Amla vs. Cancer Cell Invasion

Amla vs. Cancer Cell Invasion
4.39 (87.74%) 31 votes

Indian gooseberries (amla) block breast cancer cell growth and metastasis potential in vitro.

Discuss
Republish

Indian gooseberries can block cancer cell growth, but tumor growth is just half the picture. You could have a tumor the size of a watermelon, as long as it doesn’t spread. So these researchers took human breast cancer cells, and basically put them on a block of Jell-O, to see if the Indian gooseberries—amla—could prevent the invasion of the cancer into the Jell-O.

So here’s the control. 100% invasion; the breast cancer cells just burrow right in and effectively metastasize. Here’s if you infuse the Jell-O with the standard chemotherapy drug Taxol, which we talked about before; cuts invasion in half. Then they used tiny doses of amla, down in this range here, where it’s not even really affecting the growth much. And, as you can see, the anti-invasive effect of the Indian gooseberries was almost as good as the chemo.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by MaryAnn Allison.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Hari Prasad Nadig / flckr

Indian gooseberries can block cancer cell growth, but tumor growth is just half the picture. You could have a tumor the size of a watermelon, as long as it doesn’t spread. So these researchers took human breast cancer cells, and basically put them on a block of Jell-O, to see if the Indian gooseberries—amla—could prevent the invasion of the cancer into the Jell-O.

So here’s the control. 100% invasion; the breast cancer cells just burrow right in and effectively metastasize. Here’s if you infuse the Jell-O with the standard chemotherapy drug Taxol, which we talked about before; cuts invasion in half. Then they used tiny doses of amla, down in this range here, where it’s not even really affecting the growth much. And, as you can see, the anti-invasive effect of the Indian gooseberries was almost as good as the chemo.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by MaryAnn Allison.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image thanks to Hari Prasad Nadig / flckr

Doctor's Note

Be sure to check back for my other videos on amla, and don’t miss all my videos on breast cancer.

Also, be sure to check out my associated blog posts: Amla: Indian gooseberries vs. cancer, diabetes, and cholesterolEstrogenic Chemicals in MeatFoods That May Block Cancer Formation; and Mushrooms and Immunity.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

32 responses to “Amla vs. Cancer Cell Invasion

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. Please feel free to post any ask-the-doctor type questions here in the comments section and I’d be happy to try to answer them. Be sure to check back for the other videos on amla and don’t miss all the videos on breast cancer. And there are 1,449 subjects covered in the rest of my videos–please feel free to explore them!

  2. These two links are very compelling but I am left with a few questions to ponder:
    1. These tests were done in vitro , not in vivo. Are the active ingredients actually absorbable from the GI tract and able to get to the cells where they are needed? And behave similarly within the micoroenvironement of the human body?

    2. How much is needed in order to gain a protective effect without adverse side effects? I wonder what risks/side effects come with the berries?

    3. I have been told to be cautious about antioxidants which may block the effectiveness of radiation which acts on cells possibly by an oxidation mechanism. To that end I have been not told not to take vitamin E in high doses while on radiation. Does the antioxidant property of the goose berry fall into the range of concern? –

  3. Dr. Greger;

    Many of your videos seem to be antioxidant content of various foods. Could you make/maintain a post for recommendations on how to best use that information?

    Some of the foods you talk about are cheaper than other foods with a slightly higher antioxidant content. Other foods might be lower, but are incredibly more available or it is easer to eat/injest much more of them than other foods with a higher content.

    A post rating all of these foods by availability, antioxidant dose per price and “eatability” ( I can eat a bag of dried apples easily, lemons not so much ) would go a long way toward maximising your good information in a practical setting.

  4. Dr. Greger, I am excited to learn about Amla and as I have gone and searched for sources online I am now wondering about the quality of what is available. I can find dried amla, poweder, and capsules. Do you happen to know what the best way to get the benefits of amla would be?

  5. Dr. Greger,

    After watching your DVD (volume 7) the segment about amla and it’s antioxident power we were wondering if there was a specific goal for antioxidants that we should reach each day. Thank you for all that you do!

  6. Hi Dr. Greger,

    I had the pleasure of seeing your presentations at the Toronto Vegetarian Society. I really enjoyed them. Anyways, quick question on Amla.

    Is there reliable evidence that Amla lowers cholesterol? One of the studies you mentioned seemed to indicate that, but I’m wondering if there are others? My father is slowly (much to slowly) transitioning to a plant-based diet, but I know his cholesterol remains too high. I’m wondering if I should recommend he take a teaspoon of this stuff a day. Maybe even testing his cholesterol before and after (3 weeks) or so, to see what happens.

    Dan Hooley

      1. In the large Adventist 2 Study, vegans outlived meat-eaters (already eating healthier than the Standard American Diet) by an average of 12 years, largely due to less cardiovascular disease.

        In this study published in the journal Metabolism, those on a high-fiber, high vegetable diet saw significant drops in LDL cholesterol and improvements in HDL-LDL ratio in just one week: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11288049. The authors note in the abstract: “We conclude that very high-vegetable fiber intakes reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease and possibly colon cancer. ”

        The only diet, shown in interventionist studies, to reverse heart disease is a whole plant foods diet. See Dr. Ornish’s 1990 study in in the Lancet (as well as follow-ups), and – albeit small sample – Dr. Esselstyn’s trial. In the context of cardiology, these are astounding findings. Prior to these studies, the profession assumed that it was impossible to reverse heart disease, and that the best that could be done was slow the progression. While Dr. Ornish’s trials incorporate moderate exercise and mediation and other stress reduction therapies (may as well do those, too!), this study only does a plant-based diet: http://dresselstyn.com/JFP_06307_Article1.pdf. And the results, not only in terms of cholesterol reduction but reversing heart disease and saving lives, were great.

        Note that in these studies, whole grains were consumed liberally. The large Nurses Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study shoed that people who eat more whole grains tend to live significantly longer lives independent of other dietary and lifestyle factors. In this meta-analysis published in the American Journal of Cardiology – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25727082 – the authors conclude, based on the data, that “higher whole-grain intake has a protective effect against cardiovascular heart disease.” Other published studies in peer-reviewed journals show that increased consumption of whole grains results in lower rates of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and stroke. There is a world of difference between refined and whole grains.

  7. It seems to me that many people may start to eat these healthy foods when they are diagnosed with a cancer. But by then, these nutritional factors cannot overwhelm or de-metasticize the tumors. I am guessing they would have a more preventative effect decades earlier to prevent the tumor growing at the start.

    This suggests that the key to reduced cancer risk for our society is to build a diet of these healthy foods (ie whole plant foods) and eliminate the cancer-phillic foods (meat and dairy) in childhood and adolescence. What do you think? Is there evidence to support this idea?

    The only thing I have seen on this subject is in your piece on breast cancer in Japanese women where you show that there is evidence that mushrooms given to children seem to protect them from lung cancer for life (unless they adopt the SAD).

  8. this is a disappointing video Dr. Greger as it provides false hope.

    While it’s impressive that Amla has anti-invasive properties in vitro, comparing 25-50mg/L Amla vs. 2mg/L Taxol seems like a standard trick to make the focus of a study look good. (cant type microgram symbol).

    25mg/L is a high concentration, can Amla reach tissue in these concentrations and for sustained periods of time?

    It’s a cool study that will pave the way for future research but don’t you think you’re morally obligated to point out flaws in the study so people can make a more informed decision rather than running out to buy Amla that may effect their chemotherapy? Some people may not question the importance of the concentrations. Best wishes for this site, I’m just nervous about desperate people watching this.

    1. Hi concerned viewer, the amla dose in the study quoted above is 25-50 micrograms per litre. not mg, i.e. 0.000025 of a kilo, not 0.025 of a kg.
      I think that at this stage it is too early to consider Amla a cancer treatment, but I think I might put a couple of frozen Amla berries in my morning smoothie from now on.

      1. so, lead is the factor, but amla is in that category too–Ayurveda. If you were to buy amla from a supplier that could have lead as well as triphala. The moral of the story ask to see the COA (certificate of analyses).

        1. Sam: For myself, I don’t know if I would trust a certificate. I’m not sure if you kept clicking through to see the rest of the videos in the series. In the following one, you can see that it’s more than just lead that is a concern: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/amla-and-triphala-tested-for-metals/ Here’s the last video in the series: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/dragons-blood/ Here’s the video that was just before the amla vs triphala video: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/get-the-lead-out/

          It’s up to you of course. I’m just answering the question of why Dr. Greger does not recommend triphala. Amla is an ingredient in triphala, but it looks like when the triphala is made or sourced, it is often enough a problem compared to the amla itself. At least, that’s the gist I got from the video, thought it wasn’t so clear in the graphics.

  9. It will be good to see the study where correlate the amla thats end in the tissue or blood, like they didt with the sulforophane in the breast .
    So one can se if this doses of 100 iu that are very toxic to cancer sells. How much one have to eat to arrive to eat.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26180601
    Gregger follow the track of amla!!
    Thank you!

  10. Thank you for your question. It is probably best to check with your cancer pharmacist regarding this. There is also a great app called AboutHerbs by the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre. They suggest that Amla could interfere with chemo and radiation treatments so probably best avoided

  11. If a person has already been diagnosed with cancer and doing the “conventional Chemotherapy” How much Amla is recommended in a daily diet of a person who is now on WFPB Diet (whole food plant based )? I purchased Pure Organic Amla Fruit Powder from Microingredients Company in California. They now sell it on Amazon. Would love feedback. THX

    1. Hey,

      as Shireen correctly stated, there could be an interaction, so you need to check with your doctor. He should be also able to tell you the dosing, too. If he won’t be able to give you the answer, please do not hesitate to ask a pharmacist.

      Hope this helps,

      Moderator Adam P.

  12. There are many videos about the effects of specific foods on cancer cells. I’m wondering if there is any known research on specific foods against Lyme disease. I would assume that some foods would have the necessary mechanisms to kill of the Lyme bacterium, but these bacteria are much more evasive than your average cancer cell. I have been fighting off a Lyme infection (that I’ve had for years) with antibiotics, diet, and natural supplements for over a year now. I certainly think that a plant based diet has helped, but I’m looking for evidence of specific foods that could kill the bacteria themselves.

  13. I saw this warning on Webmd
    Liver disease: In theory, taking Indian gooseberry (Amla) with ginger, Tinospora cordifolia, and Indian frankincense (Boswellia) might make liver function worse in people with liver disease. But it’s not known if taking Indian gooseberry alone can have these effects.
    But I can’t find any scientific studies for this warning, I would like to know your opinion on this warning.
    An answer please.

  14. As the comment states, there does not yet seem to be data correlating alma consumption with worsening liver disease. It’s under investigation for potential beneficial effects in fatty liver disease, in fact. Perhaps WebMD could comment on why the above mixture might theoretically be of concern?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This