Doctor's Note

This is video #6 in a seven-part series on the fascinating phenomenon of Solving the Mystery of the Missing Calories. I review the balance of evidence as to why nuts don't tend to contribute to weight gain in Nuts and Obesity: The Weight of Evidenceintroduced two theories on Monday, both of which were put to the test in a study on peanut butter, see Testing the Pistachio Principle. Then came an elegant study using walnut smoothies, followed by the big reveal in yesterday's video-of-the-day Testing the Fat Burning Theory. Arginine may indeed explain the thermogenic effect of nuts, but it also might be the flavonoid phytonutrients, which we'll explore tomorrow. Should one avoid soy protein isolate even though it's such a concentrated source of arginine? Stay tuned—I'm going to cover that when I cover IGF-1 and the cancer growth reversal studies. I offer a sneak peak in my full-length 2012 presentation Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death. If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

For some context, please check out my associated blog posts: Nuts Don’t Cause Expected Weight GainBurning Fat With FlavonoidsWhat Is the Healthiest Meat?, and The Best Nutrition Bar.

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