Benefits of Garlic for Fighting Cancer and the Common Cold

Benefits of Garlic for Fighting Cancer and the Common Cold
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Raw garlic is compared to roasted, stir-fried, simmered, and jarred garlic.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Garlic lowers blood pressure, regulates cholesterol, and stimulates immunity. I’ve talked about the heart disease risk factors, but what about the immunity? Eating garlic appears to offer the best of both worlds, dampening the over-reactive face of the immune system by suppressing inflammation while boosting protective immunity, for example natural killer cell activity, which our body uses to purge cells that have been stricken by viruses or cancer. In World War II garlic was evidently dubbed ‘Russian Penicillin’ because, after running out of antibiotics, that’s what the Soviet government turned to. But does it actually work? You don’t know, until you put it to the test.

For example, how about preventing the common cold, perhaps the world’s most widespread viral infection, with most people suffering approximately two to five colds per year. The first double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the prevention of viral disease with a garlic supplement. Those randomized to the garlic suffered 60 percent fewer colds, 70 percent fewer days affected, so not only fewer colds but faster recovery, suffering only one and a half days instead of five. So, accelerated relief, reduction in symptom severity, and faster recovery to full fitness. OK, but this study was done nearly 20 years ago. What about all the other randomized controlled trials? There aren’t any—just that one trial to date—but still, the best available balance of evidence then suggests that garlic may indeed prevent occurrences of the common cold.

The common cold is one thing, but what about cancer? Is it a stake through the heart of cancer? Various garlic supplements have been tested on cells in a petri dish or lab animals, but there were no human studies to see if garlic could affect gene expression… until, now.

Eat one big clove’s worth of crushed raw garlic, and within hours you get an alteration of the expression of your genes related to anti-cancer immunity. It’s one thing to see a big boost in the production of cancer-suppressing proteins like oncostatin when you drip garlic directly on cells in a petri dish, but you also see boosted gene expression directly in your blood stream within hours of eating it. Does this then translate into lower cancer risk?

Ten population studies put together, and those reporting higher consumption of garlic only had half the risk of stomach cancer. How do you define high? In each study it was different, from a few times a month to every day, but regardless, those who ate more appeared to have lower cancer rates than those who ate less, suggesting a protective effect. And hey, stomach cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death around the world while garlic is relatively cheap, widely available, and easy to incorporate into your daily diet in a safe manner, and perhaps the more the better.

The only way to prove garlic can prevent cancer, though, is to put it to the test. Thousands of individuals were randomized to receive seven years of a garlic supplement or placebo. And they did tend to get less cancer and die from less cancer, but the findings were not statistically significant, meaning they could have just happened by chance. Why didn’t we see a more definitive result given that garlic eaters appear to have such lower cancer rates? Well, they didn’t give them garlic; they gave them garlic extract and oil pills, and it’s possible some of the purported active components weren’t preserved in supplement form. One study of garlic supplements found that it might take up to 27 capsules to obtain the same amount of garlic goodness found in just a half of a clove of crushed raw garlic.

What happens if you cook it? If you compare raw chopped garlic to garlic simmered for 15 minutes, boiled for six, or stir-fried for just one minute you can get a three-fold drop in one of the purported active ingredients called allicin when you boil it, even more if you simmer it too long and it all seems to get wiped out by even the minute of stir-frying. What about roasted garlic? Surprisingly, even though roasting is hotter than boiling, it preserved about twice as much. Raw has the most, but it may be easier for some folks to eat two to three cloves of cooked garlic than even a half clove of raw.

What about pickled garlic, or those jars of minced garlic packed in water, or packed in oil, or that fancy fermented black garlic? Though jarred garlic may be more convenient, there is comparatively less garlicky goodness, especially pickled garlic, and the black garlic really falls far behind.

Can you eat too much? The garlic meta-analysis suggests there’s no real safety concerns with side effects or overdosing, though that’s with internal use. You should not stick crushed garlic on your skin. It can cause irritation and if left on long enough, can actually burn you. Wrap your knees with a garlic paste bandage, or stick some on your back overnight, and you can end up like this, or this.

Definitely don’t rub garlic on babies. “But an article online said that topical garlic was good for respiratory disorders, and the girl was congested.”

Look at those blisters! Oh, the poor pumpkin. “Natural” does not necessarily mean “safe.”

Don’t put it on your toes, don’t use it as a face mask, don’t use it to try to get out of military service. But when you instead just eat it like you’re supposed to, there shouldn’t be a problem, though some people do get an upset tummy if they eat a little too much. And you can’t really say no side-effects, given the body odor and garlic breath.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Robert Owen-Wahl via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Video production by Glass Entertainment.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Garlic lowers blood pressure, regulates cholesterol, and stimulates immunity. I’ve talked about the heart disease risk factors, but what about the immunity? Eating garlic appears to offer the best of both worlds, dampening the over-reactive face of the immune system by suppressing inflammation while boosting protective immunity, for example natural killer cell activity, which our body uses to purge cells that have been stricken by viruses or cancer. In World War II garlic was evidently dubbed ‘Russian Penicillin’ because, after running out of antibiotics, that’s what the Soviet government turned to. But does it actually work? You don’t know, until you put it to the test.

For example, how about preventing the common cold, perhaps the world’s most widespread viral infection, with most people suffering approximately two to five colds per year. The first double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the prevention of viral disease with a garlic supplement. Those randomized to the garlic suffered 60 percent fewer colds, 70 percent fewer days affected, so not only fewer colds but faster recovery, suffering only one and a half days instead of five. So, accelerated relief, reduction in symptom severity, and faster recovery to full fitness. OK, but this study was done nearly 20 years ago. What about all the other randomized controlled trials? There aren’t any—just that one trial to date—but still, the best available balance of evidence then suggests that garlic may indeed prevent occurrences of the common cold.

The common cold is one thing, but what about cancer? Is it a stake through the heart of cancer? Various garlic supplements have been tested on cells in a petri dish or lab animals, but there were no human studies to see if garlic could affect gene expression… until, now.

Eat one big clove’s worth of crushed raw garlic, and within hours you get an alteration of the expression of your genes related to anti-cancer immunity. It’s one thing to see a big boost in the production of cancer-suppressing proteins like oncostatin when you drip garlic directly on cells in a petri dish, but you also see boosted gene expression directly in your blood stream within hours of eating it. Does this then translate into lower cancer risk?

Ten population studies put together, and those reporting higher consumption of garlic only had half the risk of stomach cancer. How do you define high? In each study it was different, from a few times a month to every day, but regardless, those who ate more appeared to have lower cancer rates than those who ate less, suggesting a protective effect. And hey, stomach cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death around the world while garlic is relatively cheap, widely available, and easy to incorporate into your daily diet in a safe manner, and perhaps the more the better.

The only way to prove garlic can prevent cancer, though, is to put it to the test. Thousands of individuals were randomized to receive seven years of a garlic supplement or placebo. And they did tend to get less cancer and die from less cancer, but the findings were not statistically significant, meaning they could have just happened by chance. Why didn’t we see a more definitive result given that garlic eaters appear to have such lower cancer rates? Well, they didn’t give them garlic; they gave them garlic extract and oil pills, and it’s possible some of the purported active components weren’t preserved in supplement form. One study of garlic supplements found that it might take up to 27 capsules to obtain the same amount of garlic goodness found in just a half of a clove of crushed raw garlic.

What happens if you cook it? If you compare raw chopped garlic to garlic simmered for 15 minutes, boiled for six, or stir-fried for just one minute you can get a three-fold drop in one of the purported active ingredients called allicin when you boil it, even more if you simmer it too long and it all seems to get wiped out by even the minute of stir-frying. What about roasted garlic? Surprisingly, even though roasting is hotter than boiling, it preserved about twice as much. Raw has the most, but it may be easier for some folks to eat two to three cloves of cooked garlic than even a half clove of raw.

What about pickled garlic, or those jars of minced garlic packed in water, or packed in oil, or that fancy fermented black garlic? Though jarred garlic may be more convenient, there is comparatively less garlicky goodness, especially pickled garlic, and the black garlic really falls far behind.

Can you eat too much? The garlic meta-analysis suggests there’s no real safety concerns with side effects or overdosing, though that’s with internal use. You should not stick crushed garlic on your skin. It can cause irritation and if left on long enough, can actually burn you. Wrap your knees with a garlic paste bandage, or stick some on your back overnight, and you can end up like this, or this.

Definitely don’t rub garlic on babies. “But an article online said that topical garlic was good for respiratory disorders, and the girl was congested.”

Look at those blisters! Oh, the poor pumpkin. “Natural” does not necessarily mean “safe.”

Don’t put it on your toes, don’t use it as a face mask, don’t use it to try to get out of military service. But when you instead just eat it like you’re supposed to, there shouldn’t be a problem, though some people do get an upset tummy if they eat a little too much. And you can’t really say no side-effects, given the body odor and garlic breath.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Robert Owen-Wahl via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Video production by Glass Entertainment.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

135 responses to “Benefits of Garlic for Fighting Cancer and the Common Cold

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  1. Does anyone have clarification on cooking time vs deterioration of protective benefit? In another Dr G video it recommended boiling garlic < 3 minutes to preserve cardiovascular protection. So that is what I do in vegetable/bean soup.

    Today we learn "If you compare raw chopped garlic to garlic . . . boiled for six [minutes] . . . you can get a three-fold drop in one of the purported active ingredients called allicin"

    So does cooking if < 3 minutes mean I lose only half the benefit. That is, should we consider it a linear relationship? More boiling = more drop. Little boiling preserves most of the benefit. I personally find eating raw garlic gross. TIA

        1. Thanks, Farmcountry and Barb.

          Yes, I was just thinking about his powdered form of everything on Kelly and Ryan. I have spices in jar form.

          I laugh, Farmcountry because I have been watching videos that teach cooking and they do everything backwards.

            1. The reason things are added during cooking and not at the end when it’s done is so the flavors mix. It makes a huge difference. If you eat garlic raw and cooked, no reason to worry about eating enough and you can still enjoy your marinara sauce and all that. Just crush/chop and let sit for 10 minutes before cooking–did they do that in the study that tested cooking methods? If not, then it wasn’t that telling. In another video, Dr. Greger showed a study which showed that if you crush garlic and let it sit 10 minutes before cooking, it still has the benefits after being cooked. This was done in regards to arterial boosting from the garlic. Onions on the other hand, lost their arterial boosting effect once cooked… still all those great minerals in cooked onions, though.

        2. Barb, Thanks. I did see that and use garlic powder also. Both this and the < 3 min cooking fresh garlic both pertain to cardiovascular disease. Today's video dealing with cancer protection vs cooking time with garlic remains a question. I will assume less time in the boiling water = more protection, and that it is linear. If anyone has further data, that's be appreciated.

        3. Barb: what brand of garlic powder do you use? My experience with a limited number of brands is that they’re either weak or don’t taste like garlic. And then there is the issue of them coming from China. Thanks Barb.

          1. George, I use bulk organic garlic powder from our local health food store. I do not know where they source it from but will ask. I have asked about suppliers for numerous other herbs and spices and have seen their ‘pickiness’ in this regard. This powder I get has the strongest purest garlic odor of any powders I have used. In cooking and in salad I use fresh cloves, grown in usa or locally.

          2. While watching this video, I paused it to dump a teaspoon each of McCormick garlic powder and onion powder onto my lunch. Just called the company: their garlic powder is sourced from China and USA, and the onion powder is from India and Egypt, depending on time of year and weather conditions. I can tell you that it taste quite strong as my breath is pretty stinky right now and the smell will probably come through my pores for a couple days…

            1. Fawn, in the studies Dr Greger has reported on in previous videos, 1/4 tsp or so of powdered garlic was used. More is not necessarily better, and in fact can have deleterious effects depending on whether or not you take medications or have other conditions that warrant caution. Herbs and spices are not innocuous substances. Many will cause unwanted bleeding or bruising!

              1. “and in fact can have deleterious effects depending on whether or not you take medications or have other conditions that warrant caution.”

                Kind of sounds over cautionary… There is no reason to suspect that there is any kind of negative effect of having copious amounts of garlic with the possible exception of someone with a bleeding condition (not sure if they have to stay away from garlic), you’re on a medication it can interfere with–which lots of healthy and safe things can interfere with many medications–and will likely be advised to stay away from it for a short window if about to have surgery. In this video, Dr. Greger even questions “the more the better?” and says there seems to be no side-effects. It make sense since garlic has been consumed in abundance as a food additive, and even as a medicine, through the ages.

            2. Exactly. My experience is that people can’t stand to be around someone that eats raw garlic. And brushing the teeth doesn’t solve the problem.

              1. I wonder if chopping the garlic, then waiting 10-15 minutes before lightly cooking causes same deterioration as just cooking immediately. Anyone know? i don’t like it raw and it upsets my stomach.

                1. Marilyn,

                  I can only say that many sites do recommend the chop and wait for the enzyme to increase the benefits method of using it.

                  They say that the level increases, so it would seem like the starting number might be higher?

                2. Marilyn, . . .Jo Robin wrote a book – Eating on the Wildside – which documents the various health benefits of various foods including garlic. The research she cites states that the garlic should be given 10 minutes for the allicin to develop after crushing. However you decide to do it, press, chop, grind, etc., the idea is to crush as many garlic cells as possible. I use a garlic press. Once the allicin is made it is supposedly stable.
                  When I make pasta, after draining I put the raw, pressed garlic right onto the hot pasta and let the pasta temperature low-cook the garlic. I like the pungent flavor which remains.

                3. Marilyn, Dr. Greger has a video on just that, and indeed it is shown that if you crush/chop the garlic up and leave it sit for 10 minutes before cooking, it retains he benefits! :) Onions unfortunately did not… but they’d still be nutritious. I don’t remember the specific video title, but it shouldn’t be too hard to find if you want to look for it.

              2. I am chuckling. I am prone to sinus infections several times a year. All those antibiotics and I got a fungal infection. ENT doc did not believe the culture and gave me more antibiotic. I promptly got worse. In tears of illness I started taking 2 very aromatic garlic and parsley oil gelcaps at the start of every meal (or I tasted garlic for hours.) I improved greatly. A friend asked what I was doing and stepped back when I told her. Then a look of amazement came, “but I don’t smell garlic on you!” The garlic suppressed the fungus until I returned to my own country over a year later! The parsley cut the odor.

                Since we changed to whole-food plant-based, I have gone as much as 2 years without illness. But, when I do become ill or think something g is coming, I make my banana-peanut butter-Fresh garlic-fresh parsley sandwich ( no bread). Halve the banana lengthwise, spread the pb on both halves, sprinkle the minced fresh garlic on, and add the parsley sprigs. Put the halves together and … enjoy? Just be sure you have enough parsley! A meal after ensures you are not belching garlic.
                We are taking our gelcaps daily during flu season this year, but we cannot get the New Zealand ones I started with anymore. They were superior.

              3. “My experience is that people can’t stand to be around someone that eats raw garlic.” Not my experience at all… Also, how could you even possibly know? Do you realize how many people eat raw garlic? It’s used in dressings constantly, for example. So there’s actually no way of any one person knowing if they truly can’t stand to be around someone who eats raw garlic because they don’t even know who does. If someone is odorous to them and that person eats raw garlic, all that means is that they personally have an odor, not that all people who consume garlic raw obtain said odor.

          3. George, I searched high and low and it’s practically impossible to find garlic powder not from China. I’ve found that the best bet is to get from a trusted company who does their own testing for purity and are transparent about that. Simply Organic garlic powder is one of those companies and same with Fronteir co-op… wonderful companies, but Simply Organic powder is my favorite–AMAZING garlic powder. Both brands are very strong.

  2. This is off topic, but interesting:

    I found this article on GoodNewsNetwork.org last week – about how certain gut bacteria can help eliminate a protein implicated in Parkinson’s Disease.
    https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/gut-bacteria-could-guard-against-parkinsons/

    And here’s the source article:
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211124719317437?via%253Dihub

    Imagine that… your gut microbiome might be able to defend against or prevent Parkinson’s Diseases. So, it seems if you treat your microbiome nice, it will treat you nice.

    Where have I heard that before?

  3. I think I finished the math for steam cleaners and I am buying one that takes tap water, but sadly, I don’t think steam is the answer for the poor community because most of the cheaper machines would require them to buy distilled water and many of those machines also don’t get hot enough to disinfect dishes or clothes. Not bad for cleaning up.

    My math for buying one is that my dishwasher doesn’t have a heated dry and, Dr. Annie’s Petri dishes showed me that it means that it isn’t killing the germs on my dishes, even though it cleans pretty well.

    I figure having one and using it for things like steam cleaning clothes that aren’t heavily soiled and dishes that aren’t heavily soiled could extend my washing machine and dryer and dishwasher life and not having to buy cleansers or distilled water could keep a whole lot of plastic out of the landfills.

    Plus, I can use it for detailing my car and that can cost over $100 to have it done.

    So, is it justifying a newly acquired shopping addiction or is it making an investment in something that I believe will last the rest of my life?

    Time will tell.

    Hindsight is 20/20.

    1. Hi, Tom! Garlic powder is beneficial too. It has been shown to improve artery function, reduce cholesterol, slow the progression of atherosclerosis, and lower both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (thus reducing the risk of stroke and heart disease). See here: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/benefits-of-garlic-powder-for-heart-disease/. Garlic powder can also be recommended for the treatment of mild-to-moderate lead poisoning (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/best-food-for-lead-poisoning-garlic/).

  4. I just LOVE garlic stuffed green olives. The comments by Dr. Greger indicated that pickled garlic would not be as healthy. But was mostly talking about that processed garlic sold in stores; but what about whole garlic cloves in a garlic stuffed olive? I love them so will continue to eat several most days but would love to understand how the garlic may be impacted. BTW, I have prostate cancer so always look for helpful foods; been vegan/Plant-Based almost 11 years too!

    1. I have a few cloves of raw garlic daily in my salad. I made simple fermented garlic (just add salt water) which I use at the same time or when I am too lazy to peel garlic (which rarely happens, but sometimes things get rushed). The older my fermented garlic gets in the fridge, the more of the cloves turn green.

      Now, I am in the process of making black garlic in my rice cooker (which seems to be on the lower temperature range when set on ‘keep warm’ as it’s now more than 5 weeks in and it’s still more a brown garlic rather than black garlic; other rice cookers get the job done in 3 weeks they say). I plan to eat these dark cloves in addition to my other garlic versions (they already taste very interesting but lost all their heat).

      Although I am happy that garlic is healthy (very happy), I mainly go through my garlic consumption because I love the taste. My grandparents from Transylvania believed that garlic did deter some vampire creatures (which may have been some form of bats that occasionally pestered their sheep).

      I used garlic granules at times, but find it much less appealing or tasty.

      About bad body odor and breath…. Who cares? I myself don’t really smell it, the plants and animals I like to hang out with don’t care (except the one or other mosquito) and my husband, what can he do (poor man who doesn’t eat garlic, got used to it, at least I don’t hear any complaints)? But truly, I believe that the ‘bad garlic odors’ aren’t very strong or long-lasting in a vegetarian/vegan.

      1. I have noticed that people aren’t complaining about garlic smell when I eat raw garlic regularly, but complain when I begin to eat raw garlic after a long hiatus.

      1. Hello David,

        You suggested: That does sound good. Have you tried stuffing the olives yourself with raw garlic cloves, for a super intense dose!

        I guess I could buy the large olives, remove the pimento and stuff them with fresh/raw garlic, but to be honest I don’t have the time and buying them (get them at Walmart really great price) is so much easier. I used to buy them by the case from Santa Barbara Olive Company but the shipping was killing me; then I found imported ones at Walmart at all places! Storing them, even if I stuffed them myself, would still be an issue. We eat TONS of fresh garlic in almost everything anyway as Nancy, my lovely wife, is a Plant Based Certified Chef! Am I a lucky guy or what!

        Thanks for your reply. You gotta try them, no matter what, they are absolutely DELICIOUS. Heck, I just finished off a jar; eating like 8 of them with lunch!

          1. Hello Johan,

            Yes, Costco will sometimes carry garlic-stuffed olives in a big economical jar, but I just don’t like the taste/flavor/seasoning they use in them. They don’t often carry them at our local store in Florida. Frankly, I like the ones I get at WalMart better !

    2. Skip, . . .Sorry to hear of your prostate cancer. Just in case you don’t have this information, Dean Ornish, M.D. showed prostate cancer to slow, stop, or reverse in a “watchful waiting” group he was monitoring when they went to a WFPB diet. I realize you’ve done that already. But since he is following this cancer and has a foundation that he works out of, you may want to contact him/it to see if he has any more/better suggestions for you. Also, I’ve not yet read his latest book, but it is titled “Undo It” I believe where he shares his information.
      Hope I’ve shared something useful for you and best of luck to you!

      1. Hello Ron,

        Thanks for your kind response. But no worries my friend. Cancer was a blessing in disguise of the Grim Reaper. It forced me to change a horrible lifestyle/diet to a Whole Food Plant Based approach. I am very familiar with all the leading experts in this WFPB field and Ornish was/is truly a pioneer and a Godsend to us all. Yep, and I too have written my own book that tells my story over a 10 year period: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1095700782 Collected Essays of a Cancer Survivor: A Nutritional Holistic Survivor’s Story.

  5. I have yet to hear from others like me who suffer from GERD and reflux if not careful about food choices and raw garlic is definitely a culprit. Would the garlic powder be less problematic and still beneficial? Also, how effective are the Kyolic aged garlic extract capsules? Anyone have information on that? Thanks.

    1. Jennifer, I posted a warning in a comment, above. This link offers some things to consider (scroll down) https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/garlic-powder/profile
      For a couple of weeks I was waking in the night with burning stomach and nausea. It was garlic partly to blame. Turmeric, ginger, a myriad of other herbs and spices can have deleterious effects.
      I take my ‘shots’ of powders in a tbsp or 2 of water mid-breakfast…. not on an empty stomach, and not at night.

    2. Hi Jennifer! Although there’s I couldn’t find a specific video about garlic and GERD; I found some video and resources by Dr Greger about how to treat reflux with food. I think it worth to have a sneak peek on them. I hope you find them useful too. Bye

      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/diet-and-gerd-acid-reflux-heartburn/

      https://nutritionfacts.org/2017/05/23/best-foods-for-acid-reflux/

      https://nutritionfacts.org/audio/just-say-no-to-reflux/

    1. Ray Man,

      Dr. Greger is presenting the specific scientific studies as done by the researchers.

      When he was on Kelly and Ryan he put out the dried spices because the studies he was quoting used dried spices.

  6. Wondering if for the sake of convenience, can you chop a few cloves and then refrigerate or freeze for later use without compromising its efficacy?

    1. Jennifer,

      Onions lose their super powers if chopped ahead of time.

      Dr. Greger didn’t mention whether the same thing happens with garlic.

      I switched to baby lettuces and microgreens because of it and stopped buying chopped vegetables.

      But the onions sitting in my house have not been used and it looks like they might not be used.

      It is hard for me to get the balance between trying to implement all of this information and figuring out that I will end up throwing out produce if I buy it thinking I will chop it. I have to only buy one.

      1. “It is hard for me to get the balance between trying to implement all of this information and figuring out that I will end up throwing out produce if I buy it thinking I will chop it. I have to only buy one.”

        Ugh. This.

  7. First I don’t understand people who are afraid to eat garlic. I’ve been eating raw since I was 5 and for some reason I love it.

    Are their any studies using garlic paste on skin lesions and pre-cancerous skin growths. I’ve used it on a couple spots, and yes it somewhat burns them, but when they heal, the skin looks almost brand new, and typically are undetectable from the previous growth. The spots I used them on where about 1/4” or less in diameter. Don’t think I would do a large area ya that would be dumb.

    And lastly are there no bleeding risks with high doses of garlic. Seems like if I take a lot I get bruised very easily ?

    1. Interesting about using garlic on skin lesions. I had an infection on my finger that wasn’t healing with the typical neosporin/Bandaid treatment, so I put garlic paste on it for a half hour, twice per day which healed the infection nicely. Yes, the skin peeled a little, but that’s better for me than going to the doctor for antibiotics. But of course we shouldn’t keep garlic on for a long time and putting it on babies delicate skin is definitely a bad idea.

      1. I have often used topical garlic to heal small stubborn infected lesions. It always seems to work and I’ve never had a bad reaction. I do not apply a garlic paste, instead I briefly and gently rub a thin slice of garlic on the infected area twice a day. From Dr. Greger’s video, it seems some people have a very bad reaction to topical garlic, so this is not a good treatment for everyone.

  8. Dr. Fuhrman has stated that finely chopping or crushing raw garlic (and/or onions) and then allowing it to sit out for 15 minutes allows the complete formation of allicin. It may then be safely cooked, he says, since it is the allicin-forming enzyme alliinase that is heat-sensitive, not allicin itself. (This is similar to the case with cruciferous vegetables, where myrosinase is heat-sensitive, and without it sulforaphane is not formed, even though sulforaphane itself is heat-tolerant.)

    This paper seems to confirm this: https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/131/3/1054S/4687116. However, it does not directly compare the allicin content of raw versus crush+wait+cook garlic.

  9. What about the minced garlic from costco Kirkland brand? It is a really good value and grown in California. Does The preservation in water diminish the effects? Or the citrus acid additive?

  10. I love garlic and onions. I was encouraged to learn that roasted garlic, although losing to raw, is not completely a waste. I eat them frequently with olive oil and Italian bread.

    Great reminder. During this winter season I will increase my consumption of raw garlic in salads, although not easy as roasted, will preserve the properties we learned. I wondered whether the minced raw garlic we buy in big jars at supermarkets still carries a good percentage of the allicin. Thoughts?

  11. I’m Canadian but raised by Germans and had garlic (sometimes cooked, sometimes raw) in pretty much everything that wasn’t dessert; I loved it then, and love it now, and can’t imagine cooking without it. I grow my own garlic now in my veggie garden. In consideration of friends and co-workers, I eat raw garlic only at dinner when others are eating it, too, but I have no reservations about eating cooked garlic anytime. Garlic is a total staple food for me. I suppose it helped to counteract some of the unhealthiness in that traditional German food I was raised on (salted lard on rye, anyone?). I’m so happy to be eating a WFPB diet now and happy that garlic can still be major part of my diet.

    1. Hi Maureen, Nancy and I have been WFPB for almost 11 years now; eat garlic constantly and like I have previously posted eat garlic stuffed olives constantly as snacks. Funny thing, after being WFPB for all these years (and LOVING IT) we just don’t have BO anymore and never have a garlic smell even with all we eat of it. Shoes don’t smell, socks and armpits all clear; we do use Crystal Deodorant as a precaution though; just in case. Not only do you Feel Great, Look Great, you even smell better!! Go figure!

      Skip Stein

      1. Skip,

        I would say the same thing.

        I would add that I used to take garlic pills and burp garlic up all of the time.

        A few years later, I couldn’t eat garlic bread or garlic in recipes without getting sick to my stomach and I loved garlic bread with my pasta.

        I eat garlic hummus very often and never think about it anymore.

        My gut microbiome must have been confused before and found out what garlic actually does.

  12. Warning about leaving garlic in oil, not good.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=garlic+infused+oil+botulism&rlz=1C1CHZL_enAU767AU767&oq=garlic+infused+in+oil&aqs=chrome.5.69i57j0l7.13254j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

    I extend the life of garlic cloves by leaving them in a jar of good vinegar at room temp, in about four days the cloves will turn blue and then the garlic liquid is poured/filtered into another jar with the same amount of honey. Will keep in the fridge for months and just one table spoon a day keeps the bugs away.

  13. Not sure whether Dr. Greger has time to check these comments but wanted to make a suggestion for a video (but happy if anyone else has advise):

    Love the taste of garlic but not the after effects. Because it’s such an important addition to the diet – a video on whether garlic-breath can be lessened by taking powder instead of raw, taking a chaser (apple?) after a garlicy meal, etc., etc., might be helpful.

    And a question: regarding the recent video on garlic powder and heart disease. Was wondering how common it is for garlic to be heated to dry it, to produce the powder. And then, given the negative effects of most heating methods, whether Dr. Greger might be surprised at the heart benefits of the powder supplement.

  14. I have NO idea if this is true, but years ago I was told “Zink takes away the stink” How much zink to take? I think the RDA would do. Again, I am only passing this on.

  15. Wondering if the boiling antioxidants are still in the water?

    Meaning soup.

    Something had a video where boiling wiped out the value, but the antioxidants were in the water.

    What was that?

    Something green?

  16. I solved for my steam cleaner and UV light and I suddenly had the burden of every cleaning product cost and storage and health effect and germs as a concept all fell off my shoulders.

    I solved things and slept tonight.

    1. I left off guilt about recycling so many plastics and the burden of my impact on the environment.

      I know how long to steam and for UV I know ecoli takes 2 minutes max to get rid of with a UV light and a Steripen needs 2 passes to work completely and if I want hospital-degree of sanitization, 30 minutes within 8 feet away of UV light on a timer so I am not exposed to it.

      I feel like the Petri dishes are what made the biggest difference.

      Maybe the environmental issues themselves were too big a burden, but 60 seconds of steam means something to me now.

      Not having to buy gallons of distilled water because the heating element of my steamer is not going to be in the water getting destroyed by the minerals makes me happy.

      I feel so happy about that and it helps me know that I can learn this food stuff, too.

      The extra burden is gone and it helped me get more done at work and sleep more.

      1. What I am learning is that the problem really is not understanding the best ways to do things or the science behind things.

        The fact that I could either put a glass bowl in a stockpot and turn the lid upside down with some ice in it versus buying a $200 machine that requires filters or buying hundreds of bottles of distilled water comes down not understanding that there are simple ways to do things.

        My friend’s mother just got diagnosed with Stage 3 Kidney failure and I mentioned WFPB and she said that she was confused enough and that it would be the doctors who handled the medical and I know that there are all of these hidden simple ways to do things and people don’t know about them and they are too stressed out by being confused to want to hear anything.

        I told her that there were testimonials on Forks Over Knives that people went from Stage 5 kidney failure being on dialysis to slowly lessening dialysis to getting off of it completely using WFPB and I know my even mentioning it wounded her and I also know that her mother’s doctor won’t even know about it at all.

        That is a tragedy.

        But she has asked me not to talk about it and I won’t talk about it anymore, but it is hard to not share when you believe she could avoid what my cousin is going through. But his doctor didn’t believe in it and his nutritionists didn’t even suggest it and may not have known about it either.

        1. Hello Deb,

          Todays crop of medical practitioners are totally lacking in any form of nutritional education and have been brainwashed, almost totally, by the pharmaceutical industry (who fund a LOT of medical school programs). I have pretty much given up with them; and I have had prostate cancer since my diagnosis in 2010. BUT I changed to a fully WFPB diet and lifestyle almost 11 years ago and, even though they gave me just 3 years to live, am alive and kicking TODAY. Heck, I just went to a new urologist at the beckoning of my current GP (have to keep up the charade). Hadn’t seen one in about 9 years and I STILL got the same song and dance; they read out of the same bank book it seems. Nothing new under the sun and this guy has NO interest, even after I explained my WFPB Lifestyle, in how in the heck I was still alive. He just wanted to do Another biopsy, bone scan and then on to surgery, chemo and radiation crap. Doctors today have NO interest in actually making you better or healing; its all about how many drugs, treatments they can pump into you before you finally succumb and DIE. Me? To hell with them, my blood work (besides the PSA) is better than most of them (if not ALL of them) and I will hapilly go on enjoying my delicious WFPB cuisine and LIVING LIFE to the fullest extent I am able.

          1. Good for you Skip. You go for it. I agree. I didn’t know it but Dr.s can be fined or their license revoked if they suggest anything except the standard procedure of cut, poison, burn.

        2. Shock of my life when I learned 5 years ago I had Stage 3 kidney disease, very close to Stage 4. Cause unknown, possibly ibuprofen or the clean-out stuff you drink for colonoscopy. As a lifelong healthy eater, I was utterly devastated, and absolutely terrified. Kidney disease doesn’t get better, everybody knows that, it’s all downhill. And the diet they recommended was horrendous: white flour, white rice, limit many great fruits and veggies, what! Did my own research and eventually evolved to a WFPB diet, no animal products whatsoever, no processed foods. Over several years my numbers have improved to a point my doctor didn’t think was possible, slowly going from an eGFR of 33 (late Stage 3, nearly Stage 4) back up to 56 (early Stage 3) and remaining stable. I can live with that, literally and figuratively, although I always hope I’m improving further. But I take no meds, blood pressure great, weight normal, total cholesterol 157 (working on that).

          Your friend’s mother is in a terrified state of shock, I was there… She’s vulnerable and dependent on her doctor, who knows nothing about nutrition, and doesn’t want to hear anything that might even suggest that he doesn’t know what he’s doing. Recently there are some good published articles on how the idea of the ‘kidney diet’ is evolving to be more WFPB — maybe she’ll be able to hear it from published researchers as it will seem more mainstream. I wish her all the best.

          1. Hello Nora,

            Congratulations!!!

            Join us, those who ventured into the world of WFPB diet and lifestyle; because WE DID OUR OWN RESEARCH and didn’t (often refusing) to listen to the ‘traditional medical opinion’ that as you say is usually ill-informed to say the best.

            Mine was Prostate Cancer; they gave me just 3 years to live ELEVEN (11) years ago! Go figure.

            Keep it up, you will only continue to Improve and get healthier. Our bodies are truly amazing with the ability to HEAL. No matter what the age (I am 73) it is NEVER TOO LATE!

            1. Thanks, Skip! 63 here, feel like 43. You sure showed them! Wish I could motivate my husband: 77, diabetic, overweight, triple bipass, two stents, meat & potatoes, white rice and white bread. His list of approved vegetables is written in stone: iceberg lettuce, carrots, peas, and corn. Won’t even TRY anything he hasn’t tried and liked before. He’s a university researcher, highly intelligent — but even though he acknowledges and appreciates what WFPB has done for me, he simply can’t or won’t change his diet. I don’t want to spend our remaining years being the food police; I just want to enjoy him for as long as I have him. But I can’t help but wonder how much it could all turn around if only he’d choose to eat to live.

              1. Hello Nora,

                Yes, unfortunately, we hear this all the time. For some reason, some highly intelligent people just refuse to accept the empirical EVIDENCE presented by people like you. They may acknowledge it but still refuse to accept it for themselves. It is the power of brainwashing/indoctrination beaten into them for decades; their entire lives. It IS hard to refute that and to convince people to change something that has been part of their existence their entire lives.

                Our own darling daughter (45) with 7 kids, accepts we are Plant Based (vegan) but fought us tooth and nail for many years. Now she is forced to grudgingly accept the fact that we continue to be ALIVE and Healthy; despite our ‘crazy diet’. We pray for her. Her #2 son (23), is actually trying veganism so good for him.

                We still love them all, but continue to Pray that one day, before too much longer, as the World is changing, they too will embrace the facts and want to Live Long and Prosper with a WFPB lifestyle. It truly is NEVER too late.

          2. Nora,

            Nicely done and congrats on the much improved GFR !

            Yes, it’s true that most physicians will not go down the diet road especially if it’s off the beaten track. By suggesting a very different (PBWF) diet to get CKD patients back to better functionality has been successful often times. Most were responsive to the suggestions given the grim outcome potentials…..

            Keep up the diet and the numbers.

            Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  17. I did not know garlic to be a severe skin irritant. Seems to work well enough inside. I use jars of minced garlic in my bean / veggie stews. Too bad prepared minced is not as healthy as fresh cloves.

  18. In “Eating on the Wild Side” the author, Jo Robinson says that if you chop/crush/mince the garlic and let it sit for 10 minutes before adding it to cooked dishes that it retains its beneficial effects.  If you chop it and immediately add it to stir fry, for example, you lose the benefits.

    1. This is true, Dani (btw, love your name!!). It’s actually in an older video on garlic and onions somewhere on this site, where it’s shown the garlic retains the allicin if prepared as you said prior to cooking.

  19. I have been buying organic garlic capsules (and ginger) from a company called Wild Harvest… if you open the jar and smell it, it is pretty pungent. Although I think it is just unprocessed garlic in capsules, I don’t notice any garlic breath or smell coming from me…

    I saw in the previous video that garlic from Kyrolic does not have the same beneficial effects… if anybody knows about whether their process eliminates the good stuff, please respond. Thanks

    1. Is this the company Magnus?https://oregonswildharvest.com/products/garlic They look like a good company. They are selling organic, strong, dried garlic in capsules. (different than the aged kyrolic garlic). Looks great to me! Another person wrote in the comments that when they take garlic everyday, there doesn’t seem to be an odor. Maybe our microbiomes change to really digest it?

  20. I am 71 years old. I have a diagnosis of Myeloid dysplasia. Any nutritional advice for my situation would be greatly appreciated. I already searched your databases for this disease. Thank you.

    1. I don’t think that there is a lot of scientific evidence on this.

      That condition apparently used to be known as ‘preleukaemia’. However, only some people with this condition go on to develop leukaemia.

      Apparently smoking and meat eating are associated with progression to leukaemia S giving up both smoking and meat eating may be helpful. Drinking coffee also seems to be associated with less progression to leukemia.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2842202/

      I hope this helps. However, you should be guided by your treating physician – especially since there are various different types of myeloid dysplasia and nutritional treatment may vary according to type.

      1. I prefer tea but

        ‘Results
        59 studies, consisting of 40 independent cohorts, met the inclusion criteria. Compared with individuals who did not or seldom drink coffee per day, the pooled RR of cancer was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.82-0.92) for regular coffee drinkers, 0.89 (0.84-0.93) for low to moderate coffee drinkers, and 0.82 (0.74-0.89) for high drinkers. Overall, an increase in consumption of 1 cup of coffee per day was associated with a 3% reduced risk of cancers (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.96-0.98). In subgroup analyses, we noted that, coffee drinking was associated with a reduced risk of bladder, breast, buccal and pharyngeal, colorectal, endometrial, esophageal, hepatocellular, leukemic, pancreatic, and prostate cancers.

        Conclusions
        Findings from this meta-analysis suggest that coffee consumption may reduce the total cancer incidence and it also has an inverse association with some type of cancers.’

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3066123/

    2. Lovie, . . .I don’t have anything helpful to share specific to your condition. However, I’ve been watching the work of a longevity researcher named David Sinclair, Ph.D. He is professor of genetics at Harvard with a very large research lab. His research is focused on long, healthy aging. It is far too large and complicated for me to explain here but he has recently published a book called Lifespan which I suggest you read. In the back of the book he lists the supplements he takes and the book explains why. His perspective is to try to keep the body as healthful as possible for as long as possible and to protect it from all disease. He takes certain supplements that his research shows encourages the longevity genes that he has studied for 30 years. He is also all over Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=david+sinclair+
      In addition to the supplements he takes, he also practices eating within a time-limited time frame (like 10 hrs) and recommends high intensity interval training. You can accomplish this in 5 minute warm up, 1 minute bicycle (on stationary bike) as hard as you can, then back to recovery biking for 4-5 minutes. Then 1 minute as hard as you can. Do this so that you get 3-4 one-minute hard as you can periods. The whole thing can take as little as 15 minutes. Do this 3 times per week.
      Hope some of this may be helpful to you.

  21. Cyanocobalamin. Kidney disease. What is the threshold where it is no longer right to use it as a supplement? Over 65. Why do you have it take it every day?

    1. As a nurse volunteering on this site, I’m a little confused by your question. If I understand correctly you are concerned about a possible connection between taking the synthetic Vit B12 cyanocobalamin and kidney damage, particularly in the elderly (?). I’ve reviewed several studies all confirming that health risks for excessive Vitamin B12 intake whether for food or supplements in healthy individuals have not been found.
      https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional/ Health Risks from Excessive Vitamin B12
      I only found one study that indicated a problem with intake of too much B12: The association between vitamin B12, albuminuria and reduced kidney function: an observational cohort study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4361211/ which concluded that patients with high homocysteine levels and albuminuria had reduced kidney function.
      As far as any scientific reason for seniors to stop taking Vit b12, research seems to indicate the opposite, as studies show the elderly are less likely to effectively metabolize the B12 than younger folks so B!2 is more essential for them. I hope this is helpful and reassuring if you were concerned about Vitamin B supplementation. As far as taking Vitamin B supplementation every day, you can get a sublingual form which dissolves under the tongue is only taken once a week.

      1. Maybe this is why he is asking: from Folic Acid and Vitamin B12 in CKD, Why Not?: “Cyanocobalamin, the most commonly used form of B12 supplementation therapy, is indeed metabolized to active methylcobalamin, releasing small amounts of cyanide whose clearance is reduced in CKD [34].” I take methylcobalamin for this reason.

      2. Hi Joan, thanks for replying. The questions I have about cyanocobalamin are from the recommendations given by Dr. Greger. As i go through the logic, I get stuck about what to do. I haven’t worked out a solution I’m comfortable with. The recommendation says that you shouldn’t take cyanocobalamin if you’re a smoker or you have kidney failure. Not sure why but i think it’s the cyanide not being cleared out by urine or something like that. What if you have kidney disease but not kidney failure, is cyanocobalamin OK? I’m still not sure why you have to take 1mg/day of cyanocobalamin if you’re over 65. Is it because of gastritis or lack of intrinsic factor or atrophic gastritis (what i’ve read online about it – i don’t get it).

        Taking fortified nutritional yeast isn’t good because some people may get an autoimmune disease. My family doesn’t eat this so I’m afraid we might be the ones who react to it eventually if taken long term. Also gout. We’ve been taking (Mum and me) 1mg cyanocobalamin pill and 1mg co-methylcobalamin sublingual alternating every Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. My mum’s over 65. I would like some documents I can give to my GP to educate him about b12. I wish I had thought of printing out something he could take away and read in his own time instead of just showing him some pages from a book during the visit.

        1. The cyanide issue isn’t an issue which is why Greger recommends cyanocobalamin. If you take methylcobalamin you have to take much higher doses. I’m not sure anyone has studied the optimal dose for methylcobalamin.

  22. I take some garlic-powder every day, because I have the impression it produces less breath odour (I might be wrong). Both are good for you, as dr. Greger explained, but what is better, raw garlic or garlic powder?

  23. Body order and garlic breath? Seriously, this is blown so out of proportion, it’s obnoxious. I have known so many people who have been huge garlic eaters growing up all my life. I never experienced them having any kind of odor or bad breath. The people I HAVE come across with actual body odor have been people who ate and lived a very unhealthy lifestyle, garlic not being the culprit. Where is all the evidence to this? You hear anecdotal claims but then you also hear from so many that they do not experience this so, likewise, opposing anecdotal claims. I eat garlic all the time–every single day–both raw and cooked and I have no issues with body odor in the least, I honestly don’t even need to wear deodorant and this has been tested by those closest to me. And I have no issues with bad breath. I actually get told very often that I smell good and I wear no perfume nor do I use scented soaps or hair care nor do I use essential oils, oh, and even my laundry detergent and all that is unscented and natural (which, btw, people, all that over scented frebreezed crap does NOT make you smell good, dear god, it does not). When I did remember feeling garlic-breath-y in the past, was when I ate a lot of garlic among an otherwise typically garlic-free diet, so I really agree with others who have suggested it may simply be a matter of the microbiome. It’s such a silly thing to suggest these things are side effects when they don’t even occur as a rule, especially since garlic is such an impressively medicinal plant, to add that nonsense in the mix is vain and unjust and also harmful–think of all the people not eating garlic for fear of just that–similar to all the people who have avoided beans in fear of gas which also didn’t happen in everyone and seems to be a matter of the microbiome, go figure. And it makes sense, too, that many people don’t have an adjusted microbiome for garlic when simply half a raw clove for some people is too much to them.

    Apart from that… great video. The mocking of the internet-lore with that poor baby, and your face doing it, was priceless… very amusing and indeed.

    Was the garlic that was cooked in the referenced study of stir-frying and all that, crushed and left to sit for 10 minutes so as to let the allicin kick in in the first place? Good news about roasted garlic, anyway–roasted garlic is AMAZING.

    1. S, sometimes we don’t agree, but wanted to say I agree with everything you said.

      I too eat a lot of garlic. I don’t have to wear deodorant either or very rarely. Don’t have bad breath.

      My wife does complain when I’ve Eaten a lot of onion or garlic for a few hours after. I’m going to try the apple and parsley to see if that helps her. But seriously I’m with you, people are way to concerned about the smell of a great plant like Garlic. And I’m betting it’s mostly vanity no wonder America’s health is so crappy.

      End

      1. Just a perspective… My late mother used to cook with garlic freely, and there was definitely an odor of it about her. It permeated her house when she’d used it, and I could tell when she had been in my car. It was to the point that I sometimes kept my distance when she spoke. I think it left me with a phobia of smelling like that. I don’t consider it vanity — to me, this is an odor that ranges from merely unpleasant to so offensive that I just can’t abide it, and so it’s difficult to accept the idea of smelling like that to others. If it had that effect on my mother (whom I love and miss dearly, sorry mom!), it’s not unreasonable to suppose that it would work similarly on me. Although she was not WFPB, and I am…

        I’m encouraged to think that the microbiome may eventually adjust — I may try to incorporate it just a tiny bit at a time to see what happens.

        1. Nora, I’ve known a lot of people who cooked with it as well. One of my best friends’ moms was Italian and constantly cooked with garlic, but she nor her family or home smelled like garlic or like anything else offensive. If anything, they were some of the most hygienic smelling people I’ve known. No one I’ve ever known, personally, who used a lot of garlic ever had an offensive odor about them. And if it were so endemic as is made out to be sometimes on corners of the internet, such as this comments section at the moment, then wouldn’t the people of Italy have a very unwelcome stereo-type to deal with? It’s never been like, “oh, Italy is beautiful, but every wreaks of garlic!” cause they don’t–they just smell like people of varying sorts as anywhere else. My guess continues to be the microbiome. Also, maybe your mother in law simply had the garlic on her clothes if she cooked so much with it. Especially if she cooked with oil because it smokes and even can grease up walls and such over time. I can understand not wanting to smell unpleasant not being a vain thing, but lots of the world eats garlic and the way it’s made out to be, by the overblown description some people give, you shouldn’t be able to go to a public place without half of the population there smelling like the walking dead and that just simply isn’t the case.

  24. Not sure how everyone else is feeling about the new video format with video of Greger the whole time but I prefer the old system. I like reading the articles and now there is much less room on the screen for them.

    1. A lot feel that way. Dr. Greger has welcomed the feedback. While pleasant seeing Dr. Greger on screen, I agree it is distracting to the science. These videos are pre-made, so given the feedback, they may go back to the old style.

      1. This is great news. I’m very happy you’re so responsive to feedback. NF has previously incorporated feedback from me and others regarding a seris of videos that featured “exploding text.” The text from the papers cited would magnify and move away from the paragraph it was located in. Made it near impossible to read. That quickly went away.

  25. Regarding cooking garlic, if you slice, chop, crush garlic, THEN let it rest for 10 minutes, the nutritional value is preserved even after cooking. Page 51 of “Eating on the Wild Side” by Jo Robinson details how the Israelis discovered this.

    1. Indeed, Jim. In fact, there is a video on this site by Dr. Greger which presents a study showing that to be true. They tested garlic and onions in the study. Garlic held up if damaged as you explained, whereas the onions did not.

  26. Do I have to chew the garlic for the benefits? Can I just chop and swallow with water, no chewing? That greatly reduces smell and aftertaste.

    1. Hi, June. I found when I swallowed chopped raw garlic on an empty stomach I had stomach pain. I put it on a banana, sliced lengthwise and smeared with a bit of peanut butter and sprinkled with fresh parsley. That protected my stomach. 

          1. So to summarize best is raw and minced. You can also chop and wait 10 minutes before cooking. If you don’t want to deal with raw you can get the minced garlic at the grocery store that is soaked in water but you’re giving up 50% or so of its activity?

  27. I am looking for where I may find other medicinal type spices and plants. Anyone know anything about magnolia bark. Dr. Greger has not done anything on this tree/plant and the research out there so far is very positive. Has Dr. Greger done anything about Magnolia Bark Extract? How can I find out?

      1. Yes, I have read all of the information. After getting to know some of the experts in the research for WFPB lifestyles, it is difficult to trust outside sources. I was curious as to any of the research in the WFPB filed on magnolia bark. Do you know of any?

        1. I agree. I would only trust Greger, Esselstyn, Barnard, and Ornish. I would just Google around and see if they’ve said anything about it. If you’re already eating WFPB then magnolia bark probably isn’t going to add too much to your diet.

          1. Actually, Magnolia Bark has some really amazing properties for anxiety and insomnia. I am surprised that with the other spices and things Dr. Greger has suggested, he has not reviewed the research on it. NIH and other researchers have reviewed it, just not the ones that count to me! Do you know how I would send a note directly to Dr. Greger and ask him if he knows of a good review?

            Thank you

            1. That’s interesting. Never have I ever heard about magnolia extract. I glanced a few studies and it appears (in mice ) its well tolerated but didn’t see many studies people or dosage. However, I’m not very good at research.

              End

            2. I think they check these comments pretty closely. He has a huge backlog of papers to review and videos to make. I’d be willing to guess he’s heard of it and has it on the list to review in a video!

  28. Just an IDEA…!!

    Take empty pharmacutical capsules (readily available and inexpensive) fill with freshly crushed GARLIC….. no taste or odour. No degredation of the GARLIC

    3x capsules = 0-5 -1.00 clove……….Discuss !!

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