Does Nutritional Yeast Trigger Crohn’s Disease?

Does Nutritional Yeast Trigger Crohn’s Disease?
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Is the exaggerated reaction of many Crohn’s disease patients to baker’s, brewer’s, and nutritional yeast just a consequence of their inflamed leaky gut, or might it be a contributing cause?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Baker’s yeast in Crohn’s disease—Can it kill you?” Well, that’s an inflammatory title (no pun intended). Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease. Might baker’s yeast, which is the same yeast as brewer’s yeast, which is the same yeast as nutritional yeast, play a role in Crohn’s disease?

It all started with this study published in 1988, showing that people with Crohn’s disease tend to have more antibodies to yeast than people without Crohn’s disease. Antibodies are like homing devices our immune system makes to attack foreign invaders. That’s one part of our immune system; another is cell-mediated immunity, where our white blood cells attack invaders directly. And, the same hypersensitive reaction to yeast was found in the white blood cells of Crohn’s disease patients, as well.

If you draw blood from healthy people, even bakers who are around yeast all the time, and you expose their peripheral blood leukocytes, their immune system white blood cells, to yeast, nothing happens. They just kind of ignore it, because it’s typically harmless. But, do the same thing with Crohn’s disease patients, and their white blood cells go crazy.

Now, when I say typically harmless, if you have cancer, or AIDS, or are immunocompromised, you could potentially get infected from like, home-brewed beer, or probiotic yeast supplements, but they don’t think the yeast is actually infecting Crohn’s patients. People with Crohn’s may just be hypersensitive to exposure to the inactive, dead yeast in typical food products, which may help explain why, when you rest their bowels, when you make Crohn’s patients fast, they get better.

In fact, that’s why we add yeast extracts and proteins to vaccines, as an adjuvant, an irritant like aluminum, to make the vaccines work better, by heightening the immune response. But, might that be raising the risk of autoimmune disease, boosting our immune response a little too much, especially in people who may be genetically susceptible, like with Crohn’s?

And, the greater the anti-yeast response, the more severe the disease, in both children and maybe adults too. So, maybe we should try a yeast-free diet for Crohn’s patients, and see if they get better. But, wait a second. Just because anti-yeast antibodies are associated with Crohn’s disease doesn’t mean the reaction to yeast is causing the Crohn’s disease. Maybe the Crohn’s disease is causing the reaction to yeast. What? Think about it. Crohn’s causes an inflamed, leaky gut; so, maybe the Crohn’s came first, allowing yeast particles to leak into the bloodstream, resulting in the anti-yeast reaction. So, instead of the yeast reaction triggering the Crohn’s, maybe the Crohn’s just triggers the yeast reaction. “Whether the…antibodies are actually triggering [inflammatory bowel disease] or are only…consequence[s] of gut inflammation…remains elusive.”

So, how could we test it? Well, if anti-yeast antibodies are just a consequence of food particles leaking through the gut, Crohn’s patients should have antibodies to all sorts of common foods. But, no. Higher anti-yeast antibodies in Crohn’s disease compared to controls, but no greater reaction in Crohn’s patients to milk, wheat, or egg proteins, which would presumably all leak through, too.

Or, you can look at it the other way; instead of other foods, what about other inflammatory bowel disorders—ulcerative colitis or acute gastroenteritis? There, you could get inflamed and leaky, too, yet no increased yeast reaction. So, there does appear to be something unique about the yeast-Crohn’s relationship. But, maybe inflamed Crohn’s intestines just uniquely and selectively allow yeast through? If you cut out the Crohn’s, can you stop the yeast reaction?

Crohn’s gets so bad that most patients have to go under the knife, and get sections of their intestines removed. So, when the inflamed segments are removed, does the yeast reaction go away? No; no change post-op. So, a change in Crohn’s activity does not lead to a change in the yeast reaction. But, we still have to prove that the yeast reaction comes first.

Thankfully, the Israeli military “systematically [draws blood] from [their] recruits,” follows their health for years; so, you can go back and check the blood of newly-diagnosed Crohn’s victims. And indeed, those who went on to have Crohn’s were years earlier disproportionately reacting to yeast. So, it’s not like yeast reactions were low until Crohn’s hit, and then they shot up; yeast reactivity crept up year after year, before the diagnosis. Now look, it’s possible that there was some subclinical gut leakiness in the years preceding diagnosis that led to the yeast reaction, but there doesn’t appear to be any association between yeast reactivity and gut leakiness.

So: “Do high [blood] levels of [anti-yeast] antibodies result from a leakiness of the gut barrier in Crohn’s disease?” No; that does not appear to be the case. So, if Crohn’s isn’t leading to the yeast reaction, does that mean that the yeast reaction is leading to the Crohn’s?

Any time you have two things that appear to be associated—in this case reacting to yeast and Crohn’s disease—they both can appear tied together because X causes Y, or because Y causes X. Well, in this case it appears that Y does not cause X. But, does that mean that X causes Y? Well, there’s another option. Maybe there’s a third factor that causes both of them independently. Maybe the only reason yeast reactivity and Crohn’s disease appear to go together is that there’s a third factor causing them both—like, for instance, candida, which I’ll cover, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Gay Soon Lay, parkjisun, Milky, and Anna Hatzisavas from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Baker’s yeast in Crohn’s disease—Can it kill you?” Well, that’s an inflammatory title (no pun intended). Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease. Might baker’s yeast, which is the same yeast as brewer’s yeast, which is the same yeast as nutritional yeast, play a role in Crohn’s disease?

It all started with this study published in 1988, showing that people with Crohn’s disease tend to have more antibodies to yeast than people without Crohn’s disease. Antibodies are like homing devices our immune system makes to attack foreign invaders. That’s one part of our immune system; another is cell-mediated immunity, where our white blood cells attack invaders directly. And, the same hypersensitive reaction to yeast was found in the white blood cells of Crohn’s disease patients, as well.

If you draw blood from healthy people, even bakers who are around yeast all the time, and you expose their peripheral blood leukocytes, their immune system white blood cells, to yeast, nothing happens. They just kind of ignore it, because it’s typically harmless. But, do the same thing with Crohn’s disease patients, and their white blood cells go crazy.

Now, when I say typically harmless, if you have cancer, or AIDS, or are immunocompromised, you could potentially get infected from like, home-brewed beer, or probiotic yeast supplements, but they don’t think the yeast is actually infecting Crohn’s patients. People with Crohn’s may just be hypersensitive to exposure to the inactive, dead yeast in typical food products, which may help explain why, when you rest their bowels, when you make Crohn’s patients fast, they get better.

In fact, that’s why we add yeast extracts and proteins to vaccines, as an adjuvant, an irritant like aluminum, to make the vaccines work better, by heightening the immune response. But, might that be raising the risk of autoimmune disease, boosting our immune response a little too much, especially in people who may be genetically susceptible, like with Crohn’s?

And, the greater the anti-yeast response, the more severe the disease, in both children and maybe adults too. So, maybe we should try a yeast-free diet for Crohn’s patients, and see if they get better. But, wait a second. Just because anti-yeast antibodies are associated with Crohn’s disease doesn’t mean the reaction to yeast is causing the Crohn’s disease. Maybe the Crohn’s disease is causing the reaction to yeast. What? Think about it. Crohn’s causes an inflamed, leaky gut; so, maybe the Crohn’s came first, allowing yeast particles to leak into the bloodstream, resulting in the anti-yeast reaction. So, instead of the yeast reaction triggering the Crohn’s, maybe the Crohn’s just triggers the yeast reaction. “Whether the…antibodies are actually triggering [inflammatory bowel disease] or are only…consequence[s] of gut inflammation…remains elusive.”

So, how could we test it? Well, if anti-yeast antibodies are just a consequence of food particles leaking through the gut, Crohn’s patients should have antibodies to all sorts of common foods. But, no. Higher anti-yeast antibodies in Crohn’s disease compared to controls, but no greater reaction in Crohn’s patients to milk, wheat, or egg proteins, which would presumably all leak through, too.

Or, you can look at it the other way; instead of other foods, what about other inflammatory bowel disorders—ulcerative colitis or acute gastroenteritis? There, you could get inflamed and leaky, too, yet no increased yeast reaction. So, there does appear to be something unique about the yeast-Crohn’s relationship. But, maybe inflamed Crohn’s intestines just uniquely and selectively allow yeast through? If you cut out the Crohn’s, can you stop the yeast reaction?

Crohn’s gets so bad that most patients have to go under the knife, and get sections of their intestines removed. So, when the inflamed segments are removed, does the yeast reaction go away? No; no change post-op. So, a change in Crohn’s activity does not lead to a change in the yeast reaction. But, we still have to prove that the yeast reaction comes first.

Thankfully, the Israeli military “systematically [draws blood] from [their] recruits,” follows their health for years; so, you can go back and check the blood of newly-diagnosed Crohn’s victims. And indeed, those who went on to have Crohn’s were years earlier disproportionately reacting to yeast. So, it’s not like yeast reactions were low until Crohn’s hit, and then they shot up; yeast reactivity crept up year after year, before the diagnosis. Now look, it’s possible that there was some subclinical gut leakiness in the years preceding diagnosis that led to the yeast reaction, but there doesn’t appear to be any association between yeast reactivity and gut leakiness.

So: “Do high [blood] levels of [anti-yeast] antibodies result from a leakiness of the gut barrier in Crohn’s disease?” No; that does not appear to be the case. So, if Crohn’s isn’t leading to the yeast reaction, does that mean that the yeast reaction is leading to the Crohn’s?

Any time you have two things that appear to be associated—in this case reacting to yeast and Crohn’s disease—they both can appear tied together because X causes Y, or because Y causes X. Well, in this case it appears that Y does not cause X. But, does that mean that X causes Y? Well, there’s another option. Maybe there’s a third factor that causes both of them independently. Maybe the only reason yeast reactivity and Crohn’s disease appear to go together is that there’s a third factor causing them both—like, for instance, candida, which I’ll cover, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Gay Soon Lay, parkjisun, Milky, and Anna Hatzisavas from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is something I warned people about weeks ago on social media. It takes a while between when I first research a topic and the video gets done and uploaded to the site, so for breaking or important news, I rely on our Facebook, Google+, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube channels to let everyone know ASAP. Please consider following along and joining in on the conversation.

Warned about? What, so it really is a potential problem? Yes, and not just for Crohn’s. This is the first of a four-part video series. Stay tuned for:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

122 responses to “Does Nutritional Yeast Trigger Crohn’s Disease?

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  1. Why do some people have reactions to yeast, and yeast products such as bread, fermented foods/pickleskraut, wine,
    nutritional yeast etc. in the first place? Is there anything that can cure this intolerance? Fasting? I would think that
    fasting would be effective,starving out yeast. Science?




    2
    1. The best answers to questions about fasting are found at http://www.healthpromoting.com/water-fasting. This is the website for TrueNorth Health Center in California, with Dr Goldhamer and a large staff of doctors, NDs, and all kinds of other clinicians. They have over 30 years’ experience of treating people with fasting, followed by reintroducing food with all plant whole foods with no sugar, oil, salt or flour. I think Dr Goldhamer will answer emails, and he’s also found on Youtube. Dr Klaper practices there, too, and you’ll find many of his talks on Youtube.




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    2. …think you can get over it mostly, but when you overload your system with too much, it may come back…such was the case with me…if your gut flora is stronger, can tolerate better…




      2
    3. Actually most bread uses baking powder / soda as it is cheaper and faster than yeast. Only high quality bread such as sourdough or when you bake at home, has yeast.




      0
      1. Of course you do know you are completely wrong if one considers the ready-sliced loaf bread sold in most grocery stores. Maybe you aren’t thinking of that, but if you’ll look at a label or two you can read it for yourself.

        And I do prefer to bake my breads at home and do not use baking powder or soda. But also I recognize the flavor and preponderance of yeast-leavened breads at the supermarket and corner stores.

        Please be more careful to share accurate information.




        30
        1. “Of course I can tell without knowing” LOL

          That’s as funny as the guy yesterday who, in an effort to defend his position, posted a link to an article that was the very one Dr G debunked.

          Nobody here is angry, Jerry. We’re all amused by your ‘telling without knowing.’ Yup, that pretty much sums up the majority of your posts. Lol.




          4
      2. Wow this “Jerry Lewis” guy is addicted to spreading misinformation on this site every day. Its like he has no life but to try and screw up other people’s. He is a sad and lonely troll. Get a life




        20
      3. Um Jerry, Where on earth did you get that information from?!!
        Every loaf of bread that I’ve read the ingredients list has had bakers yeast in it. I’m yet to I see baking soda or baking powder




        4
    4. Heath – I can’t address why some folks have a reaction to yeast. And it could be there are a variety of reasons or a complicity of reasons why one develops a yeast issue. But an interesting concept as to how to deal with these reactions comes out of the homeopathy perspective on health and disease care. A basic homeopathic philisophy is “like cures like”. The idea is to provide the body with very small exposures to the offending item, in this case yeast, and let the body “learn” to deal with it. We see this principle in use when we give a vaccination to someone – a small amount of the polio virus, for example, provides the body with a template against which to develop an immune response. This simple method has protected millions of people from the polio virus. (and, no, I am not interested in beginning a conversation on the pluses or negatives as to vaccinations – that is an entirely separate conversation that I am not attempting to open here. The vaccination example is simply an example of the “like cures like” principle at work.) More recently, physicians are beginning to use this exact same principle with children who are deathly allergic to peanuts. We know how deadly that reaction can be. But physicians are now giving extremely small amounts of peanuts to children to allow their body to ‘code for’ a physiological response and calm the over reactive immune system. And this is working. It is a slow and careful process but better than staying deathly allergic to peanuts the rest of your life.
      When we are born, we all have a thymus gland which is part of our immune system. The thymus gland helps to develop appropriate immune responses to items in our environment that the immune system needs to recognize and deal with. It is necessary for kids to be exposed to dirt, dust, pollens, and other irritants because the thymus glad helps to “set the system” to deal with these items in our environment. Physicians are finding out that children who are not exposed to these items have a much more difficult time in life later on with reactions to them – the thymus gland could not code for them at the appropriate time in life when the thymus gland is active. After childhood, our thymus glad basically dries up and becomes a nodule compared to its old self. It’s job is done.
      Hope you found this information useful to you. (and, no, I am not a homeopathic practitioner :-).




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      1. Could it be also that we are way over exposed to some things, like yeast, bread, cheese, beer? I’m just guessing when you have too much of a substance it can be as bad as too little.




        0
  2. When I first starting traveling to the Pacific northwest, I discovered a delicious beer served with a wedge of lemon called Widmer Hefeweizen. It is an unfiltered wheat beer, and I fell in love with it, but it did not love me back. It would do terrible things to my lower GI, and when I mentioned it, I was told that it was probably because of all of the yeast in the unfiltered fraction of the beer. Well, after a several of bouts of suffering from its aftermath, I stopped ordering it because no beer is worth that kind of discomfort.

    This probably means that at least at the time that I was sensitive to yeast. I have subsequently started adding nutritional yeast to my diet for the zinc, and I haven’t noticed discomfort, but at dosages of 10 grams, perhaps it is not enough to elicit a response. It’s either that, or seven years on a vegan diet has helped to heal my gut.

    This may explain why so many Crohn’s disease suffers who go on a raw food vegan diet find relief from their symptoms. There is just not much yeast in a raw food vegan diet.




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    1. I didn’t know the Widmer Hefeweisen is unfiltered. Doesn’t that mean it has B vitamins from the yeast? I remember something like that from Adelle Davis’ books, which were my intro to how we are responsible for our own health and the importance of good nutrition – way back in the 1960s.

      In those days I, too, was bothered by brewer’s yeast, which I think at that time was a byproduct of the brewing industry, where now it’s grown for its’ own value. Adelle Davis said to start taking something like 1/4 teaspoon a day, increasing the dose slowly over time. Every day I did this I felt worse and worse, so I finally stopped and felt much better. This was before we knew anything about candida.




      2
      1. It’s definitely unfiltered. It is opaquely cloudy with suspended particulate matter.

        As to its vitamin B or even its yeast continent I couldn’t say. The information regarding the yeast was word of mouth, and the a quick internet search does not reveal much information regarding vitamin content. Today’s video reminded me of a time that I had discomfort from consuming a product with a suspected heavy yeast load, and I shared the experience with the community.




        3
      2. Rebecca, I also used to follow Adelle Davis’ advice and used to try to drink her brewers yeast w orange juice concoction. It tasted awful but I continued until I just couldn’t take it any more. The brewers yeast in those days had a very different taste from today’s nutritional yeast which tastes much better. I don’t really know if I had an issue with yeast and my gut back then but eventually I did find out that I was reactive to too much yeasted bread.




        2
        1. Wow! I remember that kind of gross concoction! Was that the one she called Tiger’s Milk? Anyway, she started the ball rolling for me, but I’m so glad I learned beyond what she taught, since she was big on meat, fish, eggs, cheese, and lots of dairy. It was from her that I learned I could make yogurt. This was before they even sold it much in stores. I guess I’m really showing my age!




          3
          1. Yes, I believe that it was Tiger’s Milk and we are both showing our age. You took the words out of my mouth: Adele was a helpful starting point but we had so much more to learn! David




            2
            1. Wow I followed Adelle Davis too — nasty brewers yeast and dried liver powder in tomato juice every morning! Yuck! But I did it! And Tiger’s Milk cookies for the kids! Did it help? Would we have been more or less healthy otherwise? I don’t know. My ideas are vastly different now. But what I think Adelle did (and still thank her for) was raising awareness about the connections between diet and health.

              My question to this thread is: what are the SIMILARITIES and DIFFERENCES between brewers yeast, bakers yeast, products sold as nutritional yeast, and products of lactofermentation (what we sometimes call “wild” fermentation.) Should we lump them all together and attribute problems with one to all of the others? Or does each have it’s separate set of advantages and hazards?




              2
        2. Ya know David. Perhaps what many self diagnose as a gluten sensitivity is actually a yeast sensitivity so the benefits they are seeing by going on gluten free diet is from a decreased consumption of yeast and not the wheat gluten. Just a thought…




          7
            1. Ah, I feel for you. I love good fresh hot from the oven whole grain seeded bread. I eat it sparingly because it is not a whole food, and its caloric density, but I cannot readily think of anything that can compare with the sensual culinary pleasures of its texture, taste and scent. It is a little slice of heaven.

              Of course like beer, no food is worth lower GI aggravation so I would give it up if I found myself in your situation.




              2
              1. Joe, I perfectly understand. I used to bake my own whole wheat bread (four loaves at a time) that was delicious, hot from the oven. Then I would eat an entire loaf while walking to work.That is probably what helped to push me into a yeast problem. Now, however, I do make fresh, hot pancakes (buckwheat/chickpea flour) raised with baking soda that mostly satisfies that pleasure that you so well describe. David




                3
      3. I tried this…had a concoction I managed to get down in the mornings…even though I just about barfed it up. Didn’t last long.

        I use nutritional yeast as an immune booster….also take some mushroom supplements. Thinking that the nutri yeast is less expensive for about the same immune boost.




        1
      4. Hi, Rebecca Cody. Yes, there may be B vitamins in unfiltered beer, but we don’t really know which ones and how much unless it is tested. Particularly if you are yeast sensitive, which it appears that you may be, there are better ways to get those nutrients. A whole food, plant-based diet like the one outlined in the Daily Dozen https://nutritionfacts.org/app/themes/sage/dist/images/book/daily-dozen_6c40d3eb.jpg is likely to supply most B vitamins. The exception is B-12, which should be supplemented. I hope that helps!




        0
  3. My genetic test identified several genes which increase my chances of getting Crohn’s disease, and indeed, I had severe stomach upsets as a young adult going all the way until switching to a vegan diet: excruciating stomach or intestinal pain and either constipation or bouts explosive diarrhea which could last for weeks and keep me near a toilet. Then the bouts would suddenly disappear for several months, only to return with ferocity. Since going vegan however, I haven’t had any such complaints and it’s been 16 years now. I don’t know why, but a vegan diet seems to be the cure.




    16
    1. Rickshaw,

      Your past symptoms seem to match what I am going through now. I have always suspicioned that when going back to my vegan diet there are several recipes that use nutritional yeast, such as “cheesy sauce” or vegan “Parmesan ” etc . I also bake and consumed moderate amounts of sourdough bread. I have stopped eating the nutritional yeast but not the sourdough breads. I’m scheduled to see a Dr to see if I can track this down further, and am curious as to the genetic testing? I guess you do it through a Gastroenterologist ?




      0
  4. Brewer’s yeast is Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but yeasts in sourdough bread is commonly Candida milleri, Saccharomyces exigous or Candida humilis. There’s anecdotal stories about naturally fermented sourdough bread being useful for people who have digestive or gluten sensitivity issues.




    3
  5. Many people who have Crohn’s try the SCD, the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, which eliminates all grain from the diet-so no yeast consumption.
    Elaine Gottschall’s diet has been studied for years.
    I will be interested in further posts on this link with yeast.




    3
    1. This SCD is awesome. Cleared up my skin issues. Psoriasis. Vegan SCD diet, but still cant
      go overboard on beans, nuts, and seeds as these are allowed but in smaller amounts.




      1
    2. My husband was on the SCD diet for 1.5 years. It helped him a lot with his IBS/IBD symptoms. The U of Mass medical school has done some research into it and come up with their own version. It is a little less restrictive and therefore easier to follow. It also has stages according to your level of symptoms. Here is a link: https://www.umassmed.edu/nutrition/ibd/ibdaid/




      2
      1. This diet looks good and healthy but I see a lot of animal foods. People on this board are going to burn you alive. Here comes Ben Sif. Watch out.




        1
      2. For the over 1.6 million Americans suffering from an inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, simply managing the condition can feel like a full-time job. But new research might make that job a lot easier.

        Researchers have known for some time that an abnormal immune response was a key driver of inflammation in the bowel. But they haven’t been able to pinpoint specific triggers or ideal treatment options.
        This new research, from the UNC School of Medicine, may be changing that. These researchers found that a detrimental feedback loop between gut bacteria and inflammation may be causing the symptoms associated with these diseases. More importantly, it might be possible to interrupt this loop.

        The UNC researchers believe that people who suffer from inflammatory bowel disease may be missing an inflammation inhibitor protein called NLRP12. It seems that NLRP12 helps the immune system recognize inflammation so it can address it. Without this inhibitor, unchecked inflammation disrupts the balance of gut bacteria, and an overgrowth of harmful bacteria in turn fans the flames of inflammation.

        The researchers found that twins with ulcerative colitis tended to have lower levels of NLRP12 than twins without the disease. They also identified higher levels of colon inflammation as well as a different microbiome makeup in mice who lacked NLRP12. In particular, the mice had fewer strains of beneficial bacteria and more strains of inflammatory types. This microbiome population is similar to that of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

        While the researchers don’t know if there’s a way to replace this inhibitor, they did find that adding beneficial bacteria back to the gut can help end the inflammatory cycle. The researchers are interested in seeing if they can determine whether people have low levels of NLRP12 before their symptoms become severe. This might be helpful if you think you’re at risk, but for now this study is an excellent reminder that keeping a healthy balance of bacteria in your gut is vital to your overall health.

        You probably know by now what steps you need to take to keep your gut bacteria happy and healthy. Eat plenty of fiber-rich foods to give them something to munch on. Fermented foods and other foods that contain naturally occurring beneficial bacteria, such as yogurt, are great too. And if you’re suffering from inflammatory symptoms, it’s especially important that you’re supplementing with a good probiotic like Advanced Probiotic Formula. It will give you billions of friendly bacteria to help you douse the fires of inflammation and reduce the amount of time and energy you have to spend managing the condition.

        Frank Shallenberger, MD

        ……………….

        My guess is a veggie diet and the right probiotic?

        This one has worked for me:

        https://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson-ultra-dynamic-balance-blend-soil-based-organisms-90-veg-caps

        My experience says try one…but don’t start with the most expensive ones with the special capsules. You might notice small changes over time. My experience was less intestinal issues and a smoother digestive experience. Still trying various probiotics.

        I had only mostly minor issues compared to some.




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        1. Soil based probiotics is good and it’s like playing in the dirt as a child but not really playing in the dirt because the environment is very polluted these days and so you want a controlled “dirty” environment. That Swanson brand looks inexpensive and I may try it.

          I currently uses the following brand with good results. Although I have no digestive issue whatsoever, I can feel the difference.

          https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000GWKA2K/ref=sns_myd_detail_page?th=1




          0
    3. Related to nutritional yeast…or same thing?

      Healthy Origins EpiCor

      https://www.amazon.com/Healthy-Origins-Clinically-Support-Capsules/dp/B0010YAFCI?th=1#customerReviews

      “I have suffered for years with IBS. I have tried so many things to settle it down that I have lost count. Nothing has worked like this product for settling everything down. My only complaint is that because I am now digesting food better, I gained a little weight. But that is a small price to pay to have intestinal peace and quiet. I read everything on the company website, so I assume it will also help keep me healthy, but for me that is icing on the cake. I am taking it 2-3 times per day, or at the first sign of intestinal upset. It quiets things down in about 30 minutes.”




      0
  6. I have Crohn’s Disease- I am on no medication and whole food plant based with no oil. I do very well eating this way, am in remission, and feel good. I do eat nutritional yeast, and pickles, sauerkraut and other fermented foods. Should I not be eating these foods?




    8
      1. PJK – it is such a lovely thing so see you express such a simple, common-sense piece of advice. A similar corollary is “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Common sense – I love it!




        6
    1. No, you should go ahead and eat yeast as it does not cause any problem. You deal with each food when problem happens but don’t throw in a blanket statement like some people only eat gluten free foods.




      1
    2. Hi Jessie and thanks for your question. Glad to hear that you are doing so well. The evidence certainly seems to suggest that yeast in all forms would be one of the first food items for you to consider removing if your symptoms return in the future.




      0
  7. I eat nutritional yeast daily with my vegetables. Note that nutritional yeast is not the same as baking yeast.

    Having said so, I don’t want to throw in a blanket statement and say that what is good for most people is always good for everybody. I don’t have those symptoms and so I don’t know what people have to deal with due to their body irrespective of how healthy they eat. For instance gluten or lectin or peanut sensitivity and now yeast.

    As a general rule, I make my kids eat all types of foods since childhood and that includes peanut. Now my kids grew up with no allergy to any food whatsoever. I don’t want to claim that being allergic to some foods is due to not eating and getting used to them because each person can have some internal health issues, but my intuition says that it is best to get exposed to all types of food since childhood. And that includes eating some foods or use household items that have some chemical in it such as arsenic in rice, plastic household items, etc.




    3
    1. This is what I’m confused about. I thought nutritional yeast was different than baking yeast. I have sensitivity to yeast and so have avoided baking yeast, eating only sourdough bread (only once a week) and eating nutritional yeast (again, once a week). So, why is Dr. Greger saying that all these yeasts have the same effect???




      0
      1. Sophie, technically yeast is live animal, literally (hey vegans, you are eating live animals). So when baking, somehow when it starts to heat up, these live animals release gas, which makes the bread fluffy. Nutritional yeast is the same animal but they make in abundance and they choose the right kind so that when it goes in your stomach, the purpose is to help in your digestion and not release gas. That’s the layman explanation I can give.

        Now Dr G is saying that some people with Crohn disease may be sensitive to yeast, but not everyone of them. So if you are sensitive to one, you will be sensitive to the other, or none. Just like people with celiac may be sensitive to one gluten food but not to all gluten foods.

        So if you have Crohn but you are not sensitive to yeast then eat to your heart’s content and there is no harm. In fact, it is very beneficial if you can eat nutritional yeast.




        2
          1. This is a simple answer from vegans to justify eating certain foods including plant foods. So yeast is a single-celled microorganism. But do you know that all life on earth including human started from a single cell billions years ago? So how do you know if a plant does not have brain and feeling? I know that plants can emit chemicals to chase off animals that want to eat them. In fact, that’s the reason your kale and broccoli can fight diseases when you eat them. Plants can also signal each others when there is a predator. I know that the weed in my backyard does not look too happy when I pour vinegar on it.

            So the following monocell organism does have intelligence because it can learn and move and search for foods. So is it a mold or an animal?

            https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160427081533.htm

            Oysters have no brain so they must feel no pain. Can we eat them?

            https://sentientist.org/2013/05/20/the-ethical-case-for-eating-oysters-and-mussels/




            1
  8. I really like the new videos style of explaining not only the study but the logic behind your explanations of them.
    The xyz thingy; simple processes are so hard to convey sometimes, I think they did this great in the last couple videos!

    Thank you once again for you hard work Dr.G & Staff!

    Denis




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  9. A while back I watched a very interesting Youtube presentation by Dr. Lim, the new(er) Medical Director at John McDougall, M.D.’s center in Santa Rosa. He touched on a number of topics, but a piece of information for this topic is the healing smoothie that the center used for a woman who had ulcerative colitis so bad that she was skin and bones and Dr’s (not McDougall, et. al) wanted to remove her colon. She was desperate for healing. She did not want to lose her colon, she wanted to heal it. She was interviewed before and after and she looked like two different women. The smoothie she consumed that she said healed her colon and made all the difference was made from white rice congee (google a recipe), purple yam (might have to order it online if you store does not carry it), spinach, and squash, either winter or summer. I, personally, would go with the winter because of the greater vitamin content. If one were worried about the arsenic issue with rice they could cook according to safe practices (per Dr. G) and purchase from a safe country. White rice is used because it lack the bran which can be an irritant in colon issues. She did not consume this smoothie in addition to her other meal eating – this is what she consumed by itself until her gut healed. And it did heal. Recipe amounts were not provided so you’ll have to figure out your own Hope this information is helpful.




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    1. I’ve met Dr Lim. He also works at TrueNorth Health Center (and Kaiser Permanente, where he teaches WFPB eating!). I bet if you wrote both him he could refer you to the person who developed the recipe. That sounds like a recipe we could all keep on hand to share with others who have serious gut issues.




      5
      1. Susan and Rebecca Cody – yes, Susan, you are right about where he works and, although i didn’t look at your link, I suspect you’ve got the correct one as I remember it was a long one and was about 47 minutes in. So thank you for digging that out so others can watch it if they choose. Lots of information in that video.
        And Rebecca, I did just what you suggested – I put that recipe in my food file in a separate folder so that I would always have it on hand just in case I might need/want it some day or someone I knew needed some help. I was impressed at the ‘before’ and ‘after’ of that particular patient. It really worked for her. Bowel issues are nothing to take lightly. And, once again, it shows the amazing ability of the body to heal if we just give it a rest and the right support. I’m going to guess that this recipe might be something one might like if they were ill or in hospital with something – easy to consume and has plenty of ‘good stuff’ in it to sooth and heal.




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  10. Oddly, if I take nutritional yeast my mouth and tongue feel like they’re on fire. I’ve experimented with this a number of times and it always occurs.




    0
  11. There is hope on the horizon for Crohn’s sufferers. A doctor in Australia, Tom Borody, had found a link between Crohn’s and Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP). He came up with a 3 antibiotic combination that killed MAP and cured his patients of Crohn’s. He sold the rights to his formulation to an Israeli pharmaceutical company called Red Hill that is currently in Phase III trials. If everything goes well the FDA could approve the drug next year or 2019




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    1. This is fascinating to me in that I was having a flare up (Crohns like) while on a cruise, I also had a sinus infection like symptoms and in order to help cure the infection, I was given an antibiotic. After taking the antibiotic for 3-4 days, my Crohns symptoms seemed to go away and I was symptom free for quite awhile. I am heartened to see that maybe more help may be on the horizon.




      1
      1. KT – Thanks for mentioning your observations when on your cruise. Your and Sidney Phillips comments make so much sense in a way. Do you remember “back when” everyone thought that ulcers were the result of stress and blamed the patient for doing something wrong? And then they find out that most ulcers are the result of H. Pylori bacterium in the gut. And a simple antibiotic cures the ulcer. Let’s hope this new antibiotic complex is helpful to folks. It would make such a difference. And we could stop blaming the patient for getting sick (which is what happened to a friend of mine who had very serious ulcerative colitis – she was told she didn’t laugh enough. I felt so badly for her).




        1
        1. Rachel – Thank you for sharing this with me about the antibiotic curing an ulcer. I always thought that I might have an ulcer caused by H. pylori, but was unaware that an antibiotic taken for a sinus infection would also treat the ulcer. I find it ludicrous that a medical practitioner would even suggest or blame a patient for getting sick, much less that they don’t laugh enough.




          1
  12. I have been eating nutritional yeast regularly for several years after watching this NF video. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/preserving-immune-function-in-athletes-with-nutritional-yeast/ It has a nice cheesy taste that I like in my pasta sauce and is loaded with B vitamins. It’s also a good source of B12. I developed such a taste for it that I also started eating brewers yeast. And I feed both to my vegan dogs. I can’t say I noticed much difference when I started eating it. I can say that I very rarely get sick. I would like to hear T. Colin Campbell’s opinion on this. I hope this isn’t the next thing to get the axe.




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    1. In general, I don’t like any foods that are faked, faked vegan burger, faked butter (margarine), etc. and you better eat the real thing. But in the case of nutritional yeast, there is an exception because it is faked cheese and it does taste like cheese :)




      2
    1. Baker’s yeast is the common name for the strains of yeast commonly used as a leavening agent in baking bread and bakery products, where it converts the fermentable sugars present in the dough into carbon dioxide and ethanol. Baker’s yeast is of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae,[1] which is the same species (but a different strain) commonly used in alcoholic fermentation, which is called brewer’s yeast.[2] Baker’s yeast is also a single-cell microorganism found on and around the human body.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baker%27s_yeast

      Nutritional yeast is a deactivated yeast, often a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is sold commercially as a food product. It is sold in the form of flakes or as a yellow powder and can be found in the bulk aisle of most natural food stores. It is popular with vegans and vegetarians and may be used as an ingredient in recipes or as a condiment.[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutritional_yeast




      4
    1. As the researchers said:

      “The exact interplay between increased erythritol concentrations in blood and the development of weight gain and fat mass is not yet understood, she said. It is not clear whether endogenous erythritol and/or exposure from food contributes to the erythritol-weight gain association.

      Future research is being planned to investigate the role of erythritol in human metabolism and to clarify its role in the context of weight gain.”

      Eryth. has some calories: 0.24 calories per gram, so it’s not really calorie-free.

      Take care,

      Adam P.




      1
  13. Hi,
    I have a genetic medical condition called Ankylosing Spondylitis. Starch has been identified as a trigger for the condition with studies finding a reduction of chronic inflammation with a reduction in starch consumption through an identified mechanism of molecular mimicry, the cause is believed to be an overgrowth of bacteria called klebsiella pneumoniae, which is gut flora that feeds on starch, this bacteria contains similar amino acid make up to the gene HLA- b27 and this causes an auto immune response.
    I am a big fan on Dr Gregor and believe in what he says but am not sure what to do due to the majority of the food he advises to eat is heavily starchy foods, I hope this can be addressed by Dr Gregor.
    Thanks.




    2
  14. Hi all, I follow NutritionFacts videos and also often find much useful to read in the comments, though I almost never comment myself. But recently a user called Jerry Lewis has trolled every comment section. The sheer number of comments and the approach of this individual seem designed to disrupt and crowd out other discussion. Clearly that user is against the fundamentals of this site. I ask Jerry Lewis to visit some other site. But I doubt they will listen. So I also ask moderators to take swift action on this. One individual can if unchecked damage a discussion community.




    13
    1. Eric: I fully agree with you. As an FYI: Many others have made the same plea. We recently heard back from the NutritionFacts staff. Their decision was that they are OK with this sort of trolling. They don’t think it breaks the rules for this site. That’s not how I interpret the rules, but I’m not staff…




      6
      1. Methinks the official staff has way too much other things on their agendas to concern themselves with the actual community we have established here as a “sub-forum” of the videos. They’ve nearly ruined any functionality here with this extremely limited WordPress package, and they apparently have no clue how much time and effort their moderators and regular participants put into these comments sections in order to help folks understand the science that Dr. Greger works so hard to extract and expose.

        I shared with them my post below. And I’m done, again. I apologize in advance for not being here to help keep the board “on task” and contributing to the conversation as once was the case. Eat well, be well. WP




        8
        1. Wade Patton: Thanks for your note. I agree that several large boats have been missed here. However, I like the staff at NutritionFacts and have a lot of respect for them. I’m hopeful that these problems will eventually be fixed. (FYI: I offered to help revise the rules to better support a working forum community. The staff and I may not share a vision for this for the forum and thus nothing may happen along those lines, but hopefully something will happen.)

          Be well yourself Wade!! I’ve really enjoyed reading about your journey over the years.




          6
  15. Instead of trying to learn something – he is mostly trying to inform with what seems to be poorly researched info. I too get a lot from the commentary section…but avoiding the comedian takes a lot of work.




    9
  16. I too have complained/reported to the NF.O staff and they told me the same thing as they told Thea above.

    Maybe they like the “uptick” in traffic, but methinks it’s pulling down the quality of the discussion and intelligence generally sustained in these comments sections.

    It’s one thing to have a different opinion and share it here and there, but to constantly and consistently argue with every perspective no matter what, with no real science to back up most of the claims-ad nauseum, is trolling. Why must we endure such nonsense when there are so many “new” folks who would like to better understand Dr. Greger’s information, rather than argue.

    Should we be burning so much time and energy countering and commenting on all the useless banter spewed by “JL” or anyone of his/her ilk? If we let him/her take over, then what?

    I do believe that NF.O needs to re-vamp their “rules” OR exercise discretion and flexibility in the application of the rules they have, LEST the “tolerance” of such clowns becomes a genuine detriment to this very site as well as the Mission of Dr. Michael Greger.




    13
    1. hi all, I read the response from the NF team about this issue, and I have to say I’m really disappointed. I think it is a short sighted view and have under estimated the value that a well-managed comment section can bring to the site. Like you folks have already expressed we’ve seen some unpleasant or awkward changes take place in format, policy and personalities.

      I have to say that the comment section was origionally the sole reason I stuck around to learn more about wfpb eating. I’m grateful for the many health and science professionals, and the very knowledgable enthusiastic regulars who shared so generously the science, their views and their experiences. It was a wonderful compliment for Dr Greger’s amazing work, and I was eager to refer people to the website.

      Between the software changes and the lack of supervision over the comments section, things are not the same. Out of the myriad of volunteers who signed up for the comments, very few have returned on a regular basis. So, questions go unanswered, trolls rule, and the former community passes away — all to the detriment (in my humble view) of NF. Yes the videos and articles are superb, Dr Greger is too, but ‘ we’ (regular NF fans) are the living proof ! It’s our very lives that have been changed, our testimonies that effect family and internet strangers alike and make it REAL. It would seem a small request that we be offered a forum that supports us to achieving that end. thanks for listening.




      9
      1. Thank you, Susan. I feel the same way. The NF staff’s lack of support on this issue is a bit of a slap in the face.

        There are very few WFPB people in my world, so I enjoy the sense of community here & enjoy hearing other people’s testimonies as well as the advice of other healthcare professionals & scientists. And although there are those who are doing everything they can to ruin our sense of community, I will stick around because I believe in ‘not letting the ba$tards win,’ so to speak.




        5
        1. I think it’s possible that the NF staff don’t really understand the sense of community we’ve created here. And we created it because it’s important to us.




          5
          1. WFPB Nancy: I agree that a lack of understanding of several key points is part of the problem. My heart goes out to people who don’t have other support systems and need places like this forum for community. That was one of the reasons I used to spend so many hours volunteering my time on this site, and I ache to see what is happening. (And even so, I still volunteer *some* time.)

            While I’m more of a, “life is too short to deal with stupid sh, uh stuff” kind of person, I highly respect the people with your outlook. You go girl!!




            3
      2. Susan, Your commentary on how this site has changed is very well stated. I hope the staff “wakes up” and takes some kind of action against the troll(s) before the comments section becomes a “ghost town”!




        2
        1. WFPB-Hal: re: “ghost town” I think you have identified another one of the problems the NutritionFacts staff are having. They are confusing numbers of comments with a healthy forum. Looking at the comments at the youtube site, one can easily see that numbers of comments has nothing to do with a healthy forum or getting people help. I don’t think the comment area will ever stop having comments (there will always be trolls and desperate people and people hoping for something good who will post). However, the forum’s usefulness (and ability to bring in donations!) can drop dramatically.

          Honestly, I’ve been re-thinking my own donations lately. My concern is not just about allowing trolls on the site. There has been overwhelming majority feedback about every major change on this site over the last year and not a single bit of it has been listened to. Not the new site design problems. Not the lack of important forum features. Not the problems with video design/format. Not a need for site rules that promote a healthy forum. *None* of of the majority feedback on problems with the site have been listened to. Do I want my money to go to an organization that isn’t serving the public like it could? That doesn’t listen to any feedback? I mentioned before that I was hoping that NF was going through growing pains rather than a downward spiral. I haven’t decided yet, but I’m getting closer and closer to getting a clear picture, and it’s not pretty.

          The purpose of this post is to try to wake them up. This is serious. There’s still time to turn things around.




          1
          1. I’m so sorry you’ve felt this way. We maintain a comments section because we want to provide a forum for questions and feedback. We are always on the lookout for trollish behavior, and at this we do not see that anyone is breaking our forum rules.

            With regards to changes to the site – we take feedback very seriously, and this is what has led us to redesign the site and the videos, offer occasional webinars, and – very soon! – launch a Spanish version, among other things! We are working on new solutions to feedback we received after the new redesign and are sorry to hear that you believe this means the feedback has been ignored. Changes take time and we weigh their priority based on the amount of input we receive for each issue.

            Though we may not chime in too often, our team pays close attention to this forum and believe it’s an important part of the NutritionFacts.org community. We all thank you for your long history of support!




            1
            1. Dr. Greger, I think one thing that might help is if it were possible for NutritionFacts.org to refute people who are posting things that are not supported by the science. I have followed nutrition for years as a lay person, and I see postings on this site that (1) provide advice as if it was coming from a medical person, and (2) directly conflicts with the science as you have posted in your videos. To see this nonsense go unchallenged is very disturbing. It is especially disturbing when uninformed persons read these postings and ask further questions of people who are uninformed. I see this as a relatively recent and disturbing event on this site.

              I used to see other doctors and nutritionists post interesting and related commentary on the ideas you present, but it seems to me that they are disappearing.

              I say this as one of your relatively recent donors.
              Liisa




              3
            2. Dr. Greger: I appreciate you weighing in. It’s great that people can hear from you directly.

              Please note that your reply included two concepts that seem to be mixed up: 1) breaking the rules, and 2) being a troll/inappropriate behavior. There is currently a major problem on the forum. The feedback that you are hearing over and over on many pages from many heart-felt pleas is that the current rules are not supporting the needs of this community. Since your opinion is that the current problem cannot be addressed by the current rules, then the rules need to change. I offered to help with fixing the rules and was declined.

              Further, note there has been almost 100% agreement by the people who use this site that trollish behavior is being allowed. If your staff are not seeing it, then you/your staff are not understanding what trollish behavior is. Or maybe we do not share a common definition. Or maybe we need another word. Maybe ‘troll’ is not the right word. Either way, there is a serious problem that you are choosing to allow. To say that staff are monitoring the site and not seeing a problem is saying that staff are either ignoring the problem or not able to recognize/understand the serious problem that we have. This isn’t just my opinion or the opinion of a small number of people. This is feedback that you are getting daily, even from people who haven’t been moved to comment before.

              I remember different reasons (other than user feedback) which were originally given for the changes to the video format and the site. These changes did not come across as user-driven. Regardless of the motivation for the changes, yes, some changes take time, but some changes are easy and could have been addressed long ago. For example, video formatting problems can be fixed between volumes, but nothing got fixed. We still have moving text making people dizzy and hard to read, etc. It’s the same video format that everyone complained about when you first released it. Nothing changed as near as I can tell.

              The idea that ‘changes take time’ for the website is an excuse that doesn’t fly. Some changes are easy to make. Even the very light font color for the links has still not been fixed. Another example: when the forum changed to WordPress, a lot of people pointed out the many problems. If feedback was taken seriously, then those problems would have been addressed before making any other changes–before releasing the new site. NutritionFacts got a large volume of feedback that did not get priority. I don’t see how you can say that feedback is taken seriously when none of that feedback was given priority. Instead, you went on to release additional (problematic) changes.

              In short, I appreciate you taking the time to address my post, but your reply did not make the situation better. It came across to me as just more dismissing of feedback. Again, this isn’t just my opinion. I hope that you will take a second look at the feedback you have been receiving from the community. I took the time to write this post, because I care. I still have lots of hope for this site.




              4
    2. “a genuine detriment to this very site as well as the Mission of Dr. Michael Greger.”

      This site is no longer a place I will recommend to others. Many times it was due to some very knowledgeable commenters that helped the rest understand and implement the information in the videos. This site changed and unfortunately Dr. Greger’s message has been damaged. Is this site not that important to him anymore?




      7
      1. Yes jj, I agree with you on all counts.I used to recommend the comments section more than the videos for the information, explanations and practical support they could find there. I saw it as a necessary adjunct to the videos since often questions abound. But no more! It’s an embarrassment.
        And they think removing thumbs down votes will change anything ? Time is best spent elsewhere methinks.




        3
      2. I will still recommend this site to others. Let’s remember that it’s free thanks to Dr. Greger and the work of dedicated volunteers. I would suggest however that all staff and volunteers should have a ID to show their credibility to separate themselves from the trolls and wannabe Drs. and nutritionists on here. Thanks again for all you do.




        3
    3. I think I’ve already noticed degradation in the commentary. Ridiculous comments result in spinning off the topic in totally different directions. Unfortunately some people are requesting information from uninformed or intentionally misleading persons…. :( :( :(




      4
  17. WFPB Nancy, Thea and Wade: thanks for replying and trying to act on this too. You’re all part in making this comment section a valuable resource!

    I today used the contact form to also message NutritionFacts about this issue, since I think it is such a clear cut case of a repeatedly disruptive user.




    6
    1. hi Eric, I went through the help section and used the contact form there to complain about this specific issue more than a month ago. The more people that take the trouble to do that, the better. Thanks for speaking up.




      2
    1. hi John, this video is the first in a four part series. Look under the video .. “Doctor’s Notes” explains further and lists the videos in the order they will be shown today, monday and next wednesday. Today (sept 1) is a video about the myths surrounding candida yeast.




      1
  18. I’m guessing the cause is yeast getting into a leaky gut caused by animal protein and the toxic gut bacteria that animal protein cultivates.




    1
  19. Wow – great video! Nice to get verification of something it took me years to figure out. I suffered all of my adult life with gut problems and skin rashes. I felt much better when I avoided sugary foods and breads. However I found I could eat pasta and quick breads (no yeast) with no problem so the whole gluten thing didn’t seem to apply to me. I finally got tested and after much consultation my doctors figured out I was sensitive to yeast. As well as dairy and sugars. I’ve always been health minded…vegetarian, vegan, etc. so I kept trying to add nutritional yeast to my diet since it is so common in recipes and supposedly good for you. I was repeatedly assured by many sources that nutritional yeast was not the same as brewers yeast. But my reaction was exactly the same as to yeasted breads, fermented foods and alcohol beverages. Before getting my official diagnosis I gave up on nutritional yeast. So nice to have this video verify my situation as being real. I really appreciate Dr Greger’s hard work researching all of this and posting these videos and blogs!




    1
  20. Could a simple explanation be that the vaccines with the yeast additives cause an autoimmune response in some people that continues and as a person eats yeast they continue to do damage to their gut and finally it results in crohne’s?




    1

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