Type 1 Diabetes Treatment: A Plant-Based Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment: A Plant-Based Diet
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Is it possible to reverse type 1 diabetes if caught early enough?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The brand-new International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention had its share of typical plant-based miraculous disease reversals. After having not one but two heart attacks within two months, a whole food, plant-based diet and no more chest pain, controlling his cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugars while losing 50 pounds as a neat little side-bonus. Yet the numbers don’t capture the transformation, the resurrection from feeling like a “dead man walking” to getting his life back.

I already discussed the cases of autoimmune inflammatory disease reversal, the psoriasis, the lupus nephritis kidney inflammation; and, speaking of autoimmune-diseases-we-didn’t-think-we-could-do-anything-about, type 1 diabetes. In contrast to type 2 diabetes, which is a lifestyle disease that can be prevented and reversed with a healthy enough diet and lifestyle, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which your body attacks your own pancreas, killing off your insulin-producing cells and condemning you to a life of insulin injections—unless, perhaps, you catch it early enough. Maybe if we can switch people early enough to a healthy enough diet, we can reverse the course by blunting that autoimmune inflammation.

Now, we know patients with type 1 may be able to reduce insulin requirements and achieve better blood sugar control with healthier diets. For example, randomize children and teens to a nutritional intervention in which they boost the whole plant food density of their diet, meaning eating more whole grains, whole fruit, vegetables, legumes (which are beans, split peas, chickpeas, and lentils), nuts, and seeds. And the more whole plant foods, the better the blood sugar control.

The fact that more whole fruits was associated “with better [blood sugar] control has important clinical implications for nutrition education” in those struggling with type 1. We should be educating them on the benefits of fruit intake, and allaying “erroneous concerns that fruit may adversely affect blood sugar.” But this case series went beyond just proposing better control of the symptom of diabetes—high blood sugars—but better control of the disease itself, suggesting the anti-inflammatory effects of whole healthy plant foods “may slow or prevent further destruction of the [insulin-producing cells of the pancreas] if the dietary intervention is initiated early enough.” Where are they getting this from? Check it out.

One patient who began a vegetable-rich diet at age three, immediately following diagnosis of type 1 diabetes; but three years later, still has yet to require insulin therapy, while experiencing a steady decline in autoantibody levels, markers of insulin cell destruction. Another child, who didn’t start eating healthier until several months after diagnosis, maintains a low dose of insulin with good control. And even if the insulin-producing cells have been utterly destroyed, type 1 diabetics can still enjoy dramatically reduced insulin requirements and reduced inflammation and reduced cardiovascular risk, which is the #1 cause of death for type 1 diabetics over the age of 30. Type 1s have 11 to 14 times the risk of death from cardiovascular disease compared to the general population, and it’s already the #1 killer among the public, so it’s like 11 to 14 times more important for type 1 diabetics to be on the only diet and lifestyle program ever proven to reverse heart disease in the majority of patients—one centered around whole plant foods. And the fact it may also help control the disease itself is just sugar-free icing on the cake.

All this exciting new research was just from the first issue of the journal! As a bonus, there’s a companion publication called the Disease Reversal and Prevention Digest, a companion publication to the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention for the lay public with the belief I wholeheartedly share: that everyone has a right to understand the science that could impact their health. And so, you can go behind the scenes and hear directly from the author of the lupus series, with bonus interviews from luminaries like Dean Ornish, practical tips from dietitians on making the transition towards a healthier diet, complete with recipes.

The second issue continued to feature practical tips like how to eat plant-based on a budget, what Dr. Klaper is doing to educate medical students, what Audrey Sanchez from Balanced is doing to help change school lunches, and if you think that’s hard, Dr. Ostfeld got healthy foods served in a hospital (what a concept). And, what magazine would be complete without an article to improve your sex life?

Now, while the journal itself is free, downloadable at IJDRP.org, the companion digest, available at diseasereversaldigest.com, carries a subscription fee, but I, for one, am a proud subscriber.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The brand-new International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention had its share of typical plant-based miraculous disease reversals. After having not one but two heart attacks within two months, a whole food, plant-based diet and no more chest pain, controlling his cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugars while losing 50 pounds as a neat little side-bonus. Yet the numbers don’t capture the transformation, the resurrection from feeling like a “dead man walking” to getting his life back.

I already discussed the cases of autoimmune inflammatory disease reversal, the psoriasis, the lupus nephritis kidney inflammation; and, speaking of autoimmune-diseases-we-didn’t-think-we-could-do-anything-about, type 1 diabetes. In contrast to type 2 diabetes, which is a lifestyle disease that can be prevented and reversed with a healthy enough diet and lifestyle, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which your body attacks your own pancreas, killing off your insulin-producing cells and condemning you to a life of insulin injections—unless, perhaps, you catch it early enough. Maybe if we can switch people early enough to a healthy enough diet, we can reverse the course by blunting that autoimmune inflammation.

Now, we know patients with type 1 may be able to reduce insulin requirements and achieve better blood sugar control with healthier diets. For example, randomize children and teens to a nutritional intervention in which they boost the whole plant food density of their diet, meaning eating more whole grains, whole fruit, vegetables, legumes (which are beans, split peas, chickpeas, and lentils), nuts, and seeds. And the more whole plant foods, the better the blood sugar control.

The fact that more whole fruits was associated “with better [blood sugar] control has important clinical implications for nutrition education” in those struggling with type 1. We should be educating them on the benefits of fruit intake, and allaying “erroneous concerns that fruit may adversely affect blood sugar.” But this case series went beyond just proposing better control of the symptom of diabetes—high blood sugars—but better control of the disease itself, suggesting the anti-inflammatory effects of whole healthy plant foods “may slow or prevent further destruction of the [insulin-producing cells of the pancreas] if the dietary intervention is initiated early enough.” Where are they getting this from? Check it out.

One patient who began a vegetable-rich diet at age three, immediately following diagnosis of type 1 diabetes; but three years later, still has yet to require insulin therapy, while experiencing a steady decline in autoantibody levels, markers of insulin cell destruction. Another child, who didn’t start eating healthier until several months after diagnosis, maintains a low dose of insulin with good control. And even if the insulin-producing cells have been utterly destroyed, type 1 diabetics can still enjoy dramatically reduced insulin requirements and reduced inflammation and reduced cardiovascular risk, which is the #1 cause of death for type 1 diabetics over the age of 30. Type 1s have 11 to 14 times the risk of death from cardiovascular disease compared to the general population, and it’s already the #1 killer among the public, so it’s like 11 to 14 times more important for type 1 diabetics to be on the only diet and lifestyle program ever proven to reverse heart disease in the majority of patients—one centered around whole plant foods. And the fact it may also help control the disease itself is just sugar-free icing on the cake.

All this exciting new research was just from the first issue of the journal! As a bonus, there’s a companion publication called the Disease Reversal and Prevention Digest, a companion publication to the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention for the lay public with the belief I wholeheartedly share: that everyone has a right to understand the science that could impact their health. And so, you can go behind the scenes and hear directly from the author of the lupus series, with bonus interviews from luminaries like Dean Ornish, practical tips from dietitians on making the transition towards a healthier diet, complete with recipes.

The second issue continued to feature practical tips like how to eat plant-based on a budget, what Dr. Klaper is doing to educate medical students, what Audrey Sanchez from Balanced is doing to help change school lunches, and if you think that’s hard, Dr. Ostfeld got healthy foods served in a hospital (what a concept). And, what magazine would be complete without an article to improve your sex life?

Now, while the journal itself is free, downloadable at IJDRP.org, the companion digest, available at diseasereversaldigest.com, carries a subscription fee, but I, for one, am a proud subscriber.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

I first mentioned the new journal, International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention, in my previous video Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Lupus. Download the journal for free at www.IJDRP.org and subscribe to the companion digest at diseasereversaldigest.com.

To date all I’ve had are videos on preventing type 1 diabetes in the first place:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

103 responses to “Type 1 Diabetes Treatment: A Plant-Based Diet

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  1. This article said they put one of the patients on a lentil loaf. Lentils are rich in Molybdenum and I think Insulin might have Molybdenum in it. I think Insulin is getting expensive because it is getting harder to make as the doctors put less and less Molybdenum in the machine that makes insulin. Brewer’s yeast is good for type Ii diabetes.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3843299/ They thought it was because of the Chromium. Maybe it is because of the Molybdenum. The A1C of these type 1 diabetes was cut in half because of lentils in this study I think. Maybe because of the Molybdenum in lentils.

    1. Could be, can’t rule anything out, but lentil loaf would have been a large part of the diet, it’s no side dish. I think it tends to lower insulin resistance, probably by helping to drain the muscles and other cells of intra-cellular lipids, thus allowing insulin to work, and lentils have an extremely low Glycemic Index, even lower than beans, which by itself could explain the drop in A1C.

    2. Today, insulin is brewed up by microbes that have been genetically engineered with the gene for human insulin.

      Molybdenum is the 54th most abundant element in the Earth’s crust.

      1. Note however, that the successful type 1 diabetes diet was low glycemic and did not include grains or high glycemic fruit.
        It also included a small amount of low fat animal protein. The devil (or angel) is in the details.
        It was essentially the diet Dr. Fuhrman has always recommended.

  2. I really am reluctant to start out the week sounding cynical, but I need some help understanding the logic behind one of the policies of this new journal.

    First, a couple of quotes from the transcript:

    “As a bonus, there’s a companion publication called the Disease Reversal and Prevention Digest, a companion publication to the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention for the lay public with the belief I wholeheartedly share: that everyone has a right to understand the science that could impact their health. ”

    and:

    “Now, while the journal itself is free, downloadable at IJDRP.org, the companion digest, available at diseasereversaldigest.com, carries a subscription fee … ”

    So the well-paid doctors get the Journal free, while we “lay” people (ie. peasants who may be on a tight budget) have to pay for the digest!

    What, may I ask rhetorically, is the logic behind this decision?

    I can see if the digest is in paper form and mailed to people, there would be extra costs involved, but to post it on-line would a negligible cost issue.

      1. Darwin Galt,

        I’ve registered for the journal; as Mr Fumblefingers said, it’s free.

        But the companion digest does require a subscription. I’m willing to pay for that; I like to support the effort to get the word out about the importance of nutrition, and what exactly is good nutrition. And then, how to actually buy, prepare, and eat healthy foods.

        But if you’ve been on this website for a while, and looked at the videos and blogs, you probably know most of the information in both of these publications. I find the more information the better, because when I first found this site, I’d been a vegetarian for almost 45 years for environmental and sustainability reasons, but had worried all that time that it might not be healthy — because everybody told me that it couldn’t possibly be!! I was so relieved to learn that they were wrong!! Now, of course, I eat whole plant foods: I abstain from eating animal products, and I avoid eating processed and prepared foods, and avoid added oil, sugar, and salt.

        My BIG question is how to prepare foods with recipes that are SIMPLE, EASY, and QUICK. Because that is a sticking point for the working folks that I know. I can find Simple and Easy, but not so much Quick.

        1. Darwin,

          Quick is you taking a variety of vegetables out of the fridge, chopping them into a pot, adding water and heating. Season to suit. It takes ten minutes, assuming you pre-washed your veggies when you brought them home. It only takes three minutes for cereal and milk, but you get to suffer fermentation from that at your leisure since both dairy and grain ferment inside you. After that you may go the rest of the day letting room clearing farts sanitize your chair and your underwear. With no dairy and no grain, you have no fart, no snot, no phlegm, no snoring, no sleep apnea, no constipation (unless other factors kick in such as stress). So there are enough benefits to offset the extra seven minutes.

        2. Dr. J – I hear you on the simple, easy, and quick meals issue. So I’ll share with you a 2-ingredient “recipe”. I can barely call it a recipe because it’s just 2 ingredients. I often bake up a whole tray of potatoes at night – put ’em in the toaster oven and go to bed and they’re waiting in the morning. Here’s the recipe – take one or two of the potatoes (I love gold potatoes) and pour some canned creamed corn over them. Warm in microwave and eat. This takes all of 5 minutes and I have become addicted to this breakfast (or lunch, or snack, or dinner). Sometimes I add a little vinegar to the potatoes, sometimes some nutritional yeast, sometimes some jalapeno for a Tex-Mex flavor and sometimes sprinkle smoked paprika, or fresh cilantro, or parsley on top . . you get the idea. This recipe is better than it sounds – rich, creamy, satisfying. And potatoes are a complete protein. https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2770/2

        3. Dr. J –
          I’m with you about quick simple and easy. So let me share something I stumbled over recently.
          I bake up a tray of potatoes in my toaster oven at night – put ’em in, set it for an hour, go to bed, ready in the morning. For breakfast I cut one or two in half, pour some canned creamed corn over ’em, heat and eat. Ready in 5 minutes. There are infinite variations – add vinegar, salt, pepper, jalapenos, any green vegg, chopped onion (or not), smoked paprika, cilantro, or anything else you’ve got handy. But just the 2 items by themselves is really yummy. I always squeeze some fresh lemon or lime on just about everything I eat – buy ’em by the bag at Costco.
          But anyway, try this for breakfast, lunch, snack, dinner, . . .any time. Simple, easy, and quick. And healthy – remember the potato guy that ate potatoes for a year straight?
          I would love to hear any of your quick, simple, and easy recipes. Thanks!!

      2. Fumbles, I realize that we all get the Journal free.

        My point is that doctors would be more interested in the Journal, which they (as well as us), get free.

        Lay people would be more interested in the Digest, which we (as well as doctors) have to pay for.

        Assuming everyone wants what they’re interested in, the Doctors get what they want for free, whereas, the lay people have to pay for what they want.

        1. Darwin,
          Another way of looking at the policy is that if doctors get it free, they might be more inclined to take a look at it and the population as a whole, (their patients,) will benefit. Perhaps it would spread the word more quickly to those people who need help from their doctors.

          1. WFPBLiisa, Yes, you have a good point. That’s the only logic I could think of that might explain the policy.

            Unfortunately, I think most doctors will do what their computer tells them to do in treating patients. It’s also all tied in to what the insurance will cover.

            However, I do expect that the virtuous doctors will talk to their patients “off the record” about the benefits of a WFPB way of eating, once they learn about it.

    1. Darwin Galt,

      From the page where you can order the digest:

      “Proceeds from purchases of the Digest enable The Plantrician Project to continue to bring the interesting and engaging content we publish in the Digest to you. Proceeds also contribute to the considerable costs we incur to publish the IJDRP, the world’s only free to publish in and free to access scientific journal dedicated to disease reversal and prevention.” https://www.diseasereversaldigest.com/

        1. Beat me to it!

          The companion journal – Disease Reversal and Prevention Digest – https://www.diseasereversaldigest.com/ – carries a fee of:

          “Pay what you can. We suggest $7.99.”

          If you want to pay nothing – you pay nothing. Not a problem.

          Why have a payment option at all?

          Speculation:

          (1) The companion digest is much slicker than the Journal. More photography and graphics staff for the companion digest = much higher cost of production than the much drier layout of the Journal.

          (2) Human Psychology 101. Lotsa studies out there on this: people in general place higher value on things that they pay for or they have to work some task for than they do for things that are free. People tend to devalue things that are handed to them for free.

          The attitude: “free advice is worth what you pay for it” is pervasive.

          An optional fee covers this natural, normal human tendency.

          While people who prefer things free retain that option.

          Just look at the cart: price starts at “$0.00.” You can set it higher from there as you like.

          The only reason that I have not explored the Digest is that I have not finished reading all issues of the Journal, yet.

          I encourage others who are more comfortable with the Digest style of presentation to pursue it – at whatever price point they prefer – and report back.

          It does look kinda interestin’ . . .

          (3) Why is the Journal free?

          Speculation:

          In the Professional Journal world – publishers have been requiring exorbitant subscription fees for scores of years.

          Recently, Professionals – Academicians – their Librarians – and the people getting published – have all been striking back – with the development of Open Access Movement – which came out of the Open Source movement.

          The Open Access Movement warms the cockles of Professionals’, Academicians’ and Librarians’ hearts.

          Fee-based knowledge does not.

          You get what you don’t pay for –

          Vivamus

      1. Dr J,

        Actually, I made my first comment based on the NF video only. I should have first visited both the Journal and the Digest websites, before making a comment.

        Both publications sound great to me! I am usually able to decipher most Journal abstracts, but even then, I may still subscribe to the Digest just to help the cause :-)

    2. When I looked the subscription fee was optional (” Pay what you can. We suggest $7.99″). So I don’t get what you are upset about.

  3. I am glad every time T1D patients get anything good to look at. They ask for the information all the time.

    Wondering about the vaccine that helped them get their blood sugar under control.

    Laughing. I can’t remember the name of it but it was one that came up during COVID-19 as countries that still used the vaccine were dying less often from COVID-19.

    I want to understand the mechanism for how a vaccine could help blood sugar levels of T1D.

    Speaking of blood sugar spikes, did anyone see this?

    https://www.realclearscience.com/quick_and_clear_science/2020/09/28/a_psychological_trick_changed_diabetics_blood_sugar_levels.html

    1. Hey. Did you know that cilantro and coriander were recommended to treat the piles or the hemerhoid which is what the CDC has covid listed as?

        1. If you go to this website, https://wwwn.cdc.gov/dcs/contactus/form?fbclid=IwAR1_h6MYoXjREf_Ua8uH_KqVvOpDWAiS1aITak3EYi-RCprJKF8WIBNPSS4 you can get a dialog box that gives you a prompt to ask a question about, “covid, piles hemorrhoid” So apparently covid is the piles or the hemorrhoid or graves disease or polio or lupus. This disease, I do not believe, is transmittable by air. Some person comes up to and rips or steals the silicon from you. Element 14. The one below carbon on the periodic table. Silicon is in Bananas, Potatoes, mint, stinging nettle, horsetail weed, cilantro, bran, and psilium fiber. There is no virus that removes silicon from the body. If you get covid, piles, hemorrhoid, take some silicon.

          1. Matthew,

            I tried to look it up a few different ways but didn’t find an article like that.

            I see the search box but I don’t see the prompt that you are speaking of.

            Are you thinking of fecal/oral transmission?

            I haven’t found it but I would think they would have a whole list like that

            Meaning, “covid, piles hemorrhoid” “covid, coughing, wheezing” “covid, difficulty breathing” “covid, diabetes” etc.

            But that is just my thoughts because I am not seeing it at all.

            I have brain problems and sometimes I might miss things but I do drink Fiji water which has silica in it for removing aluminum from my brain. There was a study where people drank 1 liter per day for 12 weeks and it lowered the aluminum in their body.

            1. Matthew,

              I think I saw a dialogue box like that but it wasn’t the CDC.

              I think it was the pre-printed journal site. I haven’t been going there anymore and I don’t remember which site it was and when I tried to search for it other sites are up now.

  4. Thank you for making a video on T1D-ers like myself. The only time you hear about diabetes when it’s in reference to type 2 or perhaps gestational but rarely T1D! So huge THANK YOU, Doc!

  5. Is it the exclusion of animal products or the inclusion of whole food plants that makes the difference? What are the specific mechanisms?

    I hate to keep repeating myself in these comments but I am just looking for answers… What about those of us that have food sensitivities and cannot eat grains/beans/nightshades? Vastly limits the diet when trying to do WFPB. When I eat grains/beans/nightshades my ANA and organ specific antibodies goes up along with various pains and fatigue. I eat autoimmune (paleo) protocol (AIP) and I have no pain (still have swings of fatigue/depression). I can manage my autoimmune by eating AIP, but would like to “cure” it and eat a wider variety of food, including grains/beans/nightshades.

    I did just do the fasting mimicking diet and felt absolutely great except for being hungry. Had great energy and a clear head which is rare for me. Plan on doing that once a month in hopes to reduce autoimmunity.

    1. Autoimmune disorders respond well to grounding, where you put your bare wet on wet bare earth or buy an earthing mat and let the Earth’s electrons help fight your inflammation.

      1. Matthew Smith,

        Re grounding:

        “What’s wrong with this? Almost everything. Our cells don’t need an infusion of electrons. Live cell microscopy is a bogus test: his pictures can’t show that there are positive charges, and the blood cell clumping is only an artifact. Anyway, clumping blood cells have nothing to do with the alleged health effects. There is no evidence that EMF disrupts communications in our body or that grounding protects us from any hypothetical ill effects of using cell phones and other technology. And the third point about aligning with an intelligence network is wild imagination not supported by anything in science or reality….

        Of course, going barefoot can be dangerous and uncomfortable (cold feet, stepping on broken glass, becoming infected with hookworms, etc.). So instead you can buy their specially designed products: earthing sheets, earthing recovery bags, grounding mats, personal grounding kits, grounding patches, accessories, grounded shoes, an earthing bed, even products for pets. Herein lies the business end of the alternative medical claims.“

        https://www.skeptic.com/reading_room/bogus-claims-grounding-bare-feet-to-earth/

        1. Going barefoot dangerous and uncomfortable? Huh?
          I spend at least an hour or two most summer days in the yard accompanied by my Maine Coon. Both of us go barefoot. :)
          Best way to do yard work and not have to clean mud off my shoes.
          No hookworms here, no glass, just soft grass and soil. Love it!
          Feels great, and I only need to watch I don’t step on a bee. :)

      2. Matthew Smith, Yes, I agree. Earthing is fantastic at reducing inflammation, from any cause. Those who are skeptical can stand or sit barefoot on a safe patch of earth for 40 to 60 minutes. Note how you feel, especially your pain level, before and after. Wet ground will work better, so if you can walk or stand on wet sand or grass, even better.

        1. Lee,

          A lot of people tolerate things like beans if they are slowly introduced to them in a way that heals their gut microbiome. Gut microbiome changes based on what you eat. A lot of times people need to introduce a little at a time, particularly until they heal leaky gut (which can be healed) and until they have the proper gut bacteria.

          1. Deb, that is SOOOOO true. When I first went vegan I was a ‘salad shooter’. LOL Now that I am adjusted I have better digestion than the meat eaters in my house.

            This reminds me of going to vegan retreats. Everyone CLAIMS to be vegan but their bathroom times expose who actually ate vegan before the retreat.

    2. Plants have more fiber which slows sugar absorption. A WFPB diet also stays away from saturated animal fat. (It is in coconut and palm oil which is also avoided). Epidemiological evidence and intervention studies clearly show that in humans saturated fat significantly worsen insulin-resistance.

      If I cheat and eat things with coconut oil, it shows in my blood sugar test by being a little high. When I avoid it, fasting sugar level is in good range.

    3. Lee,

      Saturated fats make things worse.

      Animal-based proteins, like those found in meat, milk, and eggs also cause an inflammatory response.

      They had a study where people followed WFPB a vegan diet for 3-1/2 months experienced a significant improvement in autoimmune symptoms compared to SAD diet and there was another study where people who followed a WFPB vegan diet for 3 weeks significantly reduced their C-reactive protein, a significant factor in acute inflammation. There have also been studies that have demonstrated that a single meal high in animal fats could cause a spike in inflammation for over four hours and that the animal fats harmed the arteries, cutting the flow volume in half. Plus, studies have found that exposure to animal products can trigger autoimmune attacks and flare-ups.

    4. Lee- As a nurse volunteering on this website, I was glad to read that you are willing to try alternate approaches to control symptoms when eating WFPB, but I wonder how long you’ve been trying WFPB and if you’ve used smart strategies to gradually re-introduce your body to those legumes (as another commenter has suggested). You may want to isolate certain foods that you’ve noted cause symptoms then gradually reintroduce them one at a time and increasing amounts. It may take some experiments but would be worth the effort if you could then include some of those healthy foods back into your diet This article includes several citations from reputable studies that may be of help to you: https://www.dietvsdisease.org/nightshade-vegetables/
      as well as this one: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/arthritis-should-you-avoid-nightshade-vegetables/. As to your question about what makes the difference (I’m assuming you’re referring to the benefits of WFPB and BOTH inclusion of plant foods and elimination of animal products are important for improving health risks.These NFO videos spell out how important eating your fruits and vegetables are https://nutritionfacts.org/2018/11/15/we-have-specific-fruit-and-vegetable-receptors/ and https://nutritionfacts.org/2012/06/28/fighting-inflammation-with-food-synergy/
      As far as a Paleo diet- you hopefully have done enough research to be concerned about the very real risks involved with meat eggs and saturated fats. NFO has several videos on problems with the Paleo diet if you search under the topic “Paleo” At the least check out this video https://nutritionfacts.org/2019/08/01/the-healthiest-way-to-eat-paleo/ Best of health as you work towards finding the healthy foods that agree with you.

      1. No, there was another organization which offers a subscription, and it appeared for an instant  after Dr Greger’s  video and then it disappeared totally.  I hate when this happens!

  6. It seems to me important to emphasize that the Fuhrman / Ferrerri article referred to used a special WFP diet that “is high fiber, micronutrient, and antioxidant intake with a relatively low glycemic load. This is achieved by predominantly consuming green and other non-starchy vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, and low-sugar fruits, such as berries. Whole grains and animal products are limited;”

    In other words, these case studies do NOT support eating lots of whole grains or sugary fruit! Fuhrman emphasizes the important role of nuts/seeds, i.e. higher fat than is typically recommended, and he is not a fan of eating lots of whole grains or starchy vegetables.. My slim, athletic prediabetic wife discovered from glucose testing that her blood sugar levels spike tremendously after eating whole grains, sugary fruit and starchy vegetables. She switched to Fuhrman’s actual recommendations — in her case she only eats 1/2 cup of whole oats per day and no very starchy vegetables (no sweet potatoes, no regular ones either)..Her carbs come from beans/legumes. She also does not eat sugary fruit. If she wants to eat beets, then she skips the legume (often split pea soup).
    Following Fuhrman she eats lots of nuts and seeds. This along with exercising after eating keeps her blood sugar levels well within normal range.

    I am concerned that some people with blood sugar handling problems might get the impression that they can eat with impunity all the whole grains, starchy vegetables and sugary fruit they feel like just because they are eating whole food.

    .

    1. Gengo,

      The Mastering Diabetes guys who both have Type 1 Diabetes both went Fruitarian where they ate a whole lot of fruit and they had their insulin needs drop significantly and their blood sugar stabilize.

      Plus, there was The Rice Diet where the people were eating rice, fruit and a spoonful of sugar and they were reversing the problems with Diabetes.

      Not trying to argue with Dr. Fuhrman but I do know that Dr. McDougall and Dr. Barnard and other doctors have also reversed Type 2 Diabetes without any nuts or many beans.

      There are different ways to do it and you probably have to stay within the rules for each way and not try to combine plans.

      1. Here is a Dr. McDougall Diabetes

        https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2009nl/dec/diabetes.htm

        https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/education/health-science/stars/stars-written/jason-wyrick/

        Dr. Barnard has people go way lowering in fat than Dr. Fuhrman

        https://www.pcrm.org/health-topics/diabetes

        Mastering Diabetes program includes carbohydrate-rich whole foods including fruits, starchy vegetables, legumes, and intact whole grains to reverse insulin resistance.

        https://www.masteringdiabetes.org/method/

        1. Dr. Barnard’s trial showed his diet lowered HgA1c only a little, still in the 6’s. Certainly not enough to bring people’s numbers into a healthy range. 6 is Not ok, unless you don’t mind getting heart disease.
          Yes, I know the trial was touted as a success. But, let’s be honest, it was not. And any clinician should know it wasn’t.
          Need to get HgA1c down well below 6, down below 5.7. And I’m not happy till my patients get to or below 5.5.

          Diabetics, all types, need to test to see what foods raise their blood sugar. Normal people after even a high glycemic meal don’t go above 125. Fasting should be no higher than 92.
          Most diabetics cannot eat large amounts of grains and fruit and have normal numbers.
          WFPB is good, but needs to be low glycemic for them. And that is easily done by adding nuts and seeds for the necessary calories if their weight is optimal.
          20% of diabetics are a healthy weight.

          1. This is confusing for me since fruit consumption has been associated with fewer adverse outcomes in diabetics

            ‘In this large epidemiological study in Chinese adults, higher fresh fruit consumption was associated with significantly lower risk of diabetes and, among diabetic individuals, lower risks of death and development of major vascular complications.’
            https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1002279

      2. Deb, I realize that and I don’t know what those Mastering Diabetes guys are really doing but they are not doctors and I do not trust them or their recommendations. Please present some actual scientific studies, not just parrot what some people on the internet say. I do not think the Kempner results included type 1 diabetes (which is the topic, not type 2). I stand by my comments.

        1. Deb,
          To be clear, my example was a slim, athletic prediabetic, most likely a type 1.5, i.e. beta cells not producing enough insulin. Most type 2 diabetics are overweight and have fat in their liver. Get rid of that fat, problem solved. This is quite different from those who do not have enough beta cells but are not overweight and likely have no fat in their livers. Your examples referring to garden variety type 2 people, overweight with fatty livers, is a different matter, as are type 1 diabetics. Not all diabetics are overweight and have fatty livers.

          1. Deb,
            I am very familiar with McDougall’s diet as mine is essentially the same (6-8 servings of whole grain or starchy vegetables per day). I do well on that diet. My slim, prediabetic wife did not: it spiked her blood sugar into the full diabetic range.

            I do not pay much attention to the “Mastering Diabetes” people because as I said, I have no reason to trust them. Caveat emptor.

            Note that if you compare whole grain/starchy carbs to refined carbs, then sure whole is better. That does not mean it is optimum for all people or in all cases/

            1. Gengo,

              Yes, I understand.

              But I will say that the Mastering Diabetes people are both Type 1 Diabetics who have transformed their lives and one of them is still Fruitarian.

        2. But don’t forget people like me who are described as having Type One diabetes, after having been treated as a Type Two diabetic and taking insulin for 12 years. My endocrinologist says I now have “Type One” because my pancreas is no longer making any insulin.  I’m 82 years old, and exercise regularly and am taking less insulin thanin the past (after several bad experiences with hypoglycemia).

          1. High blood sugars destroy beta cells. So most uncontrolled type 2’s become type 1’s eventually.
            This is why I want my patients to monitor their sugars.

      1. Thanks for the link, Fumbles. I do not disagree about the importance of high fiber diets in managing diabetes generally, so even a diet higher in fiber from grains would be expected to be better than a low fiber diet. But there is no reason I know of to assume the fiber in grain is special. The abstract of the study you linked to does not mention grains, although they could have been the primary source of the fiber. In any event the results are relative (low vs high fiber) but the objective should be to move toward an optimal science (given the state of the art), which I take to be, for many, a high fiber, low glycemic diet like that recommended by Fuhrman. Note the menus provided in the Fuhrman/Ferrerri study include no grains. Here’s one:

        “Breakfast: green smoothie (water, spinach, kale, romaine, flaxseed, avocado, frozen wild blueberries, 1/4 of a banana), small bowl of Mediterranean pine nuts and walnuts. lunch: raw vegetables with hummus, salad (spinach, kale, romaine, flaxseed, pinenuts, and avocado with a little bit of pomegranate balsamic vinegar), homemade veggieburger (mixture of mushrooms, broccoli, spinach, cauliflower, carrots, yam, red cab-bage, onion, seasoning), half an apple.Dinner: bowl of steamed cauliflower “rice,” steamed vegetables (onion, broccoli,bok choy, carrots, parsnips), a small (2 oz./57 g) serving of organic, pasture-raised an-imal protein, and a salad.”

        1. Oops:

          optimal science ==> optimal diet based on the science

          Should learn to be a better proof reader before publishing…

        2. Thanks Gengo.

          Note, though, that the title of the paper was ‘Dietary fibre and whole grains in diabetes management: Systematic review and meta-analyses’

          Also, I am not sure that it has been established that high fibre low GI diet is ‘optimal’ here. In fact, as far as I know, the mainstream scientific consensus is that whole grains are part of an optimal T1D diet.
          https://diabetes.ufl.edu/outreach/resources/nutrition/type-1-diabetes/

  7. Low Carb diets have also showed success in treating type 1 diabetes.

    ** Very-low-carb diet can safely curb blood sugar in type 1 diabetes, study suggests (2018)- https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/141/6/e20173349

    ** 2019, a 12-week RCT showed that when 10 people with type 1 diabetes consumed fewer than 100 grams of carbs per day for 12 weeks, they achieved more stable blood sugar levels and had fewer episodes of low blood sugar than when they ate 250 grams of carbs per day. What’s more, they lost about 5 pounds (2 kg) during the low-carb phase and gained almost 6 pounds (2.6 kg) during the high-carb phase – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30924570/

    ** 2018, a group of doctors and researchers published results from a survey completed by 316 people with type 1 diabetes or parents of children with type 1 diabetes who consumed roughly 30 grams of carbs per day. The group reported exceptional blood glucose control with infrequent hypoglycemic episodes and an average HbA1c of 5.67% (39 mmol/mol) – https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/141/6/e20173349

    ** 2017, a RCT found that people with type 1 who ate fewer than 50 grams of carbs per day for 1 week experienced more stable blood sugar control and fewer hypoglycemic episodes than they did during a week of eating 250 grams of carbs and the same number of calories per day – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28345762/

    ** 2016, a randomized, controlled trial (RCT) – considered the “gold standard” for evidence – found that people with type 1 diabetes who limited carbs to 75-100 grams per day for 12 weeks had significant reductions in HbA1c and blood glucose levels compared to those who practiced standard carb counting. Additionally, those who were overweight showed a non-statistically significant trend toward weight loss (11 pounds or 5kg – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26965765/

    ** 2005, Swedish physicians published the results of an educational program for their type 1 diabetes patients that involved consuming 70-90 grams of carbs per day. They reported significant improvements in HbA1c levels, reduction in insulin dosages, and much more stable blood sugar levels throughout the day. One of the most impressive findings was a 94% decrease in hypoglycemic episodes after 3 months and an 82% decrease at 12 months – http://prdupl02.ynet.co.il/ForumFiles_2/28984756.pdf

    1. Greg,

      Low carb diets only work because when people are insulin resistant they will have more of a blood sugar spike when they eat carbs (and also when they test fasting blood sugar)

      Fats don’t spike blood sugars. But animal products cause carbs to spike blood sugars more than carbs eaten without animal products and fats cause insulin resistance, but most important, normalizing blood sugar isn’t the whole picture.

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-insulin-resistance/

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-prevent-blood-sugar-and-triglyceride-spikes-after-meals/

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/lipotoxicity-how-saturated-fat-raises-blood-sugar/

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-a-ketogenic-diet-help-diabetes-or-make-it-worse/

      1. Greg,

        I would have said the same answer until I learned what causes insulin resistance and even then I would have said that as an alternative until I learned about the acetone doing the same damage as elevated blood sugar.

        My Keto friends have been in and out of the hospital for diabetes complications. The fact that they aren’t perfect at it would be what Keto proponents would point out and they aren’t perfect at it but because they are so ridiculously insulin resistant, they spike through the roof when they cheat and they are very sincere about it. One of my friends has lost 100 pounds on Keto but it didn’t fix her diabetes or diabetes symptoms and another of my friends also lost a lot of weight but her lab test results were the worst her doctor had ever seen and she has all sorts of things going on right now.

  8. Just keep in mind that those that attempt to treat diabetes with an animal based low carb diet may control their blood sugar levels, but end up prematurely dying 50% of the time more often than those eating a plant based low carb diet. (This is based on the study showing a 30% increase risk of premature death as compared to SAD on an animal based low carb diet, and a 20% reduction in premature death as compared to SAD in those eating a plant based low carb diet).

      1. Yet I have seen some studies that suggest that, at least in heart attack patients, low carb plant-based diets offer no benefit (although they don’t increase mortality risk as animal based low carb diets appear to do)

        “An increase in adherence to an animal‐based LCD prospectively assessed from the pre‐ to post‐MI period was associated with higher all‐cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratios of 1.30 [95% CI: 1.03 to 1.65] for all‐cause mortality and 1.53 [95% CI: 1.10 to 2.13] for cardiovascular mortality comparing extreme quintiles). An increase in adherence to a plant‐based LCD was not associated with lower all‐cause or cardiovascular mortality.

        Conclusions
        Greater adherence to an LCD high in animal sources of fat and protein was associated with higher all‐cause and cardiovascular mortality post‐MI. We did not find a health benefit from greater adherence to an LCD overall after MI.”

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4323805/

  9. I just read Furhman’s three case studies in the International Journal of Disease Reversal and Prevention (IJDRP). http://www.ijdrp.org

    Treatment and Remission of Symptoms in Type 1 Diabetes with a Nutrient-Dense, Plant-Rich (NDPR) Diet: Case Studies
    Joel H. Fuhrman, MD, PC, & Deana M. Ferreri, PhD; http://www.ijdrp.org/article/view/23/5doi: 10.22230/ijdrp.2019v1n1a23

    Kinda clever, really. I would never have thought that treating a three year old with a strict diet might have that kind of effect.

    Kudos to the parents for starting the whole thing in motion.

    Of course – it’s just a case study – so you can’t put much store in it – but it gets ya thinkin’ . . .

    Plants the seed.

    Maybe this new Journal is not entirely without value, after all.

    ————————–

    Scattered thoughts:

    (1) With diabetes, Doctors usually handle the health aspects – numbers runnin’ and insulin tuning – and complications – and they hand the dietary aspects over to the RDs – RDs who may have undergone further study for a specific Certification in Diabetic Nutrition.

    All good. Wouldn’t have it any other way.

    I attended an introductory RD lecture for new diabetic patients not long ago just to see how things are goin’ – I always enjoy learning – and I saw that the specially certified RD was instructing patients to follow a low carb / high fat / high animal protein diet.

    My low-key questions – I am careful in such settings – were deflected.

    I did learn: “Cheese is an excellent source of protein.” (Cheese is 70% fat by calorie. Fat enhances insulin resistance).

    Diabetics face renal issues. The high animal protein diet she recommended would likely exacerbate those issues.

    ‘Most every piece of dietary advice she gave seemed to me to be advice that would accelerate decline.

    It felt like I was viewing a Norwegian commando inside the Heavy Water Facility at Vermork. In slow motion.

    I was appalled.

    Say what you will about Dr. Fuhrman – he has elbowed the RD Certified Diabetic Educator aside and taken full responsibility for both the medical aspect of diabetic care and the dietary aspect. He’s a one stop shop. Good for him!

    To me this looks like it may be the way to go.

    Or else – vet your RDs very carefully. Which you may not be able to do in a large health system – there, everyone is in his own silo.

    ————————————————————–

    (2) I have been noticing something over time. Now – this is all subjective – I canna prove a thing – and I may be completely wrong – but –

    Adult-onset diabetics (now called Type II) seem to me to be deteriorating a lot quicker and dying a lot sooner than they used to.

    Much quicker than before the advent of the oral diabetic medications.

    Back then – you tuned ’em up on insulin – changing forms of insulin over the years, true – and monitored them and they struggled on with lives.

    And quite the struggle it was!

    Now – adult-onset diabetics receive their oral meds – and keep doin’ whatever it is that they were doin’ before. No big struggle – sounds good, doesn’t it? But over time the oral meds fizzle – pancreas runs outa gas – and they go on insulin. They then become increasingly brittle – blood sugars all over the place no matter what they do – and they become very, very frustrated. ‘Cause nobody believes them. Even when they are dong everything right, things are not going right at all.

    When I mention this to the RDs – they claim that the person involved is just lying and not following their diet – don’t believe them. OK. Whatever . . . .

    But I make it a policy to always believe what people tell me.

    Hey – you see little green men? I believe that you see little green men.

    There goes one now . . .

    And these people tell me that their numbers are all over the place – even when they follow the RD’s instructions strictly to the letter.

    Then the infections and the amputations begin.

    These people get shorter.

    And there’s one thing after another. Kidneys. Cardiovascular disease. Neurological symptoms up the whazoo. Then stroke or heart attack. Until someone is reading you an obituary.

    The downhill slide seems to take place pretty quickly nowadays – much faster than the pre-oral med days.

    It used to take considerable time. Now it seems to be more like five or six years from diagnosis to death – often enough to notice, anyway.

    I am not the fan of the oral meds that others may be. To me – they are not a treatment, they are a harbinger.

    I may be wrong. No one else seems to be noticin’ a thing.

    Father used to notice things like this, as well.

    When nobody else did.

    Hereditary madness? Or long term observational ability?

    I dunno for certain. Neither did he.

    But when we compared notes – they were often strikingly similar.

    I miss the Old Man.

    Makes you feel like the old Twilight zone music sometimes.

    But you get used to it – as background music – in time.

    ——————

    Here’s the deal:

    Type II diabetes is like a lame horse. It can still walk some – but it’s hindered. If you are riding a horse and it goes lame – if you care, you dismount, take off the saddle, and you let the horse out to pasture for a few weeks – and if everyone is lucky – if the tides are fair and the wind is free – that horse just might heal on his own.

    OR

    You can just stay on that horse and gallop to the next town – and destroy the horse’s leg, completely, in the process. And you’ll have to put him down.

    Well – with Type II diabetes – your pancreas has gone lame. You can put it out to pasture for a little bit – low fat low sugar low calorie WFBP diet – and if everyone is lucky – it just might heal on its own. Not completely, maybe. But good enough.

    OR

    You can run that pancreas into the ground.

    The oral diabetic meds just run it into the ground.

    Insulin works entirely differently. Think of insulin as a crutch – it takes some of the workload off the poor lame pancreas. It can help the pancreas keep limping along for years and years and years.

    If you start with the oral meds – and wipe out what’s left of your pancreas, first – then have to go to insulin – you are using insulin with no residual pancreatic back-up. You are then dealing with an extremely brittle situation – extremely volatile – blood sugars all over the place.

    That’s what these people are experiencing.

    No place to run. No place to hide.

    You won’t find this in the oral drug sales literature. And perhaps not even in Mr Fumblefingers scientific papers.

    But this is what I see with mine own two eyes.

    ———————————————-

    (3) Lotsa “Prediabetes” diagnoses these days.

    People aren’t afraid of obesity. “It’s the way I am.” Heck – they marry obese, they have obese children.

    They have obese pets.

    It’s a lifestyle.

    People aren’t afraid of high blood pressure. People aren’t afraid of high cholesterol.

    They eat like hogs and they take their meds – or no – and don’t seem to give it all that much thought.

    You can say anything you like to encourage them to adopt a healthier lifestyle – and you won’t have any effect, whatsoever.

    But a diagnosis of prediabetes? Now they just might listen . . .

    I tell them not to worry about a likely upcoming future of diabetes – but plan for it. We have a pill for it. We can deal with the renal issues with dialysis – it’s only a few hours a day three times a week – but you do feel a little weak afterwards. And the ocular issues can be dealt with with large print books and with talking books – or nowadays, with just buying the largest availalble computer monitor and increasing the print size on the computer screen. People can do very well with amputations – it just takes some modification to their house – ramps at the entryway and putting a bed in the living room and a roll-in shower stall in a first floor bathroom – in time they may no longer be going upstairs – those sorts of things. Do you have a van? Great! Then you can just get a back winch and a mobility scooter. It’s all very doable. Lotsa people available to help you. People live very rich and rewarding lives this way.

    Sometimes I feel almost evil . . .

    The game here – I don’t tell them what they need to do. They are completely inoculated from other people telling them what they need to do. I get it.

    They have to figure out what they need to do for themselves.

    Of course . . . I may guide just a little . . . but they have to ask, first . . .

    Funny thing is – they always do.

    It’s like a Burns and Allen comedy sketch.

    I love prediabetes.

    ‘Cause if they deal with it – all the labs improve markedly – the weight goes down – medications get reduced – they FEEL better – they recommend people in my direction effusively, which is kinda funny – ’cause I always undersell – AND they bitch and moan about having to buy new clothes like they’re the first ones to come up with that same old joke (they’re just kiddin’ – but it’s always good to hear).

    And I end up feelin’ kinda good.

    If they do not deal with it – hey, it’s not my problem.

    It’s theirs.

    And there is the referral list to the house contractors.

    No kick-backs from any of the contractors. Why do I give it to them? Well – you know me –

    I’m always happy to help.

    ——————

    Just some thoughts.

    Take care –

    Vivamus

    ——————

    No Hiding Place
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkjejFERf4w

    1. Vivamus,

      The people who I know that are pre-diabetics or diabetic have been told to focus on not having too many carbs. They get so carb focused that they mentally spend all of their time just counting carbs the way Weight Watchers has them count points.

      Mentally, they don’t even know that there is a different way and when given the new way, it depends on how they feel about fruits and vegetables and how afraid of grains they are, and how addicted to other foods.

    2. ‘And perhaps not even in Mr Fumblefingers scientific papers.’

      Viv

      I admit that I do like to see the data, having come across far too many people on YouTube and elsewhere who have seen with their ‘own two eyes’ that the Earth is flat or that apricot kernels cure cancer.

      My understanding however is that US diabetes mortality rates have declined in recent decades (although that might be affected by changes in diagnostic criteria). I’d always thought too that eg metformin actually lowers the risk of mortality and other diabetes complications

      ‘Patients allocated metformin, compared with the conventional group, had risk reductions of 32% (95% CI 13-47, p=0.002) for any diabetes-related endpoint, 42% for diabetes-related death (9-63, p=0.017), and 36% for all-cause mortality (9-55, p=0.011). Among patients allocated intensive blood-glucose control, metformin showed a greater effect than chlorpropamide, glibenclamide, or insulin for any diabetes-related endpoint (p=0.0034), all-cause mortality (p=0.021), and stroke (p=0.032).’
      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9742977/

      However drug interactions may well be problematic

      ‘ Early addition of metformin in sulphonylurea-treated patients was associated with an increased risk of diabetes-related death (96% increased risk [95% CI 2-275], p=0.039) compared with continued sulphonylurea alone.’

        1. Mr. Fumblefingers,

          Long ago and far away I was ill. My father gave me the names of two Physicians whom he respected – family does not treat family. I set up appointments with both.

          The first was an extraordinarily learned gentleman and a strong Academician. He talked of Published Papers relevant to my illness. How he might be able to get me into a Relevant Study Protocol on the Cutting Edge. He did strike me as being a little vain – he made himself something of the center of attention of the examination – not myself.

          The second was much more soft spoken – he didn’t say one word about any publications at all. But he did give me the most thorough Physical Examination that I have ever received, before or since. I then realized that the first had hardly examined me at all. I also noticed that the second Physician received two telephone calls from Physicians asking for his counsel while I was in the examining room, interrupting the examination. But that was OK – when he got off the telephone, he returned his full attention to me. When I asked him about the latest studies, he looked at me like I might be a little addled – then spoke to me kindly about treating the patient, not the study.

          Young and relatively innocent – compared to later years – I chose the second Physician. On feel – it is hard to explain. The telephone calls from Doctors asking for help during examinations continued during later visits – and the funny thing was he would always say – “I would do this” . . . “I would feel best about this” – he never once quoted one study – not once. One more odd thing – over the months, every third or fifth name called out in the waiting room was proceeded by the title “Dr.” “Dr. Smith . . . Mrs. Becker . . . Mr. Williams . . . Dr. Jones” etc. And I realized that I was seeing a Doctors’ Doctor. Over time, I have learned that these are the best we have – the Doctors that all the other Doctors choose to go to for their own health needs.

          I would not be alive today but for this Physician. One night at 9:00 P.M. or so – or maybe later – he was in the hospital – I could make out the conversation right outside my room – over-ruling the Chief Resident on his service on my care. “Right now!” he was saying. The Chief Resident wanted to go by the book – he gave his reasons. My Physician – by his Clinical Judgement – didn’t give any more reason than that – he just pulled rank – and he was obeyed.

          They tell me that it took six young men – Interns, Residents and Medical Students – to hold me down. My mother was at the waiting room mid-corridor – she said that she heard inhuman screams going on and on and on through the night – in my voice. She was – concerned.

          He made the right call. I am alive today because of that call.

          I am not surprised that your literature does not show the reality that I see on the ground. I have learned to expect this. And I am not surprised at your embrace of your literature.

          Not my problem.

          You would probably have been more comfortable with the the first doctor. Had I chosen the first doctor, I would now be dead. The Clinical Intervention that was needed to keep me alive would likely have violated one of his study protocols – and his study would have come first. And he would never have been at the hospital at 9:00 PM anyway – he would have been at home, scanning the literature and working towards the success of his next study.

          As Doctors grow in experience – they become less like the first Doctor and more like the second Doctor. As they grow – they put much less faith in the literature and much more faith in the wisdom of their own Clinical Experience. And that is as it should be.

          You might not take such a path, yourself – and that’s fine, too. I would simply go elsewhere.

          Mr Fumblefingers.

          Good luck in all your choices –

          Vivamus

          1. Thanks Vivamus

            Some people do indeed find stories and anecdotes more convincing than scientific evidence. As you know, I am not one of them. Well, I try not to be anyway.

            So when it comes to a choice between believing some pseudonymous online commentator or hard data and scientific studies, it’s an easy choice for me. After all, for every confident experienced, observant, reasonable person telling us to turn left, there is always another equally confident, articulate, plausible, experienced, observant and reasonable person telling us to turn right. How are we supposed to know which – if any of them – is correct?

            I remember spending quite some time years ago buying/reading books and articles about cognitive psychology. They were very enlightening, especially the studies on how systematic cognitive dispositions or inclinations in human thinking and reasoning that often do not comply with the tenets of logic, probability reasoning, and plausibility. They affect even to the smartest of us (remember Nobel Disease?). Fascinating stuff.

            Ever since, I’ve never been inclined to just take people’s word for it. Especially when their assertions are contradicted by hard date and/or well-designed studies.

            Good luck to you though. I realise that my approach is not for everybody.

              1. “After all, for every confident experienced, observant, reasonable person telling us to turn left, there is always another equally confident, articulate, plausible, experienced, observant and reasonable person telling us to turn right. How are we supposed to know which – if any of them – is correct? ”

                After all, for every scientific study telling us to turn left, there is always another telling us to turn right. How are we supposed to know which – if any of them – is correct?

                By filtering them through our own knowledge and experience.

                Best regards,

                George

                1. Viv

                  ‘After all, for every scientific study telling us to turn left, there is always another telling us to turn right. How are we supposed to know which – if any of them – is correct?

                  I tend to ask are there multiple studies all pointing in the same direction? Do observational and experimental studies agree? And are there demonstrated mechanisms of action which explain the hypothesised effects? In other words, do all the ducks line up in a row? That seems a little less subjective.

                  Cheers

      1. Metformin is one of the ‘good’ drugs. Excellent outcomes for most patients. Only caveat is that it can lower B12 absorption.
        But on the WFPB diet B12 needs to be supplemented anyway. So all patients are advised to take it.

      1. Deb,
        Okay, the slime does not look appetizing. Perhaps if presented like nutritional yeast.

        The point I am wanting to make is the potential of a single celled fungus being a whole food that can be produced in a warehouse, and can feed people anywhere, any time, any place, almost endlessly.

  10. I was back to thinking about the study where people’s blood sugar spikes even more if they believe there is sugar in a food than if there is sugar

    https://www.realclearscience.com/quick_and_clear_science/2020/09/28/a_psychological_trick_changed_diabetics_blood_sugar_levels.html

    I wonder if the people doing the study understood the animal products causing blood sugar to spike or time of day or if there is a hormonal response to the thoughts of sugar. I feel like they should do a “thinking of sugar” blood spike test at that point.

    I am a Christian and we do believe that belief affects us down to the very cells of the body already.

    And what I remembered tonight was the WNPR discussion where the moment people find out that they have bad genes through genetic testing, their hormones begin to develop a negative reaction.

    1. The fact that people are being taught that carbs are sugar and the fact that their believing that will cause their blood sugar to spike more is interesting.

      1. The time of day could have been a confounding factor.

        If they did the “thinking they had more sugar” drink at a time of day where people are more likely to spike from the circadian rhythms problem

  11. Hi,

    only recently have I discovered nutrition facts and Dr. Michael Gregors speeches. I have three questions on my mind:
    1. Is there a statistical or logical analysis of a diet that is composed of 100% liquid nutrition, e.g. Soylent or MANA? As far as I know concerning MANA, it consists of only vegan ingredients, but I think that most ingredients are refined.
    2. Would a ketogenic diet that is plant-based potentially be more healthy than a mixed ketogenic diet? I know that it is very difficult to realize, but similar to liquid nutrition of Soylent, there are also plant-based ketogenic powders that could work.
    3. How often should You eat on one day?

    Thanks for all Your responses.
    Regards

    1. Invisible Os,

      Do you not like Plant Food? Or are you afraid of carbs?

      Low carb diets are linked to all-cause mortality even if they help with weight loss.

      Right now, you are in between the logic of Keto and Whole Food Plant-Based and what I will tell you is that I have been there and it is really confusing.

      Listening to Dr Greger’s videos will help.

      I also recommend watching the movie

      the Game Changers

      Forks Over Knives

      Eating You Alive

      There are a lot of doctors who have food plans.

      Dr Greger has his Daily Dozen

      Dr Fuhrman has Nutritarian

      Dr McDougall has Starch Solution

      Dr Barnard has a process that uses some transition foods if you struggle to go off animal products.

      The list could go much further than that but I just do recommend the documentaries and there are sites like Forks Over Knives that help with meals.

  12. I have T1D and have had great success with WFPBNSOS. I eat everything Dr Gregor recommends. I was not able to initially. I used building blocks to get to this point. Journaling helped/s; what I am eating, # units, activity level. One great thing I noticed was how the math became simple. It’s easy to pre-treat for carbs minus fiber. Same for cooked and a little harder when dealing with “baked”. I use sweet potatoes and applesauce as substitutes for processed sugar and oils on the rare occasions I make oatmeal cookies. Yes, “stuff doesn’t taste the same”, during the first year or so. Now, I look forward to the taste – and I suspect it is simply because I’ve become better at food preparation, using spices, etc. I am fortunate to have had an MD order lab panels every 3-4 months for the first 2 years. I could see the results in writing when I started wondering what was the point/feeling sorry for myself. Around the one year mark, others were noticing – no dark circles, my energy was better than theirs, no foot numbness, my muscles began to return, mood swings stopped. What I am experiencing now? no need to wear socks at night, interest in being intimate, my vision has stabilized and I do not have to get new glasses annually. I was able to have cochlear surgery, quickly and successfully. Same goes for cuts and abrasions, healed within days. Lows happen rarely and I recognize when one is coming on well before I’m in trouble.

    A big one was the confidence to switch back to a manual meter. I was paying 13,000 yearly for insulin/CGM, etc. Now, I’m approximately $3,500.

    I’ve read through the commentaries and my response is:
    I believe in Food as Medicine, which is a commitment to not eating meat, dairy, processed sugars, oils and salts. It is and always will be the most powerful action an individual can make; for their own health, well-being, finances politically and globally.

  13. Hi, InvisibleOs! I am not sure why you would want to embark on a 100% liquid diet, unless your jaw is wired shut, or there is some other medical reason for doing so. Most of the research on liquid nutrition is related to the use of feeding tubes in hospital settings, since that is the most common application of this approach. Because people in those settings tend to be very ill, data may not apply to healthier people. If you are considering this for weight loss, I would encourage you to check out the resources on this site related to weight loss with whole plant foods. https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/weight-loss/
    While a plant-exclusive ketogenic diet might be safer than an animal-based one, it would be difficult to achieve, and might not provide benefits. We don’t really know, until we put it to the test. Most of the research on ketogenic diets has been on animal-based diets, and the risks are well-known. Here at NutritionFacts, we find the evidence supports a whole food, plant-based diet as the most health-promoting. I would not suggest building a diet around processed liquid diets and powdered supplements.
    There are many factors that determine how many times a person should eat in one day, including activity levels and appetite. Generally, eating 2-3 meals per day will reasonably meet the nutritional needs of most people. You might be interested in this: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/to-snack-or-not-to-snack/
    I hope that helps!

  14. Speaking of How Not To Die, I have been watching death rates from COVID in the USA and we have been having fewer than 300 deaths per day after a summer of having over 1000 deaths per day.

    I waited until today to say it because there has been a weekend lag in the numbers but it has stayed under 300 Monday and Tuesday.

  15. Nice video!

    This is off-topic, but I have been seeing a lot of criticism of Dr. Greger’s videos and books on the basis of “cherry-picking”. The only place where I have seen Dr. Greger respond is in one YouTube video which I can’t find. Anyways, I was wondering if anyone can respond to this accusation as it seems to be a common one leveled against Dr. Greger.

    Thanks!

  16. I am a 59yo Type 1 diabetic, insulin dependent, on a pump and CGM. I began eating a WFPB diet six months ago. I have experienced a dramatic drop in my A1C (from 10.6 to 6.4) in six months eating a WFPD diet. My insulin requirements and insulin resistance have also decreased. I will never go back.

    1. That’s great! Thanks for sharing your success.

      I’d be interested to know more about your WFPB diet, e.g. how many servings (or grams) of whole food carbs do you get from grains and starchy vegetables, or what your daily Carb/Fat/Protein ratios roughly are.

        1. Very easily, John.

          There is a wide variety of different WFPB diets. The Fuhrman/Ferrerri example menus contained zero grains and potatoes/sweet potatoes. I happen to think strictly restricting whole grains and starchy vegetables is likely important (obviously Fuhrman does) but it seems others disagree (see some kf the other comments). I was looking for some confirmation or disconfirmation from someone with personal experience. I like specifics.
          You might be satisfied with generalities.

          Take a “chill pill”, John.

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