Black Tea vs. Earl Grey

Black Tea vs. Earl Grey
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Bergamot oil contains a phytonutrient that may be beneficial.

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If you do prefer black tea, though, which is healthier: plain black tea, or Earl Grey?

The answer is Earl Grey, which has the added benefit of bergamot oil, the source of bergamottin, a phytonutrient that beat out two dozen other phytonutrients last year in a test of human stomach lining protection.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to pj_vanf via Flickr.

If you do prefer black tea, though, which is healthier: plain black tea, or Earl Grey?

The answer is Earl Grey, which has the added benefit of bergamot oil, the source of bergamottin, a phytonutrient that beat out two dozen other phytonutrients last year in a test of human stomach lining protection.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to pj_vanf via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

Check out these videos on black tea:
Is Caffeinated Tea Dehydrating?
More Than an Apple a Day: Combating Common Diseases
Is There Too Much Aluminum in Tea?

And check out my other videos on black tea

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

15 responses to “Black Tea vs. Earl Grey

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  1. I have been a vegan for 4-1/2 months. My main health issues have been gout, which I have taken meds for for over 4 years, and also ED.I still take the gout meds, and my condition has worsened. I still have ED where pills no longer work. Remedies for gout say to stay away from dark green vegies,i.e.broccoli, spinich,etc. These are high in purine. I have been told that once the fat leaves my body, the high purine vegies will not cause a problem. I have lost 31#, with about another 10 to go. Will I be getting relief from either gout or ED?

    1. old post, but in case anyone else is wondering, rapid weight loss can releaase a lot of urate crystals from tissue, thereby causing gout attacks. before changing your diet or going on a Calorie deficit diet, gout sufferers should discuss with their doctor. often medication (allopurinol) has to be elevated and colchicine taken prophylactically. whatever the case, losing excess fat will only help gout sufferers in the long run.

  2.  I read on an internet search that Women who consume large amounts of tea have increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis,The source they claim is from :European League Against Rheumatism
    I have been drinking tea my whole life and I do suffer from Arthritis realted to Crohn’s. RA runs in one side of my family. I really love my tea and I would hate to ever have to give it up, do you think that this reserch that I found is true?

  3. Until
    bridge 3 nanotechnology helps me I’m sticking to what we have with diet,
    so my question is how can I gain weight on a vegan lifestyle, while
    reducing my risk for type two diabetes and CHD, I live in a budget of
    200$ a month for food, I weigh 113lbs, I’m 26 and 5′,5″. I also am some
    what active I walk a lot because I have no car. Is this a dangerous
    weight to have?

    I try to follow an Ornish Style Diet of low fat high complex carb of low Glycemic Load Variety, But find myself eating some simple carb foods and sugars such as Fiber One Protein but i worry that will raise my blood sugar level and increase my risk for diabetes. I Also read A book called Transcend by Terry Grossman and his diabetes prevention diet calls for higher “healthy” fats im just so confused. Please help.

    I attached a picture of a usual lunch for me.

  4. Dr Gregor, I’ve read some claims, supposedly with peer reviewed properly designed studies that show that extracts of the citrus fruit of the Bergamot orange (Citrus bergamia) are highly effective at reducing LDL and total cholesterol while boosting HDL and also aids in maintaining healthy blood glucose levels. A short video separating the facts from the hype would be very useful eg “Is Bergamot citrus extract a viable natural substitute for statins”? Thank you!

  5. My husband has been having problems with severe leg cramps, Charlie horse if you will. We have finally narrowed it down to Earl grey tea. I don’t drink it, but he was drinking it a lot since we switched to this diet. When he drinks green tea or water, no problems. He drinks Earl grey and his leg muscles are not happy campers. Are there any studies on the side effects of Earl grey or black tea in general?

    1. I had not heard of this, but did a literature search and indeed, it’s a thing! There is a case report from 2002 in the Lancet, a top medical journal. They reported a case that sounds like your husband’s. They hypothesized that the bergamot that makes Earl Grey Earl Grey was at fault, as it has an effect on potassium channels, the normal function of which is needed for normal muscle function and avoidance of cramps. Here’s the link: http://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140-6736(02)08436-2.pdf You can get the whole article for free by creating an account.

      -Dr Anderson, volunteer

  6. Is Bergamot BPF a supplement worth taking? I have found some Cardiologist recommending it as a natural way to improve cholesterol levels,etc.

  7. Some people are allergic to bergamot oil and in this setting it could irritate the skin. In Earl Grey, this effect may be diluted. If bergamot oil, say, on your skin, has caused mild irritation, then I’d advise you to also avoid Early Grey.

    Dr Anderson, Health Support Volunteer

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