Dietary Cure for Hidradenitis Suppurativa

Dietary Cure for Hidradenitis Suppurativa
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The role of dairy- and yeast-exclusion diets on arresting and reversing an inflammatory autoimmune disease.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

This landmark study suggested that exposure to dietary yeast—like baker’s yeast, brewer’s yeast, nutritional yeast—may worsen the course of Crohn’s disease, an autoimmune inflammatory bowel disease. The reason they even thought to do the study was because Crohn’s patients tended to have “elevated levels” of antibodies to yeast.

But that’s not the only autoimmune disease with increased yeast antibodies. The same has been found in lupus patients, and rheumatoid arthritis, another joint disease called ankylosing spondylitis, autoimmune liver disease, and autoimmune thyroid disease. So, might avoiding yeast help those conditions, too? They haven’t been put to the test, but hidradenitis suppurativa has. What is that?

Hidradenitis suppurativa can be a pretty gruesome disease. Starts out with just like pimples, though, typically along parts of the body where there are folds—armpits, groin, buttocks, under the breast. Then, “painful…nodules form,” which turn into abscesses and drain a “thick,…foul-smelling” pus. And then, it gets even worse, forming these active tunnels of pus inside your body.

And, it’s not that rare. An estimated prevalence of like 1 to 4 percent. That’s like 1 in 50. Clothes typically cover it up; so, it remains hidden, but you can often smell the pus oozing out of people. There are all sorts of surgical options and chemotherapy, but why did they even think to try diet for the condition? I mean, you can see Crohn’s disease as a disease of intestinal inflammation, how a food you react to could make things worse; but why a disease of armpit inflammation? Because there seems to be a link between hidradenitis suppurativa and Crohn’s disease. Having one may make you five times more likely to have the other. So, there may be “an immunopathogenic link” between the two. They may share similar abnormal immune responses.

So, if cutting yeast out of Crohn’s patients’ diets helps them, then maybe cutting out yeast might help those with HS. A dozen patients with hidradenitis suppurativa were put on a diet that eliminated foods with yeast, like bread and beer, and they all got better—12 out 12. “[I]mmediate stabilization of their clinical symptoms, and the skin lesions regressed,” reversed, went away within a year on the diet.

Okay, but how do we know it was the yeast? By cutting out a food like pizza, you also may be cutting out a lot of dairy, and that’s the one other thing that appears to help. “A dairy-free diet” led to improvement in like five out of six patients.

See, these tunnels of pus are caused by the rupture of the same kind of sebaceous glands that can cause regular acne. But, in hidradenitis suppurativa, they explode, and “[d]airy products contain 3 [things] that drive the process” of clogging up your pores, and contributing to the “leakage, rupture, and ultimate explosion.”

First, there’s the casein, which elevates IGF-1 (I’ve got probably a dozen videos on that). Then, there’s the whey and lactose, and third, the hormones in the milk itself: six hormones produced by the cow, her placenta, and mammary glands that end up in the milk. So, why not try cutting out dairy, and see if things improve?

There’s a whole series of nasty drugs you can try to beat back the inflammation. But, as soon as you stop them, the disease can come roaring back. Even after extensive surgery, the disease comes back in like 25 to 50% of cases. So, we are desperate to research new treatment options.

But, patients aren’t waiting. They’re getting together in online communities, sharing their trial and error through social media, and people reported successes cutting out dairy and refined carbs, like white flour and sugar. So, this dermatologist in New Hampshire was like, okay, let’s give dairy-free a try, and 83% of his HS patients he tried it on started to get better, and he didn’t even try cutting out the sugar and flour.

Now, this wasn’t a clinical trial or anything, he just figured, why not? It’s not easy to do a randomized clinical dietary intervention, but that doesn’t stop individual patients from giving things a try. I mean, you understand why there has to be institutional review boards and stuff when they out new, risky drugs and surgeries. But if it’s just a matter of trying switching to soy milk or something, why do they have to wait? “As patients search for an effective path to [clearing this horrible disease], they need support and guidance to follow the most healthful diet available, free of dairy and highly processed sugar and flour. Nothing could be more natural.”

What about the yeast, though? How do we know it was the yeast? And look, eight of the 12 patients just went through surgery; so, maybe that was why they got so much better. It’s like when I hear someone who has cancer and goes through the conventional chemo/surgery/radiation followed by some quack clinic in Mexico, and then attributes their cure to the wheatgrass colonics or whatever they got. How do they know it wasn’t the chemo/surgery/radiation that saved them? In this study, why do we suspect it was the yeast?

Because not only did every single one of the patients get better; every single one showed “an immediate recurrence of skin lesions following accidental or voluntary consumption of beer or other foods [like bread].” So, not only did the elimination of yeast result in “rapid stabilization” and “complete, regression” of the lesions “within a year,” but, in every single case, take a little brewer’s yeast or something, and within 24 to 48 hours, BAM—symptoms are back. So, that’s why the researchers concluded that “[a] simple exclusion diet could promote the resolution of the skin lesions involved in this disabling and [perhaps actually not-so] rare disease.”

What was the response in the medical community to this remarkable landmark study? “Why was there no mention of informed consent and ethics committee approval…?” Letter after letter saying, wait a second, you violated “the Declaration of Helsinki,” which is like the Nuremburg Code or Geneva Convention to protect against involuntary human experimentation. Yet where was the institutional review board approval for this yeast-exclusion study? To which the researchers replied, look, we just told them to avoid a few foods. We gave them the choice; look, we can put you on drugs that can have side effects, cause liver problems, or you can try out this diet. And “[t]he patients preferred the diet.” Not to mention, I would add, that they were all cured!

Anyway, bottom line, by avoiding foods, like pizza, which contains both dairy and yeast, sufferers may be able to prevent their armpit from turning into this: stage three of the disease. 

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Pavel N, Joe Harrison, Laura Barretta, H Alberto Gongora, Gab Bandala, Chris Homan, Made by Made, Nook Fulupton, Iconic, Vladamir Belochkin, parkjisun, Milky, and Anna Hatzisavas from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Francis Storr via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

This landmark study suggested that exposure to dietary yeast—like baker’s yeast, brewer’s yeast, nutritional yeast—may worsen the course of Crohn’s disease, an autoimmune inflammatory bowel disease. The reason they even thought to do the study was because Crohn’s patients tended to have “elevated levels” of antibodies to yeast.

But that’s not the only autoimmune disease with increased yeast antibodies. The same has been found in lupus patients, and rheumatoid arthritis, another joint disease called ankylosing spondylitis, autoimmune liver disease, and autoimmune thyroid disease. So, might avoiding yeast help those conditions, too? They haven’t been put to the test, but hidradenitis suppurativa has. What is that?

Hidradenitis suppurativa can be a pretty gruesome disease. Starts out with just like pimples, though, typically along parts of the body where there are folds—armpits, groin, buttocks, under the breast. Then, “painful…nodules form,” which turn into abscesses and drain a “thick,…foul-smelling” pus. And then, it gets even worse, forming these active tunnels of pus inside your body.

And, it’s not that rare. An estimated prevalence of like 1 to 4 percent. That’s like 1 in 50. Clothes typically cover it up; so, it remains hidden, but you can often smell the pus oozing out of people. There are all sorts of surgical options and chemotherapy, but why did they even think to try diet for the condition? I mean, you can see Crohn’s disease as a disease of intestinal inflammation, how a food you react to could make things worse; but why a disease of armpit inflammation? Because there seems to be a link between hidradenitis suppurativa and Crohn’s disease. Having one may make you five times more likely to have the other. So, there may be “an immunopathogenic link” between the two. They may share similar abnormal immune responses.

So, if cutting yeast out of Crohn’s patients’ diets helps them, then maybe cutting out yeast might help those with HS. A dozen patients with hidradenitis suppurativa were put on a diet that eliminated foods with yeast, like bread and beer, and they all got better—12 out 12. “[I]mmediate stabilization of their clinical symptoms, and the skin lesions regressed,” reversed, went away within a year on the diet.

Okay, but how do we know it was the yeast? By cutting out a food like pizza, you also may be cutting out a lot of dairy, and that’s the one other thing that appears to help. “A dairy-free diet” led to improvement in like five out of six patients.

See, these tunnels of pus are caused by the rupture of the same kind of sebaceous glands that can cause regular acne. But, in hidradenitis suppurativa, they explode, and “[d]airy products contain 3 [things] that drive the process” of clogging up your pores, and contributing to the “leakage, rupture, and ultimate explosion.”

First, there’s the casein, which elevates IGF-1 (I’ve got probably a dozen videos on that). Then, there’s the whey and lactose, and third, the hormones in the milk itself: six hormones produced by the cow, her placenta, and mammary glands that end up in the milk. So, why not try cutting out dairy, and see if things improve?

There’s a whole series of nasty drugs you can try to beat back the inflammation. But, as soon as you stop them, the disease can come roaring back. Even after extensive surgery, the disease comes back in like 25 to 50% of cases. So, we are desperate to research new treatment options.

But, patients aren’t waiting. They’re getting together in online communities, sharing their trial and error through social media, and people reported successes cutting out dairy and refined carbs, like white flour and sugar. So, this dermatologist in New Hampshire was like, okay, let’s give dairy-free a try, and 83% of his HS patients he tried it on started to get better, and he didn’t even try cutting out the sugar and flour.

Now, this wasn’t a clinical trial or anything, he just figured, why not? It’s not easy to do a randomized clinical dietary intervention, but that doesn’t stop individual patients from giving things a try. I mean, you understand why there has to be institutional review boards and stuff when they out new, risky drugs and surgeries. But if it’s just a matter of trying switching to soy milk or something, why do they have to wait? “As patients search for an effective path to [clearing this horrible disease], they need support and guidance to follow the most healthful diet available, free of dairy and highly processed sugar and flour. Nothing could be more natural.”

What about the yeast, though? How do we know it was the yeast? And look, eight of the 12 patients just went through surgery; so, maybe that was why they got so much better. It’s like when I hear someone who has cancer and goes through the conventional chemo/surgery/radiation followed by some quack clinic in Mexico, and then attributes their cure to the wheatgrass colonics or whatever they got. How do they know it wasn’t the chemo/surgery/radiation that saved them? In this study, why do we suspect it was the yeast?

Because not only did every single one of the patients get better; every single one showed “an immediate recurrence of skin lesions following accidental or voluntary consumption of beer or other foods [like bread].” So, not only did the elimination of yeast result in “rapid stabilization” and “complete, regression” of the lesions “within a year,” but, in every single case, take a little brewer’s yeast or something, and within 24 to 48 hours, BAM—symptoms are back. So, that’s why the researchers concluded that “[a] simple exclusion diet could promote the resolution of the skin lesions involved in this disabling and [perhaps actually not-so] rare disease.”

What was the response in the medical community to this remarkable landmark study? “Why was there no mention of informed consent and ethics committee approval…?” Letter after letter saying, wait a second, you violated “the Declaration of Helsinki,” which is like the Nuremburg Code or Geneva Convention to protect against involuntary human experimentation. Yet where was the institutional review board approval for this yeast-exclusion study? To which the researchers replied, look, we just told them to avoid a few foods. We gave them the choice; look, we can put you on drugs that can have side effects, cause liver problems, or you can try out this diet. And “[t]he patients preferred the diet.” Not to mention, I would add, that they were all cured!

Anyway, bottom line, by avoiding foods, like pizza, which contains both dairy and yeast, sufferers may be able to prevent their armpit from turning into this: stage three of the disease. 

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Pavel N, Joe Harrison, Laura Barretta, H Alberto Gongora, Gab Bandala, Chris Homan, Made by Made, Nook Fulupton, Iconic, Vladamir Belochkin, parkjisun, Milky, and Anna Hatzisavas from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Francis Storr via Flickr. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is the fourth and final installment of a video series on the role baker’s, brewer’s, and nutritional yeast may play in certain autoimmune diseases. If you missed any of the others, here are the links:

For more on dairy hormones, see:

And check out our IGF-1 topic page if you’re unfamiliar with this cancer-promoting growth hormone, which I highlight in my video Animal Protein Compared to Cigarette Smoking.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

143 responses to “Dietary Cure for Hidradenitis Suppurativa

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  1. Am I alone in thinking that industrial medicine is horrible?

    Am reminded of Paraselsus’s ridiculing doctors for being less effective than folk medicine, but that was 500 years ago.

    What has changed?




    19
    1. James, After working in the medical field for over 40 years a lot of it is greed and money motivated… I must admit though great strides have been made and if I get in a horrible car accident get me to a trauma center FAST. Then after the smoke clears, try the combination of traditional and natural medicine and then natural medicine and then no medicine, just good foods.. YMMV that’s just me..
      m




      19
      1. mitch, Understand. Med profession is terrific with trauma. Treating symptoms works for acute injuries. But chronic illnesses are a different story, for those I look to population mortality rates and changes there in. My personal difficulty is, it seems to me, that once you adopt a WFBD and exercise you are no longer within the experience profile medical technicians (my bias kicks in here and consider the term “doctor” to be self aggrandising) deal with day in and day out. I feel off the curve. While a few medical professionals (more likely nurse level) will applaud your efforts others look at you as unprofitable.

        Hopefully your experience has been better.

        jo




        9
        1. James O, what really gets me is when I take my octogenarian mother for her iron infusions. She gets the infusions in a chemo ward surrounded by chemo patients, and right in the middle of the room is a table full of free cookies, cakes, pretzels, potato chips & donuts. SMH.

          While she gets her infusions, I make a point to go out & get smoothies for me & my mother, so we can drink them in the chemo ward.




          8
        2. That’s why I use a PA as a primary instead of an MD. She is also a physical therapist in great shape so we are on the same page.
          MD starts with ” have you had your bonescan, calcium score, etc., etc.”
          All I want are some blood tests run so I can decide what I need to do. But, of course, that doesn’t make them a lot of money. And they won’t see me till next year at this time.
          I don’t want radiation, and I wouldn’t take any drugs you prescribe anyway. Seems to me the people working in the hospitals and clinics, in general, look very unhealthy. Why would I listen to their advice?




          5
          1. Marilyn Kay: You’re so fortunate to have found a PA who gets it! My mother’s PA, who we see every other visit, doesn’t have a clue either. Nearly all the ‘healthcare professionals’ in that whole office are overweight & don’t look very healthy.




            1
    2. For treating trauma and diagnostic tools, modern medicine is miraculous.

      For chronic conditions, long term pharmaceuticals regimens that target a handful of biomarkers and/or mask symptoms seems like a poor strategy. Any other treatment that instead addressing the root causes of the disease process including folk medicine would be preferable.




      10
  2. What about the YEAST that occurs naturally on lots of fruit skins, like grapes, dates, and some other high-yeast producing fruits? Is this
    often enough yeast to be of concern, regarding yeast exposure?




    4
    1. Bev, according to this paper, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16023239 , the yeast is a different strain/type than the brewers, bakers and nutritional yeast Dr G has been informing us about. Therefore, it is likely that it wouldn’t have the same effect.

      That being said, I’d wash them thoroughly in running water ensuring they get good contact with each other and/or one’s hands to best remove the fruit’s mould and yeast flora. This will also help to remove any pesticide residue. I do this using a stainless steel sieve.




      9
      1. Are you implying that nutritional yeast is included in the yeasts that contribute to HS?

        Also, would wild ferments like sourdough cause these negative effects?




        1
        1. Also, would wild ferments like sourdough cause these negative effects?
          MS,
          Sourdough yeast is different. From what I’ve read it’s a lactobacillus yeast. Not the same as bread/beer/nutritional yeasts..
          m




          2
          1. A sourdough culture is a mixture of wild yeast and bacteria: “The type of yeast that settles down in the starter may be Saccharomyces diarensis, S. exiguus, or Candida milleri, while the bacterial organism is usually a strain of Lactobacillus.” [http://blogs.britannica.com/2010/01/sourdough-bread-a-delicious-mix-of-harmonious-microbes/] (The yeast cause the bread to rise, and the bacteria give it a wonderful tang and flavor, and also some preservative properties — so it doesn’t mold as quickly during storage.) So wild yeast are generally not the same as the commercially used yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae used in bread making and beer brewing and wine making and nutritional yeast. I too am curious to know if the antibodies found against baker’s yeast are also reactive against wild yeast.




            5
            1. Thanks, Dr. J & Wade. Along with today’s video, I learned something really interesting from you both about the difference between wild & commercially made yeast.




              2
          2. I am a baker. While you might find some sourdough breads that are only made with a sourdough culture, many also contain yeast! Our sourdough bread has both sourdough starter and a bit of yeast…so be sure to ask/read about the ingredients if you are avoiding baker’s yeast.




            6
        2. Hi, MS. Nutritional yeast and brewer’s yeast are the same type of yeast as baker’s yeast, although nutritional yeast is not alive. Although I do not know that his has been specifically tested for HS, it could potentially contribute. You are not the first person to raise the question about wild yeasts, and I am sorry that I do not have an answer for you. I did not find any research on this. Much of the research on wild yeast focuses on ways to detect it and keep it out of processes that rely on yeast fermentation, because it can kill the “desired” yeast in these processes. It might cause these negative effects, but I do not know. I wish I had a better answer for you, but that is the information I have right now.




          0
    2. Interesting question because yeast is everywhere around fruit and I made my first sourdough starter simply by exposing flour and water mixture to air. Traditional wine makers do not add yeast to their musts, it is on the skin of the grapes.

      Yeast in a packet is a product of industrialized foodstuffs. Packaged yeasts are selected for particular purposes-including speedy fermentation. These great “mono-cultures” of yeast guided by the hand of man, rather than nature may be entirely the root of the issue.

      Otherwise a yeast-sensitive person would need to avoid any fruit-growing region where lots of wild yeast are doing their wild-yeast thing. Hmmm, wonder if that has been put to the test?




      9
      1. I agree with the idea that mono-culture may contribute to issues in the same way pharmaceuticals do. Concentrating what man deems desirable and excluding the natural components of the source isn’t without drawbacks. Just an example… I find sourdough bread is infinitely easier to digest than the commercial yeast counterpart when I make them at home, but the chemical laden, alien fluff sold in stores is a horror that has nothing to do with wheat or gluten.




        10
      2. A yeast sensitive person would literally have to live in a protective bubble if wild yeasts provoked a similar reaction. Wild yeasts are literally everywhere: in the air you’re breathing right now, on your fingers, on your lips, all over your skin, on every piece of food you eat (not just fruit), on every surface you touch.




        8
      3. Yes, interestingly, when I lived in Fresno area, I heard about people being sensitive to all the fungi in the air from the grape harvest. A lot of fruit sitting out drying in the sun. I don’t do well with yeast breads and wines (bloating and digestive pain) and have a history of autoimmune hypothyroid but I don’t seem to have issues with unwashed fruit. Going to the Jack Daniels distillery for a tour and leaning over the fermenting vats gave me a pounding headache though!




        0
      4. Hi, Wade Patton. You raise an interesting question, and it has not, to my knowledge, been PUT TO THE TEST. Much of the research on wild yeast has been focused on ways to detect it and keep it out of processes that use yeast to make beer, wine, and even ethanol fuel, because wild yeasts can kill the “desired” yeasts used in these processes. Thanks for contributing thoughtful ideas to the conversation!




        0
    3. Brilliant question regarding the fruit skin-yeast content.

      Grapes would have a lot of yeast, and lots of fruits seem to have
      mold-issues. Especially dried-fruit.




      0
      1. Nope, the white stuff that you see on grape or prune is the natural wax that the fruit produces to protect itself from losing moisture and it is harmless to eat.

        For dried fruit then it is normally the sugar crystals that surface when the fruit is dried.

        I am not saying that fruits do not develop mold when it is old and about to spoil, but you should eat fresh fruit and you should wash your fruit before eating to get rid of any possible pesticide or insecticide residue, unless it comes from your backyard.

        http://www.glit.com/faq/what-are-the-white-crystals-on-my-dried-figs-is-this-mold/




        5
  3. Bring the thumbs down option back! Pessimists already have it bad enough with our negative outlook on life, don’t take this away from us!




    17
    1. @Miles Davis–
      said, “Bring the thumbs down option back! Pessimists already have it bad enough with our negative outlook on life, don’t take this away from us!”
      ————————————————————
      A thumbs-down option contributes no more information to the forum than a thumbs-up option. More to the point, and put to the test, a thumbs-down has not kept the trolls at bay, but invited flame wars and an entirely negative distraction. Conserve your energy for upgrading the conversation.

      The best way to handle a troll-species comment is to leave it alone, and let the poster try a different (more hopeful) tack. As you imply with the comment, “(We?) pessimists already have it bad enough…”, pessimism feeds on itself, so why encourage it? Yet, against type-casting, even your own (hopeful) suggestion is an effort at something better, so keep trying :)




      3
      1. Wow. You got bullied a lot as a kid, didn’t you?
        “A thumbs-down option contributes no more information to the forum than a thumbs-up option.” That’s 100% a fallacy. But why bother explain to you… you seem to know it all as it is.




        3
    1. Mushroom does contain yeast and should be avoided only if it causes a problem. Otherwise, mushroom is very beneficial. I don’t have a single cold or light illness in the last couple of years since eating a lot of mushrooms.




      4
  4. I wonder if this yeast sensitivity problem has to do with modern wheat and modern baking method that our population is not used to, as pointed out by the 2 following articles.

    With modern wheat, they are mostly imported to the U.S. and contains more gluten than traditional wheat in the U.S used to contain.

    With modern baking method, bakers use quick risen yeast to save time, and grain is not soaked to sprout like it used to be.

    It is not to say that it is necessarily bad because other cultures eat more bread than us and have no problem. But it has more to do with our body getting accustomed to it.

    http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/02/bread-gluten-rising-yeast-health-problem/

    http://www.healthline.com/nutrition/modern-wheat-health-nightmare




    2
    1. Jerry Lewis, Regarding your above comment on wheat, which states: “With modern wheat, they are mostly imported to the U.S. … “, where did you ever get that misconception? The U.S. has been a great wheat exporter for years! Last year the United States exported 27 million metric tons of wheat and imported only 3.13 metric tons.

      See the latest statistics here:

      https://www.statista.com/statistics/237902/us-wheat-imports-and-exports-since-2000/

      I’m beginning to wonder what else you’re saying is way off the mark!




      8
      1. Darwin Galt: “I’m beginning to wonder what else you’re saying is way off the mark!”

        Umm… just about everything… scientific facts are not a major part of his thought process. He just likes to hear himself type ;-)




        9
      2. It’s wheat gluten import.

        http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/02/bread-gluten-rising-yeast-health-problem/

        “As whole-wheat bread has grown in popularity, so has vital wheat gluten use. US gluten imports—mostly from Australia, Canada, China, and Europe—more than doubled between 1997 and 2007, reaching 386 million pounds, and most of that went into baking. Donald Kasarda, a scientist with the USDA, estimates that our annual vital gluten intake per capita has tripled since 1977, from 0.3 pounds to 0.9 pounds—and Jones speculates that people who eat lots of commercially baked whole-wheat products may be getting more than their fair share.”




        1
  5. I just keep thinking, if we all could give up anything processed, we’d be thriving. If we could tax the heck out of animal ag, and make meat the most expensive food on earth, we’d be so much better off.




    8
    1. Good thought, but . . .. WFPB diets are gaining adherents daily and I would speculate at an accelerating rate. Each of us are taking responsibility for our own health and in doing so are making the change immediately. There is no necessity for government action. The story is just too compelling.




      7
    2. Better yet, ban the unnecessary exploitation, enslavement, abuse and murder of innocent sentient beings. I live in hope that in my lifetime a city or an area or a country will do this. It’s obviously better for the animals, better for our health and better for the environment.




      3
  6. Fat is the cause of diabetes , as it coats the cells and preventing the insulin from pushing the sugar into the cell . Yeast regulates this sugar , if there’s too much sugar yeast proliferates , take the fat away and everything goes into place naturally , could this be the case here , not really a sugar or yeast problem but a unnatural partial food like fat problem.




    9
      1. ben siff
        No that is not always so , There have been people with candida that only when they cut out avocados and most seeds and nuts and of course sat fat did they get rid of the candida chronic infections . Not for the rest of their lives but until their bodies could heal . also heart patients must restrict fatty foods .
        One of my worries with nutritional yeast is its 40 % protein , that is really high and would cause some problems at least for some people.




        7
          1. Jerry Lewis, Dr Greger has covered the subject of coconut oil before. If you want to learn about nutrition, please watch all of Dr Greger’s previous videos. Furthermore, Dr Greger merely reports the latest scientific findings from unbiased research sources. Why don’t you contact the authors of the research papers listed in the “Sources Cited” and tell these researchers how their study is flawed. Maybe with your vast knowledge of nutrition you can teach them something!




            11
            1. Darwin, I need to remind you of Greger’s own words as repeated by one of his staff member that, and I quote:

              “For consideration however, do remember that as Dr. Greger repeatedly reminds us, rather than focusing on his opinion, we need to look to the science”.




              1
              1. You seemed to have missed a key word in my statement: “Dr Greger merely reports the latest scientific findings from UNBIASED research sources.” Please read slowly and carefully and try to comprehend what is written. Valid science does not come from biased research papers. Nor does it come from magazine articles that you frequently reference.




                7
                  1. Did you even read the article you referenced in the Tufts “Newsletter”? It’s comparing coconut oil to Beef Tallow and soybean oil in the guts of mice! Coconut oil worked fine to reduce C. albicans in the guts of mice, but the researchers warned that humans should not use coconut oil on a regular basis due to it’s detrimental effects on heart disease! Jerry, please read the articles before you reference them.

                    “A coconut oil-rich diet reduced C. albicans in the gut compared to a beef tallow-or soybean oil-rich diet. Coconut oil alone, or the combination of coconut oil and beef tallow, reduced the amount of C. albicans in the gut by more than 90% compared to a beef tallow-rich diet.”

                    “As exciting as these findings are, we have to keep in mind that the majority of adult Americans are at high risk for heart disease, the number one killer in the U.S. The potential use of coconut oil in the short term to control the rate of fungal overgrowth should not be considered a prophylactic approach to preventing fungal infections.”




                    9
                    1. First of all in the context of candida, the Tufts article said that fat in general and coconut fat in particular, will treat it. Secondly in the context of saturated fat causing heart disease, the Tufts researchers repeat the same misconception from half a century ago that is still taught in medical school and repeated elsewhere today. And you know that the fat theory was invented by big Pharma to sell cholesterol drug such as statin and big sugar to sell more sugar and big food industry to sell more vegetable oil and processed food, and the American Heart Association to make money by putting those heart logo on cereal boxes that are full of sugar, all in the name of low fat. And the vegan doctors are spreading that theory to get people to not eat animal food in the name of saturated fat and cholesterol. If they just want people not to eat animal foods then why don’t they just say so but they have to use the fat excuse.




                      1
                    2. Jerry Lewis, Wait a minute. You just said earlier that the Tuft’s article was very reputable and that’s why you used it as a reference. Now you’re saying that it’s reputable when it agrees with your thinking, but it’s not reputable when it disagrees Let me quote you:

                      “First of all in the context of candida, the Tufts article said that fat in general and coconut fat in particular, will treat it. Secondly in the context of saturated fat causing heart disease, the Tufts researchers repeat the same misconception from half a century ago that is still taught in medical school and repeated elsewhere today.”

                      Talk about “cherry picking”! Are you even aware of the inconsistencies in your thinking? Or do you just assume people won’t notice?




                      7
                    3. Scott B, Thanks for the compliment. I don’t think Jerry realizes that he may be harming people’s health by giving medical advice that could be very erroneous. The regular readers and commenters on this website can easily see through his faulty thinking, but newcomers may actually believe what he says and take action on it. I’m all for legitimate disagreement on any controversial subject, but to continually repeat the same idea with no new evidence is non productive. He seems to be using the old propaganda technique of “Repeat a lie often enough, and people will begin to believe it”!




                      9
                    4. Darwin : awesome job in answering JL. Though he has been answered by others such as Thea, TG, Darryl, etc, he does persist as you say. Your point about the impact on newcomers is well taken, and one which we have presented to NF more than a few times in recent weeks. You would think they would be concerned about the (il)legality of erroneous medical info being dispensed on the site, but apparently not. Anyway, well done, and thanks for taking the time and trouble.




                      6
                    5. Susan, Thank you for the compliment. I’ve been visiting this website for several years now and reading the comments section, too. But I rarely post anything. I usually find the comments section very helpful, as an addition to the videos, since the intellectual caliber of most of the commenters is so high. And most people who seek advice here really want to learn.




                      4
                    6. Darwin, just for the sake of argument. Let say if you have candida right now. Would you rather consume coconut oil to get rid of candida or live with candida to avoid “saturated fat”?




                      2
          2. Really, so when my brother had his quadruple bypass in Vancouver, Canada last year, he was shown a chart (which I also saw) showing the healthiest oils to eat and coconut oil was the worst for saturation (something like 90% saturated fat) and he was advised to never eat it if he wanted the benefit of his surgery to last. Canola was ranked the best at 7% saturation.

            My husband, a cardiologist, also told me that Sri Lankan males are a unique demographic for high cardiac risk based solely on their intake of coconut oil in their diet, when all other risk factors were considered.

            So somewhere in the “coconut oil is good for you”, jamboree, the deadly facts have been excluded. Just saying.




            6
            1. With due respect to doctors, they are the last ones you should seek advice for nutrition. The only things that doctors are good for, are to treat trauma, perform surgery and give medication when you absolutely need it. There is a story that even Dr G repeated it several times that when there is a medical conference in a city which the doctors attended, there are fewer deaths in the hospitals.

              And Sri Lankans and Indians have a high rate of heart disease, not because they eat ghee (which is better than butter) or coconut but because they fry everything including fat, and they eat a lot of sugar in form of sweet pudding. And not to stereotype anybody, do you notice that a lot people from South Asia are overweight, despite being vegetarian? That’s all because of the fried foods and sugar.




              2
              1. Jena et al, 2015. Mortality and treatment patterns among patients hospitalized with acute cardiovascular conditions during dates of national cardiology meetings. JAMA internal medicine, 175(2), pp.237-244.

                In teaching hospitals, adjusted 30-day mortality was lower among high-risk patients with heart failure or cardiac arrest admitted during meeting vs nonmeeting dates (heart failure, 17.5% vs 24.8%; cardiac arrest, 59.1% vs 69.4%. Adjusted mortality for high-risk AMI in teaching hospitals was similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates (39.2% vs 38.5%, although adjusted percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) rates were lower during meetings (20.8% vs 28.2%).




                4
    1. Yes, yeast will cause problems to people who are sensitive to it, but it is not harmful to others who don’t.

      If you bake at home then you can always use baking powder.




      0
    2. Hi, John Chartrand. Are you from Houston, by any chance? I know it is a long shot, but we had a Chartrand family as neighbors in a Houston suburb many years ago. You are the only person I have encountered since then with that name, and it would be a fun coincidence if we were former neighbors!
      Anyway, back to your question. The sprouting and whole grains in the bread do not, to my knowledge, affect the action of the yeast in the body after it is eaten. The yeast would only be a problem for you, however, if you are sensitive to it. Otherwise, it should be fine. I hope that helps!




      0
  7. I would be one of those nurses who would be over the moon about a client eating a WFPBD. But you are right. so few would even know what it is. Add to that most Registered Dieticians in Canada teach the Canada food guide, but wait! our food guide is undergoing radical change and in fact recommending more evidence-based plant based nutrition in its sources- so I am pleased. Hope the end product is not sterilized by industry or just inferior information before production.

    A proud monthly supporter of Nutritionfacts.org.




    14
    1. I like your potential response to patients eating a WFPB diet — because our medical professionals in the US are like, OK, vegan, WFPB, whatever, got it. It’s all very ho hum. In fact, now that I think about it, I’m never asked about diet — I volunteer the information. So I’m guessing they don’t really care, one way or the other.




      3
      1. So true, Dr. J! And when they say, “whatever”, it’s usually accompanied by a bewildered look, as if you just told them that your house has hardwood flooring instead of ceramic tiles. For too many of them, nutrition & health seem to be non sequiturs.




        1
  8. oh my, I’am always watching these videos while having dinner and the last images were just …
    And the thumbs down? Why? why? why? I have been enjoying the heat in the previous videos comments and giving lots of thumbs up and down haha




    4
    1. Tofu is not a fermented food; it’s made by coagulating soy milk (i.e., precipitating out the proteins from soy milk) by the addition of salt (often calcium sulfate but also magnesium and calcium chloride and maybe others), acids, or enzymes. Sauerkraut can be made by fermentation of the wild bacteria naturally present on the cabbage, usually a lactobacillus (that’s my favorite kind, naturally fermented). So no yeast added to either one.




      1
  9. I have disabling PTSD and depression: I am watching these videos as part of my recovery plan and to keep motivated that there is hope for healing if I continue with healthy lifestyle and avoid drugs. However, the often graphic, punch line photos are terribly disturbing to me. I want to keep watching the videos and respectfully challenge the need for shock-value photos.




    4
      1. Haha! I, too, thought it pizza!

        As I viewed the “pizza” image I thought, “Jeez, I’m glad I don’t consume this crap anymore!”
        Hahaha!




        2
    1. As Dr. Greger cranks out these videos a dozen or more at one time, he probably is well beyond breakfast when choosing photographs and key words and phrases from the studies. And he has demonstrated a real love for “shock value” photographs over the several years of videos I’ve seen. I’ve had to block some of the images because of their disturbing nature.

      It is NEVER safe to eat and watch these videos (us of normal sensibilities, not desensitized as MD’s or EMT’s might be).

      It is too bad we all have to learn that for ourselves with a mouth or plate full of food some mornings. It is very unlikely to change. We’ve fussed over it before.




      4
    2. Rosalind, along with healthy diet, consider adding cardio and strength training. Both are proven to help with depression.
      Wishing you the best on your journey to health. :)




      5
    3. Your exaggerated startle response will disappear after the psych med withdrawal wears off. And you’ll probably find your depression and PTSD will simply disappear, too, once you’re off meds and out of withdrawal, if applicable. These are temporary conditions that only become persistent when you treat them with drugs and therapy. A plant-based diet will make you recover more quickly, too, and is one of the only two treatments proven to work better than placebo.

      In the meantime meditation, the other proven treatment, will take the edge off.

      Mental illness is a lie. In most cases it’s simply a normal side effect of the standard Western diet. Check out the works of Robert Whitaker and Thomas Szaz. Anatomy of an Epidemic and The Myth of Mental Illness should be required reading for anyone who’s ever received a psychiatric diagnosis.




      7
  10. I don’t understand why black tea, vinegar and cheeses are on the list of things not to eat. None of those items uses brewer’s yeast. Neither does pasta. Seems like they’re painting their “don’t eat list” with a broad brush.




    3
    1. Diet therapy for medical conditions is often pretty arbitrary. I did some work at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, and when they put together their official migraine diet protocol they incorporated some odd recommendations that you don’t find in the traditional studies. When I asked about it, the lead doctor simply said, “Well, I’m pretty sure one of my patients once mentioned that was a trigger.”

      Medicine is rarely very scientific in my experience.




      6
  11. Yeah, we could hide the truth about the devastation to human health caused by animal product consumption but then we would be no better than those who turn animal products into cheerful shapes, and provide toys and games to distract us from the fact that we are eating cadavers.

    Strange how so many people do not find the bones, muscles and guts of animals wrapped up nicely for sale and consumption, not offensive at all. I was one of them.

    A proud supporter of Nutritionfacts.org




    6
  12. What timing! I just took delivery of 25 pounds of nutritional yeast!

    I eat about half a cup of nooch a day. I would be sad to have to give it up. But I have had some problems that may have an autoimmune component, and, based on the information in this video, may be exacerbated by all the yeast I consume. I have chronic sacro-illiac joint pain (bad news for a meditator!) and I have been diagnosed with major depressive disorder.

    (BTW, I am truly 100% WFPB.)

    I’m going to “PUT IT TO THE TEST”, i.e., go yeast-free for a trial period (and without FDA approval for the trial! ha, ha!). Wouldn’t it be wonderful if it cleared up my very wearisome chronic conditions that I have struggled to find a cause for!




    5
  13. Been sharing this in all the HS groups I could find on Facebook…Quite shockingly, it wasn’t received well at all. I feel quite drained by some very immature responses and general resistance. You’d think they’d welcome this with 10 open arms each. Nah ah.

    There is a lot of stigma around the word “cure”. Based on their personal experiences countlessly trying things that didn’t work, many people with HS have built a very strong belief that “there is no cure”. I’ve heard that over and over.

    In a skeptic’s defense, the title focuses on “dietary changes” only when really it is “surgery + dietary changes”. I’ve patiently reminded that, but people keep persisting that “there is no cure”, “anyone who says there is a cure is a liar”…Some even suspected that I had something to sell and that I couldn’t possibly simply benevolently share such potentially-life-changing without ulterior motive.

    A few people did get interested but it’s a minority. I think the HS community will start to really listen and step out of the “no cure” dogma when there are larger successful trials on this, or when they hear it straight from whatever experts they follow. Personally, if I had a condition like HS, a study with even only 12 people all having 100% of regression with a reasonably benign/harmless intervention, I would welcome this video, read all the papers, and likely give it a go.




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    1. its unbelievably sad, but dont let it hurt you…your very brave & kind to want to help on those facebook groups but they are carefully monitored so that no one decides not to take meds… i also had awful experiences in the heart groups….but…i had a little fun exposing trolls & posting excellent videos that received a thousand views a piece …. every little post helps…have fun & get well xxx




      6
    2. Youcef, that’s noble of you to be spreading this beneficial info, even to people who don’t care to listen. I think we all know the feeling of advocating for the wellbeing of others even if they don’t do it for themselves. Anyway, I wanted to provide a little support, specifically a way to get past the whole “there is no cure” objection used as an excuse to not listen or to give up.

      http://livingwithgastroparesis.com/is-there-a-cure-for-gastroparesis/

      This post provides an excellent response to people who say there is no cure for something, and then use that to decide that unless there is some magic pill that will fix everything instantly, then there’s no point even bothering. Her basic point is that when a doctor or scientist say there is no cure, they mean there is no medicine/surgery/therapy that you can just take and it will permanently eliminate the condition forever. But that is not the same thing as saying “it is impossible to recover.” She makes the point that there is no “cure” for the common cold, but that doesn’t mean you get a cold and you have it for the rest of your life. “There is no cure” just means that there is no magic bullet and you can’t put all your eggs in one basket; instead, you have to hit it from every angle with everything you have until you move the needle. And part of that means listening and trying all sorts of things, together, for a long enough time to see if they work, i.e. changing something in your lifestyle.

      The website is fantastic IMO for anyone who wants to focus on healing in general, but that post is specifically addressing this excuse people make. But yeah, highly recommended for anyone on a healing journey who wants to learn how to support their mental, physical, and “spiritual” health.

      Anyway, keep up the good work, and to avoid getting burned out, remember it isn’t your job to save others. All you have to do is provide them with the motivation, info, and support they need when they decide to save themselves. If they aren’t ready yet, they will be when they are sufficiently tired of the pain and suffering.




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  14. Thank you so much…. i’ve had this for years…i’ve had a couple of heart attacks as well recently …i suspected dairy, i drink alot of tea its one of the last of 2 things to quit the other is smoking then i start gerson… all my love Doc xxx




    1
  15. This comment is off topic for the video – but can anyone please help me find the video I am looking for? There was a comment in it that the fruit/berry/? that was being discussed could ‘even help the islets of langerhans regrow’. Does anyone remember this? If so, please let me know the name of the video, Thanks




    0
      1. Thanks for the reply and effort you have gone to Nancy! Unfortunately, that is not the video. In the video I listened to, it actually stated in the video about the ‘islets of langerhans’ regrowing. Regards, Sue

        .




        0
      2. Thanks WFPB Nancy for looking into this for me. Unfortunately that is not the video. It does not directly state in it that re the islets of langerhans regrowing. My feeling is that is was a herb/drink from a herb maybe???




        0
  16. Does grains products especially flour based ones like pastas contains nutritionnal yeast and does non added natural yeast are problematic also in these patients?




    0
    1. Thanks for your comment Julot.

      I believe yeast is not usually added to foods that do not require a rising agent and therefore I am assuming that pasta does not have yeast. But if it has “non-yeast” on the label that can probably be credible information.

      Hope this answer helps.




      2
  17. I have been dairy free and wheat free for 5 years. It manages symptoms pretty well, but I still get new flares at least once a month. This is not a cure; a good treatment, not a cure.




    1
    1. Thanks for your comment Arianne.

      That is great to hear, we are happy that it can help. I believe Dr Greger was speaking in the word “cure” in terms of the context of the research presented but response can be individual.

      Hope this answer helps.




      2
    2. Wheat free isn’t the same as yeast free. The studies said that the yeast avoidance was a cure, and the dairy avoidance was an improvement. (In these particular studies)




      1
  18. May I first say a huge thank you for this video …..because THANK YOU!
    I have Stage 3 HS and I have had this horrible disease for 21 years now (I’m 33). I stopped seeking medical advice several years ago because nothing they tried worked or helped. I have been searching for years to find a way to cope, never any hope of it calming down much less going away.

    Am I correct that it is just brewers, bakers, nutritional yeast? What about fruit? Where can I find a reliable list of foods/ingredients that I should avoid?

    Thank you so very much for this. If this works, you all will be the first to know.

    Brynn




    4
    1. I hope you have found your answer! This list might be of help to you: http://www.foodsmatter.com/allergy_intolerance/yeast/articles/yeast-mould-joneja-04-14.html

      I don’t know that I would be as concerned about the yeast on fruits….but certainly pay attention to yeast in baked goods, alcoholic beverages, nutritional yeast, probiotics and vitamin supplements.

      Let us all know if a yeast free diet helps you! I don’t have that problem but I don’t tolerate yeast….it gives me headaches and makes me itch….so I don’t eat it.

      Good luck!




      2
    2. Does anyone know if the yeast is inactive by processing is it still pretty bad for you?? I’m a vegan and my B12 is derived from yeast but is deactivated during processing….




      0
      1. Hey Brynnx, thanks for writing. I would not worry about the extremely small amount of yeast that might remain from this B12 source. The kind of flora you have in your gut would in all likelihood not be influenced by such a small amount.




        0
    3. Hey Brynn, thanks for writing! A review article (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1521693414001369?via%3Dihub) states that the two dietary culprits to avoid include dairy products and carbs with a high glycemic index (i.e., glycemic LOAD. Some good-for-you foods like carrots have a high glycemic index, but don’t raise blood sugar by much, so they’re okay – we’re trying here to avoid the ones that have a big impact on blood sugar.) Dr. G discusses the glycemic index here (https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/glycemic-index/) and a list of these foods can be found here (https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/glycemic-index-and-glycemic-load-for-100-foods). Good luck!




      0
  19. I’m a pediatrician and very open to dietary modification to help treat diseases and keep kids healthy. However, I am also influenced by the articles I read via traditional medical organizations and recognize that children are different than adults. I listen to Dr. Greger on a regular basis and have been open to switching my recommendation for patients to drink noncows milk. Over the last year, I have basically started saying that non cows milk was healthier. However, a study came out last month from journal of clinical nutrition saying that there’s an association between kids who drink non-cows milk and significantly shorter height compared to children drinking cows milk. Of course, we are encouraged to recommend regular milk and for me to go against the norm, I want to be sure that I am doing the right thing and not sacrificing anyone’s height prediction or any other health benefits. So if anyone (including Dr. Greger) wants to read the article and give me feedback as to whether they think I should still not recommend cows milk, I would love to hear. Thanks so much

    http://m.ajcn.nutrition.org/content/106/2/597.abstract?sid=9c0da295-d064-4676-bc12-64727def6801




    1
    1. Ok – to be fair – I did not read the article you posted. BUT, does it seem reasonable to you that the “normal” height charts have shifted DUE to milk consumption, and that being shorter due to non-milk consumption is more of a return to true human normal from cow-human normal?




      1
      1. I appreciate your response. However, I’m often dealing with very short children who really want to grow, and I worry about recommending non cows milk to those children. The article mentions that non dairy milk is not as regulated so you don’t actually know what you’re getting. I basically eat plant based and feel great but I’m not growing anymore. I’m concerned about the children who still need to grow.

        Thanks again,

        Rachel




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        1. Rachel: I can’t remember if I’ve responded to you on this topic or not. My apologies if this is a repeat. The paragraphs below are a quote from an article on a site I generally consider to be pretty good. If you go to the article (linked below), you can see the full references. I’m hoping something in this will be of help to you.

          ———————-
          “Several studies have been reported showing that the growth of vegan children is slower than that of non-vegans (see 7-9). Studies such as these are often cited as evidence that vegan diets are inherently unhealthy. However, when the studies are examined more closely, we find that they are often based on vegans who have very low calorie or very limited diets (only fruit and nuts for example). In addition, many vegan infants are breastfed. Babies who are breastfed tend to gain weight more slowly before their first birthday than do bottle-fed babies. Up until a few years ago, vegetarians whose babies were breastfed were justly suspicious of growth charts. Before 2006, growth charts for infants were mainly based on the growth of babies fed infant formula. Growth charts based on formula-fed infants may make it seem that breastfed infants are not growing well. In 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO) released growth charts that were based on the growth of breastfed infants (10). These growth charts, which show what normal growth should look like, are called the WHO growth charts and should be used to assess growth of children less than 2 years of age. Older children are monitored with growth charts from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) (10).

          An additional question that must be asked is, “What is a normal growth rate?” Growth rate is assessed by comparing changes in a child’s height, weight, and head circumference to rates of growth that have been established by measuring large numbers of apparently healthy children. Once your child’s height and weight are measured, the measurements are compared to growth curves – graphs that show growth patterns of children by age. There is no single perfect growth rate. Instead, growth charts are set up using percentiles. If your child’s height is at the 50th percentile, that means that 50% of children of that age are taller and 50% are shorter. Similarly, a weight at the 25th percentile means 25% of children weigh less and 75% weigh more at the same age.

          While some studies show that vegan children are at a lower percentile of weight and height than are other children of a similar age, a recent study shows that vegan children can have growth rates which do not differ from those of omnivorous children of the same age (11). A wide range of growth percentiles are considered “normal.” A child at the 10th percentile for weight or the 95th percentile for height is still considered to be within the healthy range. You don’t get extra points for higher or lower percentiles. However, if your baby or young child is below the 2nd or above the 98th percentile for weight or head circumference (or below the 2nd percentile for length), your health care provider will try to find out why this is and if intervention is needed. In addition, children don’t usually make large jumps – like from the 75th to the 25th percentile – so if this happens, the reason for this faltering is investigated. Older children (age 2 and older) are assessed using slightly different standards. Older children’s’ body mass index (BMI) is calculated using their weight and height. If BMI for age or weight for height is above the 95th percentile, the child is evaluated as being overweight. If BMI for age is between the 85th and 95th percentile, the child is “at risk of overweight.” If BMI for age is below the 5th percentile, the child is considered underweight and further evaluation may be needed (10).”

          from: http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/kids.php

          My Lay-Person Thoughts: From this, I think one of the questions is: Does dairy really make kids grow taller or does having adequate nutrition make kids grow taller? What is the evidence really telling us? We know that the evidence is telling us that diary in general is bad for humans past weaning. How much do we really know about this growth question?

          Anecdotally: I have a friend who is smaller than her mom. She told me that her mom has said on more than one occasion that she was worried that her daughter was shorter than her because the mother gave her skim milk instead of full fat. She drank dairy. She just drank some with less fat. I don’t know what you are dealing with in terms of patients, but it seems like parents will be grasping at straws to find something to help their kids get taller and of course, like you are trying to figure out now, the solution should be based on really good science, not fears based on things people hear on the media.

          While not directly related to your question, I thought I would also share the following blurb from PCRM (Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine) since it came through recently and is on my mind and is about kids and dairy:

          ———————————
          Children Consuming Too Much Cow’s Milk

          Children who were part of the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program consumed two to three times more protein than considered age-appropriate, according to results published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Researchers followed 542 mothers and their children’s first 5 years and tracked protein intake and food sources. The primary sources of protein after 9 months of age were cow’s milk and milk products. These sources resulted in excess protein consumption by the majority of participants with respect to current Australian daily recommendations. The authors caution that such high intakes of animal protein sources, particularly cow’s milk, provide poor sources of iron and predict unhealthful body composition later in life.
          Children

          Campbell KJ, Abbott G, Zheng M, McNaughton SA. Early life protein intake: food sources, correlates, and tracking across the first 5 years of life. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017;117:1188-1197.




          1
  20. Thank you for the disgusting picture! Bleh. But I am sure that it is so much more effective than arguing your point. I would like to hear of success stories regarding Crohn’s patients as well.




    1
  21. Hooray, hooray….thanks for the HS and Chron’s info…..I 65 and my adult son 40 have HS and can not tolerate dairy……for years when I ate a giant cinnamon roll of too many dinner rolls or tried to drink beer in college, I had brain fog and major intestinal distress….later I noticed milk and ice cream had the same very uncomfortable result…..the HS was treated with antibiotics for years…..I hoped it was hormone related and would abate as I aged, no such luck….then my son was having the same distresses! He quit dairy and thanked me (not!) for sharing my genetic heritage….my Dutch aunts had the same HS….then I heard stories of grandpa and his sudden intestinal releases?! Thought he must have been a milk drinker, too….I am doing the HFPB diet with no oils for about 4 months.(preventing and reversing heart disease by Esselstyn)…BUT have been putting my garbanzo bean hummus on delicious olive and whole wheat breads….just listened to the yeast and HS video and will delete the yeast, my husband is supplementing his HFPB diet with nutritional yeast…..I will be avoiding that, too and looking forward to HS relief…..Thank you Dr. Mac and staff for this information……Robyn




    3
      1. Equal volumes baked smashed sweet potato (or canned pumpkin puree) and whole wheat flour (wwf). Mix to form a soft dough. Turn cast iron skillet on to high. Make dough into balls (golf ball size). Pour 1/4 cup or so of wwf onto counter, roll ball in wwf. Pat into roti/tortilla shape, or use rolling pin, using ample amounts of wwf to keep dough from sticking. Roll to preferred size (mine are the size of my hand). Put in center of hot skillet (no oil) for about 15-30 seconds. Flip to other side for 15-30 seconds. If you have a gas stove, take the partially cooked roti out of the pan and set it directly over the flame till you get little scorch marks (brown marks). Flip to the other side and do the same. Roti will probably puff up full of air – or not – it doesn’t really matter. If you have glass top or electric element stove, place a cooling rack (like for cooling cookies) over the element, and proceed as with gas above. I make a batch of dough and have it in the fridge at all times. I roll and cook the roti fresh for each meal – I don’t try to store them cooked – except I will make some in the morning and put them in a paper bag for hubby to take to work with lunch. Dough will also freeze. Easiest roti recipe I ever made in my life!




        1
  22. I think I have avoided intestinal problems thru the no more dairy approach for about a year now….the dairy, yeast, brain fog, HS, Crohn’ s connection is becoming more evident……hoping the no yeast approach will take care of the HS….Thank you, again…




    3
  23. Quick question: Greger as someone who has hidradentitis suppurativa, I am absolutely destroyed that I can’t have Kombucha anymore, but I was wondering, would xylitol or any other sugar alcohol be alright to consume or is it just like regular alcohol and the yeast would start a flair?




    1
  24. So what’s the bottom line on nutritional yeast? I’ve been WFPB for 6 years now but do enjoy sprinkling nutritional yeast on my salad every day.




    2
    1. See my comment above regarding possible nooch/arthritis connection in my own case. I have eaten a LOT of nooch over the years. Definitely my favorite condiment. But I am excluding it from my WFPB regime now to see whether it makes a difference in my sacroiliac pain. So far (three days), I have to say, I am feeling less inflammation.

      There are many scholarly articles on carnitine metabolism in yeast, but I haven’t been able to find out exactly how much carnitine it contains per 100g. I will continue to research this. If it does contain significant amounts of carnitine, that would be sufficient reason, in my book, for excluding it. Anyone with knowledge of the carnitine content of yeast, please do weigh in!




      1
  25. There is a source in the video missing from the Sources Cited tab.

    It is “Diet in the prevention of hidradenitis suppurativa (acne inversa)” by F. William Danby.
    The citation in the video says it comes from: J Am Acad Dermatol. 73 (5 Suppl 1):S52-4




    2
  26. Hi Everyone, As a man (unusually) diagnosed with the auto-immune condition Sjogren’s Syndrome, I would love to know if there is any evidence implicating the involvement of nutritional yeast in this disease. I was diagnosed three and a half years ago, and my main symptom, apart from somewhat dry eyes, mouth and throat, is fatigue when I am experiencing a flare-up of the condition.

    I have been vegetarian since the mid-eighties, but have only become a whole-food, plant-based devotee, eliminating all daily and eggs, since early December last year. One of the newer elements of my diet is nutritional yeast, of which I use a lot on a daily basis. I am doing really well the last few months and have noticed no ill-effects from my yeast intake.

    Does anyone else have either a positive or negative experience of the association of yeast and Sjogren’s Syndrome?

    Thanks,
    Adrian.




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  27. Hi.Michael. Great article.I’ve also read an article about LYRICA and GABAPENTIN. Which do you prefer? the one that can cure more diseases but more expensive or the one that can also cure but cheaper?




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    1. Donna,

      They actually are different drugs and yes the price is very different…..

      My clinical experience has taught me to use the gabapentin first and then Lyrica if the results are less than adequate (note dose escalation/etc.). It should be noted that with neuropathic pain either can work better….. not a clear choice however there appears to be more of an adverse events profile for Lyrica……

      And for clarity I would more than hesitate to use the word “cure” as neither of these drugs accomplish that goal.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com




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  28. Wow, interesting! We have been sorely lacking data for HS patients. I have often heard that no-nightshade diet produces remission just like that described in the no-yeast diet, so I was surprised not to see it mentioned in the video. But I guess there’s not a good study on it yet.




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  29. For those with HS please have a look at primalgirl.com. Tara (founder) has done some great work. She addapted to paleo, witch makes sense as to the yeast reduction but you can of course, avoid yeast on a plant based diet as well.

    Also, avoiding nighshades will improve your condition. Guess you have to try it out. For me it is not the yeast, but the pepper bells, which in pouder form is add to a lot of processed foods. However maybe if I would consume lots of pizza, the yeast might also be a problem. Just hard to tell and just my personal experience.

    Take care.




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  30. Does anyone have any view on the exclusion of apple cider vinegar in context of this post? It was featured prominently in other videos with respect to its antiglycemic potential, but perhaps the use of ACV should be reconsidered by those affected? ACV has visible yeast in the “Mother”.




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  31. The article mentions not to drink beer and wine because of the brewers yeast and/or fermentation. What about other alcohol, for instance, distilled spirits?




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    1. I could be wrong, but my online research shows that most clear, domestic (USA) beers are filtered to have little to no yeast. The unfiltered or imported beers would still be a big issue.

      I have HS and have had it for decades. I just stumbled upon this while researching brewer’s yeast, not HS. I noticed I have a very bad anxiety reaction when I take B12 vitamins and read that it could be a brewer’s yeast reaction. When I got here and saw another connection to HS, it all began to tie together. There are foods that make me bloat immediately, like bagels or pizza, all with brewer’s yeast. I had noticed I reacted to some pizza and not others, and now, I think it may be the type and amount of yeast that makes the difference. (Papa John’s will about kill me!) I am going to try to cut out things recommended for that particular yeast, and if I still have problems, will go a step further to cut out all yeasts.

      I can say that within 24 hours of stopping the B vitamin supplement, the anxiety I had for months disappeared overnight. I did not notice that it worsened the HS during that time, but I was also having more gastro problems during that time.




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  32. That is an excellent question, Debbie Lewis! Distilled spirits, being distilled, should not have much yeast in them, if any. If a person has a lot of antibodies to it, however, even a little bit could trigger a reaction, as with those with celiac disease who react to tiny amounts of gluten, or those with severe peanut allergies who react to residues on surfaces. It would be interesting to eliminate all alcoholic beverages for a period of time, say a month, and then reintroduce distilled spirits to see if there is a difference. I hope that helps!




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  33. My daughter has hidradenitis suppurativa (and is being investigated for Crohn’s), and I’ve recently done a food intolerance test after much frustration at our lack of success after cutting out yeast in her diet (she has already been diagnosed lactose intolerant, and I thought she was gluten intolerant, but seems she isn’t – it’s wheat, barley and oats she has a problem with). The results came back yesterday, and as well as being highly reactive to yeast and mushrooms, she has also been advised to cut out any fermented foods, as well as dried fruits, peanuts and pistachios, which all have bacteria/yeasts that I’m told cause similar reactions in the gut. She was also reactive to nuts (apart from walnuts) and seeds, oats, potatoes and corn. Eliminating these foods is hopefully only a temporary measure until we can heal her gut and start reintroducing foods. However, it’s really hard to know how to feed her a balanced diet now as a vegan (the nutritional therapist I’m seeing, though lovely, is desperate to get her on bone broth and fish, but I’m trying my utmost to get her healthy without resorting to meat.) Any advice would be gladly appreciated. I can’t find an accredited vegan nutritional therapist in my area of the UK.




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