How to Strengthen the Mind-Body Connection

How to Strengthen the Mind-Body Connection
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Slow-paced breathing at the right frequency can result in a vagal nerve activation, which may have a variety of beneficial effects.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

There are “all manner of [purported hiccup] ‘cures,’ everything from chew a lemon, inhale pepper, or, our dog’s favorite, “a spoonful of peanut butter.” Here’s the technique I’m excited to try next time I get hiccups: “supra-supramaximal inspiration.” You take a very deep breath, hold for ten seconds, then breathe in even more, hold for another five seconds, and then one final tiny breath in, and hold for five last seconds. “[A]n immediate and permanent termination to hiccups was achieved.”

When I was a kid, I taught myself how to control my own hiccups using slow-paced breathing, and I was excited to see there was finally a case report written up on it.

It’s really neat—there’s a nerve, called the vagus nerve, that goes directly from our brain to our chest to our stomach, and connects our brain back and forth to our heart and our gut, and even our immune system. The vagus nerve is like the hardwiring that allows our brain to turn down inflammation within our body. When you hear about the mind-body connection—that’s what the vagus nerve is, and does. So, there’s been “increasing interest in treating a wide range of disorders with implanted pacemaker-like devices for stimulating…vagus [nerve] pathways.” But, certain Eastern traditions like “Yoga, QiGong, and Zen” figured a way to do it without having electrodes implanted into your body. Let me explain how.

“A healthy heart is not a metronome. Your heart rate goes up and down with your breathing. When you breathe in, your heart rate tends to go up. When you breathe out, your heart rate tends to go down.”

You can pause this video, and test it out on yourself right now by feeling your pulse change as you breathe in and out. I’ll wait. Isn’t that cool?!

See, that heart rate variability is a measure of vagal tone—the activity of your vagus nerve. And so, the game to play next time you’re bored is to try to make your heart rate speed up and slow down as much as possible within each breath.

This can be done because there’s a whole other oscillating cycle going on at the same time that’s speeding, then slowing, your heart rate based on moment-to-moment changes in your blood pressure. And, as any physics geek can tell you, “all oscillating feedback systems with a constant delay have the characteristic of resonance”—meaning you can boost the amplitude if you get the cycles in sync. It’s like pushing your kid on a swing; if you get the timing just right, you can boost them higher and higher.

Similarly, if you breathe in at just the right frequency, you can force the cycles in sync, and boost your heart rate variability. Uh, and why are we doing that again? Because that allows us to affect the function of our autonomic nervous system “via vagal afferents to brainstem nuclei,” like the locus coeruleus, activating “hypothalamic vigilance areas,” or at least according to the “neurophysiologic model” postulation. I mean, duh.

Uh, and why are we doing this again? It’s not just to cure hiccups. Practicing slow breathing a few minutes a day may have lasting beneficial effects on a number “of medical and emotional disorders,” including asthma, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and depression—though in the U.S. of A., we’ve put it to use improving “batting performance in baseball.”

Now, to date, most studies have lacked proper controls, and used fancy biofeedback machines to determine each person’s resonant frequency, but for most people, it comes out to be about five-and-a-half breaths per minute; so, a full breath in and out, about every eleven seconds.

When musicians were randomized into slow-breathing groups with or without biofeedback, slow breathing helped regardless. Same with high blood pressure. You can use this technique to significantly drop your blood pressure within minutes. The hope is if you practice this a few minutes a day, you can have long-lasting effects the rest of the day, breathing normally.

Practice what exactly? Slow breathing, five or six breaths per minute, split equally between breathing in and breathing out should do it. So, like, five seconds in, then five seconds out, all the while breathing “shallowly and naturally”—you don’t want to hyperventilate. Natural, shallow breaths, but just breathing really slowly. Try it the next time you get hiccups. Works for me, every time.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credits: Dimitris Vetsikas via pixabay and Luiz Carlos via Wikipedia. Images have been modified.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

There are “all manner of [purported hiccup] ‘cures,’ everything from chew a lemon, inhale pepper, or, our dog’s favorite, “a spoonful of peanut butter.” Here’s the technique I’m excited to try next time I get hiccups: “supra-supramaximal inspiration.” You take a very deep breath, hold for ten seconds, then breathe in even more, hold for another five seconds, and then one final tiny breath in, and hold for five last seconds. “[A]n immediate and permanent termination to hiccups was achieved.”

When I was a kid, I taught myself how to control my own hiccups using slow-paced breathing, and I was excited to see there was finally a case report written up on it.

It’s really neat—there’s a nerve, called the vagus nerve, that goes directly from our brain to our chest to our stomach, and connects our brain back and forth to our heart and our gut, and even our immune system. The vagus nerve is like the hardwiring that allows our brain to turn down inflammation within our body. When you hear about the mind-body connection—that’s what the vagus nerve is, and does. So, there’s been “increasing interest in treating a wide range of disorders with implanted pacemaker-like devices for stimulating…vagus [nerve] pathways.” But, certain Eastern traditions like “Yoga, QiGong, and Zen” figured a way to do it without having electrodes implanted into your body. Let me explain how.

“A healthy heart is not a metronome. Your heart rate goes up and down with your breathing. When you breathe in, your heart rate tends to go up. When you breathe out, your heart rate tends to go down.”

You can pause this video, and test it out on yourself right now by feeling your pulse change as you breathe in and out. I’ll wait. Isn’t that cool?!

See, that heart rate variability is a measure of vagal tone—the activity of your vagus nerve. And so, the game to play next time you’re bored is to try to make your heart rate speed up and slow down as much as possible within each breath.

This can be done because there’s a whole other oscillating cycle going on at the same time that’s speeding, then slowing, your heart rate based on moment-to-moment changes in your blood pressure. And, as any physics geek can tell you, “all oscillating feedback systems with a constant delay have the characteristic of resonance”—meaning you can boost the amplitude if you get the cycles in sync. It’s like pushing your kid on a swing; if you get the timing just right, you can boost them higher and higher.

Similarly, if you breathe in at just the right frequency, you can force the cycles in sync, and boost your heart rate variability. Uh, and why are we doing that again? Because that allows us to affect the function of our autonomic nervous system “via vagal afferents to brainstem nuclei,” like the locus coeruleus, activating “hypothalamic vigilance areas,” or at least according to the “neurophysiologic model” postulation. I mean, duh.

Uh, and why are we doing this again? It’s not just to cure hiccups. Practicing slow breathing a few minutes a day may have lasting beneficial effects on a number “of medical and emotional disorders,” including asthma, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and depression—though in the U.S. of A., we’ve put it to use improving “batting performance in baseball.”

Now, to date, most studies have lacked proper controls, and used fancy biofeedback machines to determine each person’s resonant frequency, but for most people, it comes out to be about five-and-a-half breaths per minute; so, a full breath in and out, about every eleven seconds.

When musicians were randomized into slow-breathing groups with or without biofeedback, slow breathing helped regardless. Same with high blood pressure. You can use this technique to significantly drop your blood pressure within minutes. The hope is if you practice this a few minutes a day, you can have long-lasting effects the rest of the day, breathing normally.

Practice what exactly? Slow breathing, five or six breaths per minute, split equally between breathing in and breathing out should do it. So, like, five seconds in, then five seconds out, all the while breathing “shallowly and naturally”—you don’t want to hyperventilate. Natural, shallow breaths, but just breathing really slowly. Try it the next time you get hiccups. Works for me, every time.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credits: Dimitris Vetsikas via pixabay and Luiz Carlos via Wikipedia. Images have been modified.

Doctor's Note

Isn’t that mind-blowing? What happens in vagus need not stay in vagus. :)

I talked about other methods for How to Stop Hiccups in my last video, and touched on heart rate variability before (see Boosting Heart Nerve Control).

Slowing our pulse down in general may also have beneficial effects. See Finger on the Pulse of Longevity and Slow Your Beating Heart: Beans vs. Exercise.

Every time I’m amazed by ancient wisdom, I have to remind myself of that video I did on toxic heavy metals (Get the Lead Out). So, though traditional healing methods may offer a plethora of insights, they still need to be put to the test.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

62 responses to “How to Strengthen the Mind-Body Connection

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      1. Jonathan: My understanding is that there was some problems with disqus, so they wanted to try another forum. I agree that wordpress is a serious step back and have been communicating this to staff. I’m collecting and passing on comments (pro and con) regarding wordpress vs disqus. I’ve been told that we will get some improvements to the wordpress forum after the new NutritionFacts website version is released (in the not too distant future?). However, I don’t know the details on what will improve and what will not.

        If you have any specific issues or concerns you want to share regarding wordpress, feel free to post. As I said, I will pass that information on.

        – Thea, a volunteer moderator for this site.




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        1. Thank-you very much for such a swift and comprehensive reply. I myself wasn’t aware of the issues with disqus but I’m supportive of trying other things. The immediate issues that come to mind with the current wordpress comments is that ->

          – You have to sign in each time
          – It’s easy to impersonate someone
          – There isn’t a voting system which means interesting comments are perhaps lost in a sea of less interesting comments
          ( I know some people don’t like the idea of voting but a few discussions in the comments section of NF have been really interesting (such as brown rice and arsenic ) and quality comments are worth having at the top of the comments section, for people to see first.

          Jonathan ( I named myself Thea to highlight my second point and to see if it is actually an issue)




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          1. Jonathan: Thanks for this post! And it looks like you made your second point very well. Though, note that it was possible for someone to sign in as a “guest” in disqus and use any name. Though I think in disqus it always made it clear that the person was a guest???

            Also, for always having to sign in: There is a “Login/Register” link at the very top right corner of the NutritionFacts screen. It seems that people are not seeing it. But I think if you sign in through that button, you won’t have to enter who you are each time. If you give it a try and find that I’m wrong about that, please let me know.

            Thanks for your post!




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        2. Thea,
          The current posting system is pretty one dimensional. You get the posts, and that is about it. I liked the posting history feature of “disqus.” One see the posting history of other participants and one could explore the posts of others one found to be thoughtful and insightful. I’ve been introduced to some very interesting posts and URL’s by following the activity of others.

          I also liked the feedback one received in disqus. You were informed when someone commented on your post, or your voted your post up. It was nice. It felt more connected. It was more like a community.

          I also appreciated that fact that I had more than five minutes to update a post. Under the new system, I am much less ambitious regarding the posts that I make because there is just no going back to repair mistakes and omissions after the window closes.

          It is also not very clear who is responding to your posts.

          Anyway, that’s my $0.02.




          1
        3. Thanks Thea.

          I spent about 5 minutes and did a password reset in order to thank you. This WordPress stuff is wearing me OUT!

          Cheers and thanks again! Pretty sure you “get my drift” on the topic.

          WP (not affiliated with Word Press).




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        4. KEEP DISQUS, PLEASE
          Add my vote for Disqus– indispensable for tracking threads (conversations) through forum after forum. With over 1,500 such forums on this website, and growing daily, the problem of losing a vital thread of reference becomes a real hazard. With only Disqus, which centralizes all commentary keyed to a particular member, all references and links can be recovered and followed.

          To the specific point, Disqus allows a member to find almost anything with minimal effort– but not with other forum software.

          For example, months afterward, I can recall Bill or Brenda commenting about a new study or technique and providing a link in the text of the post. Ordinarily– on forums not using Disqus– I could not hope to recover such obscure text without enormous effort. Thanks to Disqus, I can find post through my own Disqus account record. Under my account conversations / commentary. finding the text is a matter of only a few seconds.

          Nutrition Facts is not science made into pablum, but is the real thing, and demands a forum fully capable of serving members properly. IT may have its complaints about Disqus, but they are likely to be administrative / managerial concerns. In contrast, few (if any) users have complained about Disqus.

          While tinkering sometimes can improve a system, it should be done without pushing a pre-conceived notion of improvement. As often as not, uninvited change offends members because the forum is their own tool, practically speaking. The most an IT administrator can hope to provide is general satisfaction. With Disqus, the general satisfaction is already here– entirely unsolicited, other members and I have registered support and general satisfaction with Disqus. Any other measure deprecates our response, and distances us from full participation in NutritionFacts.org.




          1
          1. .
            A POSTSCRIPT ABOUT WORDPRESS SOFTWARE
            .
            WordPress has a few major warts, already evident. For example, when posting, the system response takes so long, we are almost tempted to click on the “Submit Comment” button, once again. That creates real user issues, and happens because the software is not as speedy and efficient as Disqus in handling end-user response.

            For another example, WordPress allows a member who posts a comment a number of seconds to add/modify text. While that is a good feature, Disqus handles it better. With WordPress, however, the problem is the WordPress clock is not accurate– with a full minute to spare, I could not modify my own text for greater clarity or to make a correction.




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      2. There were quite a few issues with people’s post being removed, or not showing up for various reasons, for a start, but I know there were more.




        0
        1. There are “sort” options for viewing posts on DQ. That got me confused once about where my post went. I’d be surprised if that wasn’t the case for some of the others. I miss the sort option. I hope the issues were bigger than that. I never had a problem-aside from that time I lost my own post.

          Hope it all works out for the best of all.




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          1. Wade, without presuming you have used Disqus for a while, did you search for comments under your own Disqus account? In a matter of minutes after logging into your account, you are able to find any comment you have successfully posted and displayed.




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            1. I only had to notice that the sorting order had been toggled. Then it was no trouble to find my post. I have glanced at the DQ panel a few times, but it’s not a habit and was not necessary in that case. Thanks for pointing out the option, it may help others when they are using DQ.




              0
              1. Yes I used DQ a while, think I have about 800 comments documented there and I’ve only used DQ in association with NF.O. I was online before the internet was public. Remember BBS’s?

                DQ was far more user friendly, but I know not of the security issues and otherwise as may be the concerns of our great NF.O staff and volunteers. So I won’t make a bunch of fuss either way. But that I cannot foresee my participation levels remaining at the same level as they were if we continue with WP.

                Who has the thyme?




                0
                1. Wade, most of IT is about creating a better interface between users and the task through appropriate software. If Disqus works well, and WordPress does not, or at least, does not seem a better replacement, there is no need to replace Disqus.

                  Disqus is used very effectively by such publications as The Hill, a national political website which has more than its share of volume, visitors and security risk, yet is without significant problems. Although Nutrition Facts has not made explicit why the person responsible for forums wanted to change the software, the change is not beneficial and not conducive to forum participation at the level of Disqus.

                  Part of encouraging public support is to make it easier for the public to participate, and Disqus remains the only successful channel, by comparison to any other software. This post under WordPress, for example, is written with much greater effort, inconvenience and loss of screen and graphic appeal.

                  Overall, a hesitant “C-plus” grade to WordPress, but a proven “A-minus” to Disqus.




                  0
                  1. .
                    IT HAPPENED AGAIN
                    .
                    The WordPress clock on editing comments is crudely ineffective– this time, I had 90 seconds left, and the clock closed access while I was still in-process of editing. The WordPress software is supposedly dedicated to editing, but is one of the poorest editors of any description I have encountered.

                    At its core, WordPress is designed for amateur websites / blogs created by individuals about their personal interests and passions, and it originated as a web log / blog, itself. However, WordPress quickly shows its original limits and loses its appeal when forced into service for larger enterprises.

                    WordPress is not enterprise-ready, and not ready for NutritionFacts.org.

                    Instead, WordPress resembles a small Fiat sedan entered into the 24-hour LeMans race course, while Ferraris and Porches zoom past as if it were standing still. The Fiat probably will finish, but that is surely not the point.

                    Visitors deserve the best possible experience with this site, and need a good experience to induce them to return. Disqus works well, and that should tell us something when WordPress does not.




                    0
  1. Interestingly when I practice transcendental meditation (TM) my breathing rate drops dramatically, and TM has reported benefits for pretty much the same conditions.

    BTW- my technique for hiccup correction is to block my ears with my index finger of each corresponding hand, and my nostrils with my thumbs or each corresponding hand, at the same time, hold my breath for as long as I can – works every time. I assume this is doing a similar thing and increasing intra-thoracic pressure to affect the vagus nerve?




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  2. As luck would have it , I.m taking a course in becoming a Guru , it’s a online course called 12 and a half steps to becoming a Guru . each step is just 9.95 . I,m up to step 11 already . i,ll be able to meditate like nobody else .
    The girl in the picture is doing it wrong , you need to sit cross legged with both arms up over head palms up , then speak slowly and very softly , by the way don.t do this with kids around, you,ll spook them out.
    Good luck to all the other Guru,s out there, hope your hiccups are gone too.




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      1. I have Dr. Andrew Weil on CD’s somewhere around here- on breathing techniques. Learn from anyone. Doing is better than not. Imperfection is Perfection.

        Breathing I can do. It’s getting this hyperactive mind of mine to settle that I find to be supremely challenging.




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  3. There are videos out on the web that present a calming image and a timer to guide you. Search for “6 breathes per minute video” I get tired of counting one one thousand, two one thousand…..




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  4. My father used to take us (my brother and I) to a Mazdaznan gathering where they taught us to breath 7 in and 7 out. The best is 7 in, 7 hold your breath, 7 out, and 7 hold in vacuum. I am trying for the best sevens. The first two sevens I can do them. I do not know exactly but I feel that I can control my “bradicardia”by doing my 7-7.




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    1. I used to have very frequent extra or skipped heartbeats (PVCs. extra-systoles, whatever) that were very disturbing, though supposedly not dangerous, (along with a host of illnesses that were) but the combination of changing to a whole food plant based diet and breathing based meditation dramatically reduced them!




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  5. HeartMath has been dealing with this for almost 20 yrs and has many biofeedback products
    to help regulate breathing via heart rate variability.




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  6. I was wondering if the Linx anti-reflux device which is implanted in the area around the upper esophageal spinchter, but under one branch and over the other branch of the vagus nerve has any effect on ones breathing. Any thoughts about that?




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  7. Twenty years ago I went to Stanford Medical Center to be treated for bladder/pelvic floor muscle spasms which are very painful. Along paradoxical meditation, I was taught this method of breathing. Instead of timing breaths in seconds, the pulse was used. While monitoring your pulse with finger of one had on inside of wrist of the other, you breathed in for five beats and out for 5 beats. Since, as the video points out, the heart beats faster while breathing in, the 5 beats in was a shorter time than the 5 beats out. This is easier and cheaper than fancy medical devices that monitor and beep for you to follow. We were taught to do this for 15 minutes, then continue breathing comfortably while meditating for another half an hour. I had electrodes place on me to monitor heart rate, respiration, blood pressure changes, galvanic skin changes, etc. All were shown on a computer screen. At the start, their graphs were all jagged. At the end, the were smooth sinusoidal waves, often with various point of different graphs in synch. And they stopped the spasms.




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  8. This is how I’ve always gotten rid of hiccups – slow, RELAXED, breathing. I never understood why or how it worked, but thanks to Dr. G, now I know!




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  9. Along these lines, I’d be curious to hear Dr. Greger’s thoughts on the breathing techniques popularized by Wim Hof.

    RE: Colleen’s mention of nose breathing–If breathing through you’re nose isn’t your default condition while at rest, you have problems. The reason the endurance athlete mentioned in your link uses nose-only breathing as a training tool is that it forces you to maintain a relatively low-intensity pace which is ideal for maximizing certain aerobic adaptations, namely left ventricle stroke volume and increased mitochondrial size/count. If you want to understand further, a good place to start is renowned running coach Phil Maffetone’s Maximum Aerobic Function (MAF) method (trigger warning: Phil is not an advocate of vegan or low-fat diets).




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  10. Actually All You Need To Do To Stop Hiccups is To Open Your Mouth, Stick You Little Fingers into Your Ears With The Finger Nail Pointed Toward The Back Of Your Ear, Close Your Mouth Tightly For about 30 Seconds… Wallah… No More Hiccups! Pressure Points Have Worked EVERY SINGLE Time For The Last 20 Years For Me, My Kids and My Grand Kids…




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  11. Dr. Doug Lisle (True North Health, Dr. John McDougall program, etc.) has repeatedly insisted there is no such thing as a mind-body connection. So, it cannot be true.




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  12. Intentional altering of the breath has been around for centuries in the spiritual or more commonly in the pseudo spiritual sciences, but it comes with very real dangers. For those tinkering with it for a minute or two here and there it may very well have a calming effect. But unfortunately the general thought with some is that if a little is good, then a ton is even better. There are some very strong warnings against this sort of practice from those in a position to know. For example increasing the heart or lung size disproportionate to the body creates derangement and it’s not something you simply go to the doctor’s office to have fixed. If you’re truly looking for the benefits of breathing you’re 100 times better off finding a good form of exercise like walking, or go with a commonly practiced form of meditation.




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  13. Thanks to Dr. Greger and team for helping me find the wfpb path. Eternally grateful. Mindfulness meditation was a big piece missing when I was changing my body those first 6 mos of going wfpb.

    Mindfulness Meditation is the ability to know what is happening in your head in any given moment without being carried away by it. What is commonly known as: “being in the moment”.

    This gives you the ability to respond wisely to any event. Being mindful will give you a choice in any situation to take the right approach and not be carried away by your thoughts like a mad dog. And just like learning a new skill, it takes time to master.

    Meditation has nothing to do with religion or spiritual practice.

    It has been scientifically proven to be the best exercise for keeping a healthy mind. Its “lifting” for the mind.

    First, here is a though concept you need to digest.

    The mind is just a tool for you to use….and the voice inside, it it’s not you. You are the one that is aware of it, the one that can hear it.

    When you build the habit of meditation you can hear that voice speaking all day long, because that is his job. To look for problems to solve, to comment on the bad weather, to think of your ex, etc. And most of the time it is speaking smack about you. But when you know that whatever it says is not true, it’s just its job to say things, you stop taking it seriously.

    for more:




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    1. Hi Darb,

      What you are saying peaked my interest. I’ve been interested in mindfullness for a while. Your description of the mind and the voice inside struck a cord. Lately I’ve been wondering about who I am in regards to the monkey mind ( the voice you described). In your message you tried to give more information but the link seems to be missing. Could you direct me to the source of information you wanted to link here?




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  14. Thank you for adding this related topic of Mindfulness / Meditation / Breathing and the Mind Body connection to your body of work. For me this was the support I needed to find the ability to change to a WFPB way of life. Of course the mind and body are connected physically by the neck, but seeing the connections on more and more levels is really a powerful tool!




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  15. I do yoga and workout to improve my mind and body connection. The body follows whatever mind orders, so we must train both But to train mind first train your body. A healthy mind lives in a healthy body.




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  16. I eat totally healthy whole food plant based but I got sick anyway…a bad cough with nausea ( no throwing up though) How can I help myself to get rid of this and get well again. It has been lingering for a week now. The nausea is the worst symptom. Thank you!




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    1. Have you tried the lemon honey tea? That works awesome to fix a cough and sore throat. I tried and it worked and one more thing that eating clean is not the complete thing for health workout is also an important part to stay healthy.




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  17. I enjoyed this video very much. I sometimes repeat a mantra when I meditate, and I thought it would be cool to come up with something that had 11 syllables on the breath in, and 11 syllables on the breath out, with the idea that at two syllables per second, it would fit the recommended optimal breathing pattern for the vagus nerve. I was happy to notice that one of my favourite bible verses fits the bill! It’s “Ask and you shall receive. Seek and you shall find.” “Knock and the door shall be opened unto you.” It can be used by people of all religious faiths, or of none.




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  18. I recently learned of a man named Wim Hof (aka The Iceman) who I believe holds the Guinness record for staying in an ice bath for 1 hr and 52 min’s. He also climbed 22,000 ft of Everest with nothing but shorts and shoes. He uses breathing techniques to accomplish this and evidence indicates he has learned to harness his immune system.

    This seems impossible and I would very much like to see nutritionfacts.org research this and present evidence as to the science behind Wim Hof’s accomplishments.




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  19. PLEASE COMMENT/ DO A VIDEO ON THIS TOPIC:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dR1FCJS8DoM

    VIDEO IS ABOUT A DR. AND HIS WIFE WHO FAST 23 HRS., EAT A PLANT BASED DIET, HE A WELL RECOGNIZED WEIGHT LIFTER WITH
    EXCELLENT MUSCLE GROWTH EATING ONLY 1200 – 1500 CALORIES DAILY.

    TRAINING: AEROBIC IN THE DAY AND WEIGHTS IN THE EVENING.

    I KNOW FASTING IS CRITICAL, AS IS PLANT BASED DIET.

    MY QUESTION THEN IS, CAN THIS DIET AND LIFE STYLE BE SUSTAINED BY AN AVERAGE INDIVIDUAL WHO DOES NOT HAVE
    THE EDUCATION, KNOWLEDGE TO DO SO? IT APPEARS THAT ONE COULD JEOPARDIZE ONE’S HEALTH IF MISSING KEY NUTRIENTS




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  20. I really like your videos much better than the written blogs. I like seeing multiple images/pictures, like hearing your voice and the intonations/emphasis you place on chosen words and phrases – and your humor. It’s all much more personal than reading yet another blog post. Plus, I can be fixing my breakfast while I’m listening and watching your excellent videos. I’ve even been known to listen while driving or riding in the car. I like to be learning all the time.




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  21. Dr. Greger, Is there any research on how much yoga asanas(not pranayama or meditation but asanas) helps our body as compared to other exercise routines like aerobics, etc. I have read that Yoga has both preventive and healing capabilities for various ailments. But does science believe this to be true?




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