Aloe for the Treatment of Advanced Metastatic Cancer

Aloe for the Treatment of Advanced Metastatic Cancer
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The effects of aloe both on radiation burns caused by cancer treatment and on the cancer itself.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Worldwide attention was drawn to the possible value of [aloe] after the Second World War, when skin burns of victims of the atomic bombs on Japan were [evidently] successfully treated with [aloe vera] gel.” But you don’t really know for sure, until you put it to the test.

Today, most radiation burns are caused by doctors giving radiation treatments for cancer. These can cause severe, painful, scarring skin reactions that can interfere with the therapy. Yet, sadly, we have yet to come up with good “prophylactic skin treatment measures to prevent [this] radiation[-induced] skin toxicity.” Enter aloe vera gel, used on skin burns “for centuries.” So, a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial was performed: aloe vera gel versus a placebo gel, and no benefit was found.

“After the completion of [the study, though,] many clinicians involved felt that the patients participating in [the] trial had less” skin inflammation than normal across the board, suggesting that maybe the placebo gel was helping too. So, to their credit, they actually ran a second experiment to see if aloe was better than nothing. And, once again, aloe appeared to have no effect at all. “[I]n both trials the…severity scores were virtually identical”—meaning aloe vera gel simply didn’t work.

What about an even larger trial? Hundreds of patients randomized to aloe vera gel or just like plain skin lotion, not only during the radiation treatments, but extending for two weeks afterwards. And, the skin lotion placebo worked even better, in terms of reducing skin peeling and pain. And so, yet again, aloe failed. And, indeed, if you do a systematic review of all such studies, there is simply “no evidence” suggesting aloe is helpful.

Head and neck cancer patients suffer the additional burden of radiation damage to the lining of their mouth and throat, and aloe didn’t seem to help with that either.

Okay. So, aloe may not help with cancer treatment, but how about helping with the cancer itself? In a petri dish, aloe inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells, cervical cancer cells, and lung cancer cells. So, is aloe vera a natural cancer soother? Unfortunately, “in vitro potency [meaning like petri dish studies] often fails to translate to the clinic,” because the compounds aren’t bioavailable enough to build up to test-tube-levels within the tumor in the body. So, while “[s]ome studies suggest an anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells in vitro…evidence from clinical trials [was] lacking.” Until…1998.

Fifty patients with advanced untreatable cancer treated with melatonin, which they thought might boost anticancer immunity, or melatonin with about 20 drops of an aloe extract twice a day, which they made by soaking one part aloe leaves to nine parts 40 proof alcohol. And, the aloe group appeared to do better—nearly twice as likely to either have “a partial response,” or at least some stabilization. And, the most important outcome: improved survival.

Here are the survival curves. So, for example, six months out, 80% of the aloe group were still alive, whereas more than half of the non-aloe group were dead. The researchers conclude that melatonin and aloe “may be recommended…[to] patients with very advanced untreatable [cancers] since it didn’t seem to cause any bad side effects, and seemed to help.

We don’t know if the aloe helps on its own, though, and a subsequent study by the same group muddied the waters further by adding a third component, a tincture of myrrh. But, the main problem with these studies is that they weren’t randomized. So, if sicker patients were intentionally—or unintentionally—placed in the non-aloe control group, that could explain the apparent aloe benefit. The problem is that there had never been any randomized studies of aloe for advanced cancers, until…now (or at least 2009), which we’ll cover, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: WildVeganGarden via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Worldwide attention was drawn to the possible value of [aloe] after the Second World War, when skin burns of victims of the atomic bombs on Japan were [evidently] successfully treated with [aloe vera] gel.” But you don’t really know for sure, until you put it to the test.

Today, most radiation burns are caused by doctors giving radiation treatments for cancer. These can cause severe, painful, scarring skin reactions that can interfere with the therapy. Yet, sadly, we have yet to come up with good “prophylactic skin treatment measures to prevent [this] radiation[-induced] skin toxicity.” Enter aloe vera gel, used on skin burns “for centuries.” So, a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial was performed: aloe vera gel versus a placebo gel, and no benefit was found.

“After the completion of [the study, though,] many clinicians involved felt that the patients participating in [the] trial had less” skin inflammation than normal across the board, suggesting that maybe the placebo gel was helping too. So, to their credit, they actually ran a second experiment to see if aloe was better than nothing. And, once again, aloe appeared to have no effect at all. “[I]n both trials the…severity scores were virtually identical”—meaning aloe vera gel simply didn’t work.

What about an even larger trial? Hundreds of patients randomized to aloe vera gel or just like plain skin lotion, not only during the radiation treatments, but extending for two weeks afterwards. And, the skin lotion placebo worked even better, in terms of reducing skin peeling and pain. And so, yet again, aloe failed. And, indeed, if you do a systematic review of all such studies, there is simply “no evidence” suggesting aloe is helpful.

Head and neck cancer patients suffer the additional burden of radiation damage to the lining of their mouth and throat, and aloe didn’t seem to help with that either.

Okay. So, aloe may not help with cancer treatment, but how about helping with the cancer itself? In a petri dish, aloe inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells, cervical cancer cells, and lung cancer cells. So, is aloe vera a natural cancer soother? Unfortunately, “in vitro potency [meaning like petri dish studies] often fails to translate to the clinic,” because the compounds aren’t bioavailable enough to build up to test-tube-levels within the tumor in the body. So, while “[s]ome studies suggest an anti-proliferative effect on cancer cells in vitro…evidence from clinical trials [was] lacking.” Until…1998.

Fifty patients with advanced untreatable cancer treated with melatonin, which they thought might boost anticancer immunity, or melatonin with about 20 drops of an aloe extract twice a day, which they made by soaking one part aloe leaves to nine parts 40 proof alcohol. And, the aloe group appeared to do better—nearly twice as likely to either have “a partial response,” or at least some stabilization. And, the most important outcome: improved survival.

Here are the survival curves. So, for example, six months out, 80% of the aloe group were still alive, whereas more than half of the non-aloe group were dead. The researchers conclude that melatonin and aloe “may be recommended…[to] patients with very advanced untreatable [cancers] since it didn’t seem to cause any bad side effects, and seemed to help.

We don’t know if the aloe helps on its own, though, and a subsequent study by the same group muddied the waters further by adding a third component, a tincture of myrrh. But, the main problem with these studies is that they weren’t randomized. So, if sicker patients were intentionally—or unintentionally—placed in the non-aloe control group, that could explain the apparent aloe benefit. The problem is that there had never been any randomized studies of aloe for advanced cancers, until…now (or at least 2009), which we’ll cover, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: WildVeganGarden via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

Here are the links to the videos I referred to: Is Aloe Vera Gel the Best Treatment for Lichen Planus? and Is Aloe Effective for Blood Pressure, Inflammatory Bowel, Wound Healing, and Burns?

Can Aloe Cure Cancer? Find out in the next video.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

53 responses to “Aloe for the Treatment of Advanced Metastatic Cancer

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  1. “Fifty patients with advanced untreatable cancer treated with melatonin, which they thought might boost anticancer immunity, or melatonin with about 20 drops of an aloe extract twice a day, which they made by soaking one part aloe leaves to nine parts 40 proof alcohol. And, the aloe group appeared to do better—nearly twice as likely to either have “a partial response,” or at least some stabilization. And, the most important outcome: improved survival.”

    I suppose that there is also the possibility that it was the 40 proof alcohol that was responsible for the benefit . Or some synergistic effect of alcohol plus aloe and/or melatonin rather than justthe aloe alone.

    1. TG thatbwas my thought too.

      Wonder why the Dr has so many videos telling us Aloe does absolutely nothing. So my next question is, is aloe harmful. If it’s not harmful than why so much ado?

        1. I am grateful that Dr. Greger is doing this process, whether it shows it does something or nothing at all.

          Those of us who have been looking for Cancer treatments know that people need to know what works and what doesn’t work ASAP in this process and there are so many in vitro studies and so many claims on-line that I genuinely appreciate every help I can get.

          The alcohol theory doesn’t make sense, because we just had the alcohol causing cancer information.

          What if the alcohol is making the aloe look worse than it is?

          That is my unsophisticated non-scientific theory.

          That is how my mind immediately processed the information.

          I appreciate the Melatonin information, because I have been pondering Melatonin for my dog.

          Pondering that tincture of Myrrh study.

          I am trying to “out synergism” the Cancer left, right, forward, back and round and round.

          I am laughing, because I really feel like I am in Infinity Wars and am wondering which super hero is strongest, fastest.

          But I always have to switch from Infinity Wars to Christianity, because Infinity Wars, the bad guy killed half of the good guys.

          1. Deb, I have followed some of your comments concerning your dogs unfortunate diagnosis of hemangioma sarcoma. In 2010 our dog, a 10 year old vizsla, was also diagnosed with HS. She had some internal bleeding and after many tests was given given a grim prognosis. The vet recommended surgery as her only option and after some hesitation we agreed. Her spleen was removed along with 10-15% of her liver. The biopsies confirmed HS and she was given about 3 months of survival or slightly more if we did chemotherapy.

            We skipped the chemo. A web search turned up a site on a dog “Ginger and her cancer diet” for HS. Ginger lived about five years longer and there were many others following the same diet with success. The site still exists along with the diet.

            Https//eattheapple.com/ginger/

            We decided it was the only way possible way to save our wonderful dog friend so we followed the diet exactly. It took a lot of effort and was rather costly but she returned to her normal life rather quickly. It is not a WFPB diet since it included organic free range chicken and sardines but it also contained brown rice, carrots and many supplements. Being a dentist it is obvious that dogs are carnivorous since the teeth and jaws are not designed for eating a strictly vegetarian diet.

            Fortunately she lived for five more years! She of was free of any signs of cancer and was quite normal until the last few months when she gradually succumbed to external HS. A great outcome considering that she lived 15 years which is probably above average for a 50 pound dog.

            1. Regarding that canine diet – my veterinarian told me that dogs should never eat garlic or onions. I’m always amazed to see garlic in many of the published homemade diets for dogs. Otherwise the diet looks good.

        2. David, we all miss the edit feature here. The upside is that we’ve all gotten pretty good at figuring out each other’s posts.

          1. Lol thanks for your kind word Nancy. I’m not a person who generally criticized people who make grammar errors, but I know some people go nuts.

  2. There used to be a multi-level marketing company that promoted a big mythology(?) that fresh cut aloe contained “healing factors” that very quickly degraded once the leaf was cut from the plant. They claimed to have a secret method of preparing dry powder for capsules that conserved those “factors”. No idea if there’s anything to that but it would be worth experimenting with I think. Here’s a mention of the key “factor”

    https://franklintnvet.com/aloe-vera-feline-leukemia-treatment/

    1. You have caused me to look forward to the next video so much. Wondering if I have to wait a few days before it pops up in the every other day video / blog rotation.

      “In veterinary medicine Acemannan (acetylated mannose) in injectible form has been approved for use in the treatment of fibrosarcomas and feline leukemia (FeLV).”

      What fascinated me was that I looked up acetylated mannose and ended up at D-Mannose and did a might as well check and see if “D-Mannose + Cancer” gets any hits and there was a sentence about Type 1 Diabetes. “They have discovered that d-mannose can surprisingly prevent and suppress type 1 autoimmune diabetes and asthmatic lung inflammation [2].”

      And then I found this sentence, “Reversal of infectious mononucleosis-associated suppressor T cell activity by D-mannose” and my friend’s daughter has needed surgery since the Spring, but ended up with Mono, which just isn’t going away. Her surgery was supposed to be in March, but now, she is going to have to miss her first year of college. Maybe something can help speed things up.

        1. Thanks Nancy!

          Yes, it is Friday and he is going to leave me on a cliff hanger and I don’t remember if Monday is video or if he keeps alternating.

          I went back to the Brewer’s Yeast problem, because they removed the blood sugar improvement factor by only selling de-bittered products, but today, I found EpiCor, it says it significantly lowered IL-8 production after 48 hours and IL-8 is one of the pathways in Hemangiosarcoma.

          Hooray, something else to try.

          1. Laughing, because my dog has so much Beta Glucan’s.

            Some of them, not on purpose.

            He has oat Beta Glucan, and yeast Beta Glucan and mushroom Beta Glucan and Barley Beta Glucan

            I wonder if he is getting too much Beta Glucan?

            Beta Glucan was what helped, but his poor IL-8 is being inhibited left and right.

            I wonder how often I should let some of these pathways up for air.

    2. I have used Aleo Vera for treating several skin conditions. Rubbing Freshly cut leaves work lot better than the extracts you find in the market. In fact the extracts had no effect. The freshly cut Aleo changes color with in minutes as it gets exposed to air suggesting the air is oxidizing it and probably rendering it ineffective.

    3. REAL ALOE WORKS! I actually know one of the doctors that holds a patent regarding aloe vera. They found an enzyme in it that is activated when the leaf is cut from the plant that deactivates the active ingredients within 30 minutes! Their patent was a way to deactivate that enzyme so there was time to harvest and process the aloe and maintain the active ingredients as active. So if you don’t use their proprietary aloe preparation, there is more aloe on the label than there is in the bottle!!
      The other option is to use the leaf immediately when cut from the plant. Use the whole leaf as most of active components are just next to the skin of the leaf. So cut the leaf, fillet it open, and put the whole thing on the wound, skin and all. That’s why research tests done using the wrong preparation show no benefits!
      They actually tried to develop a drug out of the patented aloe and were very successful with animal models curing feline leukemia etc. with a product called Acemannan. However, FDA requires an “LD-50” to become a licensed drug but they couldn’t kill anything with it to get a ‘lethal dose at a 50% kill rate.’ (like all Rx meds)

      1. Dr. Ed,

        Your on the mark: See: https://patents.justia.com/patent/4178372 for a mechanical method of maintaining aloe’s chemistry and a separations patent: https://patents.google.com/patent/EP0227806A1 to name two approaches.

        You’re also hitting the nail on the head regarding using the proper materials in adequate dose to really evaluate the responses and know what “works”.

        Nice catch.

        Dr. Alan Kadish Health Support volunteer for Dr. Greger http://www.CenterofHealth.com

  3. I’m wondering what form the aloe lotion for burns was given in – the real plant or some lotion purporting to contain aloe (many lotions labled as aloe vera lotion have been shown to contain NO aloe vera). The reason I wonder is because in my life, if I sustain a burn, immediately getting a piece of the aloe plant, opening it up and putting it on my burn wound makes the pain go away and it heals to the point where I don’t even know I have been burned. So it’s incredibly effective compared to any other treatment!

    1. I’ve had the same experience with fresh cut aloe flesh on my second degree burn…reduces pain and basically no scar visible.

        1. The skin came off immediately in my unburnt hand when I grabbed the burnt hand instinctively because it hurt. So the burn was raw. I’m sure I ran it under cool water, but the pain returned when removed. The dr wanted me to apply some kind of cream (forget what it was now) but I decided to use fresh-cut aloe flesh instead. So applied this each time I had to dress the wound and it reduced the pain.

    2. Dani, I actually had a similar experience a month ago with a pretty bad burn using lavender essential oil (it was authentic, not even all essential oils being sold are authentic, our world sucks). Couldn’t believe how quickly it took the pain away and the redness left, there wasn’t a trace of the burn shortly after.
      Dr. Greger does show in another video that aloe vera can help with burns but not sun burns at least according to the study or studies referenced.

      1. Just to add, prior to the lavender oil I was holding it under cold water but as soon as I took it out the pain would be there as bad as before, it wasn’t going away. So when the lavender oil was applied and I stopped feeling pain and it didn’t come back I was pretty amazed.

          1. YeahRight, it was actually an accidental occurrence, I tried putting quite a few drops in my soap and I had put on an exfoliating glove lathered in the essential oil infused soap and noticed how quickly the pain disappeared and to my surprise never came back as well as noticing the redness go away quickly. So it was diluted in the soap but pretty powerful.

            Awesome for the burn, NOT so much for healthy skin as I found it a bit irritating and drying. I’ll stick with it for burns and aromatherapy which I adore it for. I’m not sure if straight or diluted would be better, but I think the best way to emulate my successful and accidental experience might be mixing some drops in water and then making a compress.

  4. I received six weeks of adjuvant radiation to the head and spine after resection of 4.5 cm adult medulloblastoma. It gave me a “sunburn” inside my throat and I was directed to drink 1 pint of Alie Vera juice a day. It tasted bad, but anecdotally I perceived relief from the sore throat after drinking the aloe.

  5. like Dani,using the gel straight from the plant ,and keeping the area saturated to exclude air, i have healed burns with no scarring

    1. Yes, I have used the gel straight from the plant successfully for burns, too.

      Hope the researchers didn’t use the brands, which had none in it.

  6. Dr Greger, could multi-part videos be labeled as part 1, part 2, etc?

    Much later, it’s hard to know which video is the follow-up to which other video, when they each have their own title, and they were meant originally to be seen in sequence.

    1. Hi Rosemary – Thanks for your question and great idea! I’ll be sure to pass this suggestion along to Dr. Greger. Have a great day!

  7. I have been pondering this process tonight.

    I can’t afford multiple months of everything I have done to try to get rid of this Cancer.

    It made me think about the people going through it.

    Either the medical model or alternative or both.

    Life is so much more expensive nowadays.

    I know I have to trust the diet eventually.

    Maybe one more month of this and then see what happens by having him be vegan.

    It will be so emotional if he dies at that point.

    But I know I genuinely have to start to see what happens.

    This is such a stupidly emotional process.

    I come here and know I am researching circles around everything and still have no idea what is going to happen.

    Dr. Greger, by God’s grace, I am hoping this will be the last OCD researching for a while.

    I hope.

    I look at all my comments and hate myself sometimes, because I know I have given all these things so much focus and time and money and it is not acceptable for how people interact. I already had people get frustrated with me when I was trying to get over my own cancer and diabetes and thyroid symptoms with my brain out of whack. Praying for God to help me learn faster and not need to write so much.

  8. Yes, now that I have become a basket case every weekend, let me pause and say that you responded to people’s criticism and changed your wording and you did it brilliantly. That impresses me. You really read the comments and take the criticism and my 7 year old pal is into JoJo Siwa and the Boomerang song and nothing throws her off track and she doesn’t even fight back.

    Every web search for every topic, Google offers me Dr Greger and JoJo Siwa and Trinity and beyond videos.

    And I am up researching MSM and trying to understand if my dog needs sulfur.

    I just found out that the seven year olds family is giving her to us, so there is a chance that I will suddenly have the kids videos tip the scale, though the sick friends and relatives started contacting me today asking me to research things for them, so you are stuck with me, but I am going to be building cardboard box forts at night all year round now, so there is a chance the comments will lessen, but not this weekend.

    1. I found out in PubMed that different Beta Glucans have different mechanisms against Cancer, so my dog will continue to get lots of them.

      I thought I was just doing the expensive pee process, but that made me feel better.

  9. From reading the comments under other aloe videos here, I’ve learned that it’s supposedly important to use the aloe quickly after being cut or preserve the key enzyme or whatever through another means. Do these studies account for that?

    I know someone who had success with decreasing hyperpigmentation from using pure fresh aloe leaf bought from the store (already cut off the plant).

    I just bought an aloe plant the other day simply because they’re pretty and I know they’re good for air quality. For burns (not talking about sun burns) I’ve actually had huge success with lavender oil, it took the pain away that wasn’t going away and healed it quickly, the redness drastically decreased within the minutes it was in contact with the lavender, I never experienced such an immediate relief like that before. A bit random but relatively on subject… ish.

    1. Interesting about the Lavender.

      I have a friend who borrowed money from me years ago and she has been paying me back in essential oils. She is trying to sell Doterra.

      I haven’t had a real true essential oil testimony.

      They smell nice enough, but I don’t have that type of “Wow, it worked” type of thought at all. It is more the opposite. I feel almost like I have smelled them, as if they were an air freshener and I have rubbed them on, as if they were perfume and I put a drop of lemon in water and orange in water and I think grapefruit in water and it was not that great tasting water. I had been eating real oranges and putting real lemons in my water and that gave me such a good feeling. The scent was better than perfume after I peeled the oranges every single day. I had an internal “Wow, I love the smell of oranges.” and the taste of the real lemon water was “Wow, that is so refreshing.” but the experience with the oils was wrinkling my nose, both at the smell and at the water. I tried them in my laundry and didn’t smell anything at all and was disappointed at that. I am pondering how to use them to scent my bathroom and that might be the first positive, if it works, because I used to like the air fresheners, until I came to this site.

      I tried frankincense and myrrh on my dog, and I did the roll on thing, when I first started this “Cancer” process, but I didn’t have a sense that they did anything. Doesn’t mean they didn’t do anything. Just that he didn’t respond as if I had done anything at all and it felt more like I wasn’t sure I was reaching his skin properly, so I rolled it on myself and still just had no sense of anything at all.

      It is odd, because I was someone who would buy the Yankee candles and the little scented packets to put in the closets and would buy 5 different scents of deodorants, because I couldn’t make my mind up and did the same with the air fresheners for the same reason, and because I genuinely, genuinely celebrated every single orange I have ever peeled for how good it makes me feel, and I was young when pot smoking was always in the air and liked the smell and liked pipe smell and liked incense and liked burning sage and still LOVE when people have fire pits burning and I love the scents of spring flowers and fall spices and Christmas.

      Intellectually, I like Frankincense and Myrrh symbolically, but I rolled them on my arm and didn’t feel anything and they didn’t smell that great and I couldn’t even really smell them after, but I keep working on it.

      I will be honest, that I bought real lavender, from the produce section of Whole Foods and had put that out and LOVED that, but somehow, I just haven’t emotionally connected with the essential oils. If I ever burn myself, I will try it and if it works, I will celebrate. Aloe, the real plant did work and I like aloe. I tried to drink aloe water once and hated it and only took two tiny sips and poured it out.

      1. Even the research for the essential oils was a little disappointing.

        What I mean is that I looked at Melatonin and SAMe and Milk Thistle and Bromelain and Beta Glucan all had “increased survival times” type studies and dosages I could try to translate…..

        Some of the essential oil studies were injections or there was no mention of how they administered it at all.

        Skin cancers, I saw results.

        1. I think essential oils smell and taste like medicine.

          Funny, because real oranges felt healthier and calming and refreshing and invigorating.

          Orange essential oils, I end up needing to look up what orange does.

          Same thing with lavender. They real plant, I held against my face to smell it and the essential oil, I did the scrunched up face of something smelling too strong.

          Tom posting the link that they could harm the liver if ingested made me ponder:

          How many drops would I need to rub into his skin to do anything at all

          AND

          How many drops before it hurts his liver.

          Started feeling more like B17, so I stopped.

          1. Deb, I’ve looked through all the comments and don’t see a link posted by Tom about essential oils being toxic to the liver. I would like to read it. Not sure if it’s a problem with my view of comments are why I can’t find it. Dani

      2. When I was in an accident, besides breaking 2 vertebrae in my neck, I dislocated a shoulder and stretched the tendons. It hurt so bad more than the neck and concussion. A nurse friend of mine made me a essential oil roll on

        1. That was accidentally sent. Anyway the oils she put in the the little roller I applied to the joint and tissue around the injury on my shoulder and it was amazing. It helped by far better than the narcotic I was taking for pain. And I didn’t feel sick or weird after using it. I did ask her what has in it and all she totals me is it was combo of her highest anti inflammatory oils with Lavender and something else.
          I begged her make me a second one and it was good too. But the first one was better.

      3. Deb, I love the scent of the whole foods/plants best too but I find lavender essential oil extremely soothing and theraputic. It helps a lot with anxiety for me and relaxes me and puts me in a better mood. Have you seen Dr. Greger’s video on lavender oil? That’s why I first tried it.
        But I never put it on the skin anymore other than for an injury. I’ve found that essential oils can be very irritating to the skin and I had tried an all natural facial serum in the recent past (now I just use authentic argan oil) that was supposed to be amazing and full of antioxidants but it caused a horrible rash all over my face. At first I thought it was an allergy but I recently read how essential oils can be damaging to skin and I was like “duh!” all their serums are heavily scented with essential oils.

        For aromatherapy, are you sure they’re authentic essential oils? I’ve read that some are not and that not having the Latin name on the bottle isn’t a good sign if you’re wanting to make sure you’re getting the real stuff… that’s just from an article I quickly read. So quality or rather authenticity might make a difference. But then they just might not effect people the same.
        I also adore jasmine essential oil for the scent and know someone who can’t stand the scent. To me it’s so beautiful and euphoric.

  10. REAL ALOE WORKS! I actually know one of the doctors that holds a patent regarding aloe vera. They found an enzyme in it that is activated when the leaf is cut from the plant that deactivates the active ingredients within 30 minutes! Their patent was a way to deactivate that enzyme so there was time to harvest and process the aloe and maintain the active ingredients as active. So if you don’t use their proprietary aloe preparation, there is more aloe on the label than there is in the bottle!!
    The other option is to use the leaf immediately when cut from the plant. Use the whole leaf as most of active components are just next to the skin of the leaf. So cut the leaf, fillet it open, and put the whole thing on the wound, skin and all. That’s why research tests done using the wrong preparation show no benefits!
    They actually tried to develop a drug out of the patented aloe and were very successful with animal models curing feline leukemia etc. with a product called Acemannan. However, FDA requires an “LD-50” to become a licensed drug but they couldn’t kill anything with it to get a ‘lethal dose at a 50% kill rate.’ (like all Rx meds)

  11. Just as the end product at Walmart was questionable, I wonder if the processed products of aloe gel used in the studies were up to par also. Being allergic to many things, forced to use raw materials and to freshly make most medicines myself I see large disparities in effectiveness all to natures credit. From what I understand, some fruits lose 50 percent of their vitamin force 30 minutes after they are picked. Dr A Vogel promoted tinctures made from live plants with good reason.
    I am also allergic to many of the excipients of drugs and so I see a stark difference when making medicines from scratch. I grow my own aloe and I use it for burns mixed with vitamin E,- a very high quality supplement that I am not allergic to or with fish oil. It works fantastically. I have also healed beautifully a second degree burn very very quickly using chromatotherapy as suggested by Dr Agarpart, Paris France. Healing burns has always been a catastrophe with allopathy.

    I do not think there has been much attention to the difference between living plants and stocked, stored, and processed plants. Therefore, I am still skeptic and waiting for someone to put it to the test. Bravo for your efforts, Dr Gregore, II very much appreciate these videos. Thank you sincerely.
    mbp

  12. My apologies for going off the “cancer topic”, but I do have an aloe based question.

    Is there any good/credible research available on aloe and eye health, either by ingesting in food form or eye drops?

    I’ve seen numerous products with claims of curing myopia, dry eye and improving the health of corneas.
    Of course, they can claim anything and have little, if any, verifiable proof and safety information concerning putting aloe (or an unction there of) directly into the eye.

    I’d love to see a Dr. G video about aloe and it’s uses for eye health.

  13. Hello hzcct, thank you so much for such an interesting question!

    There are indeed several studies related to aloe and eye health. However, most of these studies are experimental, meaning that it hasn’t been put into the test on human beings. But here there are some of the conclusions of the studies I could find:

    Drugs – Do we need them? Applications of non-pharmaceutical therapy in anterior eye disease: A review
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28919243

    * Aloe vera is not toxic to corneal cells in vitro

    * Dilute aloe solution may be beneficial in the healing of superficial corneal wounds, specifically increasing the synthesis of Type III collagen

    * Though used extensively throughout the developing and developed world as either a primary or adjunct therapy, there are few controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of aloe vera. Currently, there are no studies evaluating the ocular use of aloe vera in vivo. Therefore, further research is required to assess its perceived benefits.

    Aloe vera: an in vitro study of effects on corneal wound closure and collagenase activity.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24666433

    * Although additional experiments are required, lower concentrations of aloe solution may be beneficial in healing of superficial corneal wounds to help decrease fibrosis and speed epithelialization.

    Aloe vera extract activity on human corneal cells.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22338121

    Aloe vera contains multiple pharmacologically active substances which are capable of modulating cellular phenotypes and functions. Aloe vera ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts may be used in eye drops to treat inflammations and other ailments of external parts of the eye such as the cornea.

    So, in conclusion, there are preliminary and maybe promising studies related to aloe eye drops and corneal inflammation and healing, but more studies are necessary to confirm the benefits on human beings.

    Hope it helps!

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