The Effect of Drinking Water on Adrenal Hormones

The Effect of Drinking Water on Adrenal Hormones
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Drinking water can be such a safe, simple, effective way to prevent yourself from fainting.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Drink a few cups of water, and within three minutes the level of the adrenal gland hormone noradrenaline in your bloodstream can shoot up 60 percent. Have people drink two cups of water with electrodes stuck in their legs, and within 20 minutes you can document about a 40 percent increase in bursts of fight-or-flight nerve activity. Chug two or three cups of water, and blood flow squeezes down in your calves and arms, clamping down nearly in half as arteries to your limbs and skin constrict to divert blood to your core. That’s why, for example, drinking water can be such a safe, simple, effective way to prevent yourself from fainting (known medically as syncope).

Fainting is the sudden, brief loss of consciousness caused by diminished blood flow to your brain. About one in five people experience this at least once, and about one in ten may have repeated episodes, causing millions of emergency room visits and hospitalizations every year. Though fainting can be caused by heart problems, it is most often triggered by prolonged standing (because blood pools in our legs) or strong emotions, which can cause your blood pressure to bottom out.

About 1 in 25 people have what’s called blood-injury-injection phobia, where getting a needle stick, for example, can cause you to faint. More than 150,000 people experience fainting or near-fainting spells each year when they donate blood.  All you have to do to help prevent yourself from getting woozy, though, is just chug two cups of water five minutes before getting stuck. The secret isn’t in bolstering your overall blood volume. Drinking two cups of water—even a whole quart—and your blood volume doesn’t change more than 1 or 2 percent. It’s due rather to the shift in the distribution of blood toward your center caused by the noradrenaline-induced peripheral artery constriction.

Water drinking stimulates as much noradrenaline release as drinking a couple of cups of coffee or smoking a couple of unfiltered cigarettes. If the simple act of drinking water causes such a profound fight-or-flight reaction, why doesn’t it cause our heart to pound and shoot our blood pressure through the roof? It’s like the diving reflex I talked about in the last video. When we drink water, our body simultaneously sends signals to our heart to slow it down, to “still your beating heart.” You can try it at home: Measure your heart rate before and after drinking two cups of water. Within 10 minutes your heart rate should slow by about four beats per minute, and by 15 minutes you should be down six or seven beats.

One of the ways scientists figured this out is by studying heart transplant patients. When you move a heart from one person to another, you have to sever all the attached nerves. Amazingly, some of the nerves grow back. But still, give healed heart transplant patients two glasses of water, and their blood pressure goes up as much as 29 points. The body is unable to sufficiently quell the effect of that burst of noradrenaline. Some people have a condition known as autonomic failure, in which blood pressure regulation nerves don’t work properly, and their pressures can dangerously skyrocket over 100 points after chugging two cups of water. That’s how powerful an effect the simple act of drinking a glass of water can be, and the only reason that doesn’t happen to all of us is that we have an even more powerful counter-response to keep our heart in check. It reminds me of the poor woman who had a stroke after taking the ice bucket challenge, due to an insufficient diving reflex to tamp down all that extra noradrenaline release.

The remarkable water effect can be useful for people suffering from milder forms of autonomic failure such as orthostatic hypotension, which is when people get dizzy standing up suddenly. Drinking some water before getting out of bed in the morning can be a big help. But what about that metabolic boost? With so much noradrenaline being released, with your adrenal gland hormones in overdrive, might drinking a few glasses of water cause you to burn more body fat? Could tap water be like a safe form of ephedra—all the weight loss, but with a nice slowing of your heart rate instead? Researchers decided to put it to the test, which we’ll explore next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Drink a few cups of water, and within three minutes the level of the adrenal gland hormone noradrenaline in your bloodstream can shoot up 60 percent. Have people drink two cups of water with electrodes stuck in their legs, and within 20 minutes you can document about a 40 percent increase in bursts of fight-or-flight nerve activity. Chug two or three cups of water, and blood flow squeezes down in your calves and arms, clamping down nearly in half as arteries to your limbs and skin constrict to divert blood to your core. That’s why, for example, drinking water can be such a safe, simple, effective way to prevent yourself from fainting (known medically as syncope).

Fainting is the sudden, brief loss of consciousness caused by diminished blood flow to your brain. About one in five people experience this at least once, and about one in ten may have repeated episodes, causing millions of emergency room visits and hospitalizations every year. Though fainting can be caused by heart problems, it is most often triggered by prolonged standing (because blood pools in our legs) or strong emotions, which can cause your blood pressure to bottom out.

About 1 in 25 people have what’s called blood-injury-injection phobia, where getting a needle stick, for example, can cause you to faint. More than 150,000 people experience fainting or near-fainting spells each year when they donate blood.  All you have to do to help prevent yourself from getting woozy, though, is just chug two cups of water five minutes before getting stuck. The secret isn’t in bolstering your overall blood volume. Drinking two cups of water—even a whole quart—and your blood volume doesn’t change more than 1 or 2 percent. It’s due rather to the shift in the distribution of blood toward your center caused by the noradrenaline-induced peripheral artery constriction.

Water drinking stimulates as much noradrenaline release as drinking a couple of cups of coffee or smoking a couple of unfiltered cigarettes. If the simple act of drinking water causes such a profound fight-or-flight reaction, why doesn’t it cause our heart to pound and shoot our blood pressure through the roof? It’s like the diving reflex I talked about in the last video. When we drink water, our body simultaneously sends signals to our heart to slow it down, to “still your beating heart.” You can try it at home: Measure your heart rate before and after drinking two cups of water. Within 10 minutes your heart rate should slow by about four beats per minute, and by 15 minutes you should be down six or seven beats.

One of the ways scientists figured this out is by studying heart transplant patients. When you move a heart from one person to another, you have to sever all the attached nerves. Amazingly, some of the nerves grow back. But still, give healed heart transplant patients two glasses of water, and their blood pressure goes up as much as 29 points. The body is unable to sufficiently quell the effect of that burst of noradrenaline. Some people have a condition known as autonomic failure, in which blood pressure regulation nerves don’t work properly, and their pressures can dangerously skyrocket over 100 points after chugging two cups of water. That’s how powerful an effect the simple act of drinking a glass of water can be, and the only reason that doesn’t happen to all of us is that we have an even more powerful counter-response to keep our heart in check. It reminds me of the poor woman who had a stroke after taking the ice bucket challenge, due to an insufficient diving reflex to tamp down all that extra noradrenaline release.

The remarkable water effect can be useful for people suffering from milder forms of autonomic failure such as orthostatic hypotension, which is when people get dizzy standing up suddenly. Drinking some water before getting out of bed in the morning can be a big help. But what about that metabolic boost? With so much noradrenaline being released, with your adrenal gland hormones in overdrive, might drinking a few glasses of water cause you to burn more body fat? Could tap water be like a safe form of ephedra—all the weight loss, but with a nice slowing of your heart rate instead? Researchers decided to put it to the test, which we’ll explore next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

If you missed the previous video, check out How to Get the Weight Loss Benefits of Ephedra Without the Risks.

Stay tuned for:

What kind of water is better? Check out Is it Best to Drink Tap, Filtered, or Bottled Water?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

111 responses to “The Effect of Drinking Water on Adrenal Hormones

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  1. Drinking water is not going to have a huge weight loss effect, and without calorie restriction and/or exercise, just drinking water is not likely to lead to significant weight loss. It’s important to embrace a more comprehensive and sustainable approach.

    We all know countless people who ‘diet’ that only drink water all day that still struggle with their weight.

    1. Rb,

      if people are only drinking water all day, they could be countering the efforts by slowing their metabolic rate through starvation. I’m not sure if that’s what you meant by only drinking water all day.

      1. RB,
        I went searching for full text studies last monday and came up the full version of one that Dr Greger sourced.

        https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/88/12/6015/2661518
        https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/02/000208075311.htm

        There were a several points that I found interesting though Dr Greger did not mention these topics.
        1. Even people (older adults particularly) with normal blood pressure can experience a rise in blood pressure after drinking water…. 11 millimeters of mercury within the hour. That’s a lot!
        2. 40% of the metabolic ‘boost’ came from warming the cold water from 22C to 37C.
        3. Men and women do not react physiologically to drinking water in the same way. Fascinating. Check out the first link.
        4. Drinking 2 liters of water will boost the metabolism to a 400 KJ equivalancy. This is approximately 98 calories… that would mean less than a pound per month all other things remaining equal. :(
        Anyway, check out the links if interested.

        1. * under Discussion heading at first study link, they give this example: Increasing water consumption by 1.5 liters /day would result in an increase of 200 kj (roughly 50 calories ) utilized during that day.

      2. In this video…no where does he say to “only” drink water. He’s not talking about fasting. Just the simple body response to the act of drinking water. This happens if you’ve eaten within the same day or not.

    2. Reality bites,’

      I recall one young man telling me (years ago), that he stopped drinking soft drinks, switching to water instead, and lost 25 lbs (Maybe over a year). He said he didn’t make any other changes in eating and activity, and he still sounded surprised by this result.

      He probably reduced his caloric intake, but it’s still “drinking water.”

      1. “I recall one young man telling me (years ago), that he stopped drinking soft drinks, switching to water instead, and lost 25 lbs (Maybe over a year). He said he didn’t make any other changes in eating and activity, and he still sounded surprised by this result.”

        A friend gained ~fifteen pounds in one year. He didn’t do anything different from anything previously that he could think of – except he did take a new job at a hot new start up that provided free soft drinks to all employees.

        He only drank two a day or so. Takin’ a break.

        No big deal.

        We did the math. By the not particularly accurate 3500/calorie rule, he was lucky to have only gained fifteen pounds.

        —————————————————————

        Then – you see the people at the supermarket. And you see what is in – and overhanging – their carts.

        And their belts.

        Lotsa soft drink multi-packs slung over the edge of some carts – worn with pride – like bandoliers on a bandit’s chest.

        It is not a 100% match with obesity – but one wonders about correlations.

        I have never done the actual math, however.

        Any intrepid students looking for a science project?

        To your health!

        Vivamus

      1. KT,

        You wrote: “Not that it’s the best choice.”

        Yup.

        Protein wasting.

        Fasting is always a poor idea.

        Unless you actually want to lose muscle.

        Vivamus

        1. In the most recently published study of time restricted eating (TRE), they found significant muscle loss in the TRE group and no significant weight loss difference between the TRE group and controls.

          ‘we found a significant reduction in lean mass in the TRE group. In the in-person cohort, the average weight loss in the TRE group was 1.70 kg. Of this, 1.10 kg (approximately 65% of weight lost) was lean mass; only 0.51 kg of weight loss was fat mass. Loss of lean mass during weight loss typically accounts for 20% to 30% of total weight loss.16-22 The proportion of lean mass loss in this study (approximately 65%) far exceeds the normal range of 20% to 30%.’
          https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2771095?

          1. FF
            Only one study with problems. It was a self-reporting study with rates of non compliance among both groups. The time restricted group was allowed artificial sweetener in liquids during the no eating times (VERY bad for insulin response). The time of eating was noon to 8pm which is a bit late in the day. Time of day studies indicate MORNING is the best time to eat in general. The study found only slight weight loss among both groups with the difference between groups being insignificant. Hard to pull lean mass conclusions from THAT. The weight loss was so low that assigning lean/fat characterizations strains the reasonable notions of accuracy of the lean mass measurements. Mountains from molehills where MAYBE some small portion of ONE pound may have been a difference between the lean mass weight loss of both groups. Pfft. My takeaway? Don’t drink artificially sweetened drinks. Eat mostly in the morning. Consider time restricted eating and controlled intentional water consumption to possibly provide some marginal weight loss but OTHER health benefits as well. They are low/no cost solutions which is why many knock them. No profit for corps from just simple behavioral changes.

    3. Dear Dr.Greger
      You must be a heck of a nice guy in person , and a wonderful parent and spouse. Thanks for the chuckles you include in these superbly informative videos, I got hooked on you and now my daughter is telling your story to her class mates in school, she has also become a Vegan. We catch ourselves saying to each other, “Until ……………….we put it to the test.”
      You stay safe sir and thank you for all that you do.
      Antony and family.

  2. Boy, I wish I had known that about water and fainting when I was younger.

    I used to faint all the time.

    I haven’t fainted in decades but it used to be frequent enough that my brother had told everybody, just straighten her leg and step over her.

  3. Wait… so what about my night water? Am I negatively impacting my sleep quality by drinking water before bed or when I wake up thirsty? (not speaking in regards to having to pee lol)

    What happened to the poor ice bucket woman? I don’t remember… did she survive? Was that actually her in that photo with her kids? :(((

  4. Dear Dr. Greger,
    We love you and love your videos. It’s great that you now appear in the videos. But when you jump around and wave your hands constantly, it’s quite difficult to concentrate on the material. It is a distraction. Please consider this.
    Thank you, your loyal follower.

    1. “But when you jump around and wave your hands constantly, it’s quite difficult to concentrate on the material. It is a distraction. Please consider this.”

      I very much agree.

      Maureen,

      to each their own, but it’s not a matter of taste. It’s a matter of distraction. Rick’s comment, and my agreement with his comment, had/has nothing to do with a style we like or dislike.

      1. yes but you have to let people be themselves … somewhere it is unreasonable for you to expect people to change their behaviour (their style of presenting and probably dealing with the stress) for you … this is a free service, the guy dedicates his life to helping people … but its still not enough … he also has to change who is is … because it distracts you … perhaps you (and I don t mean this badly) should try and get less distracted ….

        1. I do agree! Thanks for expressing so well what I feel. And to Dr Greger: keep up the good work !
          We owe so much to you including your « manière d’être ». So full of joy, dynamism, enthusiasm.
          Louiselle

          1. “Exactly, if you don’t like what you see don’t look”

            Maybe you should take your own advice in regards to other people’s polite comments instead of trying to force one accepted view. Why are people so ridiculous? That was rhetoric.

            1. I’m not presenting the show , Dr G is presenting the show.
              I can say to you, what you say to me, why are you trying to debunk my view on a blog set up for the purpose of discussion I’m not trying to change the way Dr G presents his show, I’m very happy with his style of presentation.
              I’m not so full of myself to think my personal like or dislike should change the way Dr G does his job, clearly some people are.

              1. terence, you need to chill out. Expressing opposing views isn’t the issue, the issue is the fact that people are whining about people just respectfully sharing an opinion. You yourself said you’re new to the site. This is a new style of video Dr. Greger and team puts out, and there has been lots of feedback, positive and negative, which Dr. Greger himself said he appreciated as he’s always trying to improve. No one here is demanding Dr. Greger do anything, they’ve just respectfully shared a perspective. Then, a bunch of people made a huge, overblown “discussion” about them doing so. If anything, I would imagine the NF team would get annoyed at that over respectful opinions. I have no problem with someone saying they disagree with an opinion someone expressed, but to attack them and accuse them of being full of them selves, etc., for again, RESPECTFULLY sharing an opinion? To that I say, grow. up.

        2. His previous videos used to focus mostly on the research, zooming in full screen on the graphs or text from published papers and highlighting key text. That enabled people to pause it and read more text surrounding the highlighted text (saved time seperately looking into the paper, useful especially if the papers are behind paywalls). That offered better education (especially as Dr Greger sometimes speaks too quickly or unclearly). That format had deeper learning, less distraction. Many people previously said they missed that detailed focus on the research papers

          There are well established basic standards for effective presentation Presention101 basics teach don’t dance on your toes, don’t fidget, wave your hands, vary your pitch or volume widely, don’t mumble or speak too quickly except for occasional.effect.

          It’s not trying to change who he is (a gaslighting accusation). It’s seeking ways for this greatly admired and respected Dr to be even more effective in reaching more people. He can still be amusing and entertaining as well as a more effective presenter, that’s who he is.

          1. WFFBBob,

            Complete agreement.

            Thank you for putting it so well.

            For once in my lifetime, I am amazed to find – I have nothing to add.

            Tip o’ the hat –

            Vivamus

        3. Wow, Patrick. You are way off the grid with this and being rude and ridiculous over a mature and polite comment. Previously, Dr. Greger himself, the one and only, thanked people for their polite input on the video styles because it helps him. It’s called helpful criticism. Rick could not have been more gracious or polite. There is no reason to act like kids on a playground ready to fight because of a menial difference in opinion. Why do you have a problem with someone expressing that something is distracting? Your response would be more appropriate if someone were being rude or something. And by the way, if you actually watch Dr. Greger in presentations and interviews, he does not use that many hand gestures and isn’t as hyper, it’s totally different in a lot of these videos so in no way is mentioning that a request for a change in personality. Maybe you should try to get less aggravated at polite critiques by others and save your energy for when someone is actually picking on a person.

      2. ‘ It’s a matter of distraction’

        No, it’s not. It’s Greger’s style of emphasising particular points or salient aspects of what he is saying. That’s the opposite of distraction. Compare Greger’s approach to someone simply reading a script or from an autocue in a flat monotone. Greger’s is a much more effective communication style.

        Sorry but I think that your and Rick’s comments have everything to do with a style you dislike. You could always just read the transcript if you don’t like his style.

        1. “No, it’s not.”

          Lol… Oh, it isn’t? ….smh

          “That’s the opposite of distraction.”

          Oh, it is? God Fumbles, when you are bias, you are so intolerant… It’s a matter of OPINION, how about that? Is that ok? We are all different, in some parts of the world, that’s still ok.

          “Greger’s is a much more effective communication style.”

          In your opinion. Everyone is different which is again, ok. However, many of us agree that Greger’s is a more effective communication style, but some of us liked when the science was the focal point and some of us like seeing him in the videos but find the gestures distracting. I prefer the science as the focal point as well as finding the gestures distracting. Why this bothers you, I have no idea.

          “Sorry but I think that your and Rick’s comments have everything to do with a style you dislike.”

          Well my comment was just agreeing with Rick’s comment and he very clearly, very maturely stated that it was about the hand gestures being a distraction. It’s really not more complicated than that unless you’re trying to make it be.

          1. That’s delicious stuff S.

            I can only say that your posts seem to express very little sense of self-awareness on this matter.

      3. S, well yes it is in fact about style…

        This is a presentation. There is more to it than information. This presentation, for the thousandth time (Hard to believe this keeps coming up) is designed and owned by the founder of this website.

        If only this website and its staff would have thought about the person who doesn’t like the style of the video presentation??

        Wait, they did. The transcript is available.

        It may be possible that if some people here somehow actually do have trouble getting information from the video, AND cant get it through reading comprehension in the transcript, they may want to go ahead and schedule an assessment of some form of ADHD, ADD, etc. perhaps a vitamin deficiency?

        People do sometimes suffer with an inability to pay attention for a long enough period of time. I don’t mean this in a bad way. SO many of here are in fact get all the info, with no concern for the style of presentation, and actually like Dr. Gregers style. I personally think its part of his appeal. It is quite authentic even as it seems affected to some.

        To me, he is the professor you remember from college, not the guy who drones on and you just get through the class. He makes it fun in a nerdy quirky way. Try to have fun with it maybe?

        If you really don’t have adhd or such, then you may be simply saying you don’t like the style of presentation. That is fair. We are allowed opinions. Its just that we may also not like a documentary movie, but we wouldn’t go through the trouble of writing the director to ask them to present it another way would we? That is because we understand the movie has its director.

        A presentation is a performance to one degree or another.

        RE NF.org there is graphic design, content research and design, and even the presentation itself has its own informed “design” in the style of the speaker.

        Here is the question:
        Can you get the intended info here through the given video or transcript, or do you simply not like that you have to make some personal adjustment beyond your own expectations, or beyond your own perspective of “what is a proper presentation”?

        Its all good, but it really is an old idea here from a very few. I’m sure in some way Dr. Greger likes that we think we own this site and can inform its presentation style, and perhaps its endearing.

        Lastly the idea of dissent is actually attractive to me but should be reserved perhaps to content right?

        Dissent of presentation delivery can be as simplistic as: “I don’t like his maroon tie, it is so distracting, and you can never trust a man who shapes his beard.” etc… It amounts to preciousness and or drama, and may not be productive.

          1. Fumbs, HAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

            Blackadder! I’d never even heard of it, thanks for that! Monty Pythonesque for sure, they are longtime favs, so this should be good!

    2. People, try to grow up a little. It’s pretty pathetic that one person cannot leave a very grown up, very polite, very gracious, very reasonable comment. And simply because you disagree, you act like children getting all pumped up and ready to argue. If the subject arises on video styles and you want to weight in, why not just say something like “I personally prefer this new style, and here’s why…” Instead it’s like condemnation. Ridiculous.

      1. ^my above comment was over the collective response, not aimed at any one individual comment. It was placed here cause I just put it in a reply to the OP.

    1. I wondered the same thing. I also wondered whether it needed to be cold to stimulate the diving reflex.

      This video contains the kind of material that I keep coming back for. I love it when good science brings us back to the power of the basics, in this case H20. You can’t get much more than that.

      1. I also appreciate the thoughtful and sometimes even insightful commentary that follows in the discussion boards (Weston A. Price and keto trolls not withstanding)

        1. PrinceMongo,

          I also like the Weston A Price and Keto trolls. I learned more because they were here.

          At first, trying to learn it from both directions was more confusing but if you look at Google trends, Keto is top in a lot of countries so it is helpful to understand them.

        1. Russ, chicken broth is not a healthy choice for reasons shown all throughout the website. Neither is milk (I assume you mean dairy) if you’re aiming for health and/or weight loss. I would check out the videos on milk and dairy on this site. I would imagine that if drinking dairy caused the same reaction, that the hormones naturally present in the dairy, calories, fat. etc. would cancel out any potential weight loss benefits.

  5. I absolutely love the way you deliver your valuable research!!
    IGNORE anyone who doesn’t like it!!
    The way you speak helps me remember the information you so kindly share so I can feel better….
    Thank you!!

    1. Michele,

      That’s a bit rude. If people are respectfully sharing their experience in watching the new style of video, why should your opinion override it? It’s up to Dr. Greger if he sees something as helpful criticism or something he chooses to ignore.

      1. S

        Sometimes people who attack Greger’s speaking style are not ‘respectfully sharing their experiences’. They are downright rude and insulting..

        In any case, Michelle is just as entitled to express her opinion as you are. Expressing an opinion different to yours is not trying to ‘override’ yours. It’s just expressing a different opinion.

        1. Mr Fumbles,

          Come on… You know exactly why I used the word “override.” I don’t need and elementary lesson from you. Saying “IGNORE [other polite commenters]” is for sure, definitively trying to override someone else’s view as opposed to just expressing their own. I’m very aware that people have been rude, childish, etc, here in that regards as well as others, but this is clearly not the case here, so why act like it was?

          1. Well, if you and others can repeatedly give frank and forthright advice on this matter to Dr G, it seems a bit of a double standard to criticise Maureen for doing so.

            For that matter, I don’t recall you chiding others for rudely insisting that Dr G change his style but here you are indignant because someone advises Dr G to ignore demands that he change his presenting style.

            1. Not indignant.
              If you don’t like what you see, don’t look, just listen.
              There may be other people who like the way Dr G presents .
              In fact more people disagreed with M than agreed with her.

            2. I wasn’t criticizing her for sharing that she likes the new style, my only comment on her post was aimed at her somewhat passive aggressive “IGNORE [the other person]” thing. I thought that was rude and I stand by that.

              As far as repetition goes, it’s unfair to say that about the OP. It seems he just expressed himself on the subject. Just because others offered their opinions before, doesn’t mean one person who hasn’t yet is being repetitive. I already commented what I thought, so you could accuse me of repetition, but there are no like buttons here so I wanted to comment my “like” of agreement. It’s not to whine and moan on my part, it’s that I actually have begun reading the transcripts more, but I so love the presentation in the videos and all the graphs, so while I accept (unhappily or not) whatever Dr. Greger decides to do, as he has every right to do it, I do hope he finds more of a balance between the old style and adding himself to the videos. Thus, my sort of vote, for lack of better word.

              “For that matter, I don’t recall you chiding others for rudely insisting that Dr G change his style”

              Oh, you missed my posts then. I have made a mocking post specifically aimed at all the rude whining people on the most ridiculous complaints about Dr. Greger. It’s just not the scenario here. I especially despised the posts of a couple people actually suggesting he uses someone else to present his research… that was just awful and definitely unwanted by I’m guessing, 99.9% of us.

          2. S. “Ignore” in this case is a supportive call for Greger to continue to be his authentic self in the face of criticism that is purely designed to request he create a delivery system which suits that person. Like a conveyor belt of puffy sweet goodies that youi or whomever feels is tasty.

            For your own information here’s the likely takeaway of the original criticism, for those of us who offer an opposing opinion

            “I really don’t understand why people don’t want to hear me ask for the owner of this site to present things to me, the way that suits me best?”

            Perhaps we should take issue with your use of the letter S? Why don’t you use L or something, because that would suit me better.

            1. jazzBass, that is the most ridiculous creation of an issue that doesn’t exist…. It’s actually simple. Greger himself said he appreciates feedback. Stop whining. Or keep it up if you’re really that bored.

              1. Oh, but it does have to be said… not that I want to engage too much… by the “logic” you’re presenting, no one should leave reviews to books, movies, business experiences. No one should have an opinion on a painting, etc.. etc… etc… You create something, you get opinions. It’s actually OK and very often, thought of as potentially useful. It’s called helpful criticism. Now the business owner, the artist, the presenter, etc. is free to do with it what they will. People need to chill out. Read the site guidelines and realize it’s all ok.

                1. S, ok, I think weve got it now, lets see.

                  Everyone else needs to:
                  Chill out, read the guidelines, grow up, stop being ridiculous, not write too much, realize your perspective, assume your selective reasoning, and lastly, adopt your perspective of simplicity while admonishing others perspectives – in the defense of others perspectives.

                  My logic is sound: Just so you know, there is in fact a difference between reviewing a book, [a movie,a painting or a business experience], and asking the writer to write it differently.

                  Are you experiencing issues with this distinction?

                  Let me help:

                  1. “I don’t like the book”. (that is a review)
                  2. “Dear author, I need you to write the book so that I like it”. (that is a useless personalized request)

      2. It’s also up to people who like t the way it is to say what they think about those full of themselves to correct his presentation style

        1. terence, you are EXACTLY what I am protesting here! No, in fact it is NOT up to people to accuse those of differentiating opinions of being “full of themselves,” like an angry child. No, it is NOT up to people to say what you think of other commenters just POLITELY, by the site’s GUIDELINES, expressing their opinion. Now, offering your own opinion to vote, so to speak, in the opposite direction, would be up to you. That’s productive feedback…

    2. Yes, yes and yes! Don’t change a bit, Dr. G. Your demeanor and personality are partly why I feel comfortable recommending you to non-veggie friends. Even if they don’t accept what you’re saying, they’ll be captivated and amused by the way you say it. And maybe later they’ll come back for more.

  6. Hi, I would like to report an issue. I think it was already reported but maybe nobod noticed.

    There is a significat volume difference between the intro/outro and Dr. Gregers speech. Every time I have to increase the volume to hear the speach and then I am stressed by the giant volume of the outro.

    I hope this can be fixed as it makes watching the videos very annoing.

  7. I pee freely and frequently, more than the average amount. I experimented with cutting back on intake, but determined fairly quickly that it is better to be abundantly hydrated. At a doctor’s visit they found I have “great” kidney function. I said, I already know that.

  8. I don’t like drinking cold water I never put ice in my water, I live in Scotland so even in the summer the water from my tap ( faucet ) is cold, the reason I don’t like drinking cold water is that I tend to gulp it rather than sip it and it’s uncomfortable on my teeth and my throat.
    Over the years I’ve developed a routine that works.
    Every morning I fill two glasses of water each about half a pint then I take a shower and dress and by the time I’ve done that I can comfortably drink the water because it’s warmed to room temperature.
    I drink the first glass and refill it .
    An hour later I drink the second glass and refill it
    And so it goes throughout the day
    I leave these glasses of water in my kitchen through which I pass frequently , I am reminded to drink these glasses of water whenever I pass them
    At night I have a glass of water at my bedside
    A common condition , dry mouth , develops in some older people, I have it , I sip the water if my dry mouth awakens me.
    In the morning I finish the rest of the glass of water at my bedside before getting out of bed.
    Drinking lots of water is not easy for some people , they simply forget to do it.
    All my water consumption during the day causes a nighttime visit to the loo but I think I can handle that , I’m retired , 64 yrs of age.
    I run a lot , I think my regular glasses of water are beneficial .

    1. TC,
      I also keep a glass of water ready to drink. I also can choke on cold water gulps on a hot day. I also get dry mouth at night but decided not to hydrate at night because I get up to pee so much. I wouldn’t be surprised if continuing to hydrate at night is better.

  9. Interesting video!

    A glass or two of water to treat morning orthostatic hypotension?

    Never heard of it. Might be worth a gander. The wonders of Internet search:

    “Early morning orthostatic hypotension
    Instruct patients to:
    Be careful on awakening
    Elevate the head of the bed (reducing nocturia)
    Drink two cups of cold water 30 minutes before arising
    Shift from supine to an erect position in gradual stages.”

    Preventing and treating orthostatic hypotension: As easy as A, B,C
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2888469/pdf/nihms205092.pdf

    Thank you, Dr. Greger!

    Thank you, Drs. Figueroa, Basford and Low!

    Vivamus

  10. Anybody heard of this book? It claims drinking water can help one lose 35 lbs. It worked for me. I gained it back over months. I was still eating a SAD diet. That was over 10 years ago. I’ve been on a WFPB diet for a year. I’ve lost 50 lbs. Perhaps Dr. G’s next discussion will cover some of this territory.

    Your Body’s Many Cries for Water – November 1, 2008
    by F. Batmanghelidj (Author), M.D.

    https://www.amazon.com/Your-Bodys-Many-Cries-Water/dp/0970245882/ref=sr_1_11?crid=2PUK6V7RZYIEC&dchild=1&keywords=water&qid=1602108383&s=books&sprefix=water%2Caps%2C170&sr=1-11

    1. ‘Batmanghelidj’s ideas about water curing all diseases have been criticised as quackery by medical experts.[7][8] He also drew criticism for his HIV/AIDS denialism.[7] Physician Harriet Hall has described Batmanghelidj as a “crank who believed dehydration is the main cause of disease. He promoted his Water Cure, which was not based on any scientific evidence.”[9]

      His ideas have been criticised by Stephen Barrett, co-founder of the National Council Against Health Fraud and the webmaster of Quackwatch, on several grounds, including a lack of any documented peer-reviewed research and exaggerated claims about the number of patients treated successfully. He further questions that Batmanghelidj has practised medicine in the United States, pointing to his lack of registration as a physician. He was licensed as a naturopath.[6]’
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fereydoon_Batmanghelidj

  11. Makes me think of the nurse demand to drink a lot of water before your Dr. visit and blood draw so she can find a vein and get a good draw. This combined with the white collar syndrome where your blood pressure is high when you go for your physical. Maybe it is just the extra water after all.

    1. Douglas,

      You wrote: “Makes me think of the nurse demand to drink a lot of water before your Dr. visit and blood draw so she can find a vein and get a good draw.”

      Consider also: Warm Clothing.

      In addition to sweating, your body cools off by bringing blood to the skin surface and dilating veins.

      You can make your veins a whole lot easier to stick by wearing warm pants, warm boots, warm socks, scarf and knit hat to the lab.

      The object of the exercise: Warm the Core.

      It doesn’t have to be enough to work up a sweat – but it may be best to be just South of toasty.

      You want to be jacuzzi-level relaxed: “Warm and Comfy.”

      The phlebotomist may think you a bit eccentric – dressed for open cockpit biplane piloting – but when you explain what you are up to – and – your veins are much easier to stick than usual – you may all come to realize that you are on to something.

      The opposite holds true as well – if you are in a thin patient gown and have only a sheet over you in a cool room – your body conserves heat by sending blood to the core and your veins may largely disappear and you may be a whole, whole lot harder to stick.

      Before any sticks in those circumstances – you may wish to ask for blankets and a hot drink.

      Douglas.

      Happy venipuncture!

      Vivamus

      1. Vivamus,

        When I was taking care of my grandmother, she kept getting sent to the ER for her pulse ox readings and it was so frustrating because she would get there and they would give her fluids and her readings would suddenly be fine and we would spent 12 hours at the ER and then go home and they start wanting to have people die if elderly people have too many ER visits and it was frustrating because most of them were false visits.

        Well, I started using heated pads under her arms and hands before the visiting nurses showed up and it worked like a charm. She never had pulse ox problems after that.

        The concept that it could have prevented some of the poor IV processes is something I have now memorized.

        If I start going to a doctor eventually, I will have hand warmers and I will be hydrated and I will probably throw in my PEMF or infrared.

        1. Deb,

          I generally suggest against external heating – particularly in the elderly or those with atherosclerosis or diabetes – the debilitated – unless you know exactly what you are doing.

          No external hot pad, electric blanket, whatever.

          Why? Well – let us take a classic example: cold feet.

          No, no – I’m not talking about the guy too shy to ask the girl to the big dance on Saturday night.

          Aw, gee . . .

          Classic example – diabetic cold feet. Well – diabetic cold feet are cold for damned good reason. Microvascular disease. The tissues ain’t gettin’ much oxygen. So said tissues reflexively go into a state of decreased metabolism. A survival response.

          And, yes – it is uncomfortable.

          Heat those feet up with hot pads or an electric blanket – sounds like a good idea! – but you just may kickstart metabolic processes that the tissues cannot support with sufficient oxygen – and you may produce some black toes in the process – and you are beginning to have to think about amputations.

          Whereas if you had just left well enough alone . . .

          You would have two uncomfortable intact cold feet.

          The rule of thumb is generally to warm up body parts only to the extent that can be done through passive processes. I.e. – lotsa blankets and socks and flannel nightshirts and nightgowns and scarves and nightcaps (the knitted kind, not ethanol).
          But leave electric blankets and heating pads and such to the largely healthy.

          Heating the core globally can help. It is amazin’ how much scarves and nightcaps – knit caps – can help warm up other body parts more distant from the core – but just to the point those parts can physiologically tolerate. Left to it’s own devices, your body can regulate things pretty well – it tries hard to keep you alive and intact. But if you are actively heating externally – you have bypassed the body’s capability to perform natural regulation – replacing its wisdom with your own – and you can cause a whole lot of heartache.

          This, of course, does not preclude the relief brought on by the heating pad for the tummy of the menstruating girl, or the heating pad recommended by the physical therapist.

          Everything has its place.

          But for the frail, the elderly, the sick – be careful.

          Primum non nocere.

          Deb.

          Always a pleasure –

          Vivamus

  12. Great off topic tip:
    –Does your laptop computer fan rev up and act constipated?
    –Here is a solution: Put a paint grid under it so it can breath air. A paint grid is used in a paint roller pan to remove excess paint from the roller bonnet. It may also be called a paint strainer. I use them liped over the top of five gallon buckets. Get a grid / strainer that has four feet. This will keep your laptop up off the surface two inches for abundant air flow.
    –No more loud fan sound.
    –This tip brought to you by a house painter ;-)

  13. I watched this video and got nothing from it .
    I usually stop his videos so I can understand some of his points but that did not work on this video.
    I would like to see more of his info in text.

    I think his efforts are fantastic. He is one of my heroes.

    1. Arthur,

      There is a transcript link beneath the video.

      Here is the transcript for the video.

      Heavens knows we don’t want people giving up.

      Drink a few cups of water, and within three minutes the level of the adrenal gland hormone noradrenaline in your bloodstream can shoot up 60 percent. Have people drink two cups of water with electrodes stuck in their legs, and within 20 minutes you can document about a 40 percent increase in bursts of fight-or-flight nerve activity. Chug two or three cups of water, and blood flow squeezes down in your calves and arms, clamping down nearly in half as arteries to your limbs and skin constrict to divert blood to your core. That’s why, for example, drinking water can be such a safe, simple, effective way to prevent yourself from fainting (known medically as syncope).

      Fainting is the sudden, brief loss of consciousness caused by diminished blood flow to your brain. About one in five people experience this at least once, and about one in ten may have repeated episodes, causing millions of emergency room visits and hospitalizations every year. Though fainting can be caused by heart problems, it is most often triggered by prolonged standing (because blood pools in our legs) or strong emotions, which can cause your blood pressure to bottom out.

      About 1 in 25 people have what’s called blood-injury-injection phobia, where getting a needle stick, for example, can cause you to faint. More than 150,000 people experience fainting or near-fainting spells each year when they donate blood. All you have to do to help prevent yourself from getting woozy, though, is just chug two cups of water five minutes before getting stuck. The secret isn’t in bolstering your overall blood volume. Drinking two cups of water—even a whole quart—and your blood volume doesn’t change more than 1 or 2 percent. It’s due rather to the shift in the distribution of blood toward your center caused by the noradrenaline-induced peripheral artery constriction.

      Water drinking stimulates as much noradrenaline release as drinking a couple of cups of coffee or smoking a couple of unfiltered cigarettes. If the simple act of drinking water causes such a profound fight-or-flight reaction, why doesn’t it cause our heart to pound and shoot our blood pressure through the roof? It’s like the diving reflex I talked about in the last video. When we drink water, our body simultaneously sends signals to our heart to slow it down, to “still your beating heart.” You can try it at home: Measure your heart rate before and after drinking two cups of water. Within 10 minutes your heart rate should slow by about four beats per minute, and by 15 minutes you should be down six or seven beats.

      One of the ways scientists figured this out is by studying heart transplant patients. When you move a heart from one person to another, you have to sever all the attached nerves. Amazingly, some of the nerves grow back. But still, give healed heart transplant patients two glasses of water, and their blood pressure goes up as much as 29 points. The body is unable to sufficiently quell the effect of that burst of noradrenaline. Some people have a condition known as autonomic failure, in which blood pressure regulation nerves don’t work properly, and their pressures can dangerously skyrocket over 100 points after chugging two cups of water. That’s how powerful an effect the simple act of drinking a glass of water can be, and the only reason that doesn’t happen to all of us is that we have an even more powerful counter-response to keep our heart in check. It reminds me of the poor woman who had a stroke after taking the ice bucket challenge, due to an insufficient diving reflex to tamp down all that extra noradrenaline release.

      The remarkable water effect can be useful for people suffering from milder forms of autonomic failure such as orthostatic hypotension, which is when people get dizzy standing up suddenly. Drinking some water before getting out of bed in the morning can be a big help. But what about that metabolic boost? With so much noradrenaline being released, with your adrenal gland hormones in overdrive, might drinking a few glasses of water cause you to burn more body fat? Could tap water be like a safe form of ephedra—all the weight loss, but with a nice slowing of your heart rate instead? Researchers decided to put it to the test, which we’ll explore next.

    2. I think Dr G is a hero too.
      I’m new to his website but have to say it’s changed the way I live my life especially eating and drinking.
      I have bought a couple of his books as well

      1. Terrence, are you crazy for saying things like that.
        You must be an idiot.

        Just joking.
        Please report me for poor online etiquette so they will remove me from this list.

        Thanks, Wade

  14. I am bit hard of hearing and The Doctor varies his speech levels a lot and often ends a sentence at low volumes. I therfor keep the headset at high volume, then comes then sudden exit sound effect. Way overwhelms my hearing. I am be the only one, but hoping for greater volume leveling.

    1. Good point.

      I wear a headset too but usually try to keep the volume down. Apart from just being unpleasant, that opening rush of sound in the intro could potentially damage one’s hearing if wearing a headset with the volume turned up high. Switching on the subtitles/closed captions makes sure that I don’t miss anything even during those low level/indistinct portions of the video. ..

  15. I drink quite lot of water all day long, mostly as Tea. But I also add salt, as well as Stevia, to it to counteract the loss by sweating. (The Stevia has no affect on hydration from what I can tell). Tea without sweet isn’t tea.) Living in a hot very dry environment you don’t feel the loss of water through sweat that you do in more humid parts of the world which can leave the uninitiated perilously close to “dropping out”. Watching yourself and learning signs of dehydration (dark color of Urine, not urinating, the color intensity of the urine, skin pinch test, whether you are urinating as usual, Thirstiness, or unusual tiredness.
    Also I found that just drinking fluids helps satisfy hunger and I may not eat for the rest of the day and without any hunger. And yet I am able to ride my bicycle in the heat of the day. Although I keep a strict eye on my condition during my rides and carry tea with me in a sizable jug.

    1. Henry,

      You wrote: “Watching yourself and learning signs of dehydration (dark color of Urine, not urinating, the color intensity of the urine, skin pinch test, whether you are urinating as usual, Thirstiness, or unusual tiredness.”

      Consider also:

      (1) Tachycardia. Best to record your normal baseline, first, for comparison.

      (2) Standing tachycardia – marked increase in heart rate when standing. Best to record your normal baseline, first, for comparison.

      —————————————————————————————————

      Blood pressure changes are a late sign of dehydration – the body does all it can to maintain blood pressure via multiple mechanisms – by the time that blood pressure does go, you are already in a heap-a-trouble. Do NOT use blood pressure to evaluate hydration – a “normal” blood pressure can give a false sense of security.

      Take care –

      Vivamus

  16. I compared your videos from 2010 until now and I can only say they are getting all the time.
    In 2010 the voiceover was comparatively monotous, later you improved your microphone and added a lot more feeling and energy to the voiceovers.
    Now the recordings with the green screen requires for sure a lot more work, but the videos are so much more lively and attracting an even broader audience.
    Please keep up your much appreciated and hard work!

    1. Dan,

      I love that you did that. Yes, he is making us work for it.

      I feel like the comments on the videos are perfect and I don’t just mean yours.

      The “distracting” but don’t change who you are even if you are a little distracting.

      The fact that he has gotten better progressively and yet he just gave a style that is so much harder to learn from.

      And he becomes the charming, yet very distracting loud and soft talker and he is dialing in between entertainment and being his best natural self.

      I love it all.

      Though I will say when I watched him in the interview with Rich Roll, I know that if he could get out of his self-monitoring head and just be natural, I would applaud so loudly but I genuinely feel like he is like a friend and I will laugh when he gets overly-dramatic and when he does loud and soft talking and when he speaks in almost a measured whisper it is nice for a change and when he flails his arms around or rises up on his toes. It is all fun for me.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auZDWTMLM8I&ab_channel=RichRoll

      But I don’t even want him to watch that interview because he can’t possibly work hard enough at being natural and accomplish it. When I was young, my friend had something called the I-Ching, I think, and it said about me that “You try to think your way out of thought.” and no I am not following the I-Ching, but that one sentence nailed it.

      I had a pastor years ago who dressed so fancy that my very first thought was to be off-put by it because I tend to be more anti-elitist without meaning to be but then he opened his mouth and passion came out and the fancy ties and fancy watch and fancy suits started to be delightful to me as I rushed into that precious, sincere, kind-hearted, passionate pastor’s arms for a hug several times per week. I started to learn about him and I feel like it takes time to get used to people and then they become friends and then certain traits can become annoying and then you get past it and all of it makes me laugh.

      1. One of the sermons I heard was on parents and children and how when we are very young we tend to exalt and almost worship our parents and then we start to see their weaknesses and start to blame them and put them down and then, if we become more mature, maybe we come to know them in their strengths and weaknesses and maybe come to accept them and maybe come to celebrate them and appreciate them in a different way.

        Dr. Greger,

        If I were to write a children’s book about what I think about your performances, it would be something akin to Green eggs and Ham without the eggs or ham and without such a dramatically negative character ark.

        I think the whole point of choosing that one is that it doesn’t matter if it is on a train or on a boat or in the rain. Or whether you are funny or passionate or serious or dramatic or even authentic.

        I feel like the passionate purpose is more than enough.

        You had me at “Welcome to my channel” and certainly by the grandmother story.

  17. Since drinking water activates the sympathetic nervous system, I assume it’s counterproductive to drink water at any time during the night as it would make you more awake, right?

  18. Dear NutritionFacts.org Team,

    I just made a donation. Really appreciate the books, videos, transcripts, website, recipes, research—everything!

    I think I recall Dr. Greger saying that his mother (or grandmother) had normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). I’m very interested in NPH because I know people with this disease. Is Dr. Greger planning to do a video about NPH, or has he already discussed NPH? His insight and research would be fascinating and helpful and also help others learn about NPH which is treatable but often goes undiagnosed.

    Thank you for all the work that you do. Take care and good health to you!

    1. Hi Connie, thank you so much for your support! We will pass your request on to Dr. Greger. He also holds monthly live Q&As that are good opportunities to ask these types of questions – the next ones are on October 22 – at 3pm ET on Facebook and YouTube, and 9pm ET on Instagram.

  19. I’m breastfeeding so not actively looking to lose weight per say, but water is my lifesaver right now. It was recommended to me that I drink 5L a day for my lifestyle.. in my opinion, that’s too much, too difficult, but I’d say I drink 3L for sure.

    As a side note, does anyone know where I could find info on breastfeeding and the daily dozen? Is it suitable?

    Many thanks.

    1. First let me congratulate you, Pakan, on breastfeeding and giving your baby the very best start! As far as amount of water you should be drinking, it’s often recommended you attempt to drink much more than you ordinarily drink to replenish the fluids for making your milk. As far as specific amounts- if a healthcare provider has suggested that based on your body size, baby’s size or age of your baby, a specific amount is best, it would be reasonable to aim for that, drinking throughout the day so you don’t get feeling bloated. If you just can’t consume that much, make sure you drink every time you feed your baby–and then some. You can find lots of information on this website: https://www.llli.org/breastfeeding-info/ Are you familar with LaLeche League? It has great practical information. As far as if The Daily Dozen would be a good fit for a nursing mother–Absolutely! As LaLeche League recommends, a good diet for a breastfeeding mom is one that if full of nutrients and variety–just what the Daily Dozen recommends. If you check out LLL information on what to eat you’ll see aiming for the Daily Dozen is just right.

  20. 2 Questions

    For those of us who do NOT want to lose weight but still want that increase in metabolism and a “boost” of energy in the sluggish mornings.

    1. I’m guessing Dr G’s cold hibiscus tea would have the same effect but w/ all that antioxidant power?

    2. How long until the metabolic boost kicks in?

    Thanks!

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