Dietary Guidelines: Corporate Guidance

Dietary Guidelines: Corporate Guidance
5 (100%) 2 votes

Nearly 2,000 comments were submitted to the U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. Watch what the Sugar Association, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, and the chewing gum company, Wrigley’s, had to say.

Discuss
Republish

As our federal government ramped up to release the new dietary guidelines, they solicited comments, which they posted online. You can read all 1,900 yourself, here.

There were all the usual suspects. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association felt that “beef’s important role in the diet [was] underappreciated.” That’s funny; that’s exactly what the President and CEO of The Sugar Association said: “Sugar’s important role in [a healthy] diet,” adding, “There is no scientifically verifiable negative health impact ascribable to sugar intake.” What? Not even, like, dental health? It’s all due to some evil cavity fairy? Unbelievable.

Wrigley’s was on the same page as the Cattlemen, complaining Americans don’t chew enough gum, a “beneficial part of a healthful diet.” Really? Gum? Hey, you have to chew it, they remind the Dietary Guidelines Committee—that’s exercise. Chewing gum expends “11 calories per hour,” they note, and Americans could use all the help they can get.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Peter Mellor.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

As our federal government ramped up to release the new dietary guidelines, they solicited comments, which they posted online. You can read all 1,900 yourself, here.

There were all the usual suspects. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association felt that “beef’s important role in the diet [was] underappreciated.” That’s funny; that’s exactly what the President and CEO of The Sugar Association said: “Sugar’s important role in [a healthy] diet,” adding, “There is no scientifically verifiable negative health impact ascribable to sugar intake.” What? Not even, like, dental health? It’s all due to some evil cavity fairy? Unbelievable.

Wrigley’s was on the same page as the Cattlemen, complaining Americans don’t chew enough gum, a “beneficial part of a healthful diet.” Really? Gum? Hey, you have to chew it, they remind the Dietary Guidelines Committee—that’s exercise. Chewing gum expends “11 calories per hour,” they note, and Americans could use all the help they can get.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Peter Mellor.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to {Charlotte.Morrall}.

Doctor's Note

Be sure to check out Nation’s Diet in Crisis, and all my other videos on dietary guidelines

For more context, also check out my associated blog posts: Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board accused of making illegally deceptive claimsPlant-Based Diets for Rheumatoid Arthritis; and Uric Acid From Meat and Sugar.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

12 responses to “Dietary Guidelines: Corporate Guidance

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer moderators by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. I find this one pretty unbelievable, by Emeritus Professor of Animal and Food Science at Penn State. He says:

    “Efficient use of resources is one of the most important factors contributing to sustainability, and
    U.S. cattle farmers and ranchers represent a model that uses fewer natural resources to produce a
    more affordable and abundant food supply for a growing planet…Additionally, all beef cattle raised in the United States spend the majority of their lives grazing on
    pasture, and no other major animal protein can match cattle’s unique ability to convert wild grasses
    and other plants into nutrient‐dense food.”




    0
    1. You would think that an emeritus professor would have more time to keep up with the literature and explore other areas that s/he is not familiar with. Unfortunately old beliefs die hard and “confirmatory bias” is a powerful influence.




      0
  2. From the National Chicken Council:

    “NCC also recommends a re-examination of the call for “plant-based diets”. As defined and modeled in the DGAC Report, the definition does not exclude animal products such as poultry, red meat, milk, and eggs. However, to the casual consumer with limited time to devote to understanding the science of “plant-based diets,” the phrase may create the impression that the federal government is telling him or her to be a vegetarian and not eat animal protein.”




    0
  3. Ever wonder why pets are getting the same cancers that people get?

    That is the reason corporations continue to lie about the crap they make for us to buy. I guess it’s time to return to the farm in a country not contaminated with herbicides and GMO’s to grow our own food and feed our own animals.

    Is there such a place?

    We cannot trust either government or corporations. We can only trust our own common sense.




    0
  4. Somehow I suspected as much. I can remember years ago seeing a report about how drinking too much water is bad for you. At that tome I stopped listening to the so called experts. It was too outrageous a claim.




    0
  5. Trying to find true research on sugar free chewing. I started chewing gum sweetened with xylitol and mannitol a few weeks ago to help with my tmj. Its working but now i am wondering how cheeing gum for an hour a day will effect my teeth. Any thoights?




    0
  6. Hello Cam- When I did a search of data bases to answer your question, I found several articles the best on being:

    [Chewing gum and dental health. Literature review] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1305985
    I’m sure you are working with dental specialists to confirm that you are indeed helping with the TMJ without causing more problems due to repetitive trauma for your jaw muscles or potential damage to mouth cartilage. One other consideration is that frequent swallowing as you are doing chewing gum excessively may result in bloating and belching. You are monitoring for that as well? Perhaps adding some high fiber foods that require lots of chewing might give you some of the same positive effect for your TMJ without such an intense exposure to the xyitol?




    0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This