Is It Best to Drink Tap, Filtered, or Bottled Water?

Is It Best to Drink Tap, Filtered, or Bottled Water?
4.52 (90.47%) 107 votes

Given the disinfection byproducts in tap water, Brita, PUR, ZeroWater, and refrigerator water filters are put to the test.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Though many distrust the safety of tap water, a study of 35 brands of bottled water did not find them to necessarily be safer, cleaner, or of a higher quality than water straight out of the faucet. How much is that saying, though? Two studies published back in the 1970s forever changed our perception that drinking water safety was only about waterborne diseases. In fact, it was our fight against microbial contaminants that led to a new kind of contamination in the form of “disinfection by-products.”

The two landmark papers in ‘74 solved the mystery of the source of chloroform in drinking water: we met the enemy and he is us. The chlorination of drinking water—”crucial for maintaining… microbiological safety”—was interacting with natural organic matter from the water’s source, and creating chlorinated compounds that can not only result in off-flavors and smells, but pose a potential public health risk. More than 600 disinfection byproducts have so far been identified.

After decades of research into the matter, it appears that the lifelong ingestion of chlorinated drinking water results in “clear excess risk” for bladder cancer. There is also some evidence of increased risk of certain types of birth defects, but most of the concern has focused on the bladder cancer link. Forty years of exposure may increase your odds of bladder cancer by 27 percent. The Environmental Protection Agency estimated that between 2 to 17 percent of bladder cancer cases in the United States are due to these disinfection byproducts in drinking water. However, this is assuming the link is cause-and-effect, which has yet to be firmly established.

The best way to reduce risk is to treat the cause. Countries could prevent the formation of disinfection byproducts in the first place through the better initial removal of source water’s “natural organic matter” (or what my grandmother would have called “schmutz”). Some countries in Europe, such as Switzerland, have newer, well-maintained drinking water systems that can distribute tap water free from residual disinfectants. But the cost to upgrade the infrastructure of even a small city here in the U.S. could run in the tens of millions. As the Flint tragedy revealed, we seem to have trouble keeping even frank toxins out of the tap.

Nearly 40 percent of Americans use some sort of water purification device. Two of the most common approaches—pour-through pitchers and refrigerator filters—were put to the test, head-to-head against Tucson tap water. Both of the fridge filters (GE and Whirlpool) did similarly well, removing more than 96 percent of trace organic contaminants, edging out the three pitcher filters. ZeroWater brand caught 93 percent, PUR pitchers got 84 percent, but by the time the filters needed to be replaced, Brita was only catching 50 percent. A similar discrepancy was found between PUR and Brita brand filters tested specifically against disinfection byproducts. They both started out about the same at the beginning, but by the end of the filter’s life PUR appeared to do better. Reverse osmosis systems can work even better, but the cost, water waste, and loss of trace minerals doesn’t seem worth it.

The annual cost for purifying your water with the pitcher or fridge filters was calculated out to be about the same, at only around a penny per cup—with the exception of the ZeroWater brand, which is up to four times more expensive.

I always figured the “change by” dates on the filters were just company scams to get you to buy more, but I was wrong. Since I drink filtered water mostly just for taste, I used to just wait until the water started tasting funky. Bad idea. Not only do the filters eventually lose some of their removal capacity, bacterial growth can build up inside them, resulting in your so-called “filtered” water having higher bacterial counts than the water straight out of the tap. You’d be actually making your water dirtier rather than cleaner; so, it is important to replace them regularly.

As an aside, I used to think the same thing about the advice to change your toothbrush every three months. Like, which Big Brush executive thought that one up? But no, wrong again. Toothbrushes can build up biofilms of tooth decay bacteria or become breeding grounds for bacteria flumed into the air with each toilet flush before going back into our mouths. Fun Fact: A single flush can spew up “millions of bacteria” that can settle on your nice moist brush. The good news is that rather than buying new ones, you can just disinfect the head of your toothbrush with as little as a 10-minute soak in white vinegar, or even more frugally—vinegar diluted in half with water.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: tonl.co via tonl.co. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Though many distrust the safety of tap water, a study of 35 brands of bottled water did not find them to necessarily be safer, cleaner, or of a higher quality than water straight out of the faucet. How much is that saying, though? Two studies published back in the 1970s forever changed our perception that drinking water safety was only about waterborne diseases. In fact, it was our fight against microbial contaminants that led to a new kind of contamination in the form of “disinfection by-products.”

The two landmark papers in ‘74 solved the mystery of the source of chloroform in drinking water: we met the enemy and he is us. The chlorination of drinking water—”crucial for maintaining… microbiological safety”—was interacting with natural organic matter from the water’s source, and creating chlorinated compounds that can not only result in off-flavors and smells, but pose a potential public health risk. More than 600 disinfection byproducts have so far been identified.

After decades of research into the matter, it appears that the lifelong ingestion of chlorinated drinking water results in “clear excess risk” for bladder cancer. There is also some evidence of increased risk of certain types of birth defects, but most of the concern has focused on the bladder cancer link. Forty years of exposure may increase your odds of bladder cancer by 27 percent. The Environmental Protection Agency estimated that between 2 to 17 percent of bladder cancer cases in the United States are due to these disinfection byproducts in drinking water. However, this is assuming the link is cause-and-effect, which has yet to be firmly established.

The best way to reduce risk is to treat the cause. Countries could prevent the formation of disinfection byproducts in the first place through the better initial removal of source water’s “natural organic matter” (or what my grandmother would have called “schmutz”). Some countries in Europe, such as Switzerland, have newer, well-maintained drinking water systems that can distribute tap water free from residual disinfectants. But the cost to upgrade the infrastructure of even a small city here in the U.S. could run in the tens of millions. As the Flint tragedy revealed, we seem to have trouble keeping even frank toxins out of the tap.

Nearly 40 percent of Americans use some sort of water purification device. Two of the most common approaches—pour-through pitchers and refrigerator filters—were put to the test, head-to-head against Tucson tap water. Both of the fridge filters (GE and Whirlpool) did similarly well, removing more than 96 percent of trace organic contaminants, edging out the three pitcher filters. ZeroWater brand caught 93 percent, PUR pitchers got 84 percent, but by the time the filters needed to be replaced, Brita was only catching 50 percent. A similar discrepancy was found between PUR and Brita brand filters tested specifically against disinfection byproducts. They both started out about the same at the beginning, but by the end of the filter’s life PUR appeared to do better. Reverse osmosis systems can work even better, but the cost, water waste, and loss of trace minerals doesn’t seem worth it.

The annual cost for purifying your water with the pitcher or fridge filters was calculated out to be about the same, at only around a penny per cup—with the exception of the ZeroWater brand, which is up to four times more expensive.

I always figured the “change by” dates on the filters were just company scams to get you to buy more, but I was wrong. Since I drink filtered water mostly just for taste, I used to just wait until the water started tasting funky. Bad idea. Not only do the filters eventually lose some of their removal capacity, bacterial growth can build up inside them, resulting in your so-called “filtered” water having higher bacterial counts than the water straight out of the tap. You’d be actually making your water dirtier rather than cleaner; so, it is important to replace them regularly.

As an aside, I used to think the same thing about the advice to change your toothbrush every three months. Like, which Big Brush executive thought that one up? But no, wrong again. Toothbrushes can build up biofilms of tooth decay bacteria or become breeding grounds for bacteria flumed into the air with each toilet flush before going back into our mouths. Fun Fact: A single flush can spew up “millions of bacteria” that can settle on your nice moist brush. The good news is that rather than buying new ones, you can just disinfect the head of your toothbrush with as little as a 10-minute soak in white vinegar, or even more frugally—vinegar diluted in half with water.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: tonl.co via tonl.co. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Hydration is important (see for example Does a Drink of Water Make Children Smarter?). But so is avoiding waterborne pollutants, if possible (for instance, Lead in Drinking Water and Benefits of Turmeric for Arsenic Exposure).

How Many Glasses of Water Should We Drink a Day? Watch the video!

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

238 responses to “Is It Best to Drink Tap, Filtered, or Bottled Water?

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  1. I just put my toothbrush in vinegar. Back 30+ years ago I remember reading about student research into dirty toothbrushes at the Univ. of Okla. Health Sciences Center–Dental School. The finding was much the same in this video, except the recommendation was to replace the brushes regularly. A room mate went to dental school there and during a lecture a professor revealed to the students some daunting news about the plethora of pathogens already in the human mouth.

  2. I’ve been on good well water for so long that I cannot stand the smell, much less the taste, of chemically-treated water, even if it were wonderfully clean.

    Soon I’ll be moving to a rainwater system. It will be more work, but also _not_ the chemical residue mixture they push down the supply pipes around here.

    I have a toothbrush to soak.

    1. Wade,

      I hope you’ve had your wells tested regularly. I’ve lived in a house where the well water was contaminated with atrazine (used decades ago on corn fields), and the news around here is that some wells are now contaminated with high levels of sodium and chlorine. Does that sound familiar? Yup, the theory is that the salt spread on the roads during the winter is getting into the groundwater. Sodium chloride. I have always wondered where the salt went; this is not a surprise.

      I’ve also learned to flush the toilets with the lids down. And to ask the males in the house: GENTLEMEN, PLEASE BE SEATED. Because that’s a way to aerosolize bacteria throughout the bathroom as well. What’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

          1. Bacteria die at 160 degrees F. This is why food safety guidelines in restaurants, etc require chicken and meats to be cooked to that temperature. Water boils at 212 degrees. I think I’ll microwave a cup of water to boiling, stick the toothbrush in it, and let it cool. Add a splash of vinegar if one is really paranoid :-).

      1. I read in some countries in Europe that both men and women always sit while going to the bathroom (at home). As a bachelor I made the switch over ten years ago for practical reasons. Simply put, it requires less cleaning that way.

        After watching this video – maybe it’s best to keep the toothbrush in the kitchen rather than the bathroom. As long as there’s no meat in the home you don’t have to worry about cross contamination and super bugs which is found on pretty much all animal carcasses.

        1. Michael,

          You are wonderful!!

          My daughter just told me that she and her new husband each have their own bathroom (they moved into military housing; both bathrooms are very small) — and she loves it! And, yes, that is one of the reasons. Plus, she told me that she always flushes with the lid down, and keeps her toothbrushes far away from the toilet. In the medicine cabinet seems like a good idea.

          Luckily, her husband is a submariner, as was my husband — who told me that oh, yes, they keep their bathrooms very clean on a sub. So the new husband can clean up his own bathroom.

          1. Luckily, her husband is a submariner, as was my husband — who told me that
            ————————————————————————————————-
            Thank the both of them for their service… and thanks as well to the taxpayers who also serve… by paying for their service. ‘-)

            1. Lonie,

              Mostly, taxpayers pay for the heavy duty military equipment — because we sure don’t pay active duty military service men and women very much!! Their spouses basically support their families.

              1. Mostly, taxpayers pay for the heavy duty military equipment — because we sure don’t pay active duty military service men and women very much!! Their spouses basically support their families.
                —————————————————————————————————-
                As a Viet Nam vet, when I came home it was like I was infiltrating a foreign country. There were anti-war protesters in almost every airport. I tried to lay low, keeping quiet until I got to my home ground where people were supportive for the most part.

                Still wearing my uniform I stayed low profile even on a plane from Ft. Lewis Washington to LAX where I was to change planes… not even speaking to a young lady with a baby sitting next to me.

                Yet when we de-planed at LAX, she stood up, shoved her baby into my arms and said “hold him/her” (can’t remember) while she took her luggage from the overhead bin and stepped into the aisle, allowing me in front of her carrying her baby.

                In the lobby, I handed her back her baby and rushed to make the connection to my next flight.

                I do not remember when I fully understood what had just happened… a young person had entrusted me, a young person too but in a “war” uniform with her most precious possession. I think that was the basis for rebuilding the self esteem that the Hanoi Jane’s of the time had worked so hard to tear down.

                Dr. J, my story is not meant to detract from your concerns… (I only made something over $100 per month as a Spec 5) but your two family members obviously have chosen to serve knowing the pay scale. I think this makes them even more esteemed in the public eye.

                For me? I have free for life health care at an improving Veteran’s Administration Agency. There are countless govt. sponsored programs I could apply for but have no need for.

                So yes, military families deserve more pay but don’t discount the good feelings your guys may feel inside from serving… in my case, it was worth more than any paycheck I received while in the Army.

                1. I was a Vietnam Era draft resistor who served 6 months in a Federal Prison for refusing the Draft. It was wrong to be disrespectful of soldiers returning from Vietnam. The soldiers who came back realizing the immorality of that war played a major role in helping to end it. I was born with a congenital heart defect and could have easily avoided the draft. This was a matter of conscience for me. At age 72 I am healthy due to my whole food plant based diet.

                  1. I was a Vietnam Era draft resistor who served 6 months in a Federal Prison for refusing the Draft. It was wrong to be disrespectful of soldiers returning from Vietnam. … I was born with a congenital heart defect and could have easily avoided the draft. This was a matter of conscience for me.
                    ——————————————————————–
                    That took courage. I tip my hat to you.

      2. Re toothbrushes – we keep ours in the bathroom cabinet. I do that for aesthetic reasons, but bonus is no germs (at least reduced).

      3. Dr. J,

        Thank you for bringing up something I used to think about each winter, the roadway salt getting into our water supply. We get our city’s water report once a year, and by 1984, after moving to California to pursue my education, I realized instantly that bottled water was a must and haven’t been able to go back to tap since, despite the dangers of plastic components leaching into the water, the cleanliness and source of the facility and, of course, the environmental concerns of plastic.

        Our water report also shows the percentage of OTC and prescription drugs which get flushed down the toilet instead of being given to the correct municipal office or pharmacy.

        I applaud your polite invitation for gentlemen to have a seat on the toilet. After not being able to enlighten my husband on this fine point I came across my own solution: we took turns cleaning the bathroom. Worked like a charm!

      4. Dr. J I don’t have the cash to test the water. No one has reported any contaminated water in my area. And most of this county gets their water from wells or springs. All water flow out of this county. The only “big” feedlot is across the county and drains to s different river system. I’d gladly send someone water to have it tested if they’re that curious. I’m moving from this well soon anyway, and it will be missed.

    2. Wade

      Rainwater may deliver some of the disadvantages of distilled and RO water because it too is usually ‘demineralised’.

      https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/gdwqrevision/rainwater.pdf

      ‘Results of experiments in human volunteers evaluated by researchers for the WHO report
      (3) are in agreement with those in animal experiments and suggest the basic mechanism of the
      effects of water low in TDS (e.g. < 100 mg/L) on water and mineral homeostasis. Low-mineral
      water markedly: 1.) increased diuresis (almost by 20%, on average), body water volume, and
      serum sodium concentrations, 2.) decreased serum potassium concentration, and 3.) increased the
      elimination of sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium and magnesium ions from the body. It was
      thought that low-mineral water acts on osmoreceptors of the gastrointestinal tract, causing an
      increased flow of sodium ions into the intestinal lumen and slight reduction in osmotic pressure in
      the portal venous system with subsequent enhanced release of sodium into the blood as an
      adaptation response. This osmotic change in the blood plasma results in the redistribution of body
      water; that is, there is an increase in the total extracellular fluid volume and the transfer of water
      from erythrocytes and interstitial fluid into the plasma and between intracellular and interstitial
      fluids. In response to the changed plasma volume, baroreceptors and volume receptors in the
      bloodstream are activated, inducing a decrease in aldosterone release and thus an increase in
      sodium elimination. Reactivity of the volume receptors in the vessels may result in a decrease in
      ADH release and an enhanced diuresis.'
      https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/nutrientschap12.pdf

      1. Hi. I live in NZ and we drink rainwater off our roof. Not rainwater that has gone into the ground and collected other things along the way. We catch it in our gutters, run it into a tank and then drink it directly from the tank (via our taps). The only way in which we clean it is to run it through a sponge (type) filter that removed any big particles. To be honest there aren’t any, because those are all at the bottom of our tanks. We don’t get sick. The water tastes great.
        It’s very common in NZ. I would love to see research on that type of water.

    3. I have heard that snow in particular is not very clean. It picks up lots of airborne contaminates on the way down. You may want to check before you drink it, But you may not even get snow where you are. Lol. Drink healthy.

  3. All the fruits and veggies we eat are grown on Farms that use water straight out of the tap. Yikes, right? When we ingest these fruit and veggies we end up “drinking a lot of tap water, unfiltered”. Scary indeed. Your thoughts, good doctor?

    1. Elle,

      Most of the farms I know of use rainwater — as in rain — to water their crops. Irrigation is provided by ground wells. I don’t any that could afford to use treated tapwater, other than home gardeners, to water their crop plants.

      I assume you were writing tongue-in-cheek.

      1. Yes, and this rain water is the same rain water we drink. Central Valley California , where most our food comes from, may be using chlorinated water. And it goes long stretches in time without any rain, and wh knows what chemicals and by products are lurking in their wells and giant man made water storage receptacles.

        1. Elle,

          I don’t know about chlorinated water, but I found this interesting:

          “Here in California’s thirsty farm belt, where pumpjacks nod amid neat rows of crops, it’s a proposition that seems to make sense: using treated oil field wastewater to irrigate crops.
          Oil giant Chevron recycles 21 million gallons of that water each day and sells it to farmers who use it on about 45,000 acres of crops, about 10% of Kern County’s farmland….
          No one knows whether nuts, citrus or other crops grown with the recycled oil field water have been contaminated. Farmers may test crops for pests or disease, but they don’t check for water-borne chemicals. Instead, they rely on oversight by state and local water authorities. But experts say that testing of both the water and the produce should be expanded….
          Microorganisms in soils can consume and process some impurities, Sanden said, but it’s not clear whether oil field waste is making its way into the roots or leaves of irrigated plants, and then into the food chain.” (https://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-drought-oil-water-20150503-story.html)

          To me, the big questions are: What chemicals are in the water? Are they taken up by plants, and if so, where do they end up, and what effect do they have on the plants (and on us)? What effects to they have on soil microbes and general ecosystem?

          1. Even decades ago when I was in Central California, no one could use their wells due to contamination by synthetic pesticide and fertilizer runoff into the ground water system. They all used bottled or filtered water and warned me about it because I wasn’t local.
            John S

            1. Any part of the world unlucky enough to be farmed in the age of industrial ag is going to have contaminated ground water. Even worse in animal ag areas. The beautiful lakes of northern Vermont are contaminated from the dairy industry. The question is: How to feed eight billion people?

        1. No, the best we can do is fight for these toxic chemicals to be banned. A lot needs to be banned, but let’s talk chemicals alone. I’ll start the list… 1) Roundup 2) Oxybenzone… you guys can keep going

          Seriously, it’s insane and it’s disgusting. These things are no-brainers but where there are millions to be made I guess the rest of us (and our planet) can go to hell.

      2. Here in California we do not get rain from May to October so farmers rely on untreated aquifers and wells. This is why the ground is sinking in parts of the central valley as it is being drained faster than it fills. This is also happening across the USA according to recent news. Floods do not fill aquifers, they create runoff into rivers and streams washing topsoil away. Aquifers take years for water to seep down and fill.

    2. I doubt that, they dont contains this nasty chlorine which is the main chemical to avoid or only traces, cant even smell it unlike from tap water.

  4. I use the Berkey water filtration for the well water in my home. I was hoping it would be mentioned in this video. I thought it was the way to go but am I being scammed?

    1. I am interested in that, too, because it has been tested for microplastics.

      I use a Pur but have been tempted to get a Berkey for the microplastics issue.

      I honestly drink more water at work and that has the bottled water cooler, which can’t be good news, but I did get a pitcher for that.

      Not sure I needed it. I just don’t trust any of it.

  5. We recently started using Clearly Filtered. Too bad that was not covered/ Kind of expensive but I am hoping it works more or less as they claim. Our water sure tastes a lot better, actually in comparison using a Brita filter, I’ve concluded we were not drinking water before. What really alerted me was that when I would leave a glass of Brita filtered water out all night in a glass with a lid, it would taste like some sort of weird chemical in the morning. With Clearly Filtered that no longer happens. Tastes just a good in the morning. Also I do not leave filtered water in the plastic container provided for filtering. Rather we use a lead-free glass container. Now I actually enjoy drinking water again.

    1. Certainly an issue. Clearly Filtered results indicate it does a reasonable job of filtering micro plastics (assu,king the posted test results from independent labs are reasonably accurate).

      https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1011/0318/files/2019_Pitcher_Filter_Testing_Data_Sheet.pdf?2562

      They also claim there technology, which does not rely on activated charcoal, does not filter desirable minerals. But I have not seen any test results showing that.

        1. “I am always in favour of companies who put their lab tests online.”

          Same!! Or companies who have their test results accessible upon request.

  6. Any comments about distilled water consumption. (I’m told the loss of minerals is negligible. ). I’m not talking about the distilled in the gallon jugs in the grocery stores, but, using your own distiller at home. (One has to be concerned about the plastic tubing in these devices—are you taking in more plastic bits? )

    1. I have sold an alkaline ionized water purification system for many years. You can choose the pH of
      the water from an acidic 3.5 to an alkaline 10.5 and each has benefits. I had to educate myself
      about different waters to know the differences. Distilled and R/O water systems basically remove
      everything from the water, including beneficial minerals. They both give you ACIDIC water of a
      pH of about a 5.5 to maybe as high as a 6.5. They also create what is called “dead” water because
      the water has a very poor hydration ability (large water molecules that do not penetrate our cell),
      and it lacks minerals. Makers of these systems do not tell customers these problems. These systems
      are affordable for a few hundred dollars, as opposed to my top quality system for $2000. I honestly
      do not recommend Distilled or R/O water to drink on a regular basis, but many people believe in their
      “purity”. You can add minerals into these waters but that does not solve the problems of acidity and
      lack of hydrating ability. namaste’, rachel

      1. I have sold an alkaline ionized water purification system for many years. You can choose the pH of
        the water from an acidic 3.5 to an alkaline 10.5 and each has benefits … Distilled and R/O water systems basically remove
        everything from the water, including beneficial minerals.
        ———————————————————————————-
        rachel, thank you for prefacing your remarks that you sell an expensive ionized water purification system. As for the distilled removing everything from the water… yes, and that includes gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Eating a SAD diet will provide more than enough minerals to supply a body.
        ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
        They also create what is called “dead” water because the water has a very poor hydration ability (large water molecules that do not penetrate our cell)
        ————————————————————————————————-
        This sounds like something of an unproveable “talking point” one would find on a sales brochure. ‘-)
        _____________________________________________________________________________
        These systems are affordable for a few hundred dollars, as opposed to my top quality system for $2000.
        ————————————————————————————————————————–
        O.K., you had me at this point. (sarcasm ‘-)
        _____________________________________
        You can add minerals into these waters but that does not solve the problems of acidity and lack of hydrating ability.
        ——————————————————————————————————————————————————-
        First of all, distilled water comes out as a neutral 7.0 pH. Like rainwater (also a form of distilled water) it picks up molecules from the air that does decrease the pH, but if you keep it in a closed loop, it should remain at 7.0.

        But irregardless, I personally drink my distilled water in tea and I also drink it unadulterated except for adding magnesium to give it an extra hydrogen component (not to be confused with heavy water… *deuterium*… as it adds an extra hydrogen but also a nuetron to the water.) I’m not against drinking it completely unadulterated, but I dislike passing up the chance to add nutrition to my body that I get when incorporating various teas as I hydrate.

        (OBTW, I do not recall ever being dehydrated from drinking (your claim) “large particle water” … lol.)

        1. I am happy you like distilled water and enjoy using it. However from everything I have read both R/O and distilled water (from machines making these waters) have an ACIDIC pH, not a neutral one.
          I would not recommend either one for regular drinking; only for fasting. Best wishes, rachel

    2. ‘Results of experiments in human volunteers evaluated by researchers for the WHO report
      (3) are in agreement with those in animal experiments and suggest the basic mechanism of the
      effects of water low in TDS (e.g. < 100 mg/L) on water and mineral homeostasis. Low-mineral
      water markedly: 1.) increased diuresis (almost by 20%, on average), body water volume, and
      serum sodium concentrations, 2.) decreased serum potassium concentration, and 3.) increased the
      elimination of sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium and magnesium ions from the body. It was
      thought that low-mineral water acts on osmoreceptors of the gastrointestinal tract, causing an
      increased flow of sodium ions into the intestinal lumen and slight reduction in osmotic pressure in
      the portal venous system with subsequent enhanced release of sodium into the blood as an
      adaptation response. This osmotic change in the blood plasma results in the redistribution of body
      water; that is, there is an increase in the total extracellular fluid volume and the transfer of water
      from erythrocytes and interstitial fluid into the plasma and between intracellular and interstitial
      fluids. In response to the changed plasma volume, baroreceptors and volume receptors in the
      bloodstream are activated, inducing a decrease in aldosterone release and thus an increase in
      sodium elimination. Reactivity of the volume receptors in the vessels may result in a decrease in
      ADH release and an enhanced diuresis.'
      https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/nutrientschap12.pdf

      1. Tom, the WHO does their work in poor nations around the world. I think most here are from first world countries and care more about first world solutions rather than third world problems.

        I get it you care about the poor, but someone needs to be for the middle people as well.

  7. I make my own distilled water and use it for drinking and cooking. I take potassium and magnesium supplements daily. What are your thoughts on the health values of this?

    1. Sue, I was just about to post asking why distilled water wasn’t covered. That is the only solution that removes both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. It is the closest thing to pure water we can get. I personally magnetize mine and create extra Hydrogen by placing a magnesium rod in it, as these have been shown to enhance the water… I store in glass and even pour the water up using a glass funnel… after leaving the distiller it never touches anything other than glass containers (or a ceramic cup when I cold brew tea in it.)

      https://www.faim.org/hydrogen-water-drink-to-better-health

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3572224/

      It’s more work than some are willing to do. I consider it one of the most important things I do for my health so I don’t consider it work.

        1. Count me in too! I want to know about home made distilled water.
          —————————————————————————————–
          Pamela, just now seeing your post. Have your questions been answered?

      1. Good to know, Lonnie! Some naysayers tell me distilled water pulls all of the minerals out of your body. Others have said that our food supplies all the minerals we need. I hope taking potassium and magnesium supplements every day covers me, regardless. What have you heard about this?

        1. Some naysayers tell me distilled water pulls all of the minerals out of your body. Others have said that our food supplies all the minerals we need. I hope taking potassium and magnesium supplements every day covers me, regardless. What have you heard about this?
          ———————————————————————————————————————————————————
          Can’t say I’ve heard that much, but I have formed opinions. For one, our liquids go through our stomach and our stomach are very acid… so even if the water is like a 6 pH, the stomach is even more acid I think. So no, the intuitive conclusion that the neutral (7.0 pH) to acid (6.0 pH) water will not leach minerals from our bodies. ‘-)

          And I agree if we aren’t getting enough minerals from our food, we just aren’t eating right. (Of course we may not be getting enough lead, copper, iron from our food so will have to drink adulterated water with those elements to do the damage required ‘-) (sarcasm)

          I think the magnesium supplements should have you covered… but can’t remember where I read it that we must be careful about over-supplying our bodies with potassium. For that reason, I’ve trimmed my own potassium supplementation down to ~ 3, maybe 4 times a week.

            1. Some.soils are low in minerals so there’s less in food
              ———————————————————————–
              That’s a pretty general statement to just throw out as evidence. But I’ve read the same thing from other non-growers.

              But no need to fear… most food from depleted soils is grown via irrigation and if a plant needs minerals to grow and produce, the farmer will add them back into the field or rotate crops so that the rotated crop will replenish the soil when the crop residue breaks down.

              And if the crop is watered from wells, the minerals you infer are missing from drinking non-distilled water will be plentiful as ground water is often highly mineralized. My desire is to not trust the minerals in the groundwater from my well.

              I’ve seen that buildup in the bottom of a distiller and do not want that crud in my body.

              1. Crops grown on particular soils, especially older soils are both well-known and scientifically established (widely published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, feel free to Google it) to be low in minerals. Often a problem for eroded, higher sand content and poorly managed depleted soils. As a result there is now a growing trade in mineral supplements to boost these soils but the science on that, (whether it improves the soil, under what conditions, such as the role of microorganisms, and if so, how long it takes and how it affects different types of crops) is still uncertain and needs extensive research

                1. feel free to Google it
                  —————————
                  No need to… I lived it. I farmed much of my life. And have had soil tests done.

            2. WFPB enthusiast, it’s negligible. This is really a claim touted by supplement industries and not much more. Dr. Greger actually presented the evidence to this and gave a great example for some perspective. I don’t remember the video and this is going on memory, but in order to obtain the amount of minerals we would have got in our food years ago (number of years named in his video) in the case of eating grapes… we would have to eat AN EXTRA GRAPE. Not too mind-blowing. The only real issue for our soil is the plethora of issues such as animal agriculture, pesticides, herbicides, specifically MONSANTO’S slew of toxic crap, etc…

        1. Hi Sue, I got the magnesium rods from Amazon

          https://www.amazon.com/8mmx250mm-Magnesium-Element-Survival-Emergency/dp/B07QV562MB/ref=sr_1_26?crid=3C78I221COMXX&keywords=magnesium+rods+for+hydrogen+water&qid=1565629254&s=gateway&sprefix=magnesium+rod%2Caps%2C200&sr=8-26

          I drill a hole in a cork that fits my bottles (gallo wine 5 liter greenish glass bottles… had a friend empty the bottles for me ‘-) and stick the mg rods in the bottom of the corks and pour the water up to the bottom of the cork to get maximum exposure. There are other solutions that include a powder you add to the water that are easier but more expensive. I read of some who buy a bar of the mg and just leave it in the water container. Amzon will offer many solutions.

          I put the cork with rods in my bottles well over a year ago and they are a long way from dissolving, so I can’t really tell how long they will last. I keep about 6 of the bottles with rods all the time and rotate them. I’ve noticed if I fail to put one in the rotation (meaning it has a longer time between uses) it has a different taste and even texture. As an inveterate tea and water drinker I think I could have been fine with only three bottles in the rotation.

          I also magnetize the contents of each of the six large wine bottles. The way I do that is having bought some magnetic (plastic) press on tape some years ago, I’ve figured out I can wrap a length of it around each jug so that it circles it at least once. Then I place a rare earth magnet onto the tape and it holds to the weakly magnetized tape very well.

          I’ve used some fairly strong small button sized magnets as well as quarter sized magnets (the quarter sized ones are so strong, if to of them attract together, it is almost impossible to separate them. One of the ways I learned is to attach a metal to each of the exposed sides of each magnet… that weakens the attraction and I can get something between them to pry them apart.)

          The good news is that magnetizing the water only changes it structurally so no need to worry how long the water is under magnetism… I’ve noticed the water seems more refreshing when magnetized, but that could just be the placebo effect.

          Prolonged hydrogenation does seem to have a distinct smell and will even leave a slight film on a drinking glass… but not that I’ve noticed in the water bottle itself.

          And of course this shouldn’t be done using plastic or metal since distilled water is a powerful solvent at times and I’m not sure how the magnetism and hydrogenation would be affected by using anything other than glass.

      2. Also, my uncle used to drink medical grade hydrogen peroxide—May still do so?—and just celebrated his 102nd birthday. Is this the same effect as you are describing?

        1. Also, my uncle used to drink medical grade hydrogen peroxide—May still do so?—and just celebrated his 102nd birthday. Is this the same effect as you are describing?
          ———————————————–
          No, not the same thing… but I did buy some food grade H2O2 once with the intention of adding a few drops of it to my distilled water. If memory serves, I think that was before I learned about the mg rods which produce extra H2.

          The food grade H2O2 is much stronger than off the shelf Hydrogen Peroxide so I thought I should learn more about it before undertaking that regimen.

        2. Also, my uncle used to drink medical grade hydrogen peroxide—May still do so?—and just celebrated his 102nd birthday.
          ——————————————————————————————————————————————————–
          Re-reading your comment has left me thinking that the air conditioner water I mentioned in a post above, might do with a few drops of the food grade H2O2. Just in case there are any tank-borne things in the water, that should take care of that problem.

          I wouldn’t be afraid to use it for cooking at all… maybe even drinking in an emergency.

      3. Lonie, I read your articles, which were very helpful. I found some magnesium rods on Amazon, and I’m wondering: do you think it would work if I put a magnesium rod in the gallon glass jug of distilled water very time I make it, or would that be overkill, or possibly harmful, or wasteful of the rod? Also, how long do you leave it in before you drink it?
        I’m still pondering the magnetizing part.
        Sue

        1. do you think it would work if I put a magnesium rod in the gallon glass jug of distilled water very time I make it, or would that be overkill, or possibly harmful, or wasteful of the rod? Also, how long do you leave it in before you drink it?
          ——————————————————————————————————————
          My personal experience/method is to make up a bunch of glass gallon jugs (organic apple juice jugs) that I distill during the winter (~120 gallons +) and then consume during the hot summer months when the distiller would heat up the house.

          But in the rotation of wine jugs I spoke of, only when I replenish them as they become empty do I put the rod back in the jug. That means each jug will probably have about 6 day of exposure to the mg rod. But I have used the water with less than a day of exposure to the mg.

          To be clear, unlike some people I do not treat myself with Extra Hydrogen water once or twice a day. I use it on a continual basis. I make no claim as my way being best, but as far as I can tell, it does no harm.

        2. I’m still pondering the magnetizing part.
          ——————————————————-
          Sue, just read the quote below:

          Forty rats were randomly assigned to four groups: a non-diabetic control group and three diabetic groups. One diabetic group served as a positive control (diabetic), while the other two groups were orally administered with water extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves and magnetized water for four weeks, respectively.

          “The pancreatic beta cells of diabetic rats are reduced and insulin secretion is curtailed. After having Ginkgo biloba and magnetized water added to their diets, the mass of the pancreatic beta cells and the amount of insulin in these cells was shown to increase markedly, almost back to normal levels, particularly in the Ginkgo biloba-treated group, says Hetta.

          In addition, both Ginkgo biloba and magnetized water improved the anti-oxidant status and reduced the oxidative stress associated with type 2 diabetes by down regulation of the two antioxidant enzymes, glutathione and superoxide dismutase 2, in the pancreatic tissue, says Hetta.”

          https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-08/uoc-gbm082219.php

          1. That’s pretty interesting! I have Type 2 diabetes. I now have four glass gallon jugs of my distilled water with magnesium rods in them, drinking the one made on 8/19. Watching my blood sugars hopefully. Even though I’ve lost lots of pounds, my fasting blood sugar is still high. One thing that has confused me or Internet articles that state that magnesium does nothing to water, doesn’t react with it at all. Have you seen that?

            1. One thing that has confused me or Internet articles that state that magnesium does nothing to water, doesn’t react with it at all. Have you seen that?
              ———————————————————————————————————–
              I could see anyone having that sort of knee jerk reaction based on the link I provided. The author merely referenced the results of studies but did not link to the studies. Plus, if I remember correctly, he may have even been selling or promoting a Mg powder to add to a jar of water.

              And I admit I am sometimes too quick to accept a premise if it seems plausible.

              But in this case I do notice a change in the taste of the magnesium rod water, especially when left in a few days (a very pleasant taste at that.) So this at least suggests to me it does something.

              And at the very worst, Mg is something that is beneficial (especially to diabetics) and is certainly recognized as safe for consumption. I think if it were in any way harmful there would have been an outcry as there are many who are practicing the consumption of H2. And, the fact it is touted as having extra hydrogen in the water, that should be a simple test so if that weren’t true, that would have been debunked long ago.

              But just like the magnetized water, I remember years ago when I first read that scientists had finally accepted that distilled water properties can be altered through electricity (magnetism is a form of an electric current) after believing that it could not be altered, for years. (To make this easier than my method, just get some decent strength magnets and tape them on to your containers.)

              Happy to read you are doing research on magnetizing water. If you come across anything pro or con in either subject we are discussing, please post it here.

              1. Lonie,

                I think I’m ready to add the magnetic part to my gallons of distilled water with magnesium rods. Please tell me again how you magnetize your water? This chain is so long now that it’s hard to find things. I have looked on Amazon, but I’m not sure what I’m looking at.

                Thank you!

                1. Please tell me again how you magnetize your water? …
                  —————————————————————————-
                  Wow Sue… I just googled round magnets and the search page below came up. This is much better than what I went through to secure the magnets to my glass gallon jugs. Just looking at the ones listed I would personally buy the 1″ x 1/16″… enough to have two for each of your four jugs.

                  Then I would get the 1/4″ x 1/16″ and just scatter them around the jugs in a proportional way. You could even put some of the smaller magnets on the larger ones (without removing the adhesive cover so you could use them as stickys some other time) in order to up the power of the larger ones. ‘-)

                  I have the 1.25 inch x 1/4 inchers and they are near impossible to separate if they accidentally get stuck together, so I do not recommend that size. I also have some smaller ones I stick around on the magnetic tape to give better coverage, assuming that could be needed.

                  If you have a special glass that you drink the water from, you may want to stick a couple of the small 1/4 inchers on that. I drink my water over time in sips rather than gulps so I may even get some of those for my own use.

                  The reason I am suggesting keeping the magnetism turned on all the time is because I remember reading that either the magnetism is lost from the water over time… or the extra Hydrogen molecule is lost over time. I’m not clear which one so I control for both.

                  https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-ab&q=round+magnets+with+adhesive

                  1. I just followed the link I posted and they only show 3/4 inch size. Just do a google search for “round magnets” and see if my original link shows up.

                    Below is a link to the actual 1″ magnets I originally referred to. Also, check around… you may be able to find a better price or even a store in your local area that has them on hand.

                    https://totalelement.com/products/1-x-1-16-inch-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-with-3m-self-adhesive-10-pack?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&adpos=1o6&scid=scplpD1X116N52-3M-10PK&sc_intid=D1X116N52-3M-10PK&gclid=Cj0KCQjwho7rBRDxARIsAJ5nhFpTV3U44qezxRCqbPX9owOEerhomT18-wWjGI0ryTnlYmX2VSZtuNEaAu5lEALw_wcB

                  2. Lonie, For some reason, the 1” diameters were 4x more expensive than the 1.25, so I went with the larger ones. I know to be careful to keep them apart! Thanks for your help with all this!!! Suzanne

            2. I have Type 2 diabetes… Watching my blood sugars hopefully. Even though I’ve lost lots of pounds, my fasting blood sugar is still high.
              ——————————————————————————————————————————-
              Sue, My VA doctors (first doctors I’ve had starting ~ 5 or 6 years ago, since back in the 1970’s) have tried to label me as “diabetic”… probably because of my labs coming back with an A1c of 10 or above and my fasting glucose number above 200, all except one time when I had just completed a 3 day fast… that time it was ~ 100.

              My resistance to their “label” was “why are the rest of my labs fantastic?… plus where’s the damage? (A nurse took the pulse in my feet and stated that was the strongest pulse she had ever encountered)

              I had read some years ago of a study done by a University in Spain in conjunction with one of the Ivy League school here in the U.S., and their conclusions were the worst part of diabetes was the inflammation it caused, and that one could live successfully with diabetes if they ameliorated the inflammation. I was supplementing healthily at the time but since then (and after the lab work uncovered the A1c and fasting glucose numbers) I have been actively working to counter inflammation. But when I signed on with the VA, I opted out of any prescription meds program and continue to follow that life-long policy. (To be clear, I am not suggesting this for everyone… we are all different.)

              I’ve learned within the last year that a supplement called ashwagandha mimics to some degree Metformin and Rapamycin… one a diabetic drug and the other a longevity drug.

              I have labs scheduled for October and look forward to seeing if taking the ashwagandha (along with bitter melon and amla on a stricter regimen) change the results for the A1c and the fasting blood glucose. I’m doing some other things like the NMN I’ve mentioned in a previous comments section, so that could even skew the results to positive. But no matter if the results are unchanged from previous lab work, I won’t be concerned.

              Just breathing the good country air seems to be working for me. ‘-)

              1. Lonie please let us know if the amla did anything for you. Dr. G has a video on this topic. My diabetic friend did amla for a long, long, time and it did nothing for his bloodwork numbers. So we’re curious.thx.

                1. Lonie please let us know if the amla did anything for you. Dr. G has a video on this topic. My diabetic friend did amla for a long, long, time and it did nothing for his bloodwork numbers. So we’re curious.thx.
                  ————————————————————————————————————————
                  Will do Ruth… but I have low expectations of a drastic change.

                  Reason is I do not conform to a classic WFPB diet. And while I seldom consume meat other than my twice weekly herring fillets leading up to my next lab appointment, I do snack on things like oatmeal cookies and a fat free yogurt cup (with MCT and Walnut oil and other things added back in.)

                  Also, things like a spoonful of peanut butter before eating anything, daily frozen wild blueberries and cherries covered in almond milk (also blueberries and cherries in gelatin)… canned grapefruit sections covered in almond milk, almond butter eaten with a few dried plums, teas and vegetable powders… well you get the idea.

                  That is, I’m wondering if my lab work will translate to anyone practicing eating WFPB. But I’ll be happy to share just in case having something like the Amla contributes to any change in my numbers.

                  To be honest, I’m expecting the Whole Body Vibration regimen to make a difference of some kind. Just started that, doing (3) ten minute sessions per day. I’ve already seen a change in my bowel movements and in the shape of the result. That suggests that maybe the vibrating platform really does mix up the purported layering of the biotics in my gut and could possibly cause the gut to produce more butyrate, as advertised.

                  (Funny story: One of the cats here has a foot fetish… that is, anytime I’m outside and standing still for even a short time, the little juvenile cat is rubbing on my ankles before taking a top of the head dive onto my shoes, rubbin’ and purrin’. At first the cat was leery of the vibration platform I stand on but finally the feet were just too tempting so it steps on and goes in to its routine. It tries to meow but the vibration creates a staccato meow… and the purrin’ is really stepped up as a result of the vibration. ‘-)

                  A lot going on here, as you might surmise. ‘-)

              2. Lonie, If you get tired of my questions, please let me know! My 1.25 diameter magnets came today, and I sure see what you mean about getting them apart! But my real problem is trying to figure out which side is north and which is south so I can position the north toward the water in the bottle, correct? When I look it up on the Internet it tells me to use a compass, but I don’t have one. Do you know another way to tell which side is north, and is it right that the North side goes in facing the water? Thank you! Suzanne

                1. Lonie, If you get tired of my questions, please let me know! My 1.25 diameter magnets came today, and I sure see what you mean about getting them apart! But my real problem is trying to figure out which side is north and which is south so I can position the north toward the water in the bottle, correct?
                  ———————————————————————————
                  Sue, no problem with the questions… I find answering questions causes me to think and sometimes I actually come away with a new perspective.

                  As for the positioning of the magnets, being round I always assumed they positioned themselves… but that was on the weak tape I had stuck to the jugs so that may have given them the ability to re-position themselves.

                  I’m really not sure it matters… maybe it does to setup a larger magnetic field. I suppose if you had just one on the glass water jug it wouldn’t really matter which direction the round magnet is pointing since it is going to set up a magnetic field around the water. If you have two on each jug on opposite sides, it might be best to have them lined up.

                  I might suggest you get a magic marker, leave the backing on the sticky part, and place the magnet loosely on the jug and allow it to align itself… mark the magnet at any position on the magnet. Peel the backing and put the magnet on the jug using the mark you put on it to the same way it was. Then, go to the other side of the jug and lay the magnet on the jug and allow it to align itself. I think the 1.25″ magnets should be strong enough to orient themselves into a cohesive magnetic field.

                  North and south alignment doesn’t matter. All that matters is the magnetic field. As for positioning, I would put the magnet or magnets on opposite sides of the middle of the jug.

                  Does this make sense for you?

                  1. It does! It didn’t occur to me that they would align with each other! I’m going to try this as soon as I get home. Thank you!
                    Suzanne

    2. Sue – there are several studies on taking supplements, basically they either don’t work or give a fraction of the benefit of real food. So real food is the answer, dark leafy greens, by the way is the best way to get both the vitamins you mention. Also, there’s a great lack of oversight on the industry, where vitamin company ingredients don’t match what’s listed on the bottle. So maybe they fill those capsules with sand or rice power, some studies show it’s a common practice.

      Save your money and ditch the supplements. When you eat real foods, you will actually experience the benefits.

      1. Supplements are just that: they supplement any deficiency or fill any nutrient void you may have. Unfortunately, due to the degradation of our soil, air, water, etc. whole foods are not as nutrient-dense as they used to be. Couple that with toxic chemicals/pesticides used to grow everything …. not good.
        And contrary, the supplement industry IS regulated – in some ways moreso than Pharma drugs. They are regulated by a different set of regulations compared to Pharma drugs. The key to buying quality supplements – and they are out there – is to research the co. and look for special labeling like GMP.. To say that all supplements are not trustworthy is like saying all white cars are fast …. doesn’t make sense.

        1. BChristine,

          Dietary supplements are regulated by the FDA, under a different set of regulations than “conventional” foods and drugs. The regulatory oversight is much, much less than that of drugs.

          “Manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements and dietary ingredients are prohibited from marketing products that are adulterated or misbranded. That means that these firms are responsible for evaluating the safety and labeling of their products before marketing to ensure that they meet all the requirements of DSHEA and FDA regulations.” (https://www.fda.gov/food/dietary-supplements). There is no requirement that a supplement be safe or effective, unlike for drugs.

          “The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994, which amended the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, created a new regulatory framework for the safety and labeling of dietary supplements. FDA is not authorized to review dietary supplement products for safety and effectiveness before they are marketed.” (https://www.fda.gov/food/dietary-supplements/information-consumers-using-dietary-supplements)

          It is BUYER BEWARE when taking supplements. This is true for all supplements, including vitamins.

          1. Dietary supplements are regulated by the FDA, under a different set of regulations than “conventional” foods and drugs. The regulatory oversight is much, much less than that of drugs.
            —————————————————————————————————–
            Au contraire Dr J,

            My dietary supplements are regulated by me and the regulatory oversight is much stricter than any govt. agency. ‘-)

      2. Sue – there are several studies on taking supplements, basically they either don’t work or give a fraction of the benefit of real food.
        ————————————————————
        Michael, there are thousands upon thousands of studies done on the benefits of taking supplements. Not saying eating “real food” (most supplements are just dried or extracted or tinctured etc. forms of real food.

        I take fistfulls of supplements daily and I’ll put my lab results up against anybody’s half my age.

        1. Not saying eating “real food”
          ————————————-
          to finish the sentence: isn’t a good thing… just sayin’ there’s more than one way to skin a cat. (With apologies to S for using that analogy ‘-)

    3. I make my own distilled water and use it for drinking and cooking.
      ————————————————————————————-
      Sue, just a little shortcut I’ve found for water to be distilled for use. I’ve recently started using a little one room portable refrigerated air conditioner and depending on the humidity, it strips 2 to 3 gallons of sorta distilled water from the air.

      I won’t use it for drinking… maybe for cooking, but I am saving every gallon of the stuff I can for running through my distiller once the seasons get cooler. This should be almost akin to rain water only better. I pour it on my head and wash my eyes out with it upon getting up in the morning. You can just feel how soft it is.

      Back when I had whole house refrigerated air I would stick a 5 gallon carboy (glass water jug) under the hose that drained that water from the air conditioner. I think I drank it at the time but I’ve since realized the water sits in a small tank before being pumped out and who knows what breeds in one of those holding tanks. ‘-)

      1. What an interesting idea! I wonder if it uses copper coils to do that. Have you thought about having it tested/analyzed? My magnets are coming by Amazon today. I hope they will stick to the glass jugs!

  8. I saw Dr. Oz do the toothbrush test after people flush with the lids up and it solved the debates between males and females about the seat left up and seat down permanently. Lid down is the winner by ten million miles.

    It also caused my toothbrush to change locations entirely.

    If you notice someone flushed without putting the lid down, wait at least 20 minutes.

      1. Yeah that is ridiculous… If that were true we’d all be dead. That kind of paranoia is EXTREMELY harmful, I don’t know who suggested that but it is L I T E R A L insanity. When that kind of stuff does not match what’s actually going on in the world around us and what actually happens to us, it is not real, it’s just madness. The negative impact of eating meat, eggs, dairy, and processed junk, that is real and people actually are dying from it. The difference is the evidence. If the hype doesn’t match reality, something isn’t right there. And I guarantee the person counting down the minutes to walk into a bathroom or who can’t walk into a public bathroom is damaging their body on a cellular level far more than the person who leaves their seat up regularly. I’d put money on that one.

  9. Great video, valuable information.

    Once again we get a helpful heads-up about a health threat… most of us have probably thought little about.

    Thanks, Dr. G.

  10. So what’s the takeaway from the article?

    Tap water: chlorinated to remove “natural organic matter”: Chlorine causes bladder cancer => not an option

    Bottled water: contains microplastics, even if it comes from glass bottles (not covered in the article at all) => Not good either, no way to get rid of microplastics

    Filtered tap water: seems to be the best option? Yes, filters can remove “schmutz”, but what about chlorine?

    Please help me reach a conclusion here.

    1. Yes, filters can take out chlorine. It will also evaporate bit it can take a number of days. Filters, depending on their construction can remove many contaminants, e.g. check out the Clearly Filtered test results (assu,I get they are accurate as advertisers).

      https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1011/0318/files/2019_Pitcher_Filter_Testing_Data_Sheet.pdf?2562https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1011/0318/files/2019_Pitcher_Filter_Testing_Data_Sheet.pdf?2562

      Clearly Filtered, however, is fairly pricey, about $45 US per 100 gallons.

    2. If your water is acceptable except for the chlorine, get a water cooler. Fill the jug with warm or hot water; by the time it has cooled, a great portion of the chlorine gas will have dissipated, and the remainder will too within a short time.

    3. Shilajit, it’s actually not difficult to remove chlorine, you can even do it by boiling water for a period of time. Even letting water sit will allow the chlorine to evaporate out of the water. It’s easy to find a filter that gets rid of chlorine–I even have one on my shower! Just make sure your city doesn’t use the dreaded chloramine instead of chlorine as that is more difficult to remove.

      I choose to use the Pelican reverse osmosis system for my drinking water which adds back the desirable minerals. I hate the water waste, but I try to be very conservative in other ways, I even boycott Vegas (I’m sure they’re really hurting form my boycott, too lol).

      1. Thats some weird bottled water, in US they are allowed to bottle tap water and sell it? I was talking about bottled naturel spring or natural mineral water they sells in shops that doesnt undergo any treatments at least in France.

        1. Julot, it’s a different ‘ball game’ over here as they say ! It is very much buyer beware re the bottled water. Scammers abound, and often large food companies or soda pop manufacturers can own and promote more than a few brands of water. Lack of transparency with respect to the water source and treatments is a common problem. They can claim whatever, but bottle it from local tap water!

        2. Typically the crappy bottled water comes in plastic, anyway. More likely to find actual untreated (with chemicals, they’re still pasteurized with heat) spring water in glass bottles.

          1. Traces of plastic particles in bottled water are just present in micrograms just like some of these “polluted water” contains pesticides and drugs, the dose makes the poison, thats why most treated plants foods(organic or conventionnal, kinda the same, organic doesnt mean without pesticides treatment and never did and not even less toxic an expensive scam)are still very healthy and most foods contains trace micrograms lead/mercury and others extremely toxic heavy metals, not in significant amount to be harmful.

            But thats funny because caffeine is a major natural pesticide and a addictive psychotropic drug made from the plant just like nicotine and is present in milligrams amount in chocolate, coke, coffee(at least 100mg per cup which is 100 000 times more than few micrograms) and tea but thats even sensed to be healthy with moderation, very weird actually.

  11. One million bacteria can easily fit within the period at the end of this sentence; all furfaces of the body are covered with a patina of them (assuming we are healthy.) The greatest concentration of E Coli on the body is beneath the fingernails. And at least half of the bulk of our stool consists of bacteria ~ even when dry.

    Bacteria are at the top of the food chain, since they get first “dibs” on all consumable food stuff. And we ARE NOT what we eat, we are what our BACTERIA eat. Short chain fatty acid which our body uses for fuel, is bacteria waste.

    Finally, the mouth has so many varieties of bacteria that not all of them have been studied or even named. So don’t “dis” the organisms that regulate all higher life on the planet.

  12. I used water from Brita filter exclusively. I recently started having cardiac arrhythmias including one bout of Afib.

    I then found out Brita removes about 100 of minerals including magnesium which is essential for cardiac rhythms. I immediately switched to faucet water only. I still get some but very reduced incidences of arrhythmias and no afib on cardiac monitor.

    Of source this is anecdotal and just me. But I repeat, Brita brags about removal of all traces of magnesium from the water. Magnesium is essential for heart rate conduction system.

    I am completely plant based whole food and my only apparent health problem was cardiac arrhythmias. I have not seen any Dr. Greger reports concerning afib. Are there any?

    1. I make kombucha with half spring water for minerals. Nobody should go a day without drinking “buchie.” I wonder why Dr. G never mentions it?

        1. dr cobalt,

          From the video you linked to:

          “Kombucha tea can be harmful. Published last year in the Journal of Intensive Care Medicine, kombucha “may pose serious health risks. Consumption of this tea should be discouraged, as it may be associated with life-threatening lactic acidosis.”

          This is just the latest in a series of case reports of people ending up in a coma because their blood turned to acid after drinking kombucha. How does it do that? We have no idea.”

          I think I’ll pass. Until I learn more.

          1. Agreed, Dr. J… I found that bit of info quite terrifying, but am looking forward to more updated insight for no other reason than curiosity since it’s still so popular.

      1. So in regards to kombucha, I recently saw a Dr. Greger interview on Vegains on youtube and he was asked about any updates on kombucha which Dr. Greger declared in the interview that he’s going to do an UPDATE on kombucha!! I was excited to hear this. I haven’t drank the stuff since watching his past video on it.

    2. It sounds like what you’re saying is that you/we cannot acquire enough magnesium from plant sources to replace what Brita removes. Not even nuts, legumes, tofu? So we might have to supplement minerals too then?

      I don’t know, just asking.

      1. Regarding Magnesium, Dr. Greger’s ‘daily dozen’ recommends 3 servings of beans per day. For me that’s 3 cups of ‘black beans’ daily gives me 90% of my daily magnesium requirements. Combined with all the other fresh veggies we eat everyday…’easy-peasy’.

        Supplements are for people who still think ‘processed food’ is healthy.
        (processed food is anything that has a shelf-life of more than 7-10 days, comes in a bag, jar, container, bottle, can, wrapper, etc.)

        http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=2

      2. I think that it is not just the absence of things like magnesium from distilled/RO water that is problematic. The water itself may affect the body’s mineral homeostasis.

    3. But we get the vast majority of our minerals from our food or at least should be. There are only trace amounts in water. If you’re eating a WFPB diet along the lines of Dr. Greger’s daily dozen recommendations, you’ll be getting plenty of magnesium and then some. Also, magnesium supplements seem a pretty safe and even good idea for some.

      Do you really think the tiny amounts of magnesium could have possibly made a difference for you considering it sounds like you’re likely getting more than the RDA?

      1. As I suggested earlier, the (distilled/RO) water itself may affect the body’s mineral homeostasis even if total magnesium intake stays the same.

        1. Tom, that’s actually what I’d like to know more about and would love to see Dr. Greger address. I personally wouldn’t use a strictly RO or distilled system–it’s very important to me that my system has a remineralization process.

    4. Larry Burnett – Thanks for the info about Brita. I want to clean up my water that I consume – currently drink tap – but I, too, want my minerals in my very hard water. Years ago I had arrythmias. At 20 years old my physician offered me beta blockers to deal with them – I declined. I later figured out that magnesium was my culprit and began supplementing. When I forget to take it I soon can tell with increased rhythm interruptions. 40 years later, now, I still take magnesium supplement.
      A friends wife had severe rhythm disturbance. The medical community wanted to destroy her thyroid and then put her on synthroid for the rest of her life because that was their only guess as to how to “fix” this problem. They went to numerous doctors and this was the only offering. She declined. She later went to a nutritionist who tested her blood for magnesium. This person NEVER ate vegetables – meat and potatoes only. She was immediately given magnesium and . . tada!! . . . her arrhythmia resolved.
      A very excellent book to read on magnesium and the hundreds of ways it supports our physiology is The Magnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean, M.D., NP. She is both a medical doctor and a naturopath and she is big on magnesium. She also tells the reader that a deficiency can take a long long time to resolve as it is a mineral that moves into our tissues slowly.
      Thanks for sharing your story and information.

  13. So much to say about the video and all the comments …..

    * NO to tap water: too many problematic and toxic chemicals
    * “ZeroWater” is a very good counter top filtering system for those who cannot afford the Berkey, or other whole-house filters. ZeroWater has a 5-step filter; Brita and PuR are inferior compared to ZeroWater — you might as well not be using anything.

      1. Your opinion. I noticed a huge difference in the taste the 1st time I tried ZeroWater. The filters do tend to be more expensive because it’s 5-stage — getting rid of many more impurities than Brita or Pur:

        ” To ensure that your lead-removing water filter will actually remove lead is to get one that’s been certified by NSF International, formerly known as the National Sanitation Foundation. This independent nonprofit runs a robust water-filter testing program, the standards of which are used across the water-quality industry. And to date, the only pour-through water-filtration systems currently certified by the NSF to reduce lead in drinking water (as well as chromium and mercury, if those elements concern you, too) are certain models from ZeroWater”

          1. The Pur I get is certified to filter out 99% lead.

            I watched a video of a test between the old Pur before the types certified for removing lead and the newer ones and even the old version removed up to 90% of lead, depending on how much lead they added.

    1. Ive been asking that too. The clay or ceramic container benchtop drip filters still have little bits of plastic (but you probably get more plastic from plumbed in systems that force the water through under pressure). If you drip filter the water immediately into glass the exposure time is short to absorb plastic chemicals

  14. After watching this video, I contacted my city to ask them about these disinfection byproducts. They emailed me back immediately to say that they use chloramine and not chlorine as the disinfectant and that chloramine doesn’t produce as many byproducts as chlorine. They also wrote, “The State has regulations which require the City to test for these disinfection byproducts, trihalomethanes (TTHM) and Halogenic acetic acid (HAA). The City of Morro Bays water has not exceeded the States regulated levels for these byproducts.” Does anybody have any thoughts on this because now I am backtracking on my plan to purchase a water filter.

    1. Caroline,
      I’d ask for a complete report on exactly what they test for and the results. Where I live we get one annually.

      1. Hi Gengo. Thanks for your reply. They test for trihalomethanes (TTHM) and Halogenic acetic acid (HAA). I think Greger said there are 600 disinfection byproducts, so maybe I shouldn’t be satisfied with their testing only two. Damn, I just want to avoid buying a filter. . . .

        1. You could test your water. Amazon Bang for your buck tests for 0ver 170 contaminants.

          They were listed more than once and the price difference was big for the exact same description, so be careful, click on the wrong link and you might pay $40 more for the same test.

  15. At present:

    I decided that (maybe) the best thing to drink is organic cranberry juice and organic tomato puree since (supposedly) only pure rain water falls on the fields. The fruits and vegetables I eat seem to have plenty of water also.

    1. I decided that (maybe) the best thing to drink is organic cranberry juice and organic tomato puree since (supposedly) only pure rain water falls on the fields. The fruits and vegetables I eat seem to have plenty of water also.
      ———————————————————————————
      I applaud your decision but keep in mind that rainwater, distilled as rising moisture but picking up anything in the atmosphere (car smog, jet fuel condensate etc.) as it falls to the ground.

      But I read somewhere long ago that they believed the water in plants was tantamount to distilled water. (Sounded good to me ‘-)

        1. Sydney – I listen to NPR while working outside. I recently listened to a story about rainfall in remote geological places here in the Rocky Mountain West. Various people brought back water samples from remote Wilderness area type locations while on their hiking trips for analysis. 100% of them had microplastics in them. The Rocky Mountains are the watershed for the West. The water, now, may not be as pure as Coors Beer would have you believe!

    2. Sydney, fruit juices do not hydrate you adequately and therefore are not counted as water consumption. Dr. Greger recommends servings of water every day in ADDITION to all of the water we get from the fruits and vegetables we eat, for a reason. We need to drink water. At the point of being paranoid out of drinking actual water, we should equally be concerned about the oxygen we decided to breath in… We live in an imperfect world but we can still thrive in it. We shouldn’t be stressing about how to be perfect–which is impossible–but rather how to live in a more responsible way for a healthier planet.

  16. I’ve been wanting to get a Berkey water filtration system for years, but haven’t due to cost. I wonder if there’s been any studies done on Berkey the good Doctor could share with us! Everyone I know who has one absolutely swears by it!

    1. Good question.

      I use the Pur faucet system.

      I do wonder about that because at work we have a 5-gallon bottle cooler system and I do wonder about that and I also have tried zero water and the pitchers. The water isn’t in the pitchers long, when I do it.

      But the fact they are plastic probably means they are just as bad.

    2. Tommy – not to mention that the plastic housing parts on these filters to no biodegrade. We have a huge plastic problem and it’s only getting worse. I don’t want to add to this plastic situation.

  17. Confused about water filters. Don’t all highly effective filters remove trace minerals as they’re larger than many contaminants? I hope.theres another report coming on water filters as it’s still unclear what the best tradeoff is.
    Eg flouride?
    What about plastic exposure from.filters?.
    t’s usually said that drip filters (high end, like the clay ones, not Brita) are best as it’s not forced under water pressure, but these weren’t covered?

      1. What does.filter over minerals mean? Adds minerals back in? There are various trace minerals supplements to add in but they also have some lead and other heavy metals. I hope Dr Greger covers the full range of options for water filtration and minerals replenishment.. Although much of it is educated guesswork as there can never be adequate research into so many.variables even if there was enough funding eg water changes by location, treatment, season, droughts and floods, source

    1. Ron, thanks for posting the link! That was interesting! I am tempted to go buy a glucose meter to test my typical meals and snacks. I have a hunch I am having huge spikes these days in response to average meals. Do you monitor your blood sugar Ron?

      1. No. It sounds painful. I don’t like needles. Once a year at my annual checkup is bad enough and so far, my fasting blood sugar is fine.

    2. Well, just listen to one of his basic assumptions …… ‘people actually generally do follow dietary guidelines’ (01.35)

      That must be why McDonalds, KFC, Burger King, Krispy Kreme and innumerable pizza chains have all gone of business then?

      As far as I know, about 75% of the US population doesn’t meet US dietary guidelines recommendations. I doubt that the situation is any better elsewhere in the world either.
      https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/chapter-2/current-eating-patterns-in-the-united-states/#figure-2-1

      Also, research around the world consistently shows that adherence to dietary guidelines delivers lower mortality risk eg

      “Greater adherence to the WHO guidelines is associated with greater longevity in elderly men and women in Europe and the United States.”
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25318818
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24572039
      http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/100/2/693.full.pdf+html
      http://www.sciguru.org/newsitem/19084/adherence-dietary-guidelines-americans-reduces-mortality-low-income-us-population

      I’d be very wary of claims like this, however palusible they sound. All other things being equal, the healthy diet recommended by the WHO and others reduces overall mortality risk. Sure you can find exceptions – like you can find smokers and drinkers who live to over one hundred. But that doesn’t prove that smoking and boozing are healthy – even for them. Ditto ice cream, bacon and pizzas

  18. I live in the Toledo, OH area where algal blooms caused about a week of toxic water warnings and a shortage of bottled water. You couldn’t bathe or anything with the water. Ever since I’ve gone to distilled water. I noticed a section Dr, Gregor casually mentioned loss of trace minerals from some filtered water I believe. Can someone discuss the pros and cons of distilled water plz

    1. Can someone discuss the pros and cons of distilled water plz
      ————————————————————————————
      start at the beginning of the comments and scroll down to Sue Barbara’s post.

  19. I regularly keep a glass of hydrogen peroxide in my bathroom and just drop my toothbrushes in the glass to soak. According to what I read after a google search, it seems to work. I would imagine that any airborne bacteria that lands in the glass simply dies a quick, painless death.

  20. When I flush i make sure the lid is down. After brushing my teeth I rinse the brush off for a minute or two. I have a whole house water filter and change the pre-filter as suggested by the manufacturer. I don’t drink anything including water from plastic bottles they are full of BPAs and the BPA free are full of BPS which are worse than BPA. These are petroleum products that no living being should be consuming and they are huge hormone disrupters. Cans are lined with this as well.

  21. What about the coin operated vending machines outside the supermarket where people fill their bottles with filtered water? Are they safe? Do they use reverse osmosis?

    1. What about the coin operated vending machines outside the supermarket where people fill their bottles with filtered water? Are they safe? Do they use reverse osmosis?
      Yes, those are RO water stations. The one where I buy my water (to run through my distiller) claims the water is also ionized.

  22. I wonder about distilled water? We have been filtering and distilling our own water for years….

    And what about the ultraviolet sterilizers? My parents use a household one in Hawaii with rainwater…

  23. .
    BETTER AUDIO CONTROL, PLEASE

    The dedicated staffers preparing each “daily” video seem unaware that the opening BOOOOM! is much louder than Dr. Greger’s monologue. For example, the audio level for the video of July 22, 2015 (“Heart of Gold: Turmeric vs. Exercise”) seems to have been done with care– when the opening BOOOM! volume is set where desired (so no windows are broken), Dr. Greger’s voice still can be heard equally well. So, this balance of BOOOOM! volume and Dr. Greger’s voice is not an impossible production standard.

    Compare the balanced volume of “Heart of Gold…”:(whose creator actually listened to the recorded result, after making the recording) with today’s video (August 12, 2019), in which the opening BOOOOM! is followed by a faint, mouse-like voice which resembles Dr. Greger. In today’s video, the staffer clearly did not check for different volume levels.

    Checking all media work for quality issues is routine with most organizations publishing a media product. We very much appreciate the effort to adjust the volume of each video to provide a matching level between the opening BOOOOM! and Dr. Greger’s voice.

  24. I use the pelican reverse osmosis system which has a remineralization step. I don’t like the water waste but that is a consequence of government adding fluoride to the water and other difficult to get out chemicals that not all of us are ok with drinking in our water. I wonder how much cost would be an issue in making a healthier water supply if millions upon millions of dollars didn’t go to private jets, senseless vivisection and a bunch of other horrible and unnecessary things. I think we have the money, it just isn’t being used properly. It’s 2019, though, and you would think we would have found a better way. I think the issues lie in priorities… When the priorities are right, it seems like we can accomplish a lot.

    1. Fluoridation of drinking water seems an American experiment, and is not done by many other countries whose people and governments have not been impressed by health claims for fluoride. Many books and articles have been written on the subject of fluoridation, but the ultimate issue is political– are we sufficiently concerned to remove not only bio-contaminants, but toxic pollutants like lead (and, by some accounts, fluoride) from drinking water?

  25. Are there any known direct consequences of an average toothbrush sitting out un-vinegarized? Like does it actually affect people if put to the test? When I was little my mom just washed ours regularly and they sat out like most of America’s toothbrushes and we all very rarely got sick and when we did it was just your typical virus–we never got strep throat or anything serious like that in our household. Now I just keep it in my cupboard instead of sitting it out and obviously wash it regularly. I also use my beloved sustainable wood toothbrush which is made of bamboo and supposedly antimicrobial… but I wash it regularly regardless, of course.

  26. This video is somewhat mislabeled, in that bottled water is not analyzed.

    Besides that, we are not told the filter change interval on the GE and Whirlpool refrigerator water filters, so we can compare the cost with pitcher filters (presumably more expensive).

  27. I’m retiring my Brita and getting a PUR. I knew Brita was inferior, but it wasn’t clear to me which alternative had the fewest downsides.

    People complain about the PUR pitchers being design flawed, but it sounds like one can mostly resolve that by not filling them too full. Some of the Brita pitchers are a bit design flawed too, btw. People also complain about the PUR filters having poor QC and frequently clogging. I’m not sure there’s a good solution for that yet.

    The ZeroWater filters appear to have some chemical in the plastic that leaches into the water and causes it to have a fishy taste. For whatever reason, it seems not to occur when the filter is new, but long before it’s time to retire it. Many are saying this, so I figure it must be true. One reviewer said ZeroWater has admitted to this and calls it a “known issue.” I’m not sure whether the levels of this fishy smelling chemical are toxic, but “no thanks” to fishy smelling drinking water as far as I’m concerned! I would think that fairly clean water that I’ll drink is better than very clean water that I won’t. Until they fix this, I’ll steer clear, but ZeroWater might well be too expensive for me anyway.

    Thanks, Dr. Greger, for helping me figure out my best affordable alternative to Brita. Thanks to you for that as well, Deb.

  28. Do our bodies need the (inorganic) minerals from water? Good or bad? How important?

    Dr Greger says no to reverse osmosis because it removes minerals.
    Most water filter sellers say inorganic minerals in water are bad for your health (arteries, kidney stones, whatever) to neutral (not used by the body). Not that I take my medical science from them. But would appreciate some clarification Thanks

    Finger crossed, the minerals in water might fix my insomnia

    1. some reverse osmosis filters or at least one, remineralizes the water. I would also like to know more about the importance of minerals in water because there are a lot of interesting theories out there on that.

      1. I since read a world health organisation report that connected harder water (more minerals) with lower risk of diseases such as heart, cancers and diabetes. The comparison was to populations in the same region who had soft water. The obvious minerals are magnesium and calcium but in addition to other minerals like zinc, there are trace minerals that could also be important. I’m sure the water filters wouldn’t add all these back in

        1. WFPB enthusiast, you could contact the company and find out. I could contact Pelican and find out how many minerals are added back but I honestly don’t care enough to because I get all of my minerals from food and well beyond the recommended daily value. You get very, very little minerals from water. I’m just glad to know that the PH is right (a healthy normal PH range) and that adequate minerals are indeed added back as there may be negatives to drinking water completely stripped of all minerals. I would be more interested in the diets of the people where that study took place. Most people on a standard western diet are deficient in magnesium even after supplementing with magnesium (kind of alarming), so I would speculate that perhaps the small amount of minerals from their water was noticeably tipping the balance in their favor given an inadequate diet.

          Anecdotally, what I know for myself is that I have been drinking and cooking with reverse osmosis (remineralized) water for years and I have been vegan and more and more WFPB for years and I have had amazing outcomes in my health in practically every regard. I attribute diet for that but I think drinking the pure water has been beneficial to my health as well, but my real point was simply that it certainly hasn’t harmed me or created deficiencies. I guess the answer for people who think it isn’t good enough is to drink spring water, tap water, or minimally filtered tap water. Honestly you could just boil the tap water to get the chlorine out if that’s all you’re worried about, but make sure it’s chlorine your city uses and not chloramine.

        2. WFPB – that’s my question exactly. Our body uses and needs these minerals for operation and I do not want those filtered out. A friend contacted Berkley water filters and they claim to filter out the ‘icky things’ and leave in the minerals which are larger molecules in the water. As a person with a science background I cannot figure out how they can accomplish that magical feat. I already take extra magnesium for heart rhythm issues and want my good minerals.
          Like others have mentioned already, I would just love for Dr. G to do a real series on water, . . .the good, the bad, and the ugly, . . . so to speak.

  29. I’m still confused felt it wasn’t fully explained. In the UK we also use water that has fluoride in it and I drink a lot of tap water.
    If we filter using a jug does it actually take out the fluoride and chlorine but leave minerals in ? Do not want to waste my money on the wrong thing .
    Any advice anyone ?

    1. Tina, the only filtration system I know of that gets rid of the harder stuff to filter out, such as fluoride, is a reverse osmosis filter. Reverse osmosis takes pretty much everything out so it makes it very pure, it also takes out good minerals but the Pelican system that I use (and also maybe other companies, but I’m not familiar with many) remineralizes the water in its final step of filtration so it’s a win/win. Unfortunately more advanced filters like this create water waste but I see that as a problem rooted in adding things to our water supply that are unnecessary, hard to get out, and most of the public does not want. On the plus side, being vegan or 100% plant based can help to reduce water use due to animal agriculture being one of the biggest water wasters globally.
      Distilled water may also get rid of fluoride, but I’m not familiar with distilled water.

  30. Dr. G,
    You barely touched the surface of what water is Best to drink. You refuse to talk about the industrial waste, i.e. rat poison (fluoride) they dump in our city water or the THM’s produced from DBP’s (disinfection by products) which are known to cause cancer as studies have proven. Which is best to drink chlorinated water or Chlorimated (Chloramine) dosed water? Talk about filters and which remove these toxins and which don’t. This is what I would expect from you Dr. G when talking about which water is Best to drink.

  31. Hello,
    Since individuals absorb water and the components of that water through their skin when bathing and washing hands, it seems prudent to filter water that is used to bathe and wash one’s hands.

    Please advise me regarding your thoughts about this matter.

    Thank you!

    1. X, in regards to showers and hand washing, yeah it’s probably better to filter out chlorine, but your skin doesn’t absorb things that easily. Most people don’t filter their showers and they’re fine. I have a shower filter and I really like it but I couldn’t afford to filter all the sinks. I would guess Dr. Greger would say don’t worry about it but probably make sure to change the filter if you do have one in your shower or wherever else for the same reasons shown in the video. Actually, I think I’ll pay more attention to how often I change my shower filter now.

  32. Hello,
    Since microplastics emanate from the plastics used in the construction of the Brita and Pur water-pitcher-filter devices used in a study feature is video, would it be prudent to reduce this microplastics exposure by using a water filter that attaches to a kitchen or other faucet to reduce the time that the filtered water is in contact with plastic?

    Thank you!

  33. Edited:

    Hello,
    Since microplastics emanate from the plastics used in the construction of the Brita and Pur water-pitcher-filter devices used in a study featured in this video, would it be prudent to reduce this microplastics exposure by using a water filter that attaches to a kitchen or other faucet to reduce the time that the filtered water is in contact with the plastic water pitcher and/or plastic water filter housing?

    Also, please ask the NutritionFacts.org management team to consider adding an “edit link” adjacent to the comment window so that edits can be convenientely made to one’s comments.

    Thank you!

  34. So what is the best way to drink water? When I’ve researched it you seem to lose minerals if you filter it and get the chemicals you don’t want if you don’t ‍♀️

  35. The purpose of changing your brush isn’t for bacteria, but because the bristles aren’t as effective as removing plaque as they age. You’ll notice this with a new toothbrush that it feels stronger. It is! Avoiding cavities to protect your only set of teeth seems like a good $3 investment every three months to me!

  36. How is it switch from the topic about water to toothbrush? I could not even get the point on the topic to which one is better among the filtered, tap or purified. This article is lacking too much and based on the study done 1974.

  37. Has there been any research on the absorption levels of Calcium from ‘hard’ water that comes form a Well? (houses located out of a city get their water from the water reservoir under ground, aka: a Well). I would love to know if the abundance of calcium that is present is an adequate source of Calcium and not just a nuisance to my appliances.

    1. Miranda – well water varies significantly from area to area. You just have to have your own well water tested to see what’s there. My Uncle lived on a farm that had a very high concentration of sulfur which made it smell like rotten eggs. If he let the water sit for a few days, the odor would dissipate. There is now the problem of chemicals leaching into the ground water. So you just have to test your own to see what you’ve got.

  38. After reading through the comments I too would love to see a video on whether distilling water at home is good or bad for your health.

    Some claim it leaches beneficial minerals from your body including the study by WHO and some claim it only removes inorganic minerals that the body cannot use.

    Should it be remineralised? If so, what with?

    I’ve recently switched to distilling my own water for my family to use with no remineralisation and so far no one seems to have developed a noticeable nutrient deficiency but I guess it could be too soon to tell and with 2 young children who need minerals to grow I’d hate to be the reason they are depleted of them.

    1. I’ve recently switched to distilling my own water for my family to use with no remineralisation and so far no one seems to have developed a noticeable nutrient deficiency but I guess it could be too soon to tell and with 2 young children who need minerals to grow I’d hate to be the reason they are depleted of them.
      ——————————————————————————————————————
      Gimpy, if you are conscientious enough to take the extra ordinary step to distill your family’s water to insure safe water, then you are certainly conscientious enough to provide your family with nutritious food to supply all the minerals they need to grow up and be healthy.

      But if you are still concerned, then search for a healthy mineral product athletes might take or drink and occasionally, supplement with that. I have a brother that used to put a small amount of baking soda in his tap water before drinking it. I don’t remember my mother ever drinking our (terrible) tap water… always made tea or coffee with it.

      I personally like to make tea from my distilled water and expect to get a lot of minerals from the tea. ‘-)

  39. Check this

    https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/nutrientschap12.pdf

    For those who use/ want to use filters. I didnt know that and was drinking demineralized water in bottles (it could be demineralized and i thought its nice because i can drink tea without this white dust on the walls of my kettle) for two years

    https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/nutrientschap12.pdf

    Dr Greger should make a research about it. If its so like WHO writes then we have to find the best source of water

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