Doctor's Note

What the heck is the parable of which I speak? See Dr. Katz’s brilliant Lifestyle Medicine and the Parable of the Tiny Parachute.

This is a follow-up to my last video: Diverticulosis: When Our Most Common Gut Disorder Hardly Existed. Make sure you catch this “prequel.”

This reminds me of an ancient video I did: Flawed Study Interpretation.

People commonly ask, Do Vegetarians Get Enough Protein?—but maybe they should be more concerned where everyone else is getting their fiber. 97% of Americans don’t even reach the recommended daily minimum.

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  • Wade Patton

    Of course. We knew that. That’s why I read studies and also listen to doctors who devour studies with regularity rather than relying on any sort of commercialized media or extant medical paradigm to understand human nutrition.

    • DrDave

      More good work from Dr G, et al. This is a notorious tobacco-science trick often used by the Paleo crowd and others with perverted interests. They tried the same sort of thing a few years ago in Spain with a “high versus low” fat experiment. They tried to show that fat doesn’t really matter with respect to heart disease. However, the “low” fat group was really at 30% of calories, still much too high. They do the same thing with cholesterol, by pre-saturating the experimental group with cholesterol before the experiment begins, then showing that blood cholesterol drops during the trial period when eating an egg a day. It’s all crap. I agree with you completely, Wade, thank God for doctors with integrity like Dr G.

      • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

        Exactly what I thought of when watching the video – this is why we constantly hear that eggs don’t raise blood cholesterol – of course there are no raise in blood cholesterol if you eat an egg a day when you at the same time eat bacon for breakfast, cheeseburger with french fries at lunch and a steak with gravy at dinner. Science is not science – there are good science, poor science and manipulative science – the latter hit the news – butter is a health food, saturated fat is not the villain and so on.

      • kylemeister

        I guess you might be thinking of PREDIMED, in which the control group (which received “advice on a low-fat diet”) reduced their fat intake from 39% of calories (baseline) all the way down to 37%.

  • Noe

    It si a nif diference between cience and cience divulgation… When something it is shared in “medical magazines” normally it is an interest behind to sell something or protect some interest.. That’s the great thing of this site. Pure science !!!! From the facts . Not opinions teories beliefs .. As we see even in medical journals ..

  • Sandy

    I was diagnosed with diverticulitis
    while on the SAD diet six years ago. I have been plant based for 5 years. Is this something that can be reversed being plant based.

    • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

      Hi Sandy. I commented on this from last weeks post. Please see my answer here.

      • GEBrand

        JG –
        cannot view your answer. No link.

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Do you mind trying again? Mine works fine. Just hover over the word “here” as I inserted a hyperlink ;-) Let me know if it gives you problems.

        • Joseph Gonzales R.D.

          Works for me, not sure why you’re having trouble let me know if still acting up? Thanks.

      • elsie blanche

        http://www.iowasource.com/food/lenkastudy_0806.html

        I know this sight does have some stuff on raw, but I do hope Dr. G keeps posting more
        on this topic. Might be the difference for a lot of people regaining health. The science
        seems fascinating, either way.

    • Peter
  • Tom

    Why are the government RDAs so low? I eat about 60g of fibre each day, but the government in my country (UK) recommends only 24g a day. If the science says humans should be eating 100g a day, why does the government ignore it and recommend less than a quarter?

    • MikeOnRaw

      I believe it is the same reasons that Dr. Greger has said in videos past. They recommend what they feel is possible for the public without significant lifestyle change. No one seems to believe they can get the public to change or has the political will to propose that change.

      • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

        And that is so patronizing that “authorities” decide what the public can manage. I mean most of us on this site has probably made serious diet changes based on what we have learned from dr. G and others.

        • MikeOnRaw

          And what is so crazy is the whole health care reform in America was a claimed attempt to put the power of medical care in the hands of the public so that better choices could be made. Yet if they don’t share any of the knowledge, how can the public ever hope to make better choices?
          That said, my wife recently came back from a yearly checkup with rising cholesterol and high blood pressure and the doctors recommendations at this point? Get active, eat more vegetables and fruits, reduce pops and processed foods, and consider the Mediterranean diet and watch the movie Forks over Knives. My jaw dropped open when she told me what the doctor said. And this was a doctor in a clinic for a large health care system.
          It shocked me enough that I intend to follow up with the doctor or the system to see what has caused them to start making those recommendations. Is it getting impossible to ignore the studies now?

          • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

            That is actually good news! Maybe the good doctor watched videos on NF :-) Of course we know that it takes more than the Mediterranean diet, but anyway…

          • lilyroza

            Is your wife insured by Kaiser Permanente? Because Kaiser, the largest HMO in the US, which employs 17,000 physicians, is recommending vegan diets for all its patients. If you’re a health insurer, you have a profit incentive in knowledgeable doctors and healthy patients. Finally! Dr. Greger has a video about it, their brochure recommends NutritionFacts.org! if you want to see the brochure, google Kaiser Permanente Nutrition Brochure

          • JohnC

            In 2013, Kaiser recommended plant-based diets which may-but doesn’t have to- include small amounts of animal products, not a vegan diet. However, it is clear they have no problem with (healthy)vegan diets and mention studies that used vegans to make their case.
            This was huge and the media predictably buried it.
            http://www.thepermanentejournal.org/issues/2013/spring/5117-nutrition.html

          • lilyroza

            Thanks for the relevant link. But for anyone who hasn’t seen Kaiser Permanente”s booklet, it’s a free download, and it’s called : The Plant-Based Diet, a Healthier Way to Eat. It’s really simple, straight forward and valuable, very few people are eating as healthy a diet as they describe. It doesn’t say you may include a small amount of animal products. The only thing it says, the very last 2 sentences is this: “If you find you cannot do a plant-based diet 100 percent of the time, then aim for 80 percent. Any movement towards more plants and fewer animal products can improve your health!” Then they recommend a dozen websites and a dozen books by John McDougall, Esselstyn, t. Colin Cambell, and the Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine. All Vegan! For Pete’s Sake, how can you discourage people from it? This is what people need to hear from their doctors and aren’t hearing! And I’ve turned a bunch of people vegan, including a girlfriend whose husband has diabetes. She has tried tand tried to find a doctor on her insurance plan who will even condone a vegan diet as okay, but with no luck. Her husband’s doctor has told him that the whole grains and vegan food she is feeding him is killing him, so now he’s out barbecuing every night. No, it’s not the booze and the ice cream, and the snacks he buys and feeds himself, it’s the vegan food she’s preparing that’s giving him diabetes! So, I think we should applaud this booklet, and paise it and show it to everyone we know who still eats animal products. People may not understand nutrition (BUT THIS WILL HELP!), but they may more easily understand economics, and may get it, that the medical insurance companies have a lot of incentive to really help you get healthy.

          • Joseph Gonzales R.D.
          • MikeOnRaw

            Very cool about Kaiser Permanente. Our clinic is run by Fairview Health Services

          • lilyroza

            Wow, in Minnesota! Lucky you! Thanks for bringing us humanitarians some good news.

      • Inc.

        Science doesn’t say eat a 100g. Where did you see that untrue info?

        • lilyroza

          Maybe he is referring to Africans who have no diverticulitus having a diet with 100 plus grams of fiber a day, as noted by Dr. Greger. Also on another video, on cancer prevention maybe, the recommended amounts of fiber per day, soluble and insoluble, was a minimum of 85 grams. Since cronometer doesn’t separate soluble and insoluble fibers, 100 grams seems a good amount to aim for, in order to get enough of both types.

    • Jeewanu

      My take is one of simple logic. If you eat 60 g of fibre, where would you find room to pack in enough beef, chicken, dairy etc to keep the atherosclerotic/oncological/arthritic/ pill Industry on parade? Every gram of fiber displaces who knows how much meat n cheese pizza? Best to play the moderation card if you are Big Gov.

      • Adrien

        You got it damn right !

    • Julot Julott

      I would say a minimum of ~50gr of fiber a day seems good~

  • Catherine J Frompovich

    Thanks for pointing out how tobacco science is alive, well, and works in those who ought to know better. That’s the problem with a lot of vested interests, especially paid-for-pharmaceutical-science, I offer. Thanks again for setting the bar higher on important issues.

  • Lawrence

    Think Green. Soylent Green, that is. Global Corporate Capitalism has converted A World of Possibilities into A World of Externalities. Too little, too late? Absolutely g** d*** right! I applaud the collective efforts to turn the world’s health crisis around. I really do. But, I cannot help but feel like, if one steps back to take in the larger picture, one soon realizes that -even if these efforts were completely successful and the world’s waistline started shrinking rather than expanding – this is little more than rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. I’ll still hedge my bets by eating plant-based-silent protest in every bite. But, do a google search for ‘Arctic methane’ to see where we are all marching, pedometer or no pedometer.

    • amee

      Viva la vegan revolucion

      • Lawrence

        Comic relief (sort of). Google ‘John Oliver: Food Waste.’ (a little language/adult themes, so no link, that’s my personal policy.)

        • SeedyCharacter

          A terrific expose by John O. on the massive amount of food waste in the U.S. Much is simply based on less-than-perfect shaped fruits and veggies. I live near Santa Cruz, CA where we have some active field gleaners, but there is undoubtedly still a lot of waste here, too.

          • Lawrence

            One would think that, in this so-called ‘Christian Nation’ of ours, there would be a lot more emphasis placed on making it possible for these gleanings to be put into the hands of the neediest among us. I’m an atheist, but not because I am Biblically illiterate, and in my heart I am a better Christian than a whole lot of folks who go around advertising themselves as such including our holier-than-thou ‘lawmakers’ who very often shamelessly put profits before people.
            http://bible.knowing-jesus.com/topics/Gleaning

  • guest

    I wonder if the ratio of soluble fiber to insoluble fiber matters.

  • guest

    I wonder if the ratio of soluble fiber to insoluble fiber matters.

  • Dave

    Another relevent journal article from the BMJ..

    http://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/2/5759/450.full.pdf

  • http://www.naturallifeenergy.com/ Natural Life Energy – Aqiyl

    It is sickening how the misrepresentation of science is used to kill us off to depopulate the earth. Wickedness!

    • Lawrence

      Possible motive, maybe even plausible. Dead we will be, but not before being placed on a virtual conveyor belt at our own expense and stripped of our assets at each and every Big Corporate Profit Center possible. Follow the ‘Yellow Brick Road.’

      • http://www.naturallifeenergy.com/ Natural Life Energy – Aqiyl

        Indeed Lawrence!

    • elsie blanche

      Hey, not sure if I have asked you before, but wondering what
      your daily meals look like.

      Would also be interested to know if you take any probiotics or coconut kefirs,
      any soy or grains,
      and if you mix fat and fruit. I understand you work out a lot, very active,
      and I think you seem to have something that really works for you.
      Thanks for any info.

      • http://www.naturallifeenergy.com/ Natural Life Energy – Aqiyl

        Hi Elsie,
        it is too much for me to go into depth here. I list and explain my diet step by step in my book “The God-Awakening Diet.” The way I eat and cleanse my system works very well for me, and just plain works in general. I am back to actively amateur boxing at eh age of 47 and I just won a International Masters tournament in my weight class. I added a link to the book in my initial comment above. I also have information listed on my website if you rather check there.

        • elsie blanche

          Just looked over your website and info. Thanks.

          Interestingly i see no mention of sea salt. I’ll assume you do not use any salt,
          yet I hear it can be alkaline-forming.

          As a precautionary note, just my opinion, but I’d be real careful of wormwood.
          Not something I’d suggest anyone make a habit of ingesting. Maybe a bit
          here in there, but I’ve heard some toxic neuro-issues as a result of ingestion,

          • http://www.naturallifeenergy.com/ Natural Life Energy – Aqiyl

            I definitely agree. I used it in moderation and had no problems and many others too. those who had problems with it are the exceptions.

  • Jeewanu

    This is as much and indictment of the so-called Peer Review process as it is the ignorance (i’m being generous here) of the PI. Hey NIH! Let us peer review your peers’ review.

    • Adrien

      Well said !

  • Daniel Wagle

    I think fiber is important for diverticulosis, and a high fiber diet helps a lot with weight control, as well as many other issues. However, this does remind of how many studies “prove” that exercise is of little help for weight loss. But when you look more closely, how much exercise were they actually doing in these studies to buttress this point? Only 1-3 hours a week. It takes about 7 hours a week and up of exercise to really help with weight control. Very few, if any, studies have the subjects doing this much exercise. No studies have persons doing as much exercise as they do on the “Biggest Loser,” and people seem to lose weight on the “Biggest Loser” from all their exercise. You can’t say that doing a lot of exercise doesn’t help the contestants lose weight on the basis of studies with much lower amounts of exercise, Personally, I exercise a lot by bicycling to work and elsewhere, but I also eat a very high fiber diet with as few animal products and processed foods as possible. Both strategies are very helpful in my maintaining a 105 pound weight loss for over 5 years now. Exercise helped me to lose a lot of weight and going plant based helped me lose even more weight. Both plants AND a high daily dose of exercise help with weight control. It is true that a Vegan might not have to exercise as much to lose weight, but adding exercise to a Vegan diet can add an additional benefit, as well as adding a plant based diet to an exercise regime.

    • Thea

      Daniel: I believe I have seen posts from you about exercise before, but I don’t think I really understood your point until this post. Very interesting thought. Thanks for sharing again.

      My take-home message from your post is that we need to be more precise when talking about diet vs exercise in regards to weight loss. I mean something along the lines of, “Any exercise may be better than nothing for general health, but if you want exercise to contribute to weight lost alongside diet changes, it requires…” There are so many messages out there that tout say 20 minutes of exercise a day. Rarely do you see a message that an hour a day would be required to get X benefit.

      To be fair, I should mention that I believe that Dr. Greger does have one video where he talks about heavy exercisers and the benefits they get. And Jeff Novick’s video on Calorie Density has a great little segment that shows how exercise of X amount offsets greater calorie densities of Y amount. And as would be expected, there is a calorie density level above which no amount of exercise will prevent weight gain.

      Thanks again for your post.

      • Plantstrongdoc M.D.

        Thea,
        how are things with the salad ? :-)

        • Thea

          Plantstrongdoc: Weeeeelllll. Not much change. :-( I did actually think about it a lot, though. And I really appreciated the support. In the end, my analysis was: I already get a good amount of fresh veggies just eating them whole at my desk during the work week. I don’t think I need more raw foods to be healthy. My big problem spots are eating too much processed and calorie-dense foods. I need to focus on getting rid of and/or restricting those foods first.

          Those ideas are not mutually exclusive. If I ate more salads, presumably that could crowd out the processed and calorie-dense foods. But in practice, I know I will be more successful if I don’t worry about the salads that I’m not so fond of and instead worry about restricting the less healthy foods for now: ie, allowing myself to eat those healthier foods that I already like as much as a I want rather than giving up a food I like for one that I don’t so much.

          Bottom line: more salads are an ideal I am keeping an open mind on for the future. But I’m not ready now.

          Thanks for your interest. Much appreciated.

          • b00mer

            Thea, I also do not care for salads AT ALL and have stopped trying to “fix” that about myself. I certainly gave it a go. I ate a big beautiful salad every day at lunch for probably about a year, treated myself to a brand new lunch cooler to fit the big ol container in, tried every type of green, dressings, storebought, homemade, different toppings, nuts, seeds, warm, cold, side, entree, and I just don’t like them! One day I was in the middle of eating my lunchtime salad and I just put my fork down, decided I did not want to eat one more bite, and that was it. I tell you that saying of Furhman’s, “the salad is the main dish” just makes me cringe inside.

            However I eat plain raw veggies everyday like you. For me the crunch and flavor of a plain carrot, bell pepper, cucumber, celery, tomato is delicious! I love it. I even love the smell of the fresh, plain veggies. So fresh, like being in a vegetable garden. We’ve had videos here on the power of aromatherapy and I think my plain veggies (especially the bell peppers) give me a little boost in that sense! Never felt that way about a salad. Don’t want to overpower the smell/taste with some zesty or sweet dressing, don’t want it to be a big to do with a dish and fork, I like that I can absentmindedly eat my clean little carrot stick without skipping a beat while working. I make sure to get the green leafies in some form of cooked meals or smoothies. In my opinion if it ain’t broke don’t fix it… if you’re eating your veggies, who cares what shape they’re in or whether they’re finger foods or eaten with a fork?

            When you say “But I’m not ready now” it gave me a chuckle. Sounds so serious! Anyway maybe we can start a club, the Vegan Veggie Loving Salad Haters. My name is b00mer, I’m a vegan, and I hate salads. I am me and I am okay.

            Take care! :)

          • Thea

            :-) b00mer: Thank you for this post of solidarity! Well, I’m definitely smiling and not so serious now.

            And sign me up. My name is Thea and salads just don’t do it for me. I am me and I am okay too. Whew.

      • Daniel Wagle

        I guess the point is to lose weight by exercise, one has to do 2 or 3 times the amount necessary for good health. It is very important to eat plant based, but I do think it is better to exercise more than to drastically reduce calories, which is often necessary to do to lose weight without exercise. If one does a lot of exercise, one can lose weight without drastic calorie reduction, but of course, one cannot drastically increase one’s calorie intake. Be very careful about increasing calorie intake rather than decreasing calories. I have found that now that I am more and more plant based, that I don’t have to exercise quite as much to keep my weight under control. The high fiber inhibits the absorption of calories, which is helpful for weight control. An additional alternative to drastic calorie reduction is to drastically improve the quality of the calories one eats, which is plant based.

  • Jeewanu

    Off topic, but … I’m struggling to keep my BP below 140. Question: Is it ok to experiment with hibiscus tea WHILE taking 20 mg of Quinapril (ACE inhibitor) every AM? really don’t want more pharms, although Wiki says Hibiscus is also an Ace Inhibitor so is it like taking more Quinapril?

    I am 190 lb, 5’9″, 61 years, Also taking 90 mgs of b-blocker and 5 of calcium channel blocker. Ick.

  • Dasaniyum

    Off topic but is there anything about decreasing heavy metals in your body through exercise? Someone brought this up and now I’m curious.

  • lshedd

    Hey, I’m not sure if this question is in the right place (kind of new at this…) I am wondering about a new study that just came out about Kale and people getting metal poisoning from consuming kale on a daily basis. It has me seriously concerned, I am wondering what Dr. Greger may know about this study. I have Kale daily in my smoothie. Do I need to stop with the results of this study? http://www.delish.com/food/a43162/kale-poison-thallium/
    Thanks!

  • lilyroza

    When I was in Weight Watchers, they told us that blending a smoothie destroyed the fiber. I said: what if I only blend it as much as I would chew the fruit and nuts, because it’s not like we swallow fruit and nuts whole? So it seems to me the fiber would still be good, but just wondering if there is any official word on this? I do want to get as much fiber as possible from my food. Does blending destroy any of the desirable qualities of the nutritious food, it’s not like the food is completely liquified, or heated.

    • http://www.naturallifeenergy.com/ Natural Life Energy – Aqiyl

      That’s bogus. Blend your smoothies. Most of my meals throughout the day consist of vegetable or fruit smoothies. I poop easily 3-5 times a day, soft, long poops. I am 47, and my body and energy reverted what they were in my twenties because of my plant based diet and all the smoothies I drink. Haven’t been sick going on 4 years now, and I am back to boxing at 47.

      • elsie blanche

        http://www.iowasource.com/food/lenkastudy_0806.html

        Your raw-smoothies remind me of studies like this. It seems raw might be the way to go for
        many people. (although there are plenty who thrive on cooked, but something for us all to consider.)

        • http://www.naturallifeenergy.com/ Natural Life Energy – Aqiyl

          Thanks for the article elsie. :) I don’t think we need to eat all raw, but I think we should eat mostly raw and all or mostly all plant-based. During the day I eat raw but my evening meal I eat cooked quinoa, or green peas, or chickpeas. and may steam some veggies. Adding whole plant-based foods and minimizing or removing animal-based foods from the diet only helps, and helps a bunch.

      • elsie blanche

        http://www.iowasource.com/food/lenkastudy_0806.html

        Your raw-smoothies remind me of studies like this. It seems raw might be the way to go for
        many people. (although there are plenty who thrive on cooked, but something for us all to consider.)

    • Wade Patton

      I was a smoothie “freak” for nearly two years. And-I got a LOT of whole un-molested fiber. Even with a “mega-blender” I was always under the impression that the fiber we need is a rather fine structure, not a pillowcase weave. Hell, if you don’t blend it–it’s fruit salad, not a smoothie. Maybe they are afraid of Whole Nutrition upsetting their lop-sided system?

      • lilyroza

        Yes, Wade, it is a lopsided system,. Their Weight Watcher brand commercial artificial ingrediant smoothie is assigned only 1 or 2 points, while a fruit smoothie you make yourself from fresh ingrediants is assigned 8 or 9 points (when unblended the same fresh ingrediants would be only 2) because they say you have made the food more fattening by destroying the fiber. You have a limited # of points to eat per day (29 or so), so the system encourages members to choose their very processed unhealthy foods over home-made fresh ones. Their processed smoothie is also not vegan, and has poor quality oils, so that is how members are encouraged to eat, so members have limited success with weight loss, therefore keeping thir customers paying for weight loss “support.”

  • Julot Julott

    Awesome video, thank you!

  • Charzie

    Ha ha ha Dr G, whenever anyone asks where I get my “protein”, (depending on who it is and what I perceive their “agenda” to be) I often counter with the question, “where do YOU get your fiber and nutrients???”

  • mbglife

    Hi everyone I’d like your NF video and blog post suggestions.

    My 22 y.o. nephew and a few of his friends think that diet doesn’t matter until you get much older and want to address heart disease. I told them there are many reasons to go vegan and to start as early as possible. All they asked me too send them dinner videos to give them a good overview. So, over the next week I plan to send them 10 emails with a one or two NF videos or blog posts each day.

    Please give me your suggestion for the NF video or blog post that you think best makes a case for going vegan. I’ll pick a variety of them that, combined, will give them a broad overview.

    I know this is a challenge because there are so many great videos and do many topics, so thanks everyone, in advance for your suggestions.
    Mark

    • Adrien

      Well, there is many many video. So if they have the time for I’ll suggest the lecture from Dr Greger, particularly Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, which is a very good summary of many good video. It’s longer, but less than an hour video (55 min). It make completely the case for plant based nutrition. A very good video to start with.

      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/uprooting-the-leading-causes-of-death/

      • mbglife

        Hi Adrien. You’re right, those are great, but I promised them I’d send short videos. They’re not likely to watch that long unless they get hooked on the videos first. I’ve been watching the videos for years and came up with a list, but thought I’d get people’s ideas for their favorites to help give me different perspectives on the most imporTant or compelling. Thanks for the suggestion.

    • Thea

      mbglife: I agree that the hour long videos are really powerful and only an hour. But if you can’t get your young friends to watch an hour video, then I was thinking of some videos on this site that stress the importance of starting young. For example, there is at least one video that talks about how most Americans now are getting early heart disease by the time they are 10. But that is not normal nor something seen in other countries. And waiting to eat healthy when they get older can just result in sudden death from a heart attack without any warning. See if you can find that video?

      NutritionFacts has another video that talks about how the best way to get breast cancer protection benefits from eating soy is if someone has been eating soy their whole lives, especially through puberty. The point is not to say that they will get breast cancer (though men get it too) or that they have to eat soy. The point is to point out a pattern where the younger you start, the more likely it is to help. It is easier to prevent a problem than to reverse it.

      With that thought in mind, you might try to find the videos where Dr. Greger says words to that effect: it is easier to prevent a problem than to reverse it. (Though I don’t know how you would find that video. I’m not sure a search would work?)

      My last thought (so far) is to focus on issues that young men are likely to care about. So, find videos that talk about erectile dysfunction, testosterone, building muscle, etc.

      Fun project. Thanks for asking. I hope my ideas help! If you are so inclined, please report back in the future with the list of videos you settled on an what the results were with your nephew and his friends.

      • mbglife

        Thanks, Thea. I think I’ve got my list now, so I can tell you what I’ve got. I won’t list the videos (too long), I’ll just say that I’m including two or three videos a day related to one of the following topics until all are addressed. Also, I compiled the list by browsing the topics listed under related NF topics list. Each NF topic provides a good written overview by Dr G before the list of videos. So I include the overview to put these selected videos in context.

        – Mediterranean Diet
        – Heart disease: causes & reversal
        – Fiber
        – Gut bacteria
        – Flax
        – Diabetes
        – Junk science meant to confuse consumers
        – Dementia
        – High antioxidant foods, not antioxidant supplements
        – Body builders: vegan vs omnivore & how much protein do we need
        – Hemed vs non-hemed iron
        – Telomeres
        – Prostate health

        I’m giving them a lot of topics because it’s hard to pick. Plus, each young man has a relative who has some disease or condition. I’m hoping that at the end the emails that they will sign up for NF videos on their own and that they’ll browse topics of interest for their loved one’s conditions.
        Thanks again!
        Mark G

        • Thea

          Looks great! This is such a nice thing you are doing for them. Whatever happens, you will have done all that you can. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that this information gets through a few young heads. Good luck!

          • mbglife

            Thanks Thea. I haven’t been pushing it, just sending videos they said they agreed to view. I was later supposed when, as I started, my nephew out of the blue told me he’ll try a vegan WFPB diet for 3 to 6 months to see what he thinks. He’s a fireman, so I plan to get him the Engine 2 diet books.

  • Alan

    I eat more that 25 grams of fiber in any one meal. On a vegan diet it is not hard to do.

  • b00mer

    HOW does one eat 8 grams of fiber in a day????? I mean, I know the answer, refined carbohydrates and animal products, but still, as a vegan who effortlessly gets upwards of 70 g per day it is just so hard to imagine.

    And coupled with the fact that so many SAD eaters/non-vegans apparently think they are experiencing the norm for gastrointestinal function and apparently assume that I as a vegan must have to deal with some explosive, exaggerated, and abnormal digestive system. Was talking to someone the other day who brought this up. It just leaves me speechless, that people are so ignorant that they actually think that their digestion would be “worse” on a plant based diet.

    • Thea

      b00mer: When you are faced with that level of ignorance, you can’t even know where to start. It’s pretty jaw dropping. I just dropped my jaw in your honor.

  • http://elizabethcole.pro/ kentuckyliz

    Can diverticulosis be reversed?

  • john tiffany

    dr greger–

    Is it helpful or harmful or neutral to
    eat roughage like celery strings and other real cellulosic fiber?
    Gorillas eat plenty of roughage—such as the trunk of a banana tree.
    But then we are not gorillas….

    By the way how do apes and monkeys get
    their vitamin D, since they live in shady forests and are covered
    with fur? Or do they need sunshine to make it?

  • john tiffany

    Somewhere I read that one can have excessive intake of food fiber, leading to all sorts of gut problems. Is this true and if so how much is too much? Is it perhaps a matter of the wrong kind of fiber?

  • nutritionaltherapistcorey

    So would a diet change help to treat a person who suffers from diverticulosis? I would think it would at least stop its progression.

  • dooglio

    Dr. G: thank you for these informative videos. I have a friend who has recently been diagnosed with diverticulitis (diverticulosis? Are they the same thing?). What can be done about it when one already has the disease? Can switching to a high fiber diet (surpassing the minimum) be good enough to reverse the disorder?