Natural Treatments for Morning Sickness

Natural Treatments for Morning Sickness
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Can cannabis and ginger be considered safe and effective treatments for hyperemesis gravidarum (severe morning sickness during pregnancy)?

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Nausea and vomiting are common during pregnancy, affecting 70 to 85% of women worldwide, but not in all countries. Population groups that eat more plant-based diets tend to have little or no nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, though. For example, on a nationwide basis, the lowest reported rates in the world are in India, at only 35%.

Sometimes, symptoms are so severe it can become life-threatening—a condition known as hyperemesis gravidarum. Each year, more than 50,000 pregnant women are hospitalized. What can we do, other than reducing our intake of saturated fat, for example—cutting the odds five-fold by cutting out one daily cheeseburger?

The best available evidence suggests that ginger is a safe and effective treatment. The recommended dose is a gram of powdered ginger a day. That’s about a half a teaspoon which is equivalent to about a full teaspoon of grated fresh ginger, or four cups of ginger tea. The maximum recommended daily dose is four grams, though; so, no more than about two teaspoons of powdered ginger a day.

Cannabis was rated as extremely effective or effective by nine out of ten pregnant women who used if for morning sickness, but cannabis use during pregnancy may be regarded as potentially harmful to the developing fetus. This is not your mother’s marijuana. Today’s marijuana is six to seven times more potent than in the 1970s, and may cause problems both for the developing fetus, and then later for the developing child. The bottom line is that pregnant and breastfeeding cannabis users should be advised to either decrease or, where possible, cease cannabis use entirely.

What do they mean “where possible”? Under what circumstances would it not be possible? People don’t realize how bad it can get. This is how one woman described it. Hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to such violent vomiting you can rupture your esophagus, bleed into your eyes, go blind, or comatose. So, there are certain circumstances where cannabis could be a lifesaver for the mother and the baby, as women sometimes understandably choose to terminate otherwise wanted pregnancies.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Sarah / Flickr

Nausea and vomiting are common during pregnancy, affecting 70 to 85% of women worldwide, but not in all countries. Population groups that eat more plant-based diets tend to have little or no nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, though. For example, on a nationwide basis, the lowest reported rates in the world are in India, at only 35%.

Sometimes, symptoms are so severe it can become life-threatening—a condition known as hyperemesis gravidarum. Each year, more than 50,000 pregnant women are hospitalized. What can we do, other than reducing our intake of saturated fat, for example—cutting the odds five-fold by cutting out one daily cheeseburger?

The best available evidence suggests that ginger is a safe and effective treatment. The recommended dose is a gram of powdered ginger a day. That’s about a half a teaspoon which is equivalent to about a full teaspoon of grated fresh ginger, or four cups of ginger tea. The maximum recommended daily dose is four grams, though; so, no more than about two teaspoons of powdered ginger a day.

Cannabis was rated as extremely effective or effective by nine out of ten pregnant women who used if for morning sickness, but cannabis use during pregnancy may be regarded as potentially harmful to the developing fetus. This is not your mother’s marijuana. Today’s marijuana is six to seven times more potent than in the 1970s, and may cause problems both for the developing fetus, and then later for the developing child. The bottom line is that pregnant and breastfeeding cannabis users should be advised to either decrease or, where possible, cease cannabis use entirely.

What do they mean “where possible”? Under what circumstances would it not be possible? People don’t realize how bad it can get. This is how one woman described it. Hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to such violent vomiting you can rupture your esophagus, bleed into your eyes, go blind, or comatose. So, there are certain circumstances where cannabis could be a lifesaver for the mother and the baby, as women sometimes understandably choose to terminate otherwise wanted pregnancies.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Sarah / Flickr

Doctor's Note

People have long asked me to do videos about medical marijuana, but because of the stigma, only recently have there been a substantial number of clinical studies published. As soon as there’s a critical mass, I’ll put out a series of videos on the potential pros and cons.

What else can ginger do? See:

Check out my favorite way to eat ginger here: Dr. Greger’s Natural Nausea Remedy Recipe.

Other healthy pregnancy videos include:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

73 responses to “Natural Treatments for Morning Sickness

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  1. pot smoking a cause of mental illness in people if smoked during the formation of their brains (youth). Even troubling findings being discovered in adults who start smoking pot as well.

    1. There are many ways of ingesting medical cannabis without smoking, and even cannabis without the THC, the psychoactive part. Cannabis has helped people overcome cancer, nausea, intractable seizures, and many other physical ailments and conditions. It is a subject which is much more complex than we were taught by our government for many years. Before Big Pharma conspired to have it made illegal almost 100 years ago it was one of the most effective medications doctors used. There is still much to be learned, but the government has made research very difficult. TIn this research vacuum, the best research has come from Israel and Spain.

    2. Um, what? The first thing that comes to mind is the correlation/causation issue. Perhaps people who tend toward mental illness smoke marijuana. There are no doubt no randomized, placebo control studies on this issue, and as far as I know the government banned marijuana research when it classified it as a schedule I drug, which by the way is objectively ridiculous. Your claim suggests to me that you may need to learn how to read studies.

        1. Did you read what’s at the other end of your link? Maybe you didn’t understand it, or my post. I don’t know. I’m at a loss.

          1. Of course I read the link. It suggests that the issue is still “live” but, if you look at all the reviews and studies there, it seems clear that there is a respectable argument to be made for a causal relationship.

            I have no personal opinions on the matter but it strikes me that the post, while debatable, should not be lightly dismissed.

            1. The post should absolutely be dismissed. It says that smoking pot causes mental illness. This is not established. The page you linked to says causation is not established over and over again, as do the studies. Correlation is not causation.

              1. Yes causation is not established but it is also not ruled out.

                Yes, correlation is not causation but nor does it exclude or disprove causation.

                The jury is still out but you seem to want to dismiss completely the argument that the association is causative.? Or am I misunderstanding your point?

                1. I am open to the arguments and open to the possibility of causation. If it’s established then it’s established. However, it’s not established, so the causation claim is wrong. If you are arguing for keeping an open mind to the possibility, then I agree. However it has been tested, apparently a lot, and not yet found. Unless it’s found the claim is wrong. That doesn’t mean I’m closed to the possibility, but I am closed to the claim of a causal relationship.

                  1. I do not want to appear difficult but the causation claim is not necessarily wrong. It may be correct, It may be incorrect. We do not know at this stage.

                    1. Yes, the causation claim is wrong. Causation is not established. Until it is established you cannot make that claim and remain credible. That’s just the way it is. And I’m glad to see that you deleted your claim that things are true unless they are disproved. I like to think you deleted that after thinking it through.

                    2. We will have to agree to disagree.

                      I do not recall making (or deleting) a claim “that things are true unless they are disproved.”. However, I have effectively said that because a thing is unproven does not mean that it is disproven. The original post made a statement that is not proven but which may nevertheless be true (or it may be false). There is certainly some support in the professional literature for his/her claim but the evidence is definitely mixed.

                    3. I’m sorry you can’t acknowledge my point. I do not misunderstand yours, but the two are not mutually exclusive. Honestly, your argument seems to be one of convenience. You certainly seem capable of understanding not just my argument but the implications of it.

                    4. How about reading that linked Wikipedia page again from beginning to end?

                      You wrote
                      “I went back and reread the page “Cannabis and psychosis” you linked to. The entirety of it is an argument AGAINST the claim of causation. There is only correlation. I even looked at a few of the studies. Same thing. I’m pretty sure that concludes the matter.”

                      It is as though you are discussing an entirely different document from the one I linked to.

                      I provided the link because it clearly shows that the issue is highly debatable and that the claim in the original post has some legs even if it is not proven.

                    5. You provided a link presumably in support of the claim that marijuana causes mental illness. It fails to do that. It fails spectacularly because it CLEARLY establishes that I am right – that there is only correlation. It says this repeatedly. It says this in almost every sentence on the page.

                      If you provided that link as evidence that it is “debatable” whether or not marijuana causes mental illness, then that is exactly the same as saying there is correlation between the two, and that is what I am saying. It is not at all what you are saying. The issue at hand is the causation claim. Causation is not established and it is wrong to claim otherwise. Knowing what you know now after seeing the research, it is dishonest to claim otherwise.

                      I don’t really care that this correlation is an interesting research question. The original post made a false claim. I pointed out, correctly, that it was a false claim. You keep wanting to make excuses for it. That’s not going to ever work. I’m sorry you don’t like that.

                    6. When I posted the link, I made no comments whatsoever. The information in the link speaks for itself and, obviously, “disproven” is not a synonym for “unproven”.

                      You have made these statements before and I have responded to them before. There is no point in repeating those responses. Therefore, I will just say that I disagree with you and leave it at that..

                1. I have heard this may be the case for PTSD and perhaps other mental illnesses…which illustrates why making false, blanket claims is and should be so objectionable. If a researcher did such a thing it would end their career, which is why they generally avoid that kind of language altogether. There’s no rational justification for it and plenty of reasons to avoid it. Frankly, I think that whole conversation was a bit ridiculous.

            2. Tom, thank you for your reasoned, and dispassionate approach to this issue. I notice that other moderators have not jumped into this fray. People get very impassioned about this topic of medical effects of smoking marijuana, and I believe (from discussions of the subject with friends and patients) that many of those who deny any adverse health effects want to justify their own habits as being non-harmful. My reading of this literature over many years suggests clear adverse health outcomes from smoking marijuana. I provide links here to two recent studies (which I found on Pub Med by entering “fetal health marijuana”):
              1) BMJ study, 4/2016: Meta-analysis of 24 studies showed that women who used cannabis had a significantly increased risk (compared with non-users) of:
              – anemia — in mothers: pooled odds ratio (pOR) 1.36
              – decreased birth weight of newborns: pOR 1.77 — with mean difference in birth weight of 109 grams.
              – newborns being admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit: pOR 2.02
              2) Animal (mouse) study in Molecular Psychiatry 3/2016: Showed actual loss of inhibitory neurons in brains of mouse pups whose mothers were treated with THC during pregnancy, and mouse pups who displayed “altered social behavior”. Granted, this is an animal study, but sheds some light on the cause vs. association argument made above, regarding mental illness.

              I don’t have the references any longer, but many years ago I did a literature review of health effects of smoking marijuana, and one fact that impressed me was that sperm counts and sperm quality were decreased in men who smoked marijuana.

              Having said all this, Dr. Greger’s video is about using cannabis and ginger for the treatment of the very serious medical problem of severe nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. I think a great case can be made for using medical marijuana when the alternative is to be admitted to the hospital for 2+ days for IV re-hydration. But let’s not kid ourselves that there are no health risks of medical marijuana.

              Also, saying the marijuana is not as bad as alcohol abuse, or tobacco may indeed be true, but my response is “so what?”

              1. “…and I believe…that many of those who deny any adverse health effects want to justify their own habits as being non-harmful.”

                Unlike those who dismiss others to maintain their own bias against marijuana?

                My argument is correct, and I don’t smoke marijuana. I welcome any critique of my argument. As you are a doctor, I am disappointed by your comment.

              2. Yes, I have also seen various reports over the last three (?) decades or so of DNA damage from cannabis.
                https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Raj_Singh3/publication/24434683_Evaluation_of_the_DNA_Damaging_Potential_of_Cannabis_Cigarette_Smoke_by_the_Determination_of_Acetaldehyde_Derived_N(2)-Ethyl-2_'-deoxyguanosine_Adducts/links/004635266aa247f46c000000.pdf
                http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/002432059500208N
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2174024

                However, as you note, some people seem very personally invested in the notion that cannabis is harmless and seem unwilling to even acknowledge that there is contrary evidence.

    1. It is not anti-life to wish that we as a species, at this crucial moment in history, would evolve greater consciousness about decisions whether to make more humans.

      1. No, it’s not anti-life to suggest that we abandon rational self-interest in favor of collective sacrifice for the future potential good of others we will not know, but it is anti-human nature, and a tough sell.

    2. Yes, and we should not drive cars because you know, accidents. I’ll spare you the dozen other analogies that came to mind.

  2. Wow, it’s been a long time since I was PG, but this was sure an issue with me that I found terrible, and terribly puzzling. Sure wish I at least knew about WFPB then, because marijuana was still demonized ala “Reefer Madness”. I always thought is was an herbal remedy if it didn’t have to be smoked, because of the good it did for people. I think I read somewhere that the whole issue with hemp and marijuana has some relation to the financial interests of Dupont in conjunction with their invention of petroleum based synthetics and the inconvenient competition of an easily grown renewable resource? It can be paper, material, medicine, etc. so a huge threat to big industry! The DEA is STILL saying that hemp and marijuana are essentially the same thing!

    1. I tried reflexology acupuncture herbal remedies gingersnaps along with every other diet modification (longtime PBWFD) with only minor improvement. Wish those super-low THC cannabinoid products were around then!

    2. Indeed, the fact is, hemp was (or at least hemp products), at one time, the USA’s biggest export. The fabric and fiber products are phenomenal and virtuously impervious to many enemies of today’s synthetic fibers. Hemp produces more high quality fiber than cotton, per acre. It produces numerous times more fiber than trees per acre and is renewable each year. Hemp seed produces tons of oil per acre, which can easily be refined into the finest of lubricants and fuels. Hemp plant cellulose and fiber can be refined into fuels at staggering rates per acre. It is the biggest threat that oil companies know to the synthetic fiber and fuel businesses. It was oil companies and timber companies that pulled political strings to have it removed from our culture, by way of the marijuana aspect, many years ago. This being said, petroleum products are far more efficient and cost effective in many ways, in the long run. Ethanol is hardly non-polluting and is disastrous to engine life and fuel mileage. They each have their place and usefulness. They each have engaged in political string-pulling in order to dominate. They each have a place, as long as some degree of balance and logic are employed in their application. There is a reason that every nation on the planet (yes, even Holland and Columbia) made marijuana illegal and there is a reason why the oil and chemical industry had to use hysteria to have government remove hemp from our agricultural industries.

  3. The notion that cannabis is 6 or 7 times stronger today than “back whenever” is based on more reefer madness type “information”. There are actually guys out there who have been breeding for years to develop strains that where AS GOOD AS THEY were smoking in the 70’s. They are experts. Some have had success and what they have developed is stronger than what you buy in the dispensaries (notoriously mediocre weed amongst the guys who know). Which is another great point about “today’s” cannabis products. They VARY WIDELY in potency and THC/CBD ratios. THC content is not the best marker for “potency” of cannabis anyway. One MUST consider the other major cannabinoids their ratios and also the minor cannabinoids for their “shape” of the effects attained from cannabis consumption. Sure, there are many more forms (flower, edibles, oils, extracts) available and legal in some areas, but this does not make them six times stronger. Some researchers have disclosed that the BEST “fun effect” (high) they ever experienced was a relatively low THC (something like 5%) but that the CBD and other “minor” cannabinoids were present in higher amounts. It’s just never as simple as everyone would like for it to be.

    ALSO, folks tend to think that cannabis users always use the same amount of product and therefore if it’s stronger they use more. Quite the opposite is what I hear. In other words, LESS is consumed for the same effect when potency is better. No one likes to be “over-high” but it is a far safer and less-toxic experience that being drunk on alcohol (assuming social use). My point is that folks stop ingesting cannabis when they get the effect they desire “potency” be damned. Tolerance is less of an issue (if at all) with cannabis as well. Nice to see Dr. G’s recognition of clinical benefits from cannabis. Legitimate cannabis research has ONLY JUST BEGUN and it looks good. And that’s all I got to say about that.

    1. What really peeves me, I personally know people who died or almost died from legal alcohol and cigarettes, but other than some hyped BS stories, I’ve never heard of anyone dying from toking a bit of the forbidden weed. When my brother was dying of cancer it was the only thing that gave him any relief from the radiation and poisons he was ingesting, (much to his chagrin) and it would have made his remaining days a whole lot easier if it could have been gotten consistently.

    2. Back in the 70’s what was called mexican dirt weed was prevalent then late 70’s the name game and higher priced stuff started being the only thing available, like Mauie Wowie. By the mid 80’s one toke was too much. Still that way. There is a big difference in smell, looks, bud formation and resin.

      1. Yes, for you. I have a friend or seven in legal states who were alive and well in the 70’s and they smoked plenty of varieties. Lots of the Mexican Sativas were wonderful-they all agree. Also, some of the “ancient” seeds yet exist and I do believe there has been some lab testing. Again “THC content” is only one factor and it’s NOT the best judge of the “strength” of cannabis. Not all cannabis is the same, not now, not then, not ever.

        1. It is now totally legal in the state that I live. But the best place to obtain it is from a medical marijuana dispensary that really knows their stuff and can guide the buyer not one that just sells it. Ancient seeds is what I would like to obtain. It is fun to grow. Am amazed at all the varieties available now. Some people have had wonderful success using marijuana for migraine. Others not so much but not sure how well informed they were about what to try.

          1. There is better than dispensary, and if you grow, don’t believe all the bs hype out there. Some of it is utter nonsense.

  4. The vegan diet reduces the risk of morning sickness and cutting just one cheeseburger a day can cut your risk by five fold. Ginger is a safe and effective treatment. Perhaps these interventions are more effective than any drug and should be instituted in health care.

    1. Sorry but eating a vegan diet simply is not a cure-all for morning sickness. I wanted to believe it but couldn’t lie to myself anymore when I barfed up my green smoothie one morning.

  5. where can you get a safe source of ginger? I understand there are traces of lead in much ginger grown outside of the US. Lead of course is a neurotoxin for the developing brain. Help! There is always something.

  6. Aloha,
    Now has anyone done a study on women in Jamaica who are Rasta Farian? They have been consuming cannabis for several decades. I would think that well developed studies would bring to light the benefits and or harm of this substance.The fact remains that there are hundreds of strains of cannabis and all can and have been assessed for their potency. One need not consume a strain that is very high in THC to get the nausea reducing effects. Of course there is also the route of ingestion of the whole plant and the avoidance of any type of smoking. The mixing of tobacco with cannabis would distort any true scientific findings but it would be a very good study to warn people of the dangers of mixing tobacco with cannabis.
    here’s a link to Pubmed
    I find over 15K studies- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=cannabis

  7. From this discussion, I am getting the impression that people are not very aware of the different degrees of vomiting in pregnancy. DIet and various simple methods (small meals, etc) may certainly help with uncomplicated and mild cases, and then I think the next step should be ginger, which is often effective a is known to be safe. Women who are vomiting excessively may be unable to eat enough to gain weight in the pregnancy or may develop ketosis, an state which is not good for the baby. There are approved pharmaceutical medicines to help at this stage. If not effective, and the pregnant woman develops hyperemesis
    gravidarum, with vomiting of 30 times a day, the condition requires hospitalisation, to prevent dehydration dangerous electrolyte imbalance and other complications with the use of intravenous fluids and medications to settle the vomiting. This is a medical emergency, and exactly the kind of situation where modern medicine can be life-saving and has a lot to offer.
    Regarding the use of cannabis, there are issues and controversies regarding medicinal and recreational use of cannabis by adults. But the exposure of children, infants and unborn children, whose brains are not yet matured, to a mind altering substances is a minefield of unknown risk.

  8. This comment isnt related to the video above, but i would like to say that over on the youtube channel it would be good to have somebody answer questions and challenge some of the comments trying refute the videos. The higher view ones like, does coconut oil clog arteries? Have a lot of people trying to discredit the video

  9. My mother advised ,from her mother, that drinking a cup of hot water before getting up in the morning was effective against morning sickness.

  10. I want to know it once and for all ! Does eating Marijuana in her natural form helpful,harmless,or harmful?

    (generally speaking, not exclusively to pregnant women)

    1. just from what I read on the internet. my vote is harmful , most likely safer than other drugs though.
      Our newly elected prime minister in canada has promised to make pot legal and BTW I voted for him.

    2. There are risks but those risks seem extraordinarily low. We know it is far, far less dangerous than other substances….like alcohol, tobacco, sugar, saturated fat, hydrogenated oils, fried foods, processed meats, artificial colorings, and high fructose corn syrup.

      We know these foods are mostly legal and they kill. Marijuana kills no one.

      1. Marijuana kills no one? What about the increase in suicide rates and mental illness? What about doubling the chance of car accidents when high?Smoke of any kind is not good for the lungs including pot.

        1. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr61/nvsr61_04.pdf

          Page 101. You will notice that while there are codes for drug-related causes of death that most people have likely never heard of, there is no code for marijuana. The word ‘marijuana’ is in fact not found anywhere in this document. That’s because deaths attributed to marijuana is not a thing. It does not exist.

          This is also the case for 2011, 2012, and 2013. I stopped looking at this point.

          So yes, marijuana kills no one. your ‘what-if’s’ are interesting intellectual exercises, but that’s about it.

        1. Thanks. I found it interesting. Of note, relating to the topic of this thread, he died of trauma from a suicide attempt rather than marijuana per se. I don’t doubt that any consciousness-altering drug, including legal ones, could contribute to unusual or even self-destructive behavior. Based on my knowledge though, this kind of reaction to marijuana is exceptionally rare.

    3. I read or listened to a health podcast, like maybe a year ago, and they said that there is a type of cannabis that doesn’t get you high but is super healthy and full of antioxidants. Kind of the kale of cannabis. Apparently it doesn’t taste that good, but that’s why one of the cornerstones of civilization is cuisine-“How do you get healthy stuff to be prepared in a way that people will enjoy it”? I would love to experiment with it-different sauces, fermenting, types of cooking, etc. John S

    4. My understanding, partially from the doctor who I saw before using medical cannabis, is that cannabis has to be heated before the THC becomes active. The unheated cannabis plant has a lot of antioxidants and other nutrients and should be helpful, not harmful.

    5. It is my understanding that part of the reason there is very little research and hence knowledge about the effects of cannabis is due to “The Controlled Substances Act of 1970” which placed the drug in the most restrictive use category – Category 1- deeming it with no medicinal value and high potential for abuse. Research approval must be received from at least 3 different federal agencies and as I understand, the process is nearly impossible to successfully complete. I share this information so that you will understand that any answers you receive to your question are most likely rooted in opinion rather than based on scientific evidence.

  11. I was not WFPB for my first pregnancy. But I was WFPB for my second pregnancy and the second pregnancy was SO MUCH WORSE. You read that right. The WFPB pregnancy was worse. And not just with nausea, but with everything. Did that stop me? No. I kept with it for the most part. I tell this story to point out that there is so much variability, but you just have to play the odds and there’s no doubt in my mind that a WFPB diet is the way to go.
    Luckily, I gave birth to a perfectly healthy but ENORMOUS eleven pound two ounce baby. And before you ask, no, there was no gestational diabetes, I am of normal weight, and I only gained 35 pounds during the pregnancy. He was just a BIG baby, which explained why the pregnancy was so hard.
    Even if the research isn’t clear yet, I’m glad to see it’s being studied because it’s just so awful and effects so many women.

  12. I use canabbis mixed with olive oil turmeric and black pepper to make my golden milk everynight and i just cant explain how good is that (at least for me) way better than a glass of red wine or any pill or thing. It doesnt matter how bad i feel that day, my golden milk makes my life golden!

    1. I guess I’m the exception that proves the rule. I had no morning sickness with either my son or my daughter. This was ages ago (my son is 52), so I ate what I grew up on – meat, veggies, eggs, cheese, and milk. But the only one of those things I eat now are the veggies. The Standard American Diet back then at least was not laced with so many chemicals, and grocery shelves weren’t packed with nutritional nightmares.

  13. After reading Dr Carolyn Dean, MD’s book “The Magnesium Miracle”, I found my long-sought answer to many of my health issues, including preterm labor and serious morning sickness for the first 13 weeks of both my pregnancies. If only I had found Dr Dean’s book at that time. I am nearly certain my morning sickness was due to lack of magnesium, and I’d be willing to bet it is the main reason for all women’s morning sickness. Dr Dean’s ReMag (liquid MgCl in pico-size particles) is great….I now take it daily and would not want to live without it, plus I use transdermal MgCl (Ancient Minerals brand as a liquid). Dr Greger…..I wish you and Dr Dean would get together and share your findings with each other. All of your readers would benefit from her vast information on magnesium and her readers would benefit from your findings on animal fat/protein and it’s affect. A perfect marriage of some of the most important nutritional findings we have.

    1. Thank you for this information! I recently posted my story in the comments and saw yours just above mine… I wish I had known this while pregnant! I recently learned of magnesium deficiencies and so I bathe myself and my daughter in magnesium baths but I am going to buy that book!!
      I had the worst pregnancy experience so much so that I didn’t think I would do it again but this give me hope… thank you

  14. you should double check on the problems that can be caused be caused by cannabis, i have read other information on the development of there brain with the use of cannabis

  15. I would like to point out that there are many other methods of consuming cannabis without combustion of the actual plant matter (smoking) – this results in a reduction of harmful by-products when ingesting the substance. Specifically, I am talking about the vaporization of cannabis. The theory of vaporization means that you are heating the plant material up until a certain temperature in which the active ingredients vaporizes; therefore, getting the active ingredients without the by-product of smoke. Correct me if I’m wrong, but the typical research done with cannabis involves combustion of the material in order to ingest it. My question is whether or not this makes a difference in terms of the outcome. If smoking cannabis is different from vaporizing cannabis – could it be possible that the by-product of smoke be apart of the reason why we see so many negative outcomes in terms of research on cannabis? I personally think this may be possible. Check out this research and help me understand it if possible. Here is some research pointing at the difference between combustion of cannabis and vaporization. (http://goo.gl/8VldGx)

  16. Can real ginger be used in place of the powdered ginger (one-eighth teaspoon 3 times a day) to reduce menstrual flow? And how much real ginger needs to be consumed to get the same effects?

  17. Dear Dr,
    Do you have any info on using Cannabis in extract/oil form for cancer treatment? There are many people using it, it’s called Rick Simpson oil.
    Of course smoking is bad (who knows, maybe smoking broccoli can kill you too), but there are other ways to consume this plant that has been used for thousand of years.

  18. I had HG awhile pregnant with my daughter and was hospitalized twice and out of work for months. I could not eat or drink. I threw up anything I ate and when nothing was left stomach acid, bile and then blood. I had broken blood vessels in my eyes.
    I was prescribed two medications for nausea, one was a suppository. They didn’t help much. Before becoming pregnant I was also on Zoloft for anxiety and depression which is unsafe to take while pregnant.
    I stopped taking the Zoloft cold turkey and for anyone who has withdrawled from anti-depressants it is hell.
    I considered many times abortion because not only was I physically in pain, it was expensive to be unable to work!
    My last resort was medical marijuana. I got a vaporizer (less smoke which I’m convinced is most of the reason for the side effects of smoking it, not because of the medicine itself) and took one dose a few times a day when I needed to eat. It made me eat when nothing else could, it made me thirsty when I wasn’t drinking, and it made antidepressant withdrawals tolerable.

    My almost two year old would not be here today if it were not for medicinal marijuana. She is healthy, vibrant and very smart! She potty trained herself and speaks both English and Spanish equally, counts to 14 in both languages, the whole nine. She is ahead of the curve in every way.

    I was concerned that cannabis use during my pregnancy would have negative impacts for my baby, and even a family member who is a nurse said she would be born stupid and hungry. :\ But my labor and delivery were normal (and natural!), she had a lower birth weight but I believe that is mostly because I didn’t eat much… I only gained 15 lbs my whole pregnancy and my daughter was 6.2lb when born.

    Most people who come upon this article will be pregnant and have this condition and I think it is important to have compassion for them! Do your research but also listen to your body… a mother knows what’s best for herself and her growing baby!

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