Wheatgrass Juice for Ulcerative Colitis

Wheatgrass Juice for Ulcerative Colitis
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A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial found wheatgrass juice to be safe and effective in the treatment of an inflammatory bowel disease.

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In the editorial that accompanied the landmark study showing an extract of the spice, turmeric, could be used to fight ulcerative colitis, they congratulated the researchers on performing the largest study ever on complementary or alternative medicine approaches to treat inflammatory bowel disease. But that’s not saying much.

Two of the only other high quality trials tried aloe vera gel and wheat grass juice. No significant improvements in clinical remission rates or endoscopy findings for aloe vera, but the wheatgrass findings were impressive: “Wheat grass juice in the treatment of active distal ulcerative colitis.” The use of wheatgrass for treatment of various gastrointestinal and other conditions had been suggested by its proponents for more than 30 years, but was never clinically assessed in a controlled trial, until this study.

The use of wheatgrass juice in the treatment of ulcerative colitis was brought to their attention by several patients who attributed improvement to regular use of the stuff. So, in a pilot study, they gave 100 cc’s a day—which is between like a third and a half a cup—of wheatgrass juice for two weeks to ten patients. Eight patients described clinical improvement; one had no change; and one got worse. Why had I never heard of that study? Because it was never published. They thought they were really onto something; so, they wanted to do it right. So, this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was designed to examine the effects of wheatgrass juice in patients with active distal ulcerative colitis. The study found that treatment with wheatgrass juice was associated with reductions in the overall disease activity and the severity of rectal bleeding. Ninety percent of the wheatgrass patients improved, and none got worse. They conclude that wheatgrass juice appeared effective and safe as a single or added treatment of active distal ulcerative colitis.

No answer is available at present as to the site of wheatgrass juice action. Does the active substance get absorbed into the body and have some kind of general anti-inflammatory effect, or does it act locally right in the colon? How would you figure that out? By juicing in the opposite direction.

A study like this raises so many questions. How would wheatgrass juice do head-to-head against other treatments? Does it have any role in preventing attacks, or only when you already have one? Should we be giving it to people with Crohn’s disease, too? What’s the best dose? It’s been over ten years since the publication of this study, yet nothing since. How sad. Yes, no one’s going to make a million selling wheatberries, but what about the wheatgrass juicer companies? I wish they’d pony up some research dollars.

Until then, though, wheatgrass appears to offer a genuine therapeutic advantage in this disabling disease. That is, if you can stand the taste.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to oklo / Flickr

In the editorial that accompanied the landmark study showing an extract of the spice, turmeric, could be used to fight ulcerative colitis, they congratulated the researchers on performing the largest study ever on complementary or alternative medicine approaches to treat inflammatory bowel disease. But that’s not saying much.

Two of the only other high quality trials tried aloe vera gel and wheat grass juice. No significant improvements in clinical remission rates or endoscopy findings for aloe vera, but the wheatgrass findings were impressive: “Wheat grass juice in the treatment of active distal ulcerative colitis.” The use of wheatgrass for treatment of various gastrointestinal and other conditions had been suggested by its proponents for more than 30 years, but was never clinically assessed in a controlled trial, until this study.

The use of wheatgrass juice in the treatment of ulcerative colitis was brought to their attention by several patients who attributed improvement to regular use of the stuff. So, in a pilot study, they gave 100 cc’s a day—which is between like a third and a half a cup—of wheatgrass juice for two weeks to ten patients. Eight patients described clinical improvement; one had no change; and one got worse. Why had I never heard of that study? Because it was never published. They thought they were really onto something; so, they wanted to do it right. So, this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was designed to examine the effects of wheatgrass juice in patients with active distal ulcerative colitis. The study found that treatment with wheatgrass juice was associated with reductions in the overall disease activity and the severity of rectal bleeding. Ninety percent of the wheatgrass patients improved, and none got worse. They conclude that wheatgrass juice appeared effective and safe as a single or added treatment of active distal ulcerative colitis.

No answer is available at present as to the site of wheatgrass juice action. Does the active substance get absorbed into the body and have some kind of general anti-inflammatory effect, or does it act locally right in the colon? How would you figure that out? By juicing in the opposite direction.

A study like this raises so many questions. How would wheatgrass juice do head-to-head against other treatments? Does it have any role in preventing attacks, or only when you already have one? Should we be giving it to people with Crohn’s disease, too? What’s the best dose? It’s been over ten years since the publication of this study, yet nothing since. How sad. Yes, no one’s going to make a million selling wheatberries, but what about the wheatgrass juicer companies? I wish they’d pony up some research dollars.

Until then, though, wheatgrass appears to offer a genuine therapeutic advantage in this disabling disease. That is, if you can stand the taste.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to oklo / Flickr

Doctor's Note

The turmeric video I mentioned is Striking with the Root: Turmeric Curcumin and Ulcerative Colitis.

I think the only other videos where I’ve mentioned wheatgrass are How Much Broccoli Is Too Much? and Dietary Cure for Hidradenitis Suppurativa, and that was really just for comic relief. This is one of the topics I get lots of questions about, but there just wasn’t any good science…until now! Please never hesitate to contact us with topics you’d like us to cover.

For more on ulcerative colitis and inflammatory bowel disease, see:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

72 responses to “Wheatgrass Juice for Ulcerative Colitis

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  1. nice to hear wheat grass juice is a benefit , that all the propaganda over the years was not just someones imagination . your last words were” if you can stand the taste” which is tough. I wonder about cabbage juice now, I,m pretty sure it,s beneficial as well and a lot easier to take as far as I’m concerned. cheers!




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    1. To me, the taste of wheat grass is not so bad, it’s just that it’s very very strong. So I dilute with ice cold filtered water, several times as much water, and then it’s very refreshing.




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  2. So I looked it up. Appears to be easy enough to grow and make at home. Otherwise that’s a mail-order or extended shopping excursion item from this locale. But then I’d never “juice” only “smoothie” and am in no rush as I expect WGJ to only add some more variety and color to my eats.




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    1. Guy, Dr G said they used 1/3 to 1/2 cup daily. But there is a big caveat: Start with a very small dose, like 1/2 ounce, and build up, and NEVER take a big dose all at once. I was using some wheatgrass juice at an alternative cancer treatment center. I did OK with an ounce shot of the stuff, but when I drank too much at once it made me feel nauseated and I’ve never been able to take it since. The chef who was making it for us had the same experience.

      Also, it’s easy to grow at home, but I had trouble with some odd little gray flies that suddenly appeared. I finally had to give up my growing operation and get the stuff out of the house. I grew a tiny patch outside in a raised bed and that did very well, but of course it’s seasonal.

      Many grocery stores and our local food co-op sell little pots of wheatgrass, which I sometimes buy and place on a windowsill. You can cut small amounts and put them into smoothies, but to get enough to work as a medication you need to juice it. There are special juicers for wheatgrass and other leafy greens. They don’t juice too well in other types of juicers, though I have shoved some through my Champion juicer.

      Locally, there are a couple of juice bars that sell wheatgrass shots, so maybe you can find that in your area.




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      1. Depending on what media you were using, the little flies could be fungus gnats or fruit flies, both feed off of decomposing organic material. I live in FL and they are a pain, but an inverted funnel in a jar with a bit of vinegar traps them.




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        1. These definitely weren’t fruit flies. They were slightly smaller than a housefly, and their gray wings gave them a triangular shape. I’ve never seen them before or since. Up here in the diagonally opposite end of the country we don’t have too many bugs, so maybe you know what they are but I don’t.




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  3. I tasted freshly made wheat grass juice at a farmer’s market and the flavor was really good. Maybe I should go to the farmer’s market every week and discuss how to juice it at home. I have lower colon ulcerative colitis and I received the most dramatic help from taking chlorella in pill form – 2-1000 mg in the morning and 2-1000 mg in the evening. After the first few days I noticed a big difference. If I go off of it things change for the worse. I buy Now brand. It’s inexpensive and it works. My daughter-in-law who is a science teacher believes eating fresh raw spinach everyday will do the same thing…just a few leaves with lunch and dinner.




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  4. Very few juicers are capable of processing wheatgrass, but the Green Power juicer can do the job. Even though the juice has no fiber, it is heavy. Don’t be concerned about taste because a lot of wheatgrass is required to produce a small amount of juice. Most of us can tolerate drinking a small amount. It will not grow outside in cold weather. Growing it inside uses a significant amount of window space. In order to grow enough inside for one person, I put open shelving in front of a double window. Freshly cut and juiced wheatgrass will improve health, but it requires your time, space and effort.




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      1. Panchito: Interesting! I didn’t know about the powder.

        I asked, because I’m wondering if the whole food is just as effective or maybe more than the juice. It is more common to juice, but it sure would be interesting if big government would fund some more comprehensive studies.

        Thanks for your reply.




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    1. I do use wheatgrass because it is so cheap and easy to grow, but it is so fibrous it isn’t great in smoothies. SInce I don’t have a juicer my solution is to whiz the wheat grass in a small amount of water, and pour it through a coarse strainer before adding to the smoothie. Probably not as good as juicing, but it works for me! I also love sprouted wheat for making a weird probiotic beverage called rejuvelac…super easy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rejuvelac




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      1. Vege-tater: Nice creative solution!

        FYI: I make rejuvalac all the time for nut cheeses. But I usually make it out of quinoa just because that’s faster. But it is more expensive… Some day I will have the patience to try to make rejuvalac out of wheat berries.




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        1. Yeah, poverty is the grandmother of invention, ha ha. Sounds like you are a Miyoko fan too eh? If you do try wheat, I find letting it get a longer green sprout makes a way better (sweeter) rejuvelac. I used to go through all the trouble of growing it in flats and cutting off just the greens, but now I just sprout and rinse them in a covered strainer, expose them to the sun before using just to green them up, and puree them whole for either smoothies or rejuvelac, works great!




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      1. The first time I had it was the real wheatgrass, I put too much in the blender. When I drank it, I got so nauseated, I threw up! Now I use a powder mix (from Australia, cheaper for us in the tropics to buy from than from USA), of wheat grass powder, barley grass powder, chlorella powder, spirullina powder, and natural lime flavor. A teasp in my smoothie or even drinking it straight. No green taste or smell. Not dreaded but not yummy either!




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    2. from everything I have read Wheatgrass has to be juice/pressed first otherwise humans can’t digest it ~ also heating the juice at high speed for smoothies kills all the benifits




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  5. Nice that wheat grass juice, the innovation of Ann Wigmore get some scientific support. For five years I cultivated wheat grass in the winter. Then I suddenly realized that wheat grass, as well as rye, barley and oats, humans have grown bred from wild grass. I went over to pick wild grass in a forest meadow during the summer half-year (5-6 months). Yes, I have survived … and I’m doing very well, but I always dilutes the wild grass juice with fresh water.




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    1. what kind of juicer do you have? nice thinking outside the box BTW using wild grass, we literally walk on medicine lol.
      today I watched all 18 videos on you tube put out by Dr wheatgrass Dr. Chris Reynolds very good if it is all true




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      1. Generally, a grass juicer has 1-2 conical slowly rotating “screws” which compresses the grass and squeezes every drop from the grass. You can use any such juicer (my first post here a couple of weeks ago was removed, I think because I mentioned the name of a mixer). If you Google pictures “wheat grass juicer” you will see the contruction.

        Btw, when I’m hiking with a tent in the wilderness, I’ve a manual wheatgrass blender in my backpack. Extremely strong plastic, weighs just 470 grams (~ 1 pound) without bracket. Good nutrition supplement. All nature is green, but you need some basic knowledge of herbal medicine …

        Favorites are grass and a small amount of birch leaves. Dandelions and nettles are not to be found in the real wilderness, just around the settlements.




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  6. If I’d ever get gastrointestinal problems, of any kind, I would add cabbage (juice), which has been used in traditional European medicine since the beginning of the 17th century.




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  7. Brian Clement of Hippocrates Health Institute in Florid offers wheatgrass enemas to his clients. 8oz of wheatgrass rectally, hold for 20 mins, twice a day to cure UC and bowel cancer, he has many testimonials.




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    1. The protocol makes sense.
      Why wouldn’t the same approach work with a turmeric/curcumin enema against those same diseases, I wonder…




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    1. Wiki is always problematic because their editors can exhibit real prejudice, and I believe that the science based medicine crowd has Harriet Hall as one of their writers. She’s the one who believes that Dr. Greger is not to be believed. I have not been moved by her arguments particularly since my change to a WFPB diet has made me feel very healthy. That trip adviser link has 138 positive reviews at the highest level and 11 reviews at the lowest level.

      I do think that people who are ill are helped by switching to a Whole Food Plant Based diet. The HHI offers “cures” by changing people to a whole food vegan diet that looks to be mostly raw.

      I don’t think I’d pull a kid with cancer out of chemo, but I’d sure as heck send someone there with diabetes if I was rich. I don’t know about Brian Clement, he may be selling a bit of snake oil with all of the supplements they push, but Ann Wigmore appears a have been a truly inspired person promoting a “Living Food Lifestyle” which basically what we’re eating.. There’s lots of locations for the spas and they are defiantly pricey but I don’t think telling people that diet affects their health is quackery, even if Harriet Hall does.




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      1. I agree with your comments about Harriet Hall and Wikipedia. However, I cited them as examples of the accusations that have been made about the Hippocrates Institute.

        Also, wheatgrass juice is not a wholefood and claiming that it and a “vegan” diet can cure advanced cancer does seem like “promoting unproven cures”. I am all in favour of vegetarian wholefood diets but they are not magic panaceas. It is misleading to pretend that they are. Also, I admit that I am prejudiced against people with diploma mill “doctorates” who claim special knowledge and charge large sums for their services and products:
        “But his degree in nutrition comes from the University of Science, Arts, and Technology, a school George Gollin, an Illinois professor, investigated as a diploma mill.

        “I could have printed him a degree on a laser printer and it would be just as meaningful and just as indicative as training and skills,” he said.
        http://www.wptv.com/news/local-news/investigations/contradicting-cancer-claims-from-hippocrates-health-institute-director

        As for Ann Wigmore, she may well have been sincere but her claims were not scientifically founded – the whole idea of “detoxification” is not scientifically proven for example. Following a link from Medline I found this:
        http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/detox-diets.html

        Also, she did promote “unproven cures” herself although, unlike Clement, there was no suggestion that she attempted to financially profit from this
        http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/detox-diets.html

        I suppose that the point I was trying to make is that neither sincerity nor the promotion of a “vegan” diet, automatically makes someone a “white hat”. It will not do our cause any favours if we associate ourselves with people who make bold claims not founded on solid science especially if those people are making big profits from such claims.




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        1. I agree with you Tom Goff, I don’t think a WFPB diet is a panacea and I know that there are charlatans in the world who take advantage of people who are ill, but I just wanted to point out that the critics are sometimes just as suspect.




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        1. Personally i am on a high carb., low fat and low protein diet recommended the our Creator and also Dr John McDougall. I am 61yrs old and work hard 6 days a week. I do not remember the last time i was sick – no colds, flu, etc. But i receive Hippocrates Health Institutes magazine each quarter. There are many testimonies of people that have been there and gotten very good results. I do not know what they charge, but i do know that Dr. McDougalls 10 live in program is not cheap. Also if i need help getting well i do not care if they have “genuine medical qualifications” if they have a good track record in helping people overcome their health problems. I would just as soon go to a lawyer to get well than go to most – not all, most – Dr’s. with “genuine medical qualifications”..




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          1. Testimonies are cheap. Virtually any health approach you can think of from autourine therapy to ketogenic diets can roll out yards of testimonies. They are not meaningful evidence.
            McDougall is licensed to practice medicine. Clement is not. Clement sells supplements and EMF devices. McDougall does not. Clement bought his qualification from a diploma mill. McDougall did not. There is a big difference between. If you think there is no substantial difference between them, we will just have to agree to differ.
            If you want to put your faith in particular individuals and organisations, so be it. But that is not the same thing as following the evidence – and doctors like Esselstyn, Barnard, Ornish, McDougall, Greger etc base their approaches on the evidence.




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  8. Could you do a video on the research behind intermittent fasting, and if it is better to eat earlier in the day until say 2:00 or to wait until midday and eat until later at night? More generally, maybe take a look at just the research behind eating late at night and what health effects it has?




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    1. Thanks for your question Matt!

      According to a recently published systematic review “intermittent fasting may improve health; however, substantial additional clinical research is needed before advocating its use for health purposes.”. Especially because the”the vast majority of human studies of a fasting intervention were weight-loss studies using single-arm, non- randomized approaches or multiple intervention arms with no control.”, therefore “considerable additional clinical research of fasting is required before contemplating changes to dietary guidelines or practice”.

      Hope this answer helps!




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      1. Darchite: Your answer was super helpful to me. I see this type of question all the time on NutritionFacts and have wondered if the answer is: Dr. Greger can’t do much of a video because there simply isn’t enough research to say one way or the other. And if that’s the case, one has to wonder about the validity of intermittent fasting being so heavily promoted. I have co-workers now who are jumping on the band wagon.

        My 2 cents/hunch is: Unlike other diet fads, I don’t think this one will hurt anyone. And there is a chance it will prove healthful in one or more ways. But it’s just an experiment at this point. I think that’s the best we can say.




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    2. In addition to Darchite’s very helpful link to a 2015 systematic review, you may want to look at a somewhat wider-ranging 2014 review published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. It essentially came to the same conclusion, however, regarding your particular interests it noted benefits observed for TRF in obese subjects but:

      “Thus, far, relatively few RCTs of IER and TRF have been performed in human subjects, with the results of several studies of alternate-day and twice weekly energy restriction demonstrating weight loss and abdominal fat reduction and suggesting improvements in indicators of energy and lipid metabolism and inflammation (44⇓–46, 51, 61). On the other hand, a study of TRF in which healthy normal weight subjects consumed a balanced daily food intake within a 4-h or 12-h time period each day revealed no improvement (79, 80), which is similar to the lack of any short-term benefit of TRF in mice when the animals are fed a balanced diet (23). This finding suggests that the short-term benefits of TRF might depend on the diet and body composition.”

      (TRF = time restricted feeding)
      However, the entire article is definitely worth reading.
      http://www.pnas.org/content/111/47/16647.full




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  9. For those thinking about trying wheat grass juice but hesitant because of the “if you can stand the taste” comment, I’d like to state that I’ve had it many times over the years & didn’t find the taste bad at all, certainly no worse than many vegetables I’ve eaten for their health benefits. Maybe Dr Greger was confusing wheat grass with Barley grass which is pretty bitter but also very healthy.
    The simplest & cheapest way I found to consume wheat grass juice was to get some wheat berries from my local Whole Foods mkt. or from a company that sells such things for sprouting & grow it in pots or in your garden.
    If you look at the label on what most pet stores sell as cat grass you’ll see that it’s usually wheat grass, however it’s easy & much less expensive to grow your own if you have the time & desire to do so.
    You can then use a maceration type juicer to extract the fresh juice, which is probably healthier than re-constituting powdered juice (also available).
    The simplest, easiest & quickest way I’ve found to extract the juice is to use the God given macerators we have in our mouth to simply chew the wheat grass, swallow the juice, then spit out the fibers.
    You might also try soaking the grass prior to juicing to improve the yield.
    What I do suggest if/when you grow it is to stagger the planting in relatively small batches so that you’ll always have young grass, as the older/taller grass doesn’t seem to be as good.
    I’ve also read that many cafes now sell wheat grass juice in addition to lattes, expressos etc. so that might be a good opportunity to try it.




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  10. For people who juice at home, do you somehow sterilize the seeds, the grass prior to consumption? It may sound extreme, but you never know how the seeds were handled, it’s one thing, to buy from big companies that sell sealed products, but another thing, if it’s sold in bulk.

    How do you prevent mold?




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    1. I buy whole wheat, out of the bins at a health food store. It’s what you would buy to grind fresh yourself, for making the most healthy bread. No need to sterilize. If you grow it inside, in sterile potting soil, it’s not necessary to rinse the grass …just cut and juice. I fertilize with kelp, also from the health food store. Mold would ruin your efforts, thus good air flow around the growing area is important. As well as keeping low humidity in the whole house in general.




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  11. Can someone point me in the direction of a video or article on the site that discusses soy intake for men? My friend is concerned that it will cause him to grow breast tissue.




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    1. Thanks for your question Ruthie!

      There’s a great summary on soy that I highly recommend you to read and explore the videos linked.

      Furthermore, you should tell your friend to not worry about soy consumption in that regard as there is no evidence to support that its consumption has feminising effect on men & soy does not affect testosterone or estrogen levels in men either (1, 2, 3).

      Hope this answer helps!




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  12. Can you tell me if there is any research on a plant based diet in relation to a Chiari Malformation? I have two family members suffering from this and if a plant based diet would help I think they would finally be motivated to change their lifestyles.




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  13. I sometimes have dizzy spells and always thought it was low iron. Not sure though and now I’m wondering if low salt intake could be the problem. My blood pressure is low. Anyone have some insight on this I would really appreciate it. Kiki




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    1. Hi Kiki! Thanks for reaching out to us. It’s difficult to give specific medical advice over the internet. There are a number of causes for dizzy spells. My advice would be to make an appointment with your health care provider so that appropriate tests/labs can be ordered for a proper diagnosis. We hope you get this issue resolved soon! Best of luck!




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  14. What the best treatment for Yeast infection if you are on Autoimmune Protocol diet ,its hard to gain the weight I lost during Yeast infection, I left with mouth sores that are hard to go away, I can eat a lot of foods Mostly the Night shades




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  15. ….or may be they should research what causes these various exotic sounding diseases and once they find out, sue the big corporations that sell this crap to their customers to get their research money back.




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  16. I don’t see why people think it tastes bad. I can remember going to a juice bar and watching someone grimace after taking an ounce of wheatgrass juice. So, I said to my son, “Let’s try it. Are you ready?” He said, “Yes.” So, we chugged. Then, we looked at each other and both said, “That didn’t taste bad at all.” I’ve drunk it lots of times and think the taste is okay. If you don’t like it, you can always get it in or add it to apple juice.




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    1. Beverly: As I’m sure you know, people have different taste buds. Literally, different genes cause people to taste flavors differently from each other. You might be interested in the NutritionFacts video on how people taste cilantro differently: “The Cilantro Gene” http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-cilantro-gene/ . Also, there is a matter of acquired tastes.

      You and your son lucked out on genes, eating habits or both. Good for you for giving wheatgrass juice a try.




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  17. Years ago my mom CURED herself (can I use that word?) of a second bout of cancer when she was in her early 40’s using wheat grass juice, fresh vegetable juice, raw food, enemas, high quality pancreatic enzymes and other quality food supplements. When they found it she was given only a few months to live and she was given the prognosis of a painful, horrible death! I was so PROUD of her courage because she
    stepped away from their recommendations! She was trained as a registered nurse and that was very difficult for her because of her training and her friends who all believed in the medical model. She died at 83. She outlived ALL of her doctors. (AND by the way, that was three years after she went on the “grand slam breakfast” of eggs, pancakes, artificial syrup, margarine and coffee offered down the street from where she lived. Oh, and she didn’t die of cancer, she died of heart disease which I am sure was from the grand slam breakfast she was enjoying daily!) In 1963 I was lucky enough to meet Jack La Lanne while working at a health food store in San Francisco. I made him a big glass of carrot juice. He spent 45 minutes talking to me about food and the benefits of juicing. I thank him daily for the wisdom he gave me during that chance meeting. He asked me “How many carrots are in that juice?” I said maybe 10 or 15. He asked me “when was the last time you ate 10 or 15 carrots in one sitting?” He also said that “fresh vegetable juice is concentrated predigested nutrition that is completely and readily available to all of our cells and it can literally CURE anything!” (By the way, if you turn orange from all the carotene in your carrot juice your liver is congested and needs to be addressed.) He also said, “You can eat anything you want as long as God made it; if God made it you can eat it, if man made it leave it alone!” (It is possible that that doesn’t apply any longer unless you eat organic.) He also said “You can eat anything you want as long as you don’t have to cook it. That doesn’t mean you have to eat everything raw, it just means that most foods that need cooking are not very good for you.“ I have always believed that cancer is a deficiency disease whether it is a deficiency of enzymes from our cooked food diet that are available in raw food and fresh juice or the nutrients that are no longer available in our depleted soils. I have seen so many “miracles” using REAL food as medicine! When was the last time you ate 10 or 15 carrots in one sitting? As a health care practitioner I always encourage people to DISCOVER JUICING!!




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  18. Years ago my mom CURED herself (can I use that word?) of a second bout of cancer when she was in her early 40’s. She used wheat grass juice, fresh vegetable juice, raw food, enemas, high quality pancreatic enzymes and other quality food supplements. When they found it she was given only a few months to live and she was given the prognosis of a horrible, painful death! I was so PROUD of her courage because she walked away from their recommendations! She was trained as a registered nurse and that was very difficult for her because of her training and her friends who all believed in the medical model. She died at 83. She outlived ALL of her doctors. (By the way, that was three years after she went on the “grand slam breakfast” of eggs, pancakes, artificial syrup, margarine and coffee offered down the street from where she lived. Oh, AND by the way, she didn’t die of cancer, she died of heart disease which I am sure was from the grand slam breakfasts she was enjoying daily!) In1963 I was lucky enough to meet Jack La Lanne while working at a health food store in San Francisco. I made him a big glass of carrot juice. He spent 45 minutes talking to me about the benefits of juicing. I thank him daily for the bits of wisdom he gave me during that chance meeting. He asked me “how many carrots are in that juice?” I said maybe 10 or 15. He asked “when was the last time you ate 10 or 15 carrots in one sitting?” He also said “fresh vegetable juice is concentrated, predigested nutrition that is completely and readily available to all of our cells and it can literally CURE anything!” (By the way, if you turn orange from all the carotene in your carrot juice your liver is congested and needs to be addressed.) He also said, “You can eat anything you want as long as God made it. If God made it you can eat it, if man made it leave it alone!” (It is possible that that no longer applies unless you eat organic.) He also said “You can eat anything you want as long as you don’t have to cook it. That doesn’t mean you have to eat everything raw, it just means that most foods you have to cook are not very good for you.“ I have always believed that cancer is a deficiency disease whether it is a deficiency of the enzymes that are destroyed by cooking and only available in raw food and fresh juice or the nutrients that are no longer available in our soils. Over the years I have seen so many “miracles” using REAL food as medicine!




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    1. Susan: Welcome to the site. That’s a nice story about your mom. I’m glad she was able to get rid of her cancer. You have every right to be proud of her.
      .
      Dr. Greger has covered the subject of juicing and smoothies in several videos and blog posts. There was recently a series of videos that I recommend on the subject of smoothies. Here is a recent blog post on the subject of juicing: Why Smoothies Are Better Than Juicing: http://nutritionfacts.org/2016/06/09/juicing-removes-just-fiber/ The general point is that you are not consuming 15 carrots in your glass of carrot juice. Some important nutrients have been removed…
      .
      None of that takes away from your mom’s accomplishments. I just thought you would be interested in the article as it may include some information you may not be aware of. Here’s to your health.




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  19. 1. Do you know what amount of nutritional decay is there in the powdered version of the stuff? And how does the body respond to it? I have access only to the powdered version.
    2. Which is better in your opinion? Barley grass, rye grass, alfa alfa, moringa or wheatgrass?
    3. Can the powdered version replace (occasionally) eating fresh green leafy veggies?

    Thank you!




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  20. Hi, Emanuela. I have not seen any research on wheatgrass powder, and so I do not know how it might compare with fresh wheat grass. Presumably, it would have at least some of the same constituents. You could certainly try it. Because some people tolerate wheatgrass better than others, I would probably start with a small amount. Some people become nauseous if they take too much at once. I am sorry I don’t have more information to share, but I hope that helps.




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