NutritionFacts.org

Health Topics

  1. #
  2. A
  3. B
  4. C
  5. D
  6. E
  7. F
  8. G
  9. H
  10. I
  11. J
  12. K
  13. L
  14. M
  15. N
  16. O
  17. P
  18. Q
  19. R
  20. S
  21. T
  22. U
  23. V
  24. W
  25. X
  26. Y
  27. Z
Browse All Topics

Food Poisoning Bacteria Cross-Contamination

The food-poisoning fecal bacteria found in 70% of U.S. retail poultry is destroyed by proper cooking, but contamination of the kitchen environment may place consumers at risk.

April 16, 2012 |
GD Star Rating
loading...

Topics

Supplementary Info

Sources Cited

Acknowledgements

Images thanks to wonggawei and daydayxvi.

Transcript

More than half of the retail poultry in the world is contaminated with the food poisoning bacteria Campylobacter. About 50% of European poultry, 60% of Norther American retail, more like 70% in the U.S.— most of which were recently reported to be antibiotic resistant, but not all strains of Camylobacter can trigger human paralysis. Not all strains have that molecular mimick.
Researchers at Hopkins and UCLA recently looked into the prevalence of the potentially neuropathic strains of campylobacter in commercial poultry products, right off of supermarket shelves. Of 65 isolates of campylobacter they found, only about 60% were in the three classes most associated with the development of paralysis. So the odds may only be 50;50 or so that you might be bringing home something that could trigger Guillain-barre syndrome..
Even if you make the wrong choice, though, who undercooks chicken? I mean eggs, I can see. People like their sunny-side up yolk a little runny, or a burger that’s pink inside, but who wants rare chicken? That’s not the main problem. It’s not the undercooking, it’s the cross-contamination. Once that meat thermometer hits the right temperature, any and all fecal contamination is cooked. You could let your kids play it, you could rub your toothbrush on it, all viruses and bacteria are dead. You could still, I don’t know, choke on a chicken bone, puncture an artery and bleed to death, but the infectious disease problem with chicken is between when you first touch the package at the store and when it finally makes it into the pot.
You can have all the safe cooking labels you want, but that won’t raise awareness that bacteria from the surface of the chicken meat can stick to the hands of the cook or could be spread in the kitchen environment and subsequently may contaminate ready-to-eat foods like salads or already cooked foods accompanying the meal.
Why don’t we have that kind of label? Consumer surveys show that the majority of people want to see that kind of information on food packaging. Why not just name poultry meat and eggs as likely contamination sources with food-borne pathogens like Salmonella and Campylobacter. The problem with that is it has been shown that this sort of ‘naming and blaming’ infection risks to poultry meat and eggs may result in a drop of poultry meat and egg consumption.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by veganmontreal.

To help out on the site please email volunteer@nutritionfacts.org

Dr. Michael Greger

Doctor's Note

I explain about Guillain-Barré syndrome (Campylobacter-triggered paralysis) in Poultry and Paralysis, in case you missed it. Fecal contamination from poultry is thought to be why more fecal bacteria can be recovered from kitchen sinks than toilet seats. See Fecal Contamination of Sushi. For cross-contamination and undercooking risks associated with eggs, see my video Total RecallMigrating Fish Bones documents a parallel to the fatal arterial puncture case presented here. And hundreds of other videos are available on more than a thousand subjects.

For more context, check out my associated blog posts:  Bugs & Drugs in Pork: Yersinia and RactopamineWhich Pets Improve Children's Health?Why Is Selling Salmonella-Tainted Chicken Legal?, and Probiotics and Diarrhea

  • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/mgreger/ Michael Greger M.D.

    I explain about Guillain-Barré syndrome (Campylobacter-triggered paralysis) in Poultry and Paralysis, in case you missed it. Fecal contamination from poultry is thought to be why more fecal bacteria can be recovered from kitchen sinks than toilet seats. See Fecal Contamination of Sushi. For cross-contamination and undercooking risks associated with eggs, see my video Total Recall. Migrating Fish Bones documents a parallel to the fatal arterial puncture case presented here. And hundreds of other videos are available on more than a thousand subjects.

    • http://nutritionfacts.org/members/hemodynamic/ HemoDynamic

      I think Neal Barnard at PCRM should “sue the bastards” and make them place the labels on the packages. I can only teach so much at an office visit and the legal avenue is probably the most appropriate and rewarding!

  • Mary

    Does freezing the meat or poultry before using it destroy any or (preferably) all of the viruses or bacteria?

  • Michael Greger M.D.

    Also, please check out my associated blog post: http://nutritionfacts.org/blog/2012/05/17/poultry-and-penis-cancer/!

  • Michael Greger M.D.

    Please also check out my associated blog post, Poultry and Penis Cancer!

  • Ann

    You’re amazing.