-from-kidney-disease/

      I would take Dr. Morse’s with some healthy skepticism. He makes money off of the supplements and memberships he sells. Be careful that he is not convincing you that you have a disease and then selling you the cure. I don’t think there is a good deal of evidence to support his recommendations. Supplements in general are poorly regulated so we need to be careful:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dangers-of-dietary-supplement-deregulation/

      NurseKelly

  2. So is it safe to use aloe juice as a mouth rinse? If so how much should be used and frequency I assume would be daily? Thanks, Jim.

    1. I looked at several studies in PubMed and while some studies use aloe vera gel, two I found referenced aloe vera rinse which was shown as not only safe but effective in cutting chlorohexidine in treating plaques. These studies had subjects use the rinse (100% aloe vera juice) twice a day. The amount listed used in each study was 10ml. Here are those studies and hope that helps:
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5045693/

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4006208/

  3. Who funded the studies on aloe? I know so many people who not only drink it but eat the pulp. Many use it to heal there intestinal or stomach lining.

    1. My thoughts exactly. I am currently drinking it to soothe a bout of gastritis caused by NSAIDs after a surgery. I would like a little more infornation regarding the reasons why aloe should not be taken internally.

      1. There is an aloe without any of the toxic, yellow sap, aloin irritants in it. It is also an aloe that is not pasteurized with heat and delivers all the properties of the fresh plant…it is called Raw-Purified Aloe Force…google it. It is the only one that is safe.

      2. You would be safer taking slippery elm powder, tablespoon or two mixed with enough water to make a gloop and then chow it down- unpleasant but it is brilliant for healing the whole GI tract. Raw garlic is good for killing bad bugs in the gut. two cloves crushed with enough water to swallow. Kudzu root powder dissolved and cooked up with a little miso added off the heat and an umboschi plum chopped and mixed in, is also good. I speak from experience here so its first hand anecdote but I am not trying to flog anything.

    2. I looked closely for indication of funding for both of these studies;
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5045693/

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4006208/
      but could find no indication of funding, perhaps because these studies were done outside US and this was not required?). At any rate, you can at least look over methodology and determine if it seemed shortcuts or bias were built into design. (From what I could see they were well designed with several features to rule out bias) See what you think.

  4. The toxicity of aloe is said to be due to aloin, and aloin-free aloe products are available commercially. I wonder if the research Dr. Greger discusses in this video used whole-leaf or aloin-free aloe.

    1. That is a very crucial question to have answered. There is a big difference. Aloin is quite powerful and I think the main cathartic, laxative component (and can be dependency forming) but also does other things as well. The inner gel alone is very tissue healing (including gut lining) without the purgative effects.

  5. It mentions that it is a stabilized form of aloe vera. That is very important. There is an enzyme present that degrades the aloe making it pretty worthless, and this needs to be recognized in all aloe research. If it isn’t prepared in such a way to inactivate this enzyme, it doesn’t contain acemannan which is the active molecule in the aloe.

  6. I have that same question. Desert Harvest Aloe Vera, which has the anthraquinones removed, claims not to be hepatotoxic. There probably just isn’t enough research to know for sure what the deal is with that, I’m guessing. I just have a stake in it being OK because it healed my interstitial cystitis! I don’t even need to take aloe anymore but I took it for a year and a half and it was amazing and now I’m better. I hope I didn’t damage my liver while fixing my bladder :(

    1. Same exact question here. If you read, you only find evidence of rare cases where isolated individuals metabolize probably-unclarified aloe to become hepatotoxic. We need some studies of clarified aloe and hepatotoxicity. It would be easy to do.

    2. Plants4Ever, Wow! It’s amazing that aloe cured your interstitial cystitis. I understand that is a very tough and extremely painful problem. A couple of years ago I watched a documentary about a woman who cured hers through fasting. She is Irish and had traveled to TrueNorth Health Center in California, where she fasted for a fairly long period, under medical supervision, then changed to whole food plant based eating. She waited seven years to make the documentary, and was still well.

  7. Having read a LOT about the cases in which aloe supplements caused hepatoxicity, I am pretty confident that hepatotoxicity is quite rare. I was able to find 12 case studies in which aloe supplements caused hepatotoxicity, but there are many millions of people who take aloe daily and have for many decades. I don’t really have a horse in this race, but I also wanted to point out that there are huge differences between different aloe supplements. Some are clarified and remove the irritating (and probably hepatotoxic?) anthraquinones. Others are not. There is no evidence that clarified aloe is hepatotoxic. Also, there’s evidence that clarified aloe can also treat other difficult chronic diseases of the mucus membranes, such as painful bladder syndrome (interstitial cystitis). Here’s a small study, for example from the website of an aloe supplier: http://www.desertharvest.com/physicians/documents/DH162.pdf

    1. Hi Irene Ryan, thanks for your question and I also like to thank Dr Greger for researching this topic so we can all learn from that. It seems that the Scientefic committee are divided into two groups regarding safety of aloe vera products. One group advocates that the aloe vera is quite safe for human consumption. While the other group warns to use it with caution and utmost care to avoid contamination of aloin from the yellow exudates, as aloin is reported as DNA damaging and cancer causing (Lachenmeier et al. 2005). On the contrary scientists have reported that anthroquinones present in aloe vera leaf, including aloin, are beneficial in a number of ways when used in small quantity, though the small quantity is not well defined (Sydiskis et al. 1991).
      As for question about allergy and inflammation it is thought that topical application is beneficial. Regarding Disc Degeneration Disease I found another study that also indicated topical application can be beneficial.
      Processing, food applications and safety of aloe vera products: a review
      Implications for degenerative disorders Antioxidative activity, total phenols, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, β-carotene and β-tocopherol in Aloe vera

  8. I am also very interested in knowing if topical application of aloe vera is helpful with lichen sclerosus. If so, I assume one would one use pure 100% aloe vera?

  9. Thank you for this video. I believe there have been prior studies using topically applied turmeric. Do you have this info? And please help with managing lichen sclerosis.

  10. Hi Barbara anton, thanks for your question. Dr Greger has in fact covered this topic before and it is very interesting. The research looked into, artichokes, celery root, fiddlehead ferns, Jerusalem artichokes—which are actually the roots of sunflowers, hence the term sun choke—purslane, or watercress and one of the most common plants in the world is called Purslane. As for turmeric I found a study that looked into Curcumin and I shall include the refernce here as well.
    Diet & Lichen Planus

    Evaluation of the Efficacy of Curcumin in the Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

  11. Does anybody know of a good source of Aloe other than raising your own Aloe plants? Many of the gels on the market have been tested and have no actual Aloe in them.

    Thanks

    1. I see the leaves sold in stores now in the produce section. Some say that it needs to be used within hours after cutting due to some kind of enzyme or something, but I don’t know if that would effect it for topical uses, I don’t THINK the studies where they used aloe for topical use were from freshly cut aloe leaves, but it would be nice to get all this kind of detail.

    1. I used to get angular cheilitis, as soon as it healed it seemed to flare back up again. It was defintely not related to thrush, that would require a different treatment.
      For what it is worth, supplementing active B6, also called P-5-P or pyridoxyl-5- phosphate, helped me tremendously.
      I still would occasionally get cracks though, a couple times a year, and it was not until I went on a gluten free diet that it cleared up for good.

      I do not have Celiac, but have been given the clinical diagnosis of “Non-Celiac Wheat and Gluten Sensitivity”. It is a real thing.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4017515/

      All my joint pain improved too. Gluten is definitely imflammatory for me.

      1. Thanks for that information Claire.
        Is it possible to become sensitive to gluten late in life? I have not had issues with it over my lifetime. My angular cheilitis is not bacterial or yeast induced. Prescription meds did nothing to obliterate it and so far docs have come up with nothing else.

  12. What about brominated flours? I’ve heard that bromine competes with iodine receptors because they are both halogens and that bromine is bad for our health. Whole foods, as a selling point, says that they don’t use brominated flours. Everyone eats bread but the bread of today has bromine unlike that of our parents and grandparents.

    1. This is one of the many problems with processed foods: the physical nature of the nutrients are changed, components are added and some nutrients removed. Flour is a highly processed carb that is not necessarily healthy for this reason. The best way to eat wheat is like oatmeal: get the whole grain and cook it, without grinding it. Whole Food Plant Based is good, but all available evidence points to the fact that Unprocessed Whole Food Plant Based is even better.

      Dr. Ben

      1. I know Dr. Greger says that whole is best, but couldn’t processing it through grinding, much like blending, make some of the nutrients more bioavailable? Maybe not after they sit for a period of time, but for example, I make my own oat flour with whole oats and blend them in a cheap coffee grinder. Works perfectly and I can always get oat flour whenever I need it. Anyways, just curious because I often wondered about that. And I’m not sure how grinding from fresh would degrade the product, much like smoothies don’t degrade the greens in them. But I can see where it would make it less shelf stable over time.

  13. Whole Foods sells a 100% pure Aloe Vera gel and a 100% pure Aloe Vera Juice. Both product labels clearly state that anthraquinone have been filtered to less than 5 parts per million. I have used this product for years, as a general tonic 2 or 3 times a week.
    Ironically, I did have a form of autoimmune hepatitis diagnosed in 1992. And was medically treated with corticosteroids [ Imuran or Prednisone .] During those years of auto immune hepatitis, I never consumed aloe vera.
    However, I learned of the horrible dangers of same corticosteroids I was taking, and began a search for a diet that would resolve the hepatitis. The diet that worked totally and successfully was the Dr Fuhrman autoimmune protocol. A 99.9% plant based protocol.
    My liver enzyme levels are monitored every 3 months by my primary care doctor. My liver function remains stable and healthful for 10 years.

    Yet, aloe vera remains a part of my varied plant diet. Not a key part. Not even a necessary component. As I said, I use a bit of the juice or gel 2 or 3 times a week. I wish Dr Greger could find literature in which these tests were performed on aloe vera with the anthraquinones filtered out to less than 5 parts per million. As in the Whole Foods product.

    1. I looked up Dr. Fuhrman’s Autoimmune Protocol.

      My friend is having hives all over her body for months.

      They are testing her for Celiac and the tick-bite meat allergy, but most cases of hives don’t get resolved.

      Dr. Fuhrman posted: Many with autoimmune disease will find they are sensitive to gluten, processed foods, sweets, and animal products. Other foods are less common triggers, such as certain nuts, soy, nightshades, beans, or corn. •Fruit intake may need to be reduced to low or moderate amounts.

      I have suggested WFPB, but I know that she is a food addict, who hasn’t been able to get a handle on sweets or meats or salt or oil and his diet would take away the “easier things” she might be willing to eat. She actually likes fruit, which he says to limit and she likes many of the nightshades and she hates every spice that he recommended and pours more salt on her food than anyone I have ever seen.

      I am so glad that I don’t have an autoimmune disease. Looking at it, that would be a hard diet for me to implement, right now, because I am transitioning away from transition food and I am eating some of the allowed things, but I am also eating beans and soy and nightshades and corn and nuts so often.

      I was watching American Ninja Warrior tonight and I was thinking about how when you are raised to hate every food that is good for you and to love every food, which is bad for you, it is a process like theirs.

      This week, I overcame my hatred of blueberries and I overcame my hallucinations with Alzheimer’s. I immediately bought some blackberries and strawberries. They are up next. Raspberries and Apricots are American Ninja Warrior Stage 3.

      I find the process I am doing to renew my mind is so successful that I feel like I am flying through the course.

      Seems like I will undo all the “healthy food hatred” and then slingshot off of transition foods.

      I can use the momentum from the successful blueberry transition.

      1. If you’re looking for the company that has done the best research on Aloe go to http://www.mannatech.com and look at their Ambrotose product. They are a natural Health supplement company. Always remember the rules of the FDA that state you cannot make a claim that any natural food will “cure” a disorder or a disease.

  14. What is generally not known: Fresh-cut Aloe gel contains a long-chain carbohydrate. One must use the gel within 30 hours of cutting the leaf from the plant because there is an enzyme-(just under the leaf) that destroys the long-chain carbohydrate within 24-30 hours of the cut! Always use gel from a freshly-cut leaf for a topical application. If not addressed I doubt that one could or should expect a positive outcome.

    Did you know the Romans soldiers travelled with carts full of live Aloe plants from battle-to-battle? In fact, Aloe is mentioned several times in the Bible! Additional research may be done by interested persons into the testing of Aloe gel during WWII when the Army Testing Lab was desperately seeking anything that could heal a radiation of burn. (Probably classified by now). The researchers initiated three radiation-type burns on lab bunnies’ bellies. The first burn was treated with 3-day-old Aloe gel. The second with 2-day-old gel and the third with fresh-cut aloe gel. Only the third wound healed. As far as I know this paragraph is accurate…but I’m not a scientist-just an 83 year-old survivor of a severe case of Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    By no means is this a claim for a natural product. In my opinion, when people purchase a product featuring “Aloe Gel” with the expectation of a a positive result from either ingestion or application, unless the description includes language that claims to have controlled for the enzyme, chances are slim that a positive outcome will be enjoyed.

  15. It’s really good to know that ingesting aloe can be so harmful! It’s scary that we’re told that it isn’t only completely safe, but beneficial for so many things and here it can harm you in various ways. You should put it in a “helpful, harmless, harmful” video if you still do those.

    Off subject, why is the “like” button no longer available? I’m disappointed that feature went it away, I liked being able to appreciate comments of others’ without actually having to comment. It made the communication here feel connected and now it feels very restricted, like “look, but don’t touch.” I liked engaging via “liking” a comment as opposed to just reading it and appreciating it amongst myself, once more it felt more connected.
    At first I thought this was just showing up as a glitch but it’s the same on my phone. I actually get quite a few glitches on my iPhone on this site, for example I can’t use the search box to view different videos.

    Please bring back the like button.

    1. A company that uses Aloe in its “flagship” product is Mannatech Inc. based in Coppel, Texas – they have done the most research that I know of. http://www.mannatech.com A Health supplement company. I take several of their products.

      sheila

    2. I agree with S. Bring back the like button, or better yet, the up vote/down vote that we used to have with disqus. Community interaction has always been part of the what I enjoy and value about this site. Thanks.

  16. I have an aloe plant. It’s easy to care for–I just water it once a week. I break off a tip of the plant sometimes when I have a sore at the tip of my nose. I squeeze some liquid from the plant tip and apply it to the sore, which heals it. I have no idea what sort of sore it might be, and this is just my experience….

    1. Topically I think it deserves more attention. After an injury to my liver my hormones went crazy, I developed some mild hyper pigmentation that is almost all gone now and I noticed significant reduction in a short period of time after using aloe vera gel fresh from the plant as a pre-moisterizer (for a moisturizer I was just using argan oil which I’d always used so I knew it wasn’t that). People are saying there’s no benefits once the plant is cut after so many hours but I was buying the leaf from the store and using it and it seemed to have helped at least in this regard.

      I stopped using it as a pre-moisterizer, mostly just because I ran out but I read one study where in some subjects while it initially helped moisturize, it resulted in drying of the skin after a while. I wish I saved that link.

      I love them as house plants, too, as they’re great for air quality.

      1. I had not heard that they are great for air quality. Thanks for mentioning that. We have a lot of peace lilies and four citrus plants that we keep indoors over the winter, as well as a large spider plant, citronella, and a wax plant.

        1. No problem! Going by NASA’s study on the best house plants for air quality. I don’t remember all the plants on the list, but I do remember that peace lilies and spider plants were on the list. Others I remember are aloe vera, ferns, areca palms, and rubber tree plants, but there were quite a few others listed.

  17. Great videos! Michael Gregor’s video on Aloe Vera is a bit shocking. But how about Aloe Arborescens? Father Romano Zago praises it in his famous book about it. A tablespoon of a blended mixture of Aloe Arborescens and honey (with a touch of vodka for preservative) is recommended to prevent or cure cancer. Should we stop taking it? Or is it safe?

  18. Hello! Thanks for this video. I’d like to ask what nutrition courses/certifications are most credible to obtain? What’s your opinion on Precision Nutrition?

  19. Can someone help me? I have a disease diagnosed by a fungus, its called sporotrichosis, i’ve been taking a derived from imidazol for 5 months. Recovery has been made and the open whound I had in my arm has closed but not healed completely. Is it safe (or it will help) to apply topical aloe in my arm? How can I improve my diet to be more effective agaist this underskin fungus that i’m having trouble with? Any tips will be very appreciated. I tried nearly every dietary change. I think.

    1. If you have an Aloe plant you must cut a new leaf at least every second day. There is an enzyme that destroys the healing power of the gel (a very long-chained carbohydrate-within 24 to 36 hours once the leaf is cut! There is a product from a company in Texas that sells an aloe gel in which the gel has been “stabilized”. I’m reluctant to directly refer to the company’s name because the FDA rule that one cannot connect a natural product to a health claim. My email is sheilamc@cox.net . Email me directly and I will share the info.

    2. Hello Diego C.

      Although this video doesn’t mention sporotrichosis, it mentions other foods, more specifically green tea, and talks about its antifungal activity and how it can help relieve the symptoms of other fungal ailments, so it might worth see it.

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/natural-treatment-for-acne-and-fungal-infections/

      I looked on other databases but there’s no specific info about sporotrichosis and diet.

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