Doctor's Note

Adding nuts and seeds to one's salad boosts the bioavailability of the fat-soluble carotenoid phytonutrients in the greens. See my video Forgo Fat-Free Dressings?. Oil would work, but whole food sources of fat (and other nutrients!) are superior. For more on nuts and cholesterol see Nuts and Bolts of Cholesterol Lowering and for more on the adverse effects of too much sodium, see Dietary Guidelines: With a Grain of Big Salt and Salt OK if Blood Pressure is OK?

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  • http://nutritionfacts.org/ Michael Greger M.D.

    Adding nuts and seeds to one’s salad boosts the bioavailability of the fat-soluble carotenoid phytonutrients in the greens. See my video Forego Fat-Free Dressings?. Oil would work, but whole food sources of fat (and other nutrients!) are superior. For more on nuts and cholesterol see Nuts and Bolts of Cholesterol Lowering and for more on the adverse effects of too much sodium, see Dietary Guidelines: With a Grain of Big Salt and Salt OK if Blood Pressure is OK?

    • http://poxacuatl.wordpress.com/ Strix

       I like that juice:oil comparison! I’ve got to remember that one.

      I went salt free several years ago; but I still enjoy olives. I eat the raw, whole, no-salt olives. They are (supposedly) an acquired taste — either love them or hate them, I guess. I happen to love them.
      Any problem with these? I’ve not heard of any.

    • Jason Dunn

      Do Sprouted Nuts have a greater nutritional value (as do sprouted seeds and beans) vs raw nuts?  Would this help kick the salad up a notch?  For the people who need the oily texture on their salad, is virgin coconut oil a better alternative to Olive oil?  This is starting to sound more like a recipe channel.  Any input would be greatly appreciated Dr. Greger (specifically on the sprouted nut).

      • Thea

         Jason:  I know you addressed Dr. Greger, but I have some thoughts that you might find helpful.

        re: sprouted nuts:  I got into the idea of sprouting when Dr. Greger did his series on broccoli and sprouting.  I bought a couple of books on the topic to learn more.  It’s been a while since I read those books, but if memory serves, I believe that they did say that sprouted nuts do indeed have more nutrition – including more absorb-able nutrition.  (“You are what you absorb.”)

        Re: coconut oil vs olive oil:  Dr. Greger covered coconut oil in this video:
        http://nutritionfacts.org/video/is-coconut-oil-good-for-you/

        Hope that was helpful.

        • Jason Dunn

          Fantastic – Thank you for the affirmation (my research on sprouting nuts has been minimal) and I am love’n the sprouted broccoli (thanks for the heads up at your Toronto visit Dr. Greger) and other delisous seeds and beans I have sprouted.
           
          Sprout on my friend, Sprout on!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=640861216 Gary Yuen

    Had suspected this. I’m still curious about ghee (if one could find it without environmental toxins). And clarified butter made from milks more compatible with humans are better. Various ancient medicines (including Greek and Roman) mention many milks with different properties and tend to suggest best is of course human.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=640861216 Gary Yuen

    A new study on ghee seems to be making the rounds on some newspapers. “A spoon of ghee full of health: ‘Poses no danger to cardiac health’”. I think it’s this one.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23041740

    If anyone could share it, that’d be great.

  • Hathor42

    Huh — they didn’t think to compare to a diet enriched with nonfatty plants.  They had four groups, but apparently couldn’t add a fifth.  Partial funding from the International Nut and Dried Fruit Council…

  • Wayne Halford

    I’m allergic to nuts. All nuts. Has there been a comparison between the health benefits in seeds as compared to nuts? I’m looking for a way to enhance my salads without using nuts of course. I do use pumpkin seeds and sunflower and am wondering if there is enough fat in the seed to help with getting all the good from the nutrients in my salads.

  • vegan minstrel

    Given the recent research showing that LDL-c (cholesterol) is not nearly as significant as LDL-p (particle size &/or concentration), couldn’t one read these results differently? That is, don’t these results show extra virgin olive oil causing a bigger drop in oxidized LDL than almonds while walnuts caused an increase in same? Almonds did cause the biggest decrease in homocysteine, but virgin olive oil was nearly as good and better than walnuts in that regard. Couldn’t one make a case that since the fat-soluble antioxidant vitamins reside in the oil of a fruit, that refined oils can be more beneficial than whole fruits in some instances? Olives are the perfect example since as Dr. Greger stated, eating a bunch of olives perhaps gives the eater too much salt.

  • vegan minstrel

    Just realized that since virgin olive oil caused an increase in apolipoprotein B while walnuts & almonds caused a decrease, the whole food does have a more beneficial effect on LDL-p than the refined oil in this case, correct?