Fecal Residues on Chicken

Fecal Residues on Chicken
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Researchers use laser imaging to determine the proportion of retail chicken contaminated with fecal matter.

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This wasn’t the only new use of laser technology last year. “Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser imaging.”

See, in slaughter plants, birds are gutted by a metal hook that often rips the intestines. So, commonly, the skin on chicken gets contaminated by these ruptures of the digestive tract during the evisceration process—which can expel what they call “internal content.” Internal content that can be picked up by laser scanning.

So, what percentage of retail chicken carcasses are contaminated with fecal matter? 92%. Nine chickens out of ten. At least with pigs and cows, we don’t eat the outside of them.

But that’s one of the problems with eating chickens and fish—by eating the animals’ skin itself, we’re more likely to be exposed to fecal bacteria. Don’t try this at home.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

This wasn’t the only new use of laser technology last year. “Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser imaging.”

See, in slaughter plants, birds are gutted by a metal hook that often rips the intestines. So, commonly, the skin on chicken gets contaminated by these ruptures of the digestive tract during the evisceration process—which can expel what they call “internal content.” Internal content that can be picked up by laser scanning.

So, what percentage of retail chicken carcasses are contaminated with fecal matter? 92%. Nine chickens out of ten. At least with pigs and cows, we don’t eat the outside of them.

But that’s one of the problems with eating chickens and fish—by eating the animals’ skin itself, we’re more likely to be exposed to fecal bacteria. Don’t try this at home.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Doctor's Note

Check out these videos to learn more about the contamination of food from slaughter plants here:
Superbugs in Conventional vs. Organic Chicken
Yersinia in Pork
Ractopamine in Pork
Salmonella in Chicken & Turkey: Deadly But Not Illegal
MRSA Superbugs in Meat

And check out my other videos on chicken.

Also see my associated blog post: Why is it Legal to Sell Unsafe Meat?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

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