Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Lupus

Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Lupus
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Green smoothies are put to the test for the autoimmune disease SLE (lupus).

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

These are the journals I try to stay on top of every month, but I now have a new one to add to the list. The International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention, a new peer-reviewed medical journal created to document the science of nutrition and lifestyle to prevent, suspend, and reverse disease, with an editor-in-chief no less prestigious than Dr. Kim Williams, chief of cardiology at Rush, and past president of the American College of Cardiology. I was honored to join their editorial advisory board, along with so many of my heroes. And the best part is it’s free! Go to IJDRP.org and put in your email to subscribe for free, and you’ll be alerted when new issues are out, which you can download in full for free in PDF form.

Instead of preventing chronic lifestyle diseases, we doctors just tend to manage them. Instead of curing, we just mitigate. Why? Because of finance, culture, habit, and tradition. Many of us envision a world where trillions of dollars are not wasted on unnecessary medical care.

For this reason comes the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention. After all, “without data, you’re just another person with an opinion.”

Just to give you a taste, how about pitting plants against one of the most inflammatory diseases out there—lupus, an autoimmune disease in which your body can start attacking your own DNA. Kidney inflammation is a common consequence, and even with our armamentarium of immunosuppressant drugs and steroids, lupus-induced kidney inflammation can lead to end-stage renal disease, meaning dialysis, and death, unless, perhaps, you pack your diet with the some of the most anti-inflammatory foods out there, and your kidney function improves so much you no longer need dialysis or a kidney transplant. And another similar case is also presented with a resolution in symptoms and normal kidney function, unless he deviated from the diet.

Even just cutting out animal products, randomizing people to cut out meat, eggs, and dairy, without significantly increasing fruit and vegetable intake, can cut C-reactive protein levels, a sensitive indicator of whole-body inflammation, by nearly a third within eight weeks. But with lupus, they weren’t messing around. A pound of leafy greens and cruciferous vegetables a day like kale, fruits like berries, and lots of chia or flax, and a gallon of water a day. Basically, a green smoothie diet to extinguish lupus flares. Note, though, if your kidneys are already compromised, this should be done under physician supervision so they can monitor your electrolytes like potassium, and make sure you don’t get overloaded with fluid. Bottom line, with such remarkable improvements due to dietary changes alone, the hope is that researchers will take up the mantle and formally put it to the test.

Autoimmune inflammatory skin disease reversals can be particularly striking visually. A woman with a 35-year history of psoriasis, unsuccessfully managed for year after year with drugs, suffering from other autoimmune conditions like Sjogren’s as well. But put her on an extraordinarily healthy diet packed with greens and other vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, avocados, some whole grains, and boom, before and after. Within one year, she went from 40 percent of her entire body surface area inflamed and affected down to 0 percent––completely clear. And her Sjogren’s syndrome symptoms resolved as well as a bonus, while helping to normalize her weight and cholesterol.

Speaking of autoimmune diseases, what about the treatment of type 1 diabetes with plants? We’ll find out next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

These are the journals I try to stay on top of every month, but I now have a new one to add to the list. The International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention, a new peer-reviewed medical journal created to document the science of nutrition and lifestyle to prevent, suspend, and reverse disease, with an editor-in-chief no less prestigious than Dr. Kim Williams, chief of cardiology at Rush, and past president of the American College of Cardiology. I was honored to join their editorial advisory board, along with so many of my heroes. And the best part is it’s free! Go to IJDRP.org and put in your email to subscribe for free, and you’ll be alerted when new issues are out, which you can download in full for free in PDF form.

Instead of preventing chronic lifestyle diseases, we doctors just tend to manage them. Instead of curing, we just mitigate. Why? Because of finance, culture, habit, and tradition. Many of us envision a world where trillions of dollars are not wasted on unnecessary medical care.

For this reason comes the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention. After all, “without data, you’re just another person with an opinion.”

Just to give you a taste, how about pitting plants against one of the most inflammatory diseases out there—lupus, an autoimmune disease in which your body can start attacking your own DNA. Kidney inflammation is a common consequence, and even with our armamentarium of immunosuppressant drugs and steroids, lupus-induced kidney inflammation can lead to end-stage renal disease, meaning dialysis, and death, unless, perhaps, you pack your diet with the some of the most anti-inflammatory foods out there, and your kidney function improves so much you no longer need dialysis or a kidney transplant. And another similar case is also presented with a resolution in symptoms and normal kidney function, unless he deviated from the diet.

Even just cutting out animal products, randomizing people to cut out meat, eggs, and dairy, without significantly increasing fruit and vegetable intake, can cut C-reactive protein levels, a sensitive indicator of whole-body inflammation, by nearly a third within eight weeks. But with lupus, they weren’t messing around. A pound of leafy greens and cruciferous vegetables a day like kale, fruits like berries, and lots of chia or flax, and a gallon of water a day. Basically, a green smoothie diet to extinguish lupus flares. Note, though, if your kidneys are already compromised, this should be done under physician supervision so they can monitor your electrolytes like potassium, and make sure you don’t get overloaded with fluid. Bottom line, with such remarkable improvements due to dietary changes alone, the hope is that researchers will take up the mantle and formally put it to the test.

Autoimmune inflammatory skin disease reversals can be particularly striking visually. A woman with a 35-year history of psoriasis, unsuccessfully managed for year after year with drugs, suffering from other autoimmune conditions like Sjogren’s as well. But put her on an extraordinarily healthy diet packed with greens and other vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, avocados, some whole grains, and boom, before and after. Within one year, she went from 40 percent of her entire body surface area inflamed and affected down to 0 percent––completely clear. And her Sjogren’s syndrome symptoms resolved as well as a bonus, while helping to normalize her weight and cholesterol.

Speaking of autoimmune diseases, what about the treatment of type 1 diabetes with plants? We’ll find out next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

I think I only have one other video on lupus: Fighting Lupus with Turmeric: Good as Gold. It’s not for lack of trying, though—there just hasn’t been much research out there.

I talk about another autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes, next in Type 1 Diabetes Treatment: A Plant-Based Diet.

To read and subscribe to the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention (for free!), visit www.IJDRP.org.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and to my audio podcast here (subscribe by clicking on your mobile device’s icon). 

131 responses to “Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Lupus

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  1. Wow, that’s so cool that a new journal has been established on Reversal & Prevention of disease!

    Half of the doctors on the editorial advisory board are the ones I look up to get their opinion on different nutrition topics.

    Neal Barnard, MD
    T Colin Campbell, PhD
    Richard Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS
    Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr, MD
    Joel Fuhrman, MD
    Michael Greger, MD
    David Jenkins, MD, PhD
    William Li, MD
    Kate Marsh, PhD, FASLM
    John McDougall, MD
    Ifeoma (Ify) Monye, MD
    Dean Ornish, MD
    Sivaneswaran Poobalasingam, MD, DipIBLM
    Nicole Sirotin, MD, FACP, FACLM
    John Stevens, RN, PhD
    Scott Stoll, MD
    Kim Allan Williams, Sr., MD, MACC, FAHA, MASNC, FESC (Chairman)
    Tommy Wood, BM, BCh, PhD

    1. Darwin,

      You did the exact same process that I did.

      Pause button on the Lupus study.

      Let’s see those names.

      And I actively search out videos and articles from about 10 of them.

      It will be fun to look up the rest.

      1. Deb, Dr Greger also mentions the website of the new journal:

        “To read and subscribe to the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention (for free!), visit:”

        http://www.IJDRP.org

        I haven’t signed up yet but will probably do so soon.

    2. “Sivaneswaran Poobalasingam”

      Irish?

      ——————————————

      I’ve never been jealous of a name before.

      Now I’m burnin’ green.

      Got me beat!

      Vivamus

    3. DG,
      Agreed. I think Dr. Kim Allan Williams, past president of the American College of Cardiology and Editor In Chief of this new publication, the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention, with its recognized advisory board, will be a game changer when it comes to preventing and treating disease with diet.

    4. after being WFPB no oil for 4 years, I suddenly have a “flareup” of osteoarthristis in my knee, it’s painful to walk after sitting and very difficult to sleep. An xray showed “mild degenerative osteoarthritis.” I understand this could be due to stress, but i hoped this lifestyle would help mitigate it.
      Anyway, looking forward to this journal perhaps addressing the problem.

  2. Anyone actually interested in anti-inflammatory diets would find more info from a search engine as well as recipes. My Anti-inflammatory Diet cookbooks are dated 2015 s the info has been around for a while and is easy to find.

    And anyone who does not want to wait until next week for this doctor to tell you on video what he hinted about and probably just researched online like everyone else, you can do the same by entering ‘treatment of type 1 diabetes with plants’ into a search engine.

    1. Reality bites,

      What a hoot!! Saying that Dr. Greger and his research assistants and volunteers “probably just researched online like everyone else.”

      I do a lot of online research — but I find many to most research articles published in peer reviewed journals behind a paywall. And while reading the abstracts is a great first step, it’s not the whole paper, which is what I really want access to. Because that’s necessary to really understand and evaluate the questions asked, the methods, the results, and the conclusions. And that is what is done in preparation for the videos, blogs, etc on this site.

      So, my questions for you are: how do you manage to gain access to entire research articles? Without having paid subscriptions to them? Then, how to you understand and evaluate them? Do you have an advanced degree in medicine or biology? I find that helps immensely.

      My final question is: why do you watch these videos, if you can do such thorough and excellent research online yourself?

      To your health.

      1. Also, other videos would not be as entertaining with enthusiasm as Dr. G. I love him and appreciate all the work he does, so I can understand it.

        1. Patricia,
          Thank you so much – that website is a treasure!!

          Currently, their search engine isn’t working, but entering the DOI of any paper that I tried so far to get yielded the pdf file. I feel like I won a lottery – thanks again.

    2. Don’t be silly RB.

      Dr Greger gave us the link in his ‘Sources cited’ section. The same edition of the Journal that contains the article on treating Lupus with diet also contains an article on treating Type 1 Diabetes with a plant rich diet. No need for search engines.

      Isn’t that the point? Dr Greger reports the research so people don’t have to go Googling these issues themselves and so they don’t have to wade through academic and technical reports.

      Honestly, your constant criticisms seem to get sillier as each day passes.

    1. Sometimes a person feels the need to be a burr under everyone’s saddle.

      I’m sure I irritate some of the SAD folks who are my friends. My true friends, regardless of how they eat, accept my “nonsense” because they know I bring it from a good place and am trying to help. That’s what friends do.

      I now kinda get a kick out of how some of them try to explain away the crap they’re eating at the moment, or talk up the good stuff they ate one day last week. I don’t make a big deal of either.

      1. Wade,

        I smiled at the sentence: Sometimes a person feels the need to be a burr under everyone’s saddle.

        RB wants Dr. Greger to put more technical information in his videos.

        That appears to be a pet peeve.

        Honestly, if he could figure out how to “use his words” without using them to punch people, RB seems dedicated to the cause.

        His sentences were fine up until the accusation that Dr. Greger just used a search engine when Dr. Greger has been so upfront about his extensive process. Dr. Greger has something like 200 volunteer doctors reading journals which cost $50,000 to have access to just for one of the journal sites.

        I believe the honest feedback RB would give would be “I would like more detailed technical information and when it isn’t there I feel like I could get just as much information Googling” said politely, it is called feedback.

        1. RB,

          Feedback is useful if it isn’t unfounded accusations.

          You are getting there.

          Fewer downright attacks.

          It just would take a sentence re-write to turn your comments into feedback but I know that it would also require patience because Dr. Greger makes all of his videos in one year and sometimes it takes a while to get through that year’s worth of videos to see how much feedback he decides is valuable.

          You have called people trolls before and I didn’t want to be impolite but troll usually means the person who insults the mild-mannered host left and right.

          1. RB,

            He does listen to the feedback.

            The changes that people requested for the comments section will be coming soon.

            I know that you don’t trust him for that, but you will find out that he really did listen.

            It might be a year from now. It might be two.

            But I already see his heart about these things and believe him about it.

            I am not sure how long it takes the video company to do their process.

            1. Note to Dr. Greger,

              It is a pet-peeve for many of us when people just put you down, but I also like it when you go “less basic” and add in a little more science.

              I concede though that when I look at what your audience looks at, the favorite videos are often the ones that say the word “diet” in them.

              I am aware that Plant-Based Science London posts you all the time and it was oatmeal that was the video I skipped because I wanted the more scientific topics or health-condition topics and oatmeal was the most viewed video on their site with millions of people looking at it.

              But the commenting audience wants the studies and the science by far.

              1. Deb

                I suspect that Dr G and his team look at the metrics as well as just listening to feedback here. After all, most feedback usually comes from complainers. People who are happy with the current situation, or who don’t feel strongly about it, are more likely to stay silent than voice an opinion.

                The NF team would need to look at things like which approach attracts more views on YouTube, which attracts more more ‘shares’ on social media and so on. “Listening” to a dozen or so people complaining here won’t necessarily give the complete picture or constitute the best strategy to achieve the site’s goals. It might be that the very approach they complain about is the one that attracts most YouTube and website hits.

                We also need to bear in mind that ‘listening’ to what some people say isn’t the same thing as automatically doing what they demand. There is a much bigger audience out there that needs to be taken into account as well.

                1. Tom,

                  I agree with you.

                  The fact that Dr Greger posts the most watched videos and reads the comments already indicates how responsive he is.

                  I guess, for me, there is a subset of people who were probably taught to express themselves in ways that are borderline abusive.

                  But everybody else starts wanting to hurt them back.

                  Chances are RB had people treat him like that growing up.

                  RB has talked about things like food bullies and it is hard to imagine RB feeling bullied and having that emotionally affect him but it does.

                  My hearts desire is for RB to become emotionally healthier and to learn how to give feedback in a way that doesn’t come across as a bully.

                  Chances are RB had a bully parent.

                  I don’t expect everybody to just give grace but if RB is like a pitbull then most of the tome they just need to learn how to be good citizens.

                  1. RB just needs to count to 10 before he posts and ask, “Can I word this a little bit nicer?”

                    It would only take a few words to change everything.

                    There is a Christian singer, Tom Conlon who wrote a song with the lyrics, “If words left a mark would we still say the same thing?”

                    I am not giving up on RB.

                    I think RB can become RB’s better self and it would just take editing his words before posting.

              2. Deb, I’m quite happy with the way Doctor Greger does Doctor Greger, and I do not find the need to tweak him or his output.

                So Im not sure what your viewership interest analysis process is, but I suggest, ironically, that it isn’t scientific.

                For every video on here, there are likely thousands of happy viewers who didn’t post and potentially have no need for the content to be different or better, feeling it is what it is: useful and free.

                1. jazzBass,

                  I agree. He is amazing. I watch just about every interview and Q&A and webinar, on top of getting his books and cookbooks, etc.

                  Amazingly useful and given with such a good heart.

                  I watched Dr. Greger’s Q&A today and he has such an amazing personality. Cheerful and friendly and open-hearted and passionate day in and day out.

                  I have nothing but good things to say.

                  I still give feedback and that is because I come from a creative background and my art and film and music friends always cherished feedback and criticism, as long as it was given in the right spirit and Dr. Greger is special in that way. At the vegan tribute to him they mentioned that he leaves his less successful concepts up to inspire people who are less than perfect that if they work hard they can get better. He is leaving a trail for people like the YouTube people to follow. I would say breadcrumbs but I believe that is too processed to be a good analogy. He is a mentor and role model and wants to save people’s lives in a world where so many people are trying to steal from people and confuse them.

                  There is almost nothing I value more in this culture than having someone trying to clarify things. The value of that is high in my eyes.

                  Respect.

            2. Deb,

              I’m laughing at you.

              Here you are – the one person here who acknowledges that she has significant cognitive challenges – and you are handling the RB situation far better than anyone else on this platform.

              Bravo!

              ———————————

              “The dog who is so angry he cannot move. He cannot eat. He cannot sleep. He can just barely growl. Bound so tightly with tension and anger, he approaches the state of rigor mortis.”

              from “The Angriest Dog in the World”
              David Lynch

              ———–

              Back in the 1980s and 1990s, David Lynch had a strange and wonderful comic strip – “The Angriest Dog in the World” – that was posted in various alternative city newspapers throughout the nation – back when newspapers were printed on paper.

              Back before Craigslist put all those alternative papers out of business.

              Back when there was a nation.

              “The Angriest Dog in the World” didn’t make much sense to me initially – it was just the exact same artwork each time. But the captions changed each week. After a while – it began to grow on a fella. Until it became a highlight of each week’s paper.

              The same artwork for nine years. Hold that thought.

              The comic had an angry dog straining at it’s leash – ready to bite – always ready to bite – and always the same first panel:

              “The dog who is so angry he cannot move. He cannot eat. He cannot sleep. He can just barely growl. Bound so tightly with tension and anger, he approaches the state of rigor mortis.”

              The same frame of an angry dog in daylight for three panels – then the night comes.

              But the dog never rests.

              To me Lynch’s strip was about two different worlds – one which was suffused with impotent anger – and other world living it’s own life, completely uncaring about such anger. Oblivious. Disinterested. Comfortable. But you may see it differently.

              Here are some samples – you will not get the same effect I did – remember, mine was a discovery over weeks and months in a different context – but try to transport yourself, for a moment, back to those thrilling days of yesteryear:

              https://shihlun.tumblr.com/post/629585837077790720/david-lynch-the-angriest-dog-in-the-world-1990

              http://www.lynchnet.com/angrydog/dog5.jpg

              https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/49/Lynchangriest.jpg

              http://www.lynchnet.com/angrydog/dog3.jpg

              http://www.lynchnet.com/angrydog/dog4.jpg

              https://esprits.tumblr.com/post/40590916169

              https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-6X-ogdPS44I/Wv0oV0BQNAI/AAAAAAAAD3o/DnSYPwvT2q4sSpzIJDmCB3iuhXEp6milgCLcBGAs/s1600/cn_25_06.png

              https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Xp3xoKgpGHg/Wv0oXhXknOI/AAAAAAAAD34/2Ni7THWrv1wPxlEI_iWFUkSkKHd2hnDyQCLcBGAs/s1600/cn_29_22.png

              You get the idea.

              Nine years – no change in the artwork.

              Whenever I open a new NutritionFacts, now – it is just like old times.

              But instead of opening the page to “The Angriest Dog in the World” – I open the page to RB.

              Unchanging art – just different captions.

              It’s actually becoming a favorite feature.

              It feels just like old times.

              All the best –

              Vivamus

              ——————————————

              “Lynch came up with the idea for “The Angriest Dog” around 1973: “I was curious about anger,” he has said. “Like, once you´re angry, you´re really, really angry, no two ways about it – this dog is angry.”

              “James Vowell, editor and published of L.A. Reader, provides some interest into why the strip has such limited circulation: “It´s just the same bad jokes. They´re really pretty dreadful. You can quote me. But they´re still fun. I think sometimes he tests to see what it would take for us to throw him out of the paper.”

              “Still, Vowell has found that “The Angriest Dog” has a definite audience. According to a survey, 40 percent of his readers regularly read the strip, and 17 percent rate it as their favorite feature. But Vowell estimates that “three quarters of the people who read the paper don´t know who´s doing the cartoon.”

              https://cinephiliabeyond.tumblr.com/post/32394739777/david-lynch-s-cartoon-the-angriest-dog-in-the

              1. Vivamus,

                Thanks for the angriest dog words.

                I see that RB comes to the site every video and comments and that is something.

                I know that he puts Dr. Greger down but I sincerely believe that he means those put-downs as feedback.

                And I know that Dr. Greger has communicated that he likes feedback and I think feedback will make him better at a job that I already see him as doing amazingly well.

                His audience is so diverse – from doctors and scientists to vegans to newbies and a lot of people who just end up here because of a health problem.

                1. Vivamus,

                  I also see when it comes up.

                  An anti-inflammatory diet has been the topic twice when RB did his thing.

                  And both times it has been that he wanted deeper information. Less basic. Multiple times he has insinuated that he could find the same information googling and I do not exactly agree with him about that because a topic being here means that there is a human study on that topic and that is enough for me.

                  I think that has been the theme of the insults 4 or 5 times recently and when I evaluate whether there is anything to glean from RB, and whether I find any common ground with him, I too prefer as much detail and science and as many studies as possible.

                  RB also doesn’t like the cliffhangers and I would say that I am not upset by the cliffhangers but I watch them all at one setting in the webinars and I do agree that a few of the cliffhangers were so short that it felt like Return of the Jedi.

                  1. Deb,

                    I think RB is really David Lynch in disguise.

                    And that this is all epic performance art.

                    Certainly none of the negativity need be taken seriously. I mean – no one ever got upset over the Angriest Dog in the World.

                    I am glad that you have been able to puzzle out a message beneath the anger.

                    It teaches us all something.

                    You take care –

                    Vivamus

                    ———————————————

                    The famous meme – Peter Steiner – 1993 – scroll down and click on it, if you like:
                    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/comic-riffs/post/nobody-knows-youre-a-dog-as-iconic-internet-cartoon-turns-20-creator-peter-steiner-knows-the-joke-rings-as-relevant-as-ever/2013/07/31/73372600-f98d-11e2-8e84-c56731a202fb_blog.html

  3. Speaking from experience, this approach has significant merit and few drawbacks: I was diagnosed with SLE and rosacea five years ago; after one year of adopting a whole food, plant-based diet, I am completely off both medications I was taking for those conditions, and no longer meet any of the diagnostic criteria for SLE (in my case, neutropenia, malar rash, and ANA antibodies). Granted, I have also taken significant steps to support the totality of my health in other areas(namely stress reduction — to include changing geographical location and modification of my professional activities, as well as an increase in exercise and lean muscle mass) — so the effect of those changes cannot be ruled out. I had always eaten a relatively healthy diet (defined as generally avoiding meat and dairy, but had entirely too much sugar and processed “health foods” in my diet, although I had been gluten-free/wheat-free for 5 years prior to my SLE diagnosis). Nonetheless, I don’t think any of it would have been possible without the dramatic increase in anti-inflammatory foods (i.e., fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds) in my diet.

    1. “Speaking from experience, this approach has significant merit and few drawbacks”

      J Meyers,

      Thank you. This is useful.

      Did you go raw foods? Smoothies? Water intake? Sugar? Salt? Fat?

      Any relapses?

      Any little nuggets of knowledge?

      Thanks, again –

      Vivamus

      1. Hi Vivamus,

        Most of what I eat *does* happen to be raw, simply from reasons of workweek laziness! I love to cook, but during the week, I generally eat my veggies raw (salads or veggies with homemade hummus or homemade black bean dip).

        Breakfasts are generally a smoothie made with a wide variety of fruits, some sort of nut milk, a few spoonfuls of almond or cashew yogurt, flaxseed meal and chia seeds, copious amounts of spices appropriate to whatever fruit is going in the smoothie that morning, and a spoonful of superfruit powders (again depending upon the type of fruit going into the smoothie) such as amla, mangosteen, acai, goji, camu-camu. Sometimes I’ll also add hibiscus flowers and green tea leaves, as well. One of my favorites right now for fall is a cranberry-orange smoothie — I throw in an orange segment or two along with half a banana, about 1/2 cup frozen cranberries, a spoonful of nut yogurt, the nut milk, maybe a splash of vanilla extract, and lots of ginger, cinnamon, turmeric, cardamom, and a pinch of nutmeg and clove. Along with the smoothie, I’ll have about an ounce of nuts (pecans, raw almonds, raw peanuts, raw macadamias) and a sprinkling of cacao nibs.

        Lunch tends to be a baked sweet potato, maybe a small salad, and some sort of avocado-based homemade treat (I like chocolate avocado pudding and chocolate avocado brownie cookies — made gluten-free and vegan with flax egg). There’s also a great (and super-simple) recipe for lentil flatbreads (1 cup lentils, 2 cups water — sit for 3-4 hours, blend ’till smooth, and fry up like a pancake) which I’ll eat like a sandwich with some sort of nut butter. Those are also tasty with homemade hummus, too. Mmmm…

        For dinner, as I mentioned earlier, its usually a rainbow-colored salad with some sort of baby green (either baby mixed lettuces and/or baby kale), purple cabbage, radishes, bell peppers, carrots, green onions, cherry tomatoes, a sesame seed/pumpkin seed mix, along with a crumbled up version of the “Nooch” cracker recipe on the back of the Bob’s Red Mill Nutritional Yeast package, or Dr. Greger’s flax cracker recipe (in the “How Not To Die” book — not the cookbook) along with some sort of protein (beans, tofu), and a salad dressing that contains fat (for nutrient absorption; usually a vinaigrette) Sometimes, I’ll also make a pasta with veggies and chickpea or lentil-based pasta (unflavored nut yogurt makes a great based for a “cream sauce.”

        I have my four small shots of espresso in the morning with a coconut and mushroom-based vegan creamer, and then I drink distilled water throughout the day ( I try to drink as much as I reasonably can; it’s always been a tricky one for me), along with various heavily-spiced, unsweetened herbal tea (LOVE Good Earth’s “Sweet & Spicy”), and try to get in a cup of both white and green tea, too. During the winter, I’ll have a cup of chai (again, heavily-spiced) with a little bit of honey.

        On the weekends, I’ll get a little more adventurous and start experimenting with vegan recipes from YouTube or creations from my own head based on what I have on hand. Tonight, I’ll be trying a red lentil curry.

        You asked about salt…I don’t really use much salt, and when I do, it’s Himalayan. No particular reason for that type, other than perhaps some trace minerals. I do supplement with Iodine.

        You asked about fat… I try to eat a good amount of plant-based fat, and for me, it comes from avocados, coconut, pecans, peanuts/peanut butter, cashews, macadamias, etc. I kind of have a walnut sensitivity, so I tend to avoid those). I’m naturally on the lean side, so if I didn’t make a concerted effort at including healthy fats while living as a vegan, I’m sure I’d be in for a world of hurt.

        My discovery about no longer meeting any diagnostic criteria for lupus is very recent — with my labs from just last month. That being said, those are the results I received after a year of living vegan. It wasn’t even my intention to try to rid myself of the diagnosis (I didn’t think it was possible, really); I just wanted to improve my odds regarding all chronic health conditions, and what it really boiled down to is that I wasn’t feeling good when eating any other way…When I started eating like how I described above, I simply felt SO much better in ways I never thought possible, so it became self-sustaining. So, to that end, I don’t know about any relapses yet. Time will tell… As I may have mentioned, I think for me, stress was a big factor. Changing my lifestyle to a lower stress one has helped immensely, but I am also sure my change in diet is “the icing on the cake.”

        As others may have mentioned somewhere along the way, I think one of the biggest things to focus on is ditching the processed foods as much as possible, focus on increasing nutrition (personally, I don’t eat anything that doesn’t serve a purpose…even if I make vegan “junk food” it’s made with ingredients that serve a nutritional purpose), and bringing in a lot of colors and textures into what we eat.

        Best of luck to you!

      1. Hi Birtee,

        It’s under the diagnostic criteria heading of “hematological (blood) disorders.” Although it lists “leukopenia” and “thrombocytopenia” specifically, the “neutropenia” in my case was apparently sufficient enough of a blood disorder to be of concern to my Rheumatologist.

        I’m not a medical doctor, but I imagine there may be a number of potential causes for blood disorders.

        Best of luck to you —

    1. Hello,

      There is some data on diet, exercise and psoriasis, which seems to boil down to weight loss. Weight loss itself may improve outcomes! Couple that with an very anti-inflammatory diet, and that would likely be one of the best strategies for combatting psoriasis. Fortunately a plant-based diet may be one of hte best tools to accomplish these goals.

      I hope this helps,
      Matt, Health Support

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6318144/
      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25920774/

  4. I have a patient with several autoimmune diseases, including lupus. She also has developed severe IBS and is now fearful of all fiber-rich, anti-inflammatory foods that would be of benefit to her. I’m searching for ways to support her, but feeling defeated in my efforts.

    1. For IBS, two approaches I would consider. One, a low-FODMAP vegan diet for a couple of weeks followed by a slow transition to a whole food plant based diet. A second approach is to eliminate everything but white potatoes and white rice. After a week, add in whole grains. A week later, beans. Followed by fruit and veggies.

      1. Again, for what it’s worth, I would agree with this approach from just one “lived experience” perspective. I had previously tried making an abrupt switch, and ran into all sorts of discomfort, not to mention the uphill battle of “going cold turkey” which is difficult enough in and of itself. When the microbiome isn’t accustomed to digesting certain types of plant foods and/or plant foods in a great volume, considerable protest can ensue!

        Baby steps toward a non-processed diet…with attunement to the response of one’s internal systems (as clearly differentiated from “whatever the taste buds think”), and a focus on maximizing balanced nutritional content in whatever one is able to eat at a given point in the transition process.

      2. BMG, I’ve had success with putting IBS patients on a type of fiber called ‘Heather’s Fiber’.
        It’s very healing for the gut. It’s soluble fiber only. It’s odorless, tasteless. Can be added to water, hot or cold food. Full Instructions are included. Can be ordered online, Amazon, Iherb and most likely lots more places.
        The type of fiber many with IBS can’t handle is in-soluble fiber.
        The amino acid Glutamine is also healing, as is a combo of carnosine and zinc called PepZinGi the Japanese use.
        But I always start with the fiber as that works 90% of the time if they use it properly.
        Of course, diet is very important, and there are usually trigger foods. Should be checked for Celiac disease.

    2. She may be sensitive to grains/beans/nightshades/+ as some people are with autoimmune. AIP diet may be something to look into. I have to eat AIP and Low FODMAP to feel better. Wish it were as easy as “just eat WFPB” but that’s not the case for everyone.

      1. Again, in speaking from experience (which is offered only in the interest of instilling hope, and is by no means a “be-all-end all”), I have noticed that I, too have a sensitivity to nightshades. I can tolerate them in limited quantity, and not for extended periods of time (…like this summer, when I overdid it on bell peppers!). With how complex autoimmune conditions are, and how complex individual humans are in general, it seems often the best we can do is educate ourselves as much as possible from reputable sources, be willing and able to experiment a bit, stay aware of our bodily reactions/responses, and be willing to make the sometimes hard decisions to heed the warnings our body is giving us while learning to live with our sensitivities instead of trying to go against them.

        1. Wondering:
          Doesn’t the general WFD arrest all autoimmune issues over time? Like it arrests cancer in its tracks etc.? So for instance this concept of feeling better by laying off of green peppers would perhaps self-correct over a long period on a well varied WFD with little SOS?

          Would it be possible to later enjoy nightshades again once ones system in running optimally? Ive been told by WFD doc that this diet is in fact proven to be reparative, so it would stand to reason that even people who are starting out with autoimmune issues would even be able to enjoy the full array of colors and choices at our disposal?

          1. No jb, it doesn’t. Not sure where you got that idea.

            There have been many people through the years saying that they got cancer after having been eating wfpb for years/decades.

            Same with autoimmune. I had a horrific time with an autoimmune condition about 4 years in doing strict wfpb.
            Currently going through testing for more stomach issues…. it may be time for a reset on the elimination diet I used years ago to great success.

            If I am answering a question about wfpb to friends etc., I am careful not to make any claims whatsoever other than a general comment about it’s better for the animals, the environment, and for maintaining a low weight (for me).

  5. Very excited about a diet that is proven to control / reverse lupus!! Hopefully, a protocol will be proven successful soon.

    But the evidence in Dr Goldner’s paper is too weak, definitely not “put to the test”.

    1. She mentioned 2 patients diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) but there is no documentation of how SLE was diagnosed. There are many patients told to have SLE but when seen by experts, they don’t have it. If a kidney biopsy proved lupus nephritis, it should be reported and described.

    2. As a “proof of cure”, she said that patient #1’s nephrologist reduced hydroxychloroquine to 3 times weekly. This definitely not how a patient with lupus nephritis is managed.

    3. The conflict of interest was not disclosed. Although, Dr Goldner claims she can cure lupus, she does it for a fee through her website. Thus, this article may serve as advertisement (as clear in the body of the text) and could be biased. Financial conflicts of interest should be disclosed in scientific literature. I would encourage her to publish the protocol so all patients with lupus can try it!

    Dr Greger, as an Editorial Board member, please stand up for honor in science and enforce the requirement to disclose conflict of interest.

    1. “But the evidence in Dr Goldner’s paper is too weak, definitely not ‘put to the test’.”

      Andrea,

      Good call.

      I share your concerns.

      More below –

      Vivamus

    2. I understand your concerns. However, I want to point out that Dr. Goldner is very upfront with her treatment both on her website, in her book, and in her facebook group. She includes recipes for the smoothies and recommends a 6 week raw reset diet (raw plant-based). She does take on clients who want further guidance, but she’s pretty clear about her methods.

  6. The green shake diet was wonderful for me…until I experienced kidney stones from the kale and other culprit greens. The beans I eat also brought on a severe gout attack. A short-term pharma script got me through the gout attack. I love Dr. G’s videos and own two of his books (How Not to Die/Diet). But hope there can be a breakthrough natural remedy for kidney stones, gout attacks when people begin to practice the dietary changes Dr. G promotes. I did lose weight, and lupus fatigue was mitigated, through the diet recommendations. But the gout and kidney stone reactions have happened consistently when I’ve attempted to follow those recommendations.

      1. Yosf , apparently this kidney stones issue is not applied to all. I don’t know where I saw it on here, but there is an addendum that there are people who can in fact eat buckets of spinach, beet greens, and chard and never develop these nasty critters.

        I went back to eating them after I learned this because previously I ate spinach like popeye and never had a problem, but had become alarmed after Dr Greger mentioned the issue.

        YMMV

    1. Pkstinn: I had a kidney stone last October. It was the worst pain I have ever experienced. I stopped eating spinach, beets, beet greens, and red chard completely and cut down on turmeric, ginger, amla, cardamom, and nuts. I’m frustrated at having to limit these otherwise healthy foods. Since you seem to be into green shakes, here is something you can try: add a small amount of magnesium citrate ( I use 1/8 of a tsp.) to your drink. Magnesium combines with water soluble oxalates in the food to make magnesium oxalate, which is insoluble in water and therefore cannot be absorbed by the gut. (I haven’t seen any research to support this protocol; just applying theory.)

      1. Thank you, George. I have always included spinach in my diet…never had a kidney stone until I was introduced to kale. That being said, the kale was always blended with spinach so perhaps my assumption the kale was the cause of the stone was wrong? I will try the mag citrate you’ve recommended! Reading through the responses to my question, I was consuming nuts and other potential toxins as well. I’ve healed from both attacks (kidney + gout), so will try Dr. G’s recommendations again, with te mag citrate supplement. Thanks!

    2. pkstinn, don’t know what else you put in that shake, but kale doesn’t cause kidney stones. Kale is very low in oxalates.

      Most proteins, yes, even beans, can contribute to gout problems once they start. But beans, except for soybeans, are lower in protein than animal products.
      The most frequent culprits for causing gout are foods with high fructose corn syrup like soft drinks, beer, and animal protein, especially meat.
      Patients avoiding those generally do well.

      1. My brother went off of a whole bunch of plant-food (which he barely ate in the first place) when he got gout.

        But it was his wife getting him to drink beer for the first time in his life that seems to me to be where it started.

        He had always had a lot of soda, and he had always eaten a lot of meat before the gout.

        Beer was new and our family friend had the same experience where beer was the thing that pushed things over the edge.

        Both of my brothers married women who like alcohol and neither of my brothers grew up drinking anything other than soda.

        It may be the one example that you can replace a bad habit and end up with a worse one if the wrong influences get to you.

        My father married a wine drinker, and alcohol cooler drinker, too.

        I am the hold-out.

        Beer looked like urine and other alcohol burned my tongue and as for wine, I would get tipsy smelling it.

        Brandy was something I did drink when we went camping in the desert and it was so cold that I wanted to trick my brain.

        That was once every few years.

        1. Thank you, Deb, for your response to my question. I don’t drink beer, ever. I don’t drink sodas, ever. I occassionally enjoy a glass of wine maybe twice a year. The culprits for my condition(s) are associated with foods I consume, and also perhaps teas? Love oolong jasmine tea…iced!

    3. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/kidney-stones-and-spinach-chard-and-beet-greens-dont-eat-too-much/

      Regarding gout, it appears that in most cases bean intake is associated with a reduced risk of gout eg

      https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/art.39115
      https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa035700

      Of course, there are beans and there are beans. Some beans are low in purine while others are high. I wonder if that could have been a factor in your case. It’s intriguing because black bean broth is an Asian home remedy for gout.

      1. Mr. Fumblefinger, yes that is what I’ve read as well…beans can decrease risk of gout. Maybe for me it was the pulses, not the beans? Or, the tumeric or other nutrients included from Dr G’s recommendations? I simply don’t know…but I do know that I discontinued bean and pulses for three months. Now, slowly, adding them back to my diet. Arthritic inflammation has been an immediate reaction, again.

        1. Gosh. That sounds awful – don’t know what I would do if I had to give up legumes. Ditto for turmeric etc which are also regarded as anti-inflammatory.

          It’s possible of course that you have some genetic susceptibility to eg lectins and saponins in legumes, or autoimmune disorder. I can only sympathise and wish you luck – you appear to have drawn the short straw in this area..

    4. pkstinn, I dont want to get personal, but I read that being overweight is a prime cause of gout as well, so I guess the question for yourself obviously is, hows the weight?

  7. How timely! This past weekend a friend revealed to her Facebook followers that she has been diagnosed with Lupus. She has no support system: no kids, no husband, parents gone…I’ll pass this along to her and try to get her friends involved to improve her notably bad diet! A lifetime of pizza, beer, ice cream and donuts can’t have helped.

  8. What’s the best place to get detailed menus and recipes for this sort of anti-inflammatory diet? I am so confused by the overload of information available but struggling with PsA and Sjogrens.

    1. drmcdougall.com. All of today’s plant based doctors stand on the shoulders of the great Dr. John McDougall. All the information is free and available on his website.

      1. Blair,
        How is it possible that Dr. Leila Denmark the world’s longest practicing physician who lived to 114 years old, received over 15 awards and honors
        which is more than all the male, so called plant based doctors put together combined? Do you know what diet she used for over a century?

        1. Lets see, she was against dairy, against smoking and drinking and pro-eating fruit.

          And she was pro-vaccines.

          Must have seen something in those 100+ years that convinced her, eh?

    2. Just another suggestion that might simplify it for you: avoid processed foods, eat a rainbow of different colored foods at each meal. Get creative with the color palette and see what tastes good together. Start out with salads. If it has an ingredient list, steer away from it. Shop the perimeter of the store (or basically, just the produce section, with a brief foray into beans/rice/nut-based dairy).

  9. I come down to the bottom and smile.

    I love that you did one for getting people off of dialysis.

    I feel like that has to be its own subject for the non-Lupus people to be able to find.

    But, hooray that it is on the site now, so I can post links for people.

  10. The gallon of water a day protocol even had to be monitored so that some did not get too much fluid. And that Dr Kim Allan Williams guy; he’s too nice a guy.

  11. International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention

    This is news. This is why we read NutritionFacts. I doubt that I would ever get this stuff elsewhere.

    I have high hopes.

    Impressions:

    (1) Finally! One of these journals run by someone who is actually legitimate!

    And Open Access. What more could you ask for?

    Kim Williams, M.D. is solid in two worlds – WFPB Nutrition and Cardiology. To whatever extent he can bring those two worlds together can only be a good thing for everyone of good intent.

    (2) From the first page of the web site intro, the new International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention states that it “also incorporates the International Journal of Lifestyle Medicine.”

    Uh-oh. Here the red flags start flyin’ high.

    The International Journal of Lifestyle Medicine has always appeared to me to be a profit generating vanity piece run out of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute (both Editor-in-Chief and Managing editor), by James Rippe, largely to promote his own practice. Notable for who is absent from the editorial board: https://journals.sagepub.com/editorial-board/ajl

    In case you missed it:

    “According to the New York Times, he (Rippe) received $10M in funding between 2010 and 2014 from the Corn Refiners Association to study health effects of high fructose corn syrup and published reports “disputing any special health consequences associated with the corn-based sweeter”; he also received a $41,000-a-month fee from the group which the Times said was for him “to serve as an outside expert whom it repeatedly asked to send commentary pieces to local newspapers and dispute any claims that consuming high-fructose corn syrup in foods was any more risky than sugar.”[5][6]” Wikipedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Rippe

    Not my kinda guy. But, hey – this sort of thing may be right up your alley. Here ya go:
    https://journals.sagepub.com/home/ajl

    ————————————

    (3) From the same first page: “The IJDRP is a publication of The Plantrician Project.”

    What in the world is the Plantrician Project? Never heard of ’em! Well – they seem to have a bunch of entrepreneurs on their board. A buncha rich guys. A marketer, a publicist, an actress – this is science, huh? They did manage to snag Dr. Esselstyn! There’s a guy with Beyond Meat – sounds good for the Vegans amongst us, but the saturated fat and heme iron in some of the fake meat products may be problematic for those who actually care about health – this could be a built in conflict of interest on the Board, itself. And a guy who runs a for-profit Internet University (Full Sail University) – be careful of these guys – they each have their reasons for being there.

    The separate Board of Advisors looks legit – I see lotsa familiar names.

    We’ll withhold judgement – we can only wait and see what happens.

    Board of Directors: https://plantricianproject.org/board-of-directors
    Board of Advisors: https://plantricianproject.org/board-of-advisors

    Note that the Plantrician Project owns all rights to this new Journal. I.e., the Journal does not publish independently of their influence. The Plantrician Project Board of Directors (not the Board of Advisors) are the guys in control of the journal content:

    “The Society shall own the Journal and its title, including all trademark rights and copyrights. The Society through its appointed Editor in Chief and Editorial Advisory Board will have exclusive control of the editorial policy and the editorial content of the Journal.”

    Spells it out pretty clearly right there.

    ————————————

    (4) From the same first page: “in addition, we publish the Disease Reversal and Prevention Digest, a digital magazine that complements the Journal.” The payment plan is kinda neat: “Pay what you can. We suggest $7.99.”

    This may just be worth exploring – if only for the neat payment concept.

    But there is a lot of free reading out there that one might want to get to, first.

    ————————————

    (5) From the same first page: “Managing Editor is, Dr. Laurie Marbas, who has brought the Journal to life. Dr. Marbas is board certified in family medicine and lifestyle medicine, has an MBA in health organization management, and many years of experience engaging patients to improve their health with nutrition and lifestyle interventions.” This is who is actually running things. Kim Williams, M.D.,on the other hand, is only Editor-in-Chief, and may play anything from an active role to a figurehead role – we cannot know from where we are reading. I dunno anything about Marbas except what she has out there about herself on the Internet. Maybe she’s good and solid. Maybe she’s just a self-promoter like so many others out there. Maybe she’s both. We will see.

    ————————————

    So far so OK. They have now put out four issues – 86 pages – > 47 pages, a little more sparse over time. I hope that is not a harbinger.

    We’ll just look at Vol. 1, No. 1. 2019. First issue.

    It starts with the usual intro letters from the M.D.s. Plus one from a financial backer (Dan Purjes) from behind the curtain which is unusual – I do not recall seeing anything like this in a scientific journal, before. More like a Pritikin testimony than anything. But OK – if the financial backer wants to talk, he gets to talk – whatever Lola wants . . . Odd – but not a deal killer.

    One amusing note – the Doctor’s Notes and the importance that different Doctors place on titles in their signature lines:

    “David Jenkins, OC, MD, FRSC, FRCP, FRCPC, PhD, DSc
    Professor of Nutritional Sciences
    Canada Research Chair in Nutrition and Metabolism
    Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto”

    Contrasted with:

    “Dean Ornish, MD”

    ——————–

    Who you gonna call?

    ——————–

    The first article is the one Dr. Greger discussed in his current video:

    Six-Week Raw, Vegan Nutrition
    Protocol Rapidly Reverses Lupus
    Nephritis: A Case Series
    Brooke Goldner, MD

    [Andrea and dcraze, both posting above, picked up possible problems with this article that I did not catch while reading it. Good calls!]

    Lupus is one of the sadder things one will ever encounter – young ladies just startin’ out gettin’ knocked to their knees in the flower of their womanhood, one after the other – “next” – through no fault of their own. Pulls the rug right out from under who she is meant to be forever – makes you question the very legitimacy of the deity of your choice. Ya need a drink – even if you don’t drink. Life sucks – it ain’t fair. You can put band-aids on it but it’s a long downhill slide ahead. It’s just heart-breaking.

    Butcha gotta be strong.

    Realizing all that – this article is really just two case reports – in an established Medical Journal, it might be given 2/3 of one column on one page, not the 10 pages it gets here. No one in his right mind is ever going to change clinical practice after reading two case reports. Still – it may open minds . . . especially when nothing else is working . . .

    As for renal dysfunction – dependin’ – my first steps are typically animal protein reduction and salt reduction. I have not focused on sugars or fats or raw foods or smoothies or water intake. Just animal protein reduction and salt reduction. You never want to oversell – but good “surprises,” if they come, are then no surprise at all.

    Of particular interest to me in this article were three items:

    (1) For whatever reason – raw vegan-style foods seemed to work better in this context than cooked vegan-style foods. I am a little skeptical – but it may be worth bearing in mind.

    (2) Dr. Goldner went with smoothies. I always recommend against smoothies. She had good results. It is hard to argue against good results. Hmmmm . . .

    (3) I always suggest against fasting in any form. Fasting was a disaster for the gentleman. No surprise, there.

    And –

    (4) There is a question – of people with lupus, how many on this sort of diet intervention get these kind of results? 100%? Or 0.01%? That is the sort of question that these case reports never answer, and it is why they cannot be taken particularly seriously. This is where randomized clinical trials steal the show.

    ————————————

    There’s another 62 pages to the first issue of this new Journal – I think we can stop for now.

    This Journal looks interesting. It is needed. It is going to go through growing pains. It will only be as good as the studies it attracts.

    If Kim Williams can bring Cardiologists into the mix, well – think shotgun marriage between the cattlemen and the farm folk – that would be great accomplishment in itself.

    We will see how it goes –

    Vivamus

    1. Vivamus,

      The man on Forks Over Knives who reversed his dialysis has a Facebook site where there are 7,000 people doing it and he said that there are a lot of people having success.

      Yes, it is not a randomized control study.

      I will tell you that Plant-Based would be something I would change my practice over just from the testimonials of people who got off dialysis and stopped needing kidney transplants.

      Yes, larger studies are needed, but first any type of study has to be posted somewhere and those small testimonial studies are where things start.

      Without one of those, nothing ever changes.

      1. “The man on Forks Over Knives who reversed his dialysis has a Facebook site where there are 7,000 people doing it and he said that there are a lot of people having success.”

        Deb,

        Could you give me the url on that?

        “I will tell you that Plant-Based would be something I would change my practice over just from the testimonials of people who got off dialysis and stopped needing kidney transplants.”

        I wouldn’t. No even the least bit tempted.

        There are plenty of testimonials on the Atkins sites, the Keto sites, the Paleo sites, the Vegan sites, the coffee enema sites, the laetrile sites, the genetic analysis sites, the MTHFR sites, the hair analysis sites, the fruitarian sites, the fasting sites, the breatharian sites, etc., etc., etc.

        Ya wanna testimonial – I’ll give you a testimonial – hey, these guys are teaching this stuff:
        https://nypost.com/2017/06/15/breatharian-couple-survives-on-the-universes-energy-instead-of-food/

        We have plenty of refugees on this site from the very convincing testimonials from various of these other sites.

        Testimonials are the first tools of quackery.

        Besides snaring the innocent – they are fodder for the converted.

        I find testimonials useful for myself on this site – because I am one of those converted to a WFPB lifestyle (including oysters and wild Alaskan pink salmon).

        But I view such testimonials with great care. As something to consider – not necessarily as something to do.

        ———————————-

        “Yes, larger studies are needed, but first any type of study has to be posted somewhere and those small testimonial studies are where things start.

        Without one of those, nothing ever changes.”

        Understood. No argument there.

        But you only change the Standards of Care – Clinical Practice – with the concurrence and guidance of the learned Professional Societies.

        There are excellent reasons to stay within their guidelines: for optimal proven care, ethical, professional, economic, and medico-legal.

        To change guidelines – like turning a ship – takes time and effort – and it cannot ever be done on the basis of testimonials.

        Change requires hard data from repeated respected studies published in reputable journals.

        Sure, you can fiddle around the margins – I do that all the time – but you also have to cross all the Ts and dot all the Is while you are doing so.

        Especially while you are doing so.

        Or you won’t be doing anything for long.

        Deb.

        All the best,

        Vivamus

    2. I have had a subscription to that journal since the beginning. The same concerns that you have, I share.

      It means well but people who have done serious studies will publish in ‘serious’ conventional journals. It will have to publish quality articles from non ‘vegan’ researchers to get any traction. Otherwise it will just end up like an only slightly more credible version of the Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine

      1. Mr Fumblefingers,

        I defer to your greater experience with this journal – I have not even gotten through the first volume, yet.

        Has Kim Williams gotten any of his fellow Cardiologists on board? Or is he just figureheading?

        Any useful studies? Or just case reports, reviews and essays?

        I see the lower number of pages in the latest issue – does it seem to be petering out?

        Thank you for any insights –

        Vivamus

        1. Kim Williams is doing more than figureheading since he has already written a number of pieces for the Journal. There are also at least a couple of other cardiologists on the advisory board – Joel Kahn and Columbus Batiste – but I can’t say that I recognise, or have checked, the nams of all involved.

          The big problem is … who is going to fund large-scale, methodologically rigorous disease prevention studies? Sure, the dairy industry etc will fund all sorts of studies on risk reduction and disease prevention. Pete Granger (former marketing manager for the then (Australian) Victorian Dairy Industry Board) keeps posting such dairy industry funded studies every time dairy is mentioned here. The problem is that researchers are kind of expected to produce findings that show dairy is part of the solution not part of the problem. Ditto for the meat and egg industries etc.

          The chance of getting NIH money for that sort of thing is very low. It’s possible that some of the rich people on the various boards might fund studies, but even if they did, a single good study would take years to complete. They certainly couldn’t fund enough studies to fill just one edition a year of the Journal let alone quarterly or monthly editions. Also, the research heavy hitters here like Dean Ornish and David Jenkins would be under considerable institutiuonal pressure to publish in high impact journals anyway. For that matter, people like Greger, Katz, Fuhrman and McDougall are hard-pressed as it is trying to produce material for their own websites/newsletter, conference presentations etc. Their capacity to produce stuff for this Journal would be limited.

          On a positive note, they might have better luck persuading grad students (desperate to get published) to produce material. The fact that the Journal is not covered by PubMed is a very big disincentive though.

          So, in brief, my impression is no ‘serious’ studies yet and yes I suspect that there’s a good chance that it will peter out eventually.

  12. I was watching the homeless channels on YouTube and they said that there has been a dramatic increase in homelessness since a year ago but they also said that a lot of the housing projects are scams. One of them is being investigated about whether they stole 100 million dollars that were earmarked for housing for homeless people. A few of the people I am following are homeless but they are helping other people get into housing. I hate that they would get scammed.

    I say it here because people are scamming people about everything and that is why the journals need to have a higher standard.

    Still though, in almost 3 years, watching YouTube videos, I feel like I have received so much free information and it is like the song concept by Tim McGraw of being unbroken.

    The concept that we can just not scam people and just be nice and give information, including about WFPB freely and it literally as if our bodies can become unbroken.

    The homeless people can access Whole Foood Plant-Based teachings at the library computers or in churches or on their phones for free and we get a free journal to boot.

    1. I have been trying to figure out the culture with my broken brain.

      There is a scam culture in every part of society.

      Then there is a greedy bait and switch culture where we come up with answers that are really good but we outprice the good things So that poor people can’t afford the things at all. We take something like immunotherapy and have it start at $1000 and suddenly it becomes a half million dollars.

      I have been reading about these ways to replace fossil duels that are dirt cheap and we won’t make them dirt cheap we will make billions on them by pricing them more than fossil fuels because everybody wants to be a millionaire.

      Tesla is saying that they are going to make Teslas that cost $25,000.

      I hope they do. I hope that some of the millionaires turn around and change the world.

      There is a scam culture and an exploit culture. We need a bigger hero culture.

      Dr Greger, your name is on the hero list.

      Thank you for that.

    1. Hey the Deb. You asked if the whole plant based diet is good for heart disease. Here is a reference in a paper. “Wang et al. [76] reported consumption of yellow-orange vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, carrots and pumpkins, was inversely associated with heart disease, but not stroke. The adjusted HR for heart disease was 0.77 (95%CI 0.60–0.97) for every once/day increase in consumption of yellow-orange vegetables.” I think this might be because of the phosphorus in them, among other more superior whole food nutrients. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5986475/ Thank you for your attention. Perhaps these foods are good for cancer too if cancer is related to plaque lumps or DNA damage cause DNA has a lot of phosphorus.

  13. I would call for caution about this journal. Though highly topical to NF, it is new and, probably because of that, seems to attract case studies covering just a few patients in an article. It is easy to generalise those cases into beliefs that are not nearly as well-founded in statistics as the other reports presented on NF.

    In comparison, the highest work that I’ve seen in this field has not received any attention on NF at all, much to my surprise, and that is the EAT commission of the Lancet, which overviewed many metastudies in an editorial committee. They reported in februari 2019 what constitutes a healthy diet from a medical viewpoint (with no surprises to the NF public) and a computational model for how this fits into a future that fulfills the Paris agreements [0] — and it shows that dietary changes are part of all successful future scenarios.

    The work is thorough, but often mis-interpreted by popular press, I find. “So I can only eat 14g of beef a day?” instead of “So people should eat no more than 7g/day on average” or “So when I eat a diet with more splendour than mere carbohydrates I do not need to eat meat and then it is healthier to drop it completely”. This is due to poor reading and wishful thinking, but the report is quite clear that meat is only of added value to those who eat an unbalanced, nutritionally poor diet. They are more neutral about eggs than NF tends to be, much to my surprise.

    https://www.thelancet.com/commissions/EAT

    https://eatforum.org/eat-lancet-commission/eat-lancet-commission-summary-report/

    [0] Though America did not ratify this, I’m hesitant to believe that this is a representative act of their elected leader.

    1. “I would call for caution about this journal.”

      Yup.

      ——————————————–

      Rick,

      Just going through the first issue – a few case reports, a few reviews, a few editorial commentaries. Haven’t really absorbed it all at this point – I am pausing to write this to you.

      So far I am lowering expectations.

      I haven’t noticed any Cardiology, yet. So much for the hoped for influence of Kim Williams. Perhaps it will come in time.

      Thus far it looks like preaching to the choir – conducted by the usual suspects – Barnard, Esselstyn, Fuhrman. My hope is that it may serve – and I mean this kindly – as a bit of a kindergarten for non-academic WFPB clinicians to learn to publish. They might not even think of sending anything to the established journals. First a solo case report – maybe primarily self-promoting, true – then maybe a collaborative effort – then maybe, one day – one day a real live study.

      Maybe even something that can be replicated. I am a little concerned about that so far.

      Coached, perhaps, by experienced people who really want them to succeed.

      For now – for now it looks like baby steps – but, hey, I’m not even through the first effort, yet.

      Lowering expectations: gotta crawl before ya can walk.

      ——————————-

      You wrote:

      “In comparison, the highest work that I’ve seen in this field has not received any attention on NF at all, much to my surprise, and that is the EAT commission of the Lancet, which overviewed many metastudies in an editorial committee.”

      Looks like I have more reading to do . . .

      Can’t get to it today. I’ll bring it up in a little while after I have actually read it – will you be around and about?

      As to why it has not been reviewed here? Pure speculation:

      (1) They haven’t gotten around to it, yet. Witness that this video was on a study published “2019-04-01.” We shall see.

      (2) You have your biases, I have my biases. This site has it’s biases – when information does not support those biases, other information tends to be prioritized, instead. It may be wise to cast a wide net beyond far NF – I know I do.

      Thank you for bringing up the EAT commission study – I’ll take a look at it as time permits.

      To your health!

      Vivamus

  14. Wouldn’t it be a laudable goal of the American College of Cardiology to put ourselves out of business within a generation or two? We have come a long way in prevention of cardiovascular disease, but we still have a long way to go. Improving our lifestyles with improved diet and exercise will help us get there.

    Dr. Kim A. Williams

    1. Thanks Dan. From your link, I think the last sentence of the article is key. Dr Williams sums up saying that some patients are able to do it, and some are not.

      This is no small matter as we have seen over time in this forum as well as other wfpb sites. Even long time fans have had troubles sticking to the plan (or even doing it at all) without incorporating processed foods, baking, oils/salt or whatever. It is not an easy path for everyone though maybe people who were raised on good healthy foods have an easier time of it.

      1. Barb, (Did you bike today? I’ve been keeping up with my exercise routine)

        Dr. Williams provides a personal food transition strategy. He used meat substitutes and got his LDL down.

        1. Dan, Dr Williams is awesome. He has many videos on youtube for talks and interviews…. he did a podcast with Rich Roll too if I remember correctly. I’ll have a look.

          Yes I am keeping up with bike riding and glad you are too! I even got a neighbour out to join me at 7am yesterday for a few turns around the block :) And she bought fruit and veg the day before – miracles never cease! lol

          Today I am also dodging the occassional rain while I walk another dog for a neighbour doing poorly. Busy day.

          I don’t use the meat substitutes but I could see where they might add variety and interest to meals especially if you have kids or a spouse to impress.

  15. Off topic:
    I’m having a 14-lake turtle day here in NE Okla. I saw that many turtles sitting on a water log by the shoreline. I sometimes count that many hummingbirds in a swarm. The hummers have just gone south though. I will be putting up their feeder soon.

    1. “I’m having a 14-lake turtle day here in NE Okla. I saw that many turtles sitting on a water log by the shoreline. I sometimes count that many hummingbirds in a swarm. The hummers have just gone south though. I will be putting up their feeder soon.”

      Dan,

      Sounds like a hard life. But someone has to do it.

      I wonder if the turtles worry about the data from latest video on this site.

      Or if the hummingbirds worry about getting enough fiber.

      Thanks for the concentrated Kim Williams – I think highly of the gentleman.

      My father shared many of his views – without the optimism.

      I look for middle ground.

      Keep leadin’ that hard life –

      Vivamus

      1. V,
        Semi retirement by the lake takes up much of my time. I’m inspector general of the lake, the bird life, sunrise and sunset and the moon and stars, squirrels, changing seasons. It’s a lot to keep track of.

        1. Hard livin’ Dan,

          Sunset . . .

          I have seen no haze in the West.

          No tinged skies.

          Just a beautiful blue.

          But looking towards the sun near sunset – but not quite there – the sun still a ways up in the sky – there was that exact same orange glow that you see in the photographs from the wildfire counties.

          Maybe from far, far away – maybe from the stratosphere. I dunno.

          You noticing anything from our friends to the West?

          Sleep sound –

          Vivamus

          ——————————————————————————————

          . . . he stood a long time looking down
          To where the gray-green Channel water
          Slapped at the foot of the little town,
          And to where his boat, the Sarah P,
          Bobbed at the tide on an even keel,
          With her one old sail, patched at the leech,
          Furled like a slattern down at heel.

          He stood for a while above the beach,
          He saw how the wind and current caught her;
          He looked a long time out to sea.
          There was steady wind, and the sky was pale,
          And a haze in the east that looked like smoke . . .

          from Dunkirk
          Robert Nathan
          1941
          http://collections.mun.ca/PDFs/cns/TheGoldenCaravan.pdf
          pp 8-11

          1. V,
            I see some of the west coasters come to Oklahoma and drop a jaw over the cost differences. I do well paying painting for them. They are happy to get a nice little spread for not too much dough and they may do a 70K fix-up.

            I like your sailing imagery. I like the small boats. I lake sailed for a few years in central Oklahoma. Piece of heaven.

    2. Dan,

      A 14-lake turtle day!

      That sounds fabulous.

      I just found out that some of my snow-birder relatives bought a lake house in-State. So I may get to spend time there.

      That and my father and his wife have kept the woman who has been doing the cooking, cleaning, and laundry and she is going to snowbird with them.

      I smile because I have to let go of my anti-elitism, elitism so I can go enjoy myself at a lake house.

      1. Deb,
        Was it Emerson who said, “Give me health and a day and I will make the pomp of emperors ridiculous.” Ralph was really big on nature.
        I still have some hummingbirds.

        And I landed some exterior painting today on a nearby lake house. It has a killer view. My eyes are hurting already.

  16. I think this journal should do a test of pistachios, rich in lithium for mania of bipolar. Maybe also flax seed meal and bran or wheat germ and lecithin for anthrosclerosis. There was a clearing house lithium is so effective for mania. Thank you for your attention.

  17. Love this!
    I personaly have had Hashimoto and man when I switched to whole food plant based diet organic legumes grains – my inflammation has gone down down down… yet the keto group is so “sincerely concerned about me” eating inflammatory food??? What ???

  18. Hi. I also think this journal should do a study about raisins or grapes and arthritis. Raisins and grapes are rich in boron and boron has been used to treat arthritis. I heard gin soaked raisins treated arthritis anecdotately. I bet the whole food works better than just the boron. B3, found in peanuts was also used to treat it. Maybe raisins and peanuts could treat arthritis.

  19. Hi. Here’s another research suggestion. I found a link that said the high levels of Potassium in Sweet Potatoes can lower heart rates. Is Potassium related to heart rates? Can sweet potatoes lower heart rate? One researcher thought so. Beans have a lot of Potassium, maybe that’s why they lower pulse rate. Are lima beans good at lower pulse rate? The beans with the most potassium? How about Swiss greens? What if it is another nutrient in arjuna and hawthorn? The herbs some people take to lower pulse? Thank you.

    1. Matthew Smith,

      I lost where you posted the link above, but I loved the link.

      I found apples and pears and green leafy vegetables were inversely associated with stroke.

      So I guess we have to eat some of those with our yellow and orange vegetables.

      I love your passion.

      1. There is a reference here that too high potassium can slow the heart rate too much here:
        https://www.cigna.com/individuals-families/health-wellness/hw/medical-topics/bradycardia-aa107571
        “Conditions that can slow electrical impulses through the heart. Examples include having a low thyroid level ( hypothyroidism ) or an electrolyte imbalance , such as too much potassium in the blood.”
        You can use this to create a more ideal slow heart rate, I surmise. Worth a test.

  20. Molybdenum is involved in schzophrenia and other mental illnesses.
    Molybdenum, ng/mL OR of schz P
     ≤1.59 57 38 1.754 (0.933–3.296) 0.081
     1.59~2.07 32 39 1.000
     >2.07 25 37 0.790 (0.375–1.662) 0.534
    They say Molybdenum can treat headaches. Is this the headache of schzophrenia? Can it treat migraines? There is no real medicine for this pain.

    Kidney Beans and raw soaked lentils have a lot of Molybdenum, do you think they can treat these disease? Along with the other nutrients in them in the right ratio because you have to use the whole food? Molybdenum is very electropositive. Electropositivity can knock out all the mental illness villians, I hypothesize in my opinion, because they are electronegitive.

  21. In a paper they said that silica is related to alzheimer’s. Bananas, Potatoes, mint, stinging nettle, horsetail weed have this. “Recent epidemiological results on the Paquid cohort 52 after 8 years of follow-up have shown that high silica levels (≥11.25 mg/l) are associated with a lower risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (respectively, adjusted RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.58–0.96 and adjusted RR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.55–0.99). ” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4764671/#:~:text=Recent%20epidemiological%20results%20on%20the,%25%20CI%200.55%E2%80%930.99).

  22. There are some practical reasons why doctors don’t prescribe cabbage and spinach for various diseases. The first, is that it isn’t legal for doctors to prescribe treatments using substances that have not been through clinical trials. The second, is that since so few foods have been through the clinical trial process, turmeric being the only one I can think of at the moment, patients looking to make a fast buck can sue their defenceless doctor who has nothing in the generally accepted medical literature to fall back on. Personally I’ve never met a doctor who would ever consider using food before a drug. I, on the other hand, would never consider using a drug where food would work, and likely work better.

    It’s never been acknowledged by any doctor I’m aware of, that the most powerful things we put into our bodies are food and water. If that were not true, we would all be dead. Consequently, not considering food as a weapon against disease is foolhardy, illogical, against all the laws of nature and in many cases just plain fraud.

    And not to forget our running dispute about grain, I didn’t notice that word being used in this talk.

    More to the point, I have been taking my own advice and have maintained a non-grain, dairy, sugar posture since I was writing KILL THE CORONAVIRUS back in December. That’s when it was obviously only a matter of time before it was declared a pandemic. I needed to follow my own advice. At around the same time, I had to go to see my ENT who cleans out my ear with a pair of angled needle nosed pliers (you will see the photograph on my Facebook page:

    https://www.facebook.com/healersince1980.

    I have no ear drum thanks to an ear infection that nearly killed me in 2009. So, now I have no ear drum and the wax can build up right into the middle of my head. It took a 4 1/2 hour operation to clear the infection and save my life. I asked the surgeon about the possibility of the infection coming back if I didn’t stop consuming dairy and grain. He denied it could ever happen again. So, using myself as a guinea pig, I decided to find out if he was right as soon as possible while I had his attention.

    It took longer than expected to get results. He retired in the meantime, to devote himself to pure science that did not involve using dietary techniques to prevent ear infections. I very nearly punched him out for that, because not advising children and thus causing more victims, amounts to child predation in my books. So, he doesn’t talk to me anymore. He did not enjoy being called a child predator.

    Anyway, I posted a photo of the contents of my ear on my Facebook page How to cure ear infections and Tinnitus. I mis-named the page – you cannot cure Tinnitus. I’ve never been able to figure out how to change it since to make sense.

    Anyway, You can see that the stuff that came out of my ear is not wax. It’s a mixture of dairy and flour. No, I haven’t been able to get it analyzed yet so my claim is just an opinion until it’s tested. The labs are fully booked doing Covid-19 testing, so I’m being patient. But it will be done because I’m going to write a book about ENTs using their profession as a legal shield to grow their incomes by ignoring dairy and grain as causal, then waiting until the kids show up with unnecessary ear infections. It’s a scam of Global Proportions. So the test has to be done before publication.

    Yesterday, I went for my first ear cleaning/torture since the gunk was extracted in February. So, 7 months. In that time, I’ve had almost no dairy or grain. I wasn’t perfect but I was close.

    Getting the wax-based gunk out of your ear when it’s in as deep as mine is, is not like cleaning your ear with a Q-Tip or your elbow. This is serious torture that happens deep in your head where there are a surprising number of pain sensitive nerves close to the surface of the thin skin that covers the interior architecture of the auditory cavern where your middle and inner ear live. As the wax is secreted, it dries out because all of those sensitive surfaces are exposed to the atmosphere normally outside your head. It dries at and just below the skinline, as well as clumping around the hair in there.

    Ear hair is much coarser than the hair on your head, it’s more like the hair in your eyebrows. It’s much better anchored than the hair on top of your head. Pulling wax that is stuck to ear hair is like pulling your belly button out through your ear. I’ve had that every 3 months since 2012.

    Having your ear disturbed like that causes tinnitus or makes existing tinnitus so bad that suicide is only a moment away at any time of the day or night.

    But that’s not all. Tampering with the works in your head also disturbs your sense of balance, your ability to think clearly, and it can profoundly impact your judgement in ways you formerly would never consider. You went under the knife stable and wake up stable usually. But after a while, your sense of balance recedes remarkably. If you were not an agile person before, you either become one our you end up injured because you fell. How badly you’re injured depends on what you fell on or into or down, or what ran over you that you didn’t hear coming.

    It affects your body functions in ways you would think impossible. Functions like thinking, that were formerly automatic are now things you need Zen-like focus to achieve now. The life you live is not what you were born into. You become a person who feels like you are living with rented functions that can be terminated when the contract expires. You don’t know the expiry date. Your ability to focus on what you are supposed to be doing to live your life in an organized, responsible manner diminishes. Your interest in relationships recedes to the point of irrelevance. You are handicapped in an invisible way that your friends and family will never come to grips with.

    That is the future of children and even adults who suffer dietary abuse who end up under the knife. Once it happens, you are happy because the initial problem seems resolved as much as seems reasonable. It takes time before you fully comprehend the consequences. That, is when depression sets in.

    If you happen to be treated for depression, no one asks if your ear problems are the cause of your depression. No one asks or tells you that your life would be so much better without dairy and grain in it. Sugar too actually because sugar accelerates fermentation. Grain and dairy ferment. Fermentation causes bacterial blooms. A serious body burden. We all know that. So, that results in an overpopulation of bacteria that has no business being in the human body. But there is one group of organisms that loves bacteria. Corona Viruses. Bacteria is an energy source for all forms of corona viruses including Covid-19. So, think about it this way – what other species consume dairy and grain naturally? The African Oxpecker consumes dairy several drops at a time seasonally. NOTHING else does but offspring for a short time during infancy. That’s it. Rodents consume grain. But they have to eat it, break it up, excrete it, then later after it’s dried out, eat it again then excrete it once more to finally get the nourishment they need. They live short lives. Everything else has evolved to consume grain only as an incidental, not as a primary source of nutrition. Humans of course consume grain and dairy. Only humans and zoo fed animals get infected by Corona Viruses that exist in every country and have since life began as far as we know.

    The last component is fat. Zoo animals such as tigers get fed beef. Tigers and people eat beef. Beef is domesticated, unfit meat, full of fat. Fat, insulates our immune systems from attacking Covid-19. Not rocket science is it? Wild animals don’t get Covid-19. Ever seen a snake with a runny nose?

    Yesterday was different though. It was different because when my ENT looked in my ear, he put his stuff down and said “Perfect!”

    I didn’t know what he meant. What he meant was that for the first time since my operation in 2010, my ear was completely free of wax.

    No torture yesterday.

    When I told him how it had happened, he couldn’t take it in. It was outside his ability to reconcile with what he has believed for his entire career.

    That is the mindset I, as an amateur armed with a self-educated opinion face every time I talk about plant-based healing. That’s 42 years worth and counting.

    So the information in this lecture was pretty hot stuff for me. I joined that Group right away. Finally. A communication vehicle I can talk to without having to start with nutritional cavemen.

    1. Tinnitis can be treated with zinc from pumpkin seeds and B12. Depression can be treated with hibiscus tea. green tea, saffron (iron and molybdenum). Sunflower seeds and flaxmeal have B1 in them which is known to be a depression fighter because beriberi is an awful lot like depression. So Iron, B1, and omega 3s for depression from flaxseeds and sunflower seeds.

      1. An absence if B12 would cause tinnitus in many if not all people, but so do a lot of dietary deficiencies. When these are finally nutritionally corrected it seems like tinnitus has been cured. Nope. That is a nutritional fix. Probably most tinnitus is caused by nutritional deficiencies. The same goes for all the other stuff you mentioned.

        When the only cause of tinnitus is not dietary, my experience shows that noise levels are not affected that much or for long if at all, no matter what you do.

        Thank you for the reminder though Mathew.

    1. I can’t think who would be using the whole fava bean plant. Where would you even put it? Up here in the frozen north, trying to deal with that plant in a small apartment would not fly until it was flung out the window from a great height.

  23. Thank you for FINALLY doing a video on Lupus & WFPB lifestyle. I would LOVE MORE on the topic, as I have been on Dr. Goldner’s Green smoothies for 11 months now and have seen quite and improvement in my Lupus symptoms. I have also moved more towards Whole Foods, SOS free (although this is the hardest for me) & have realized that just because it’s vegan (processed foods) doesn’t mean it’s healthy!

  24. I would like to know what Dr. Greger’s thoughts are on the IC diet (interstitial cystitis). It doesn’t indicate avoiding meat and dairy, though his research shows they are an inflammatory. Though, tofu and some fruits and nuts being listed to on the foods to avoid. The healing naturally support groups give conflicting advice, but warn against high oxalate foods. It’s all very confusing.

  25. The foods rich in silicon, like Bananas, Potatoes, Mint, Bran, Psilium Fiber, Stinging Nettle, and Horsetail, and maybe even aerial alfalfa parts could be beneficial in preventing Alzheimer’s. https://www.rejuvenation-science.com/research-news/calcium-magnesium/n-silica-alzheimers “The women with Alzheimer’s disease were 2.7 times more likely to have daily silica intake considerably lower than those without Alzheimer’s disease, the researchers found.” Maybe you could try treating Alzheimer’s with these foods, and Nickel in matcha and Molybdenum from beans.

  26. May I point out that the protocol for lupus is not what Dr Greger recommends into the daily dozen and for a good reason: the daily dozen doesn’t work for reversing autoimmune diseases.

    Dr Goldner’s protocol is a raw plant nutrition with as mandatory basis:

    1) 500 gr of dark leafy greens (kale, spinach, etc) / cruciferous vegetables (broccolis, cabbages, etc),
    2) 1/2 cups of flax or chia seeds
    3) 2-3 liters of water

    Then, raw vegetables and fruits for adding to the calories. The mandatory basis can be drunk as a smoothies with added fruits for palatability. The goal is to hypernourish the cells with antioxydants, minerals and antiinflammatory omega 3s.

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