Benefits of Garlic Powder for Heart Disease

Benefits of Garlic Powder for Heart Disease
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See what a penny a day worth of garlic powder can do.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In ancient Greece, the art of medicine was divided into three areas: cures through diet, cures through drugs, and cures through surgery. Garlic, Hippocrates wrote, was one such medicinal food, but that was to treat a nonexistent entity called “displacement of the womb.” So, ancient wisdom can only go so far.

Those who eat more than a clove a day do seem to have better artery function than those who eat less than a clove a day, but you don’t know if it’s cause and effect until you put it to the test.

Heart disease patients were randomized to receive either garlic powder or placebo tablets twice daily for three months. And, those lucky enough to be in the garlic group got a significant boost in their artery function: a 50 percent increase in function taking only 800 mg of garlic powder a day. That’s just a quarter-teaspoon of garlic powder; a 50 percent increase in artery function for less than a penny a day.

If regular, plain, boring garlic powder can do that, what about those fancy Kyolic aged garlic extract supplements? Thirty times more expensive, and they don’t work at all! Four weeks and zero significant improvement. It’s hard to improve on Mother Nature.

Garlic powder can improve the function of our arteries, but what about the structure of our arteries? Dozens of studies on garlic, all compiled together, show garlic can reduce cholesterol levels in the blood by more than 16 points. So, might garlic powder be able to actually slow the progression of atherosclerosis? Garlic powder tablet versus placebo for three months. The placebo group got worse, which is what tends to happen. Eat the same artery-clogging diet, and your arteries continue to clog. But, the progression of the disease appeared to slow and stall in the garlic group. Of course, it would be nice to see the artery wall thickening actually reverse, but for that, one might have to add more plants than just garlic to one’s diet. Still, though, that same quarter-teaspoon of a simple spice available everywhere may be considered as an adjunct treatment for atherosclerosis, the number one killer of both men and women in the United States and around much of the world.

What about garlic for high blood pressure? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials demonstrating garlic has “a statistically significant and clinically meaningful effect” on both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, reducing the top number by nearly seven and the bottom number by about five. That may not sound like a lot, but reducing diastolic blood pressure—the bottom number—by five points can reduce the risk of stroke by about a third, and heart disease by 25 percent.

Plant-based medicine can provide beneficial effects, with little or no side effects, and “compared to other medicine are relatively cost effective.” I’d say so, at as little as a penny per day.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: John Phelan via wikimedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

In ancient Greece, the art of medicine was divided into three areas: cures through diet, cures through drugs, and cures through surgery. Garlic, Hippocrates wrote, was one such medicinal food, but that was to treat a nonexistent entity called “displacement of the womb.” So, ancient wisdom can only go so far.

Those who eat more than a clove a day do seem to have better artery function than those who eat less than a clove a day, but you don’t know if it’s cause and effect until you put it to the test.

Heart disease patients were randomized to receive either garlic powder or placebo tablets twice daily for three months. And, those lucky enough to be in the garlic group got a significant boost in their artery function: a 50 percent increase in function taking only 800 mg of garlic powder a day. That’s just a quarter-teaspoon of garlic powder; a 50 percent increase in artery function for less than a penny a day.

If regular, plain, boring garlic powder can do that, what about those fancy Kyolic aged garlic extract supplements? Thirty times more expensive, and they don’t work at all! Four weeks and zero significant improvement. It’s hard to improve on Mother Nature.

Garlic powder can improve the function of our arteries, but what about the structure of our arteries? Dozens of studies on garlic, all compiled together, show garlic can reduce cholesterol levels in the blood by more than 16 points. So, might garlic powder be able to actually slow the progression of atherosclerosis? Garlic powder tablet versus placebo for three months. The placebo group got worse, which is what tends to happen. Eat the same artery-clogging diet, and your arteries continue to clog. But, the progression of the disease appeared to slow and stall in the garlic group. Of course, it would be nice to see the artery wall thickening actually reverse, but for that, one might have to add more plants than just garlic to one’s diet. Still, though, that same quarter-teaspoon of a simple spice available everywhere may be considered as an adjunct treatment for atherosclerosis, the number one killer of both men and women in the United States and around much of the world.

What about garlic for high blood pressure? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials demonstrating garlic has “a statistically significant and clinically meaningful effect” on both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, reducing the top number by nearly seven and the bottom number by about five. That may not sound like a lot, but reducing diastolic blood pressure—the bottom number—by five points can reduce the risk of stroke by about a third, and heart disease by 25 percent.

Plant-based medicine can provide beneficial effects, with little or no side effects, and “compared to other medicine are relatively cost effective.” I’d say so, at as little as a penny per day.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: John Phelan via wikimedia. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

What else can garlic do?

Here’s a tasty recipe for garlic, from the How Not to Die Cookbook: Garlic Caesar Salad Dressing.

Of course, the best way to treat heart disease is to simply get rid of it by treating the underlying cause: How Not to Die from Heart Disease

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

147 responses to “Benefits of Garlic Powder for Heart Disease

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  1. Wow, my stomach would blow up with 800 mg of garlic powder a day, plus I’d really stink. Maybe you need to ramp up the dose slowly so your digestive system can adapt.

    1. Hi dan, Maybe you could space that 1/4 tsp. of garlic powder throughout your day. Sprinkle a little in salad dressing, a little in your beans, a little in avocado, etc.

    2. You’re probably right about the digestive system or moreover, the microbiome. I eat garlic regularly and like a lot of people who regularly eat garlic, we don’t get garlic breath or smell weird or anything–and obviously not going by our own assessment. I think the issue with a lot of people is the microbiome becoming adjusted to it is my guess as someone hypothesized on this website a while back.

      1. My dad does but we know it’s his regular scent !
        75 years old and he still
        Works out and isn’t on medications although hypertension and high cholesterol run in the family

        1. Hypertension and high cholesterol are NOT genetic diseases that they can “run in the family.” It might appear to run in the family because you all most likely grew up with the same unhealthy eating habits.

          1. 109 year old famous NYC investor Irving Kahn thought his long life was due to his love of work and a decent diet.
            He had 3 other siblings that also lived passed the age of 100, including 1 sister that thought the idea of a fun life was
            drinking, smoking and eating rich food.

            It turns out they all had genetic high levels of HDL cholesterol and a slightly under active thyroid or what would be
            a slightly elevated TSH.

            1. Yerky,

              The sister’s experience suggests that there are so many factors to consider when looking at what works for morbidity and mortality……

              Medicine is still very much in its infancy and there’s so much more to know. I’m think about George Burns and others who had similar lifestyles that certainly would be considered high risk, however they lived long prosperous lives.

              ‘Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

    3. Parsley! I have had sinus infections all my life and I began having candida infections in my sinuses from all the antibiotics. I lived overseas and the doctors just gave me more antibiotics so I had to take matters into my own hands. The pharmacy had parsley oil with parsley oil capsules and I took two before each meal. I was able to control the severity of the problem until I got back to a first-world country nearly two years later! People would step back when I told them what I was doing, and then they would say, “But I don’t smell garlic on you!” Unfortunately, the pharmacies stopped importing the capsules and I had to innovate.
      Banana-Peanut Butter-Garlic-Parsley Sandwiches became my best friend! Mince a clove of garlic and set it aside for 10 minutes to develop the antimicrobial factor. Slice the banana lengthwise and slather both sides with peanut butter. Sprinkle the minced garlic on and add fresh parsley sprigs. Put the banana pieces together and eat. It is definitely not “yum!”, but it makes it edible and stops the stomach irritation.

  2. We now keep garlic powder next to the pepper grinder — we sprinkle it on everything! But that’s because I like the taste. And because we’ve cut out added salt, and are looking for alternatives. It’s good to know that it may be healthy for us, even though I’m not sure we get up to 1/4 t a day (that would probably take a heavier hand than I have).

    I’ve also discovered vinegar, thanks in part to the commenters here who have extolled it’s taste — and they are right! Sprinkled on veggies and salads. Last night, I air fried sliced left-over steamed potatoes brushed with ACV and sprinkled with black pepper, and onion and garlic powder. Not too bad.

          1. Lola,

            I may be biased; I’m from WI, as is Penzey’s Spices. Plus, it’s family owned. And I liked their catalogs (now, sadly discontinued; I wish I’d saved older issues). Finally, there is a Penzey’s Spice store within walking distance of my house; I love walking around, inhaling all those wonderful aromas! And we like to support local businesses whenever possible.

            I don’t know how commercial spice sellers are rated. I may have other criteria.

            1. I’m a Penzey’s fan, too. McCormick can be good, but the quality is so variable. I used to buy Frontier because it’s organic, but I had some problems with them and now buy Prenzey’s. Penzey’s is consistently good. We also buy the roasted dry garlic for finishing dishes.

              Lucky you, having one of the stores nearby! I mail order, but they are quick.

              My CSA gives me lots of organic garlic bulbs through the fall, but I’ve just used the last one.

        1. This video is specifically about garlic powder. Many folks here, are speaking about ingesting garlic; yet, we know the dried powder and fresh cloves, even ones where they have been crushed and held the requisite 10 minutes before cooking, do not contain the same cancer fighting compound. This fact does not come out in the video. I have friends who will not cease ingesting their saturated fat, have high BP and poo-poo garlic powder, since their claim is that they eat enough regular garlic. Could you please comment on that?
          Thanks so much.

    1. Dr. J, as a salt alternative, you might really like Sari brand nutritional yeast. I’m not salt free, but I am low in sodium, but I have to be very careful when using nutritional yeast in a recipe to not add very much salt at all because for some reason, despite having 0%DV of sodium, it adds a salty flavor to the food. I didn’t notice this with other brands of nutritional yeast I’ve tried, maybe because they had a more vitamin-y taste as they were fortified.

  3. I eat pretty much a clove of raw garlic every other day. In fact sometimes 2 cloves of garlic. I am past 77 years old, and my physician has told me that he wishes he had my cholesterol, when he does my semi-annual blood test. I should add I go to the gym 7 days per week, for a full hour. What do I eat, you may ask. 2-3 pounds of raw fruits and vegs daily. Greek unflavored yogurt twice daily, and broiled or baked salmon 3-4 times per week. As the fellow said who jumped off the empire state building when passing the 50th floor — So far, so good !!! I love listening to the doctor and of course I subscribe and donate monthly.

    1. This comment was brought to you by the dairy and fish flesh industry. Visit facebook.com/bloodydairy and fishfeel.org and leave animals and their babies alone. There is NOTHING, I mean, NOTHING impressive about anything you typed when/if it all comes at the expense of others’ lives.

  4. I do take the Kyolic tablets per MD recommendation. The label states, “100% organically grown garlic bulbs.”…aged to perfection in a unique extraction process.” The success of the garlic powder implies al powders are dried garlic with no extraction. If the whole garlic is better than the extract, wouldn’t it be better to just eat the garlic clove rather than deal with powder?

        1. Hi, George! Aging can mean many things, and can include some type of fermentation. Garlic powder is dried, powdered garlic. I am not sure it is the aging that is the issue with the garlic pills, but the extraction process. It is often true that whole plants and plant products have benefits due to synergies between the multitude of phytochemicals present and our body chemistry, which are lost when specific compounds are extracted or isolated. In my personal opinion, fresh garlic is best, and garlic powder is a more portable, convenient, and slightly concentrated form of garlic that is preferred by some people. I hope that helps!

    1. The aging process to make Kyolic garlic supplements (in order to deodorize the garlic) removes many of the important photochemical constituents (which are believed to be beneficial to heart health and which have garlic odor). Only a few garlic compounds remain after the Kyolic garlic extract is produced. If you take garlic in a supplemental form be sure that you take one made from a garlic powder that has a gently controlled drying process (dried at about room temperature not at high heat) that retains the important phytochemicals found in fresh garlic to get the benefits. These retain the important odorful compounds but in vegan supplement form using a special drying process and/or have a special tablet coating can control the garlic odor. Some people who do not want to eat garlic every day do to the odor issues can find a quality garlic supplement a convenient way to get a daily dose of garlic, but of course eating your garlic daily is best.

    2. Traditionally we always have eaten garlic in raw form + little salt and a bit of lemon juice. We have used whole garlic pods in cooking .
      Pickled garlic with green chilies and ginger in olive oil is eaten on and with various vegetables & snacks

    3. Hi, Nancy! Garlic powder generally is just dried, ground or granulated garlic, possibly with an anti-clumping agent added. It is more concentrated than fresh garlic, because the water has been removed. Fresh garlic would certainly do the trick, although it may take more of it for this reason. Garlic powder is more portable, and some people find it more convenient than fresh. I hope that helps!

  5. I am so cheered by this one, which is wonderful considering how distressing I found the information on cut vegetables last week. It’s very good news to me that I can throw out that unused bottle of Kyolic Aged Garlic capsules. They gave me unbearable acid indigestion and reflux. I had really wanted to take them but had to stop. Funny thing is that I eat a lot of freshly mashed and cooked garlic, and sprinkle garlic powder on food – with no indigestion at all. It was just the capsules that got me. I’m so pleased that garlic powder helps, too, for days when I’m not adding a clove to dinner. As long as I eat my garlic at dinner, my morning shower washes off any of the scent I’ve sweated out.

  6. Whole Food Plant Based, I prefer the actual clove. I squash it and let it set so it can better release the nutrients. I do same for all vegetables in the allium family. My blood pressure usually runs low 90/70. Peace & Prayers

  7. There IS evidence that shows Kyolic garlic offers health benefits

    The Effect of Kyolic Aged Garlic Extract on Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Markers in Hypertensives: The GarGIC Trial –
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6297383/

    Breakthrough Clinical Study Shows Aged Garlic Extract Reverses Heart Disease –
    https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/breakthrough-clinical-study-shows-aged-garlic-extract-reverses-heart-disease-261531281.html

    The effect of aged garlic extract on blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors in uncontrolled –
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4734812/

    Australian Study on Kyolic Aged Garlic Extract and Hypertension – https://youtu.be/OL6Oh_8DgTs

    1. Greg

      Yes but my understanding is that the studies showing benefits for kyolic are pretty much all funded or even conducted by the company that owns the patent and manufactures the stuff. It is interesting that non industry funded studies (study?) failed to find a benefit. I wasn’t previously aware of that.

      I took kyolic for years and had read all the studies but gave up when I forced myself to recognise that there were no changes to my numbers (and it is darned expensive anyway). However, I must make an effort to regularly consume home ground/minced/chopped garlic. Like ginger it is readily available and affordable. The tablets were just so convenient though.

  8. In every case, I prefer to avoid supplements and go for the “real” thing – in this case garlic. If the recipe says one clove, I use 3. I’ve even started growing my own garlic (you won’t believe how many different varieties there are, and they don’t taste all the same). But, back to the point – isn’t it better to avoid the supplements (whose purity you can’t be sure of) and go for the thing itself?

    1. Arthur, you are right, but what do you expect?
      Is this website accredited by anything anywhere?
      Is it accredited by the same people who run the Mayo Clinic?

    2. Hi, Arthur! I agree, generally, that whole plant foods are better than supplements, because the beneficial effects of synergies between multiple phytochemicals and our own biochemistry may be lost when specific compounds are extracted. In addition, the whole plant food in this case is effective, and much less expensive than the supplement, especially if you are growing it yourself. I hope that helps!

  9. I’ve been taking Garlicin, an odorless type of garlic pill, for years. Is there a benefit, or would garlic powder be better? I also eat a fair amount of garlic with food as we’re garlic lovers.

    1. Unless it was put to the test I would personally stick to the powder given this information. You could even buy capsules and make your own. Though it’s so easy to sprinkle on food, garlic is good in almost any recipe.

    1. Hi, Lola! The general rule of thumb for dried herbs vs. fresh is that 1 part dried is roughly equivalent to 3 parts fresh, because the dried product has had the water removed, and is more concentrated. Garlic cloves can vary a great deal in size and potency, which makes it difficult to define the amount of garlic in a clove. If the cloves weigh about 3 times as much as the powder, then that is probably about right. I hope that helps!

  10. I looked up garlic for colds and flu.

    Partly because 1 of my worker’s and his whole family has the flu and another just got a call that his daughter is throwing up.

    Yes, I did not get a flu shot and haven’t had the flu in 20 years or something like that, but it seems like it might be getting close this year.

    So, do I run out and try to get a flu shot after having been exposed to it or try some garlic and just see what happens.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22280901

    1. According to a 2009 study curcumin can reduce viral replication by over 90 percent in laboratory cells infected with influenza varieties and also seemed to protect other cells from becoming infected. They said that they believe it is a viable candidate for treating influenza naturally, as it can interfere with the replication process in viruses and other microbes.

      I am going to be pulling out the golden milk today.

      1. Deb, go for the turmeric, but I have to say that I caught the flu this year for the first time in 20 years – regardless of my good diet (including turmeric and garlic), and even though I didn’t know of any exposure. It was very early in the season – they weren’t offering the flu shots to those under 65 yet in my area. We can give ourselves better odds, but there’s no contract or guarantee.

        1. Yeah, it is not a guarantee.

          So far, I still don’t have symptoms, but I am one of 3 people without symptoms and one of those has a daughter who is throwing up. I found out 2 more people showed up for work with symptoms today.

      2. Deb, I use L-lysine 500mg twice a day to fend off viral infections! Supposed to help inhibit viral replication. That, and a product called Repair Guard by Perque. It has lots of Quercetin and pomegranate extract , oh and chlorophyll. Introduced to this at my old practice by a functional medicine doc.

        As I type this I am fighting off the upper respiratory crud going around… I’ve dodged it from family and patients for a few months but got myself exhausted and BAM! Ugh. Oranges in the fridge!

        1. I want to add that I do NOT take lysine every day! Only when I feel something coming on… don’t want to mess up my lysine:arginine ratio.

          1. Yes, I take lysine whenever I feel a cold sore ‘tingle’ (herpes simplex virus) coming on. As you say, it inhibits viral replication. My lysine intake is often too low when for one reason or another my diet is heavy in grains and fruits and omits legumes. Whole grains are high in arginine. I used to regularly eat tempeh in Australia but it’s not available here (Philippines) and, in fact, I have only noticed tofu appearing in supermarkets within the last year (legumes are probably the best vegetarian source of lysine). My problem appears to be too much arginine and not enough lysine because my diet is high in grains

            Here is Jack Norris’ comment on vegans/vegetarians and lysine/arginine:

            “In comparing blood levels of amino acids between diet groups, vegans had lower levels of lysine, methionine, tryptophan, and tyrosine, and higher levels of alanine and glycine.

            Interestingly, arginine, a dietary concern for vegans with herpes virus, was actually lower in the blood of vegans, but not significantly. It was also lower in the diet (3.92 g/day for vegans vs. 4.13 g/day for meat-eaters; lacto-ovo vegetarians had the lowest intake at 3.36 g/day).”

            He adds

            “The takeaway message is that vegans, and particularly vegan women, should continue to make sure they eat plenty of lysine-rich foods”

            http://jacknorrisrd.com/category/protein/

            1. Mr. Fumblefingers,
              Where are you in the Philippines? I used to go to Healthy Options and if they didn’t have something, I would go on their website and request they get it. I made sure to tell them why they needed to carry it. The Tans are pretty good at listening. They now carry a couple items I suggested.

              1. Again for Mr Fumblefingers, tofu was sold in the markets in 1981 and I assume it still is. However, it had plaster of paris in it! We were able to find the real deal in the better super markets – even the NoriMu in the cartons in our later years there. It is there. You just have to look in the right places.

                1. Thanks Pat. I live on Mactan Island, Cebu. I’ve never seen tofu (tokwa) in the local markets only in supermarkets (and that’s only within the last year). Tempeh may possibly be available in Manila (although I have never seen it there) but is conspicuous by its absence here in Cebu.

                  I have to travel to Cebu city itself to find a Healthy Options outlet but they are expensive (no tempeh either). Also, they sell a lot of ‘keto’ and ‘paleo’ rubbish which puts me off somewhat …… although they seem to be just about the only source of actual whole grains here. ….. but sold at luxury prices instead of staple prices.

        2. Thanks, Jeanne.

          So far, I have used turmeric, garlic, and ginger and I ate a few oranges and gargled with salt water.

          I have saline nasal spray, and I will try it tonight, but it has backfired on me a few times when I was young where suddenly, after using it, I sounded and looked sick when I hadn’t had any symptoms before using it. I am not sure that it was to blame, but it happened twice as a young person and never tried it again, but they say it can kill viruses.

          I ended up scrambling today because we give Christmas gifts and with people sick, today was the day, and I had ordered baskets which are coming today, but I will never have the delivery be the day before ever again.

  11. Here’s how I use garlic. I take a few fresh cloves and a handful of spring onions, then blend them in a blender with some water to make a thick liquid, which I then refrigerate. I then put a couple of spoonfuls in my daily veggie soup, and the jar lasts for several days in the refridge.

    And I have never been attacked by a Vampire since doing this! Not saying it’s cause and effect, but maybe it’s just a coincidence :-)

  12. This was the first video that for me, raised more questions than it answered.
    – did anyone look at the more expensive garlic supplements to see what they contain?
    – How many of these supplements were tested? It just seems so hard to believe that garlic powder delivered in a capsule would do anything different than garlic power on a spoon.
    – Is there something about the way the body handles powder that enters via the mouth?
    – are there quality trials using unpowdered garlic cloves?
    – what if the dose was raised/lowered?
    – are there longer-term studies showing a continued therapeutic effect?
    Love your posts – they have helped me change my diet.

    1. Well one issue when it comes to supplements is that the supplement industry is very unreliable in both dosage and purity or even authenticity. More details on why kyloic didn’t work would be very helpful, I’m curious as well because it sounds like other studies showed garlic supplements to be effective unless I misinterpreted something somewhere along the line.

    2. Hi, super-high-calcium-score! Most of the studies conducted on supplements are funded by the manufacturers and are small studies, and their impacts are often exaggerated at best. I think the point is that supplements are expensive compared to actual garlic, and do not appear to be more effective. If you are interested, you can find everything on this site related to garlic here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/garlic/ I hope that helps!

      1. “Most of the studies conducted on supplements are funded by the manufacturers and are small studies, and their impacts are often exaggerated at best.”
        — – – – – – –

        I imagine the same coiuld be said of aspirin — Big Bayer and such. They’re trying to brainwash people in taking them for the rest of their (already overly drugged) lives. Forget about it! :-(

    3. Hey, super high calcium score, your screen name worries me as a person who had hyper-parathyroid and a real-life super high calcium score! It’s not a good thing, it will destroy your heart, weaken your bones and muddle your mind….

    1. Sebastian, I would like to know the answer to this as well, about the powder vs. fresh garlic, or are they assumed to have the same effect as each other. It sounds like a huge benefit and I’d like to do it the most reliable way. The answer may seem obvious that fresh is preferable, but I’m not qualified to assume that to be so.

  13. What about the fact that there’s no allicin in garlic powder, the active ingredient and only in freshly ground garlic, doesn’t that make garlic powder ineffective or significantly less effective?

    1. Kevin,

      Allicin is an antibiotic in garlic. Garlic has many other substances as well. It would seem these other substances have their own benefits as Dr Greger mentioned in an earlier video that garlic powder is effective at reducing lead symptoms.

      I glanced at a study indicating Kyolic is effective and the study was funded by Wakunaga so there’s that.

      1. Thanks Jack. You wouldn’t happen to have that link on the other benefits of garlic minus the allicin would you? Of course, I could just research on the site myself. thanks again and Happy Holidays! :)

      2. I wonder why kyolic was shown to not be effective in the study referenced in this video. I would definitely be weary of the outcome in the study funded by Wakunaga.

  14. We are plant based eaters and love Dr Greger’s videos and make a lot of his food from his HNTD Cookbook!

    We LOVE raw garlic and have eaten it for years and add it to everything. At least four cloves a day if not more and a couple of cloves, crushed, in our daily salads. Not bothered with people stepping back! It is SO good for us…… :)

    1. The chlorophyll in your salad no doubt helps mitigate any garlic odor. I take chlorophyll tablets for the purpose although I also eat a lot of raw vegetables.

  15. Advice please? For several months been using small jars of minced garlic. Super convenient and delicious. Ingredients are garlic, water and phosphoric acid. (No oil = yay). 1/2 teaspoon equals about 1 clove. Made by “Goya”. Tastes like I minced it myself. Wondering if it’s just as healthy as chopping myself or does the PHOSPHORIC ACID added affect anything health related?

    1. Hi, Gary! The main difference between garlic granules and garlic powder is texture. Garlic powder is ground more finely than garlic granules. Some products of each type may include something to prevent caking. Otherwise, garlic powder and garlic granules are essentially the same. You can find everything on this site related to garlic here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/garlic/ I hope that helps!

  16. I’ve seen garlic and parsley combined, presumably to counter any after taste or garlic breath.

    But personally I used to take fresh garlic peeled and thinly sliced up into apple sauce (along with moringa powder but that’s beside the point) and letting it rest for a bit. Granted I did not chew it but simply swallowed it quickly.

    I got out of the habit of doing that but recently found some little jars of peeled garlic in salt water. I normally just use the cloves for cooking. Anyone have any dope on whether or not the brine water destroys the garlic’s benefical properties?

    1. Forgot to mention… I’ve bought those long netted tubes of garlic and to keep them from drying out before using all, I would peel the cloves and put them in jars and cover them with coconut oil to preserve them.

  17. What are your thoughts about freeze dried garlic? I’ve recently purchased Litehouse brand (Germany) and it tastes well and is chunkier instead of powder. We enjoy it. Your opinion about it please.

    1. Hi, Ruthie! Freeze-drying is just a process for drying garlic. I think it may be faster than other drying processes, and may in some cases preserve foods with less loss of phytochemicals. I don’t know that it has been specifically put to the test compared to other methods of drying garlic. I think it is probably about the same. You can find everything on this site related to garlic here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/garlic/ I hope that helps!

  18. When my hub was alive I used to make chicken Parmesan with lots of garlic cloves at least once a week. He sometimes took a portion to his older sister, who lived alone and didn’t like to cook. However, we had to take the garlic off first. She was an accountant for a biggie law firm on Wall Street and was afraid of “offending.”

    I once told a friend that I ate a lot of garlic. She replied, “Yes, I know…I can smell it on you.” Ouch, right? :-(

    I used to watch Ryan and Angi’s channel (Happy Healthy Vegans), and on one of their shows they said they never ate garlic or onions. Caused quite a stir, as I remember. Maybe for this reason?

    http://www.krishna.com/why-no-garlic-or-onions

    1. Garlic used to bother me and I would taste it for hours after and would burp it up.

      Something changed.

      None of the things that used to bother me bother me anymore.

      I always loved garlic and onions, but then couldn’t eat them and now I can.

      I wonder if something happened in my gut microbiome or oral microbiome that switched how my body responds.

      1. Thanks, Darwin — yup, back in the days when Dr. G. wasn’t too busy to hang out with the folks. :-) Interesting comments.

        I read the transcript instead. But I found the spot that you referred to, saying that garlic was “No. 1” for all sorts of ailments. No. 1….No. 1…..No. 1.

        So many conflicting reports/opinions about a great variety of foods! Some say red onions are healthier than other onions. The website I posted said they cause whatever they do (a dry cough?).

        I’d still like to know why Ryan and Angi avoid garlic and onions.

    2. Parsley is the answer to the smell. I learned years and years ago that the oil in parsley “deodorizes” the smell in the blood. Our breath is bad because the lungs pull it out of the blood and we breathe it out. Right or wrong, I have used garlic and parsley together for many years and people comment they don’t smell me when they find out I eat raw garlic. That’s all I need to hear.

  19. I appreciate Dr. Greger’s research almost as much as I enjoy garlic. Not powder but what looks and is the more natural state of garlic. Alas! I commented above re: my jars of minced garlic with water and phosphoric acid added. I have been doing my homework and although I don’t believe I consume phosphoric acid in anything else, there’s info on how it’s a possible RUST remover! Dr G—can I then rightfully call it an ANTIOXIDANT? Just kidding. Just being silly. In truth, I’m disappointed that a garlic product seemingly so close to the genuine item receives mixed reviews. Just sharing some research in case anyone else out there likes the convenience as I had and was wondering. I guess I’ll get my garlic press out of storage for as much as I delight in the science of Dr. Greger’s Garlic Powder info, I just don’t like the taste of garlic powder.

  20. To the topic people, I like the carotid intima-media thickness topic very much.

    I know that pomegranate juice has a study.

    Can we have a fruits and vegetables and spices versus carotid intima-media thickness, like we have foods versus cancer?

    1. If I could take a flashing light and point it at the “Foods versus” studies, I would.

      Foods versus cholesterol. Foods versus triglycerides.

      All the heart topics would be fun.

      Foods versus A1C.

      1. Absolutely. I read the pomegranate juice study but anything new? That sort of spotlight.

        Also, any new food versus studies re: say, soy and cancer prevention.

        Carotid arteries (reversal of occlusion) is so important. The lists are endless.

  21. With reference to the Blue Zone groups of people who live the longest, I can’t imagine that they (like Okinawans) are into supplements which leads me to wonder why supplements are being recommended and if RDAs even matter or make sense.

    1. John Bercik, you are right, but what do you expect?
      Is this website accredited by anything anywhere?
      Is it accredited by the same people who run the WebMD?

    2. Garlic powder is merely dehydrated ground whole garlic. it is therefore arguably a minimally processed whole food.

      To my mind, supplements are isolated extracts, vitamins and minerals eg vitamin C D, E etc tablets and capsules IMHO, died herbs and spices like garlic powder are a different beast altogether

  22. Recognizing of course that “garlic powder” is a concentrated form of garlic… what would be the amount of “raw garlic” needed to achieve the same health benefits as the stated 800mg (1/4 tsp) garlic powder?

  23. I eat raw garlic. I press it, wait 15 min. like Deb, chop it up, and put it in Trader Joe’s hummus. Yummy! I appreciate the studies and I think they did that because it is easy to hide a control. Clinical herbalists mention that raw garlic is more powerful. Dr. Greger mentioned that in supplements, you don’t know what they really put into it. Wasn’t it found that 25% of supplements had absolutely none of the claimed ingredients? I’d rather know that I am really, actually consuming garlic. PLus, the smell doesn’t bother my wife and she prefers it because she knows no other girls will be nearing me.

  24. I use 2-3 cloves of raw garlic in all dinner entrees as well as another in salad dressings. As for garlic powder, I only recently started using it in Dr Gregers how not to die cookbook’s “Savory Spice” blend.
    I sprinkle the blend on lots of foods from soups to Chili and popcorn. You’ll really get all you need from the recipes in the cookbook.

      1. YR (YeahRight) – I think Dan was enjoying his good fortune at such an inexpensive pleasure in the name of his own health.
        Are you always so concrete and caustic? or just most of the time . ..

        1. Are you always so concrete and caustic? or just most of the time . ..
          ————————————————————————————–
          She’s a leopard… these are her spots. ‘-)

  25. Hello, Dr Greger and NutritionFacts team!

    Thanks for phenomenal video!

    I kindly ask you to make a comment on that article in Lancet – “Association of dairy intake with cardiovascular disease and
    mortality in 21 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study”, 2018 by Dehghan et al.

    It is included in “Eric Topol’s list of biomedical dogmas challenged by evidentiary shakeups in 2018” [that is well recognized though unofficial list of ~greatest breakthroughs in Biomedical research] and is summarized as “Dairy products are not bad for your healh; rather associated with less cardiovascular events”.

    I truly believe that this study worth some in-depth dissection. And also I do believe that NutritionFacts team is well equipped with knowledge and experience to comment on aforementioned study’s conclusions.

    All best,
    I.

    1. Yes, the community has discussed this extensively on many occasions.

      In essence, the PURE studies were led by a highly motivated team at McMaster University, where they have been promoting saturated fat, low carb diets, and higher sodium consumption for a long time. McMaster U was once described as a ‘partner’ by Canadian Dairy Farmers but they have since taken down the page listing the universityies and other bodies receiving funding from them. Dairy foods are high in saturated fat and sodium and low in carbs.

      In essence, the PURE studies are confounded observational studies which compare rich people and rich countries with good public health and hospital systems, with poor people and poor countries that do not have such things. Poor people have higher mortality while rich people eat more dairy and other animal foods.

      Many critical analyses have been made of these PURE studies ny international and US experts. No credible health authority anywhere thinks they provide a reason to change current guidelines on saturated fat, dairy or sodium consumption.

    1. Hi, Kathleen Corum! There are many reasons a person might have very low blood pressure. Since you did not say what your numbers are, I don’t know how low yours is. What many people consider to be very low is actually ideal. Low blood pressure can have a genetic component. My mother had low blood pressure, and so do I. Lifestyle factors also affect blood pressure, and people who exercise regularly, maintain normal weight, and consume whole plant-based diets tend to have lower blood pressure. Hypothyroidism can also cause low blood pressure.
      If you have always had low blood pressure, and it does not make you dizzy or lightheaded, then it should not be a problem. If there are concerns, it is a good idea to see a doctor to rule out medical causes for very low blood pressure. Garlic is not a hypertension medication, and although it can help manage high blood pressure, it is not likely to further lower blood pressure that is already low. You can find everything on this site related to blood pressure here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/blood-pressure/ Everything about thyroid health may be found here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/thyroid-health/ and everything on this site related to garlic may be found here: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/garlic/ I hope that helps!

      1. Yes my blood pressure has been as low as 70 over 45. And yes, I have fainted. I have orthostatic intolerance which I understand to be a neurological problem which water intake helps, although *not caused by* low blood pressure directly. That is per Dr Greger, a negative side effect of calorie restriction. My cardiologist has suggested taking 5000 mg of sodium per day to combat it. Because I got so much push back on this site for sodium intake, I haven’t done that. Although I am not convinced that reducing my sodium intake is a good idea. My thyroid numbers have always been within normal ranges, so far. I feel like I’m a walking dead. My heart rate is also low 49 bpm. And I tend to be cold a lot … cold feet and hands.

        So I take it that you believe garlic isn’t an issue for me.

      2. OH, and P.S. I had atrial fibrillation a couple years ago and have had the ablation procedure … which so far has been successful.

  26. Hmm, I wonder if as a result, Dr. Greger will update his Daily Dozen to include 1/4 teaspoon of garlic powder, like he does for tumeric? I try to get the 1/4 teaspoon of tumeric each day, but it’s hard when I don’t have a salad or soup – I tend to mix it w/ my daily tablespoon of ground flax…but sometimes that changes the texture of the food! Thanks.

  27. I really don’t like garlic (or shallots) at all. I taste it for days after eating just a quarter teaspoon of garlic powder. It makes me a little sick to my stomach. Can I get similar benefits from eating onion instead?

  28. I’ve been trying this since I saw it on your Facebook page recently. Easy enough to incorporate and I love garlic but not loving the garlic aftertaste for hours and twice a day to boot. Don’t want to become unenamoured of garlic. If I made my own capsules with garlic powder inside in the amount specified is there any downside to doing this in terms of efficacy? I assume a hard vegan capsule will readily dissolve in the stomach after contact with water.

  29. Comparing the AGE with garlic extract studies was hardly a fair match up. The AGE patients were drugged to the eyeballs with other medications and only received AGE for 4 weeks whilst the garlic trial had no cofounders and lasted 3 months. There are other studies on AGE that have shown positive results

  30. Great research and news. I use both garlic powder and the natural fresh garlic cloves in my diet and seasoning but never thought the powdered garlic would be so beneficial, as this article clearly states. In general, I usually believe the most unaltered and natural state of a vegetable, herb or spice holds “secret’ or undiscovered compounds that can be beneficial to our health in ways science has yet to ascertain. There is no doubt however that garlic powder source provides an easy accessibility for any meal or location. Thank you.

  31. Dr. Greger, please know that I am on board 100% with your presentations but
    it is very distracting to have you in the videos. I really want to look at the research
    and concentrate on WHAT you are presenting. Please go back to the older format
    that concentrates on showing the research and statements. The present format
    of showing you giving a lecture while flashing research in the background is
    really confusing. If this keeps up, I’d rather just read the blog. Thanks, B P.

  32. I have commented on this earlier. The issue I have with this post is not the content, but, the lack of stating whether raw or cooked garlic [with the aforementioned chop & hold 10 min before heat] still gives us the protection for those with high BP. I have friends who will eat animals ’til *they* die, or, there are no more abattoirs functioning, which, if one is paying attention to the poor Aussies, may become an eventuality. These folks say: “We already eat enough raw and cooked garlic so we don’t need the powder.” I understand the powder does not have allicin due to the heat brought on.

    I interpret this video as only garlic powder giving us the protection, not other forms. What isn’t identified is the compounds inherent in the powder giving stupit humans the benefit.

  33. How did you come to the conclusion that Kyolic isn’t effective? Yes it’s expensive, but there is a ton of clinical data supporting it’s efficacy, and I’m pretty sure it performs better than standard garlic powder in a lot of research.

  34. Hello,
    In “21 Tweaks,” Dr. Greger encourages individuals to eat a one-quarter teaspoon serving of garlic powder per day.

    Also, Dr. Greger’s nutritional philosophy is centered on a whole foods plant-based perspective in which the processing of plant-based foods is minimized.

    Therefore, would it not be more nutritious and beneficial to eat an equivalent serving of raw garlic daily rather than eat an equivalent amount of garlic powder, which is more processed and less fresh than raw garlic?

    It would seem that raw garlic would have more nutrients than garlic powder since raw garlic is fresh, contains some water/moisture, and perhaps contains some constituents that the garlic powder may not since garlic powder is dried.

    Perhaps a study of raw garlic versus garlic powder needs to be conducted.

    Thank you for your help.

    Best regards!

    1. Hello A; I think that while others have said the same thing, all of us who follow Dr.G on this single-minded site must “follow the science”. The article is specific when it cites papers that suggest and give evidence for using powder to combat high BP. C’est tout! By all means, eye and others will continue to eat raw and cooked garlic doing the chop and hold for 10 minutes, *but* the powder is what combats high BP.

  35. Just wondering. I’d love for this to work, but what about the Stanford Report study: Stanford study drives stake through claims that garlic lowers cholesterol levels

    FEB 26 2007
    STANFORD, Calif. – When it comes to lowering cholesterol levels, garlic stinks, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Despite decades of conflicting studies about the pungent herb’s ability to improve heart health, the researchers say their study provides the most rigorous evidence to date that consuming garlic on a daily basis – in the form of either raw garlic or two of the most popular garlic supplements – does not lower LDL cholesterol levels among adults with moderately high cholesterol levels.

    “It just doesn’t work,” said senior author Christopher Gardner, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center. “There’s no shortcut. You achieve good health through eating healthy food. There isn’t a pill or an herb you can take to counteract an unhealthy diet.”

    Christopher Gardner discusses how the garlic used in the study was prepared.
    Gardner said the study, published in the Feb. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, is the first independent, long-term, head-to-head assessment of raw garlic and garlic supplements. The study also drew on the expertise of two of the nation’s foremost garlic experts – Larry Lawson, PhD, of the Plant Bioactives Research Institute in Utah, and Eric Block, PhD, professor of chemistry at the University at Albany, State University of New York – who have devoted much of their careers to understanding the biochemical properties of the herb and who ensured the quality and stability of the garlic consumed in the study.
    “If garlic was going to work, in one form or another, then it would have worked in our study,” Gardner said. “The lack of effect was compelling and clear. We took cholesterol measurements every month for six months and the numbers just didn’t move. There was no effect with any of the three products, even though fairly high doses were used.”

    1. Tina, high cholesterol is not high blood pressure. While animal foods may be causative on both counts, Dr. G’s post stands as powder VS ^BP. Best to ditch the animal foods that cause high cholesterol, since our bodies produce all the cholesterol they need. But, then you’d be soloing agin the taste for flesh. Bonne chance! hahaha

  36. Here’s info on the actual study: Stanford Report, January 15, 2003

    Fresh or capsuled? Researcher studies garlic’s potency as a supplement

    By SARA SELIC

    What good is garlic? And to reap any benefits, should you eat it in its odiferous fresh form or will a stink-free capsule suffice? Christopher Gardner, PhD, a researcher at the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, is on a mission to find out.

    Thanks to a grant from the National Institutes of Health, Gardner is conducting the most rigorous study ever to address a lingering controversy in the nutritional-supplement field: whether fresh garlic and garlic supplements — a widely consumed herbal supplement — lower cholesterol as claimed.

    Food service workers carefully peel garlic in preparation for an unusual study conducted by Christopher Gardner. Gardner and his team are comparing the effectiveness of garlic taken in supplement form to garlic eaten fresh. Study volunteers must agree to eat a number of garlic-infused specialty sandwiches. PHOTO: COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER GARDNER

    In preparation for the study — which is seeking volunteers and entails eating gourmet sandwiches six days a week — Gardner’s staff spent two weeks peeling, mashing and measuring 150 pounds of fresh garlic. That’s on top of the weeks they spent taste-testing a dozen custom-made sandwiches ranging from Portobello mushroom to chicken quesadilla.

    The Stanford study differs greatly from the dozens of garlic studies conducted over the past four decades, Gardner explained.

    While previous studies tested different garlic preparations with inconsistent and often inadequate potency, the Stanford researchers know the exact chemical composition of the garlic preparations they’re using and will monitor this throughout the study with periodic chemical analyses. And unlike previous studies, which tested just one garlic type, the Stanford study will evaluate the effects of two top-selling garlic supplements along with fresh garlic.

    “This study goes far beyond the other trials, because we know exactly what we’re giving participants,” said Gardner, assistant professor of medicine. “These results should help set the record straight.”

    For centuries, garlic has been touted for its disease-fighting properties. The most commonly claimed benefit is reduced cholesterol, although garlic is also said to reduce blood pressure, boost antioxidants and reduce the risk of certain cancers. Seeking such benefits without eating (or smelling like) garlic, millions of Americans take garlic supplements — pills containing powdered garlic or aged-garlic extract.

    Meanwhile, researchers sought to determine whether garlic deserves its reputation. More than two dozen studies in the 1970s and ‘80s claimed to prove that garlic lowers cholesterol, but the studies were later criticized for poor design. They involved too few participants or didn’t include a control group, for example. When more-rigorous studies were conducted in the 1990s, most concluded that garlic offered little to no significant benefit.

    Gardner said the question remains unsettled because chemical analyses conducted by Larry Lawson, PhD, a biochemist and co-investigator for Stanford’s study, revealed serious flaws in the formulations of the garlic supplements used in past studies. The key issue is allicin, an enzyme that is garlic’s active ingredient.

    When a person eats fresh garlic, allicin is released by chewing or mincing the herb. It’s more challenging to get allicin from a garlic pill, however. In some cases, if the pills dissolve in the stomach, the garlic enzyme needed to produce allicin becomes inactivated.

    Some pills, meanwhile, have an enteric coating, and these pills often pass through the body undissolved. “The problem is, all these studies didn’t really test garlic — they tested garlic supplements,” Gardner said. “That’s not the same as eating garlic.”

    To select the fresh garlic for the study, Gardner traveled to Gilroy, Calif., the nation’s “garlic capital.” An eight-person team spent two weeks peeling and mashing the garlic, then scooping it into 5-gram containers.

    The premeasured garlic portions will be spread onto the gourmet “study sandwiches” that participants in the “fresh garlic group” must eat six days a week.

    All other participants must eat the sandwiches as well, but minus the garlic. The six types of sandwiches used in the study were chosen in taste tests from a larger sample all custom-prepared by a chef. “This isn’t your typical clinical trial. It’s a lot of fun,” Gardner said.

    Participants in the Stanford study — 200 healthy adults with moderately elevated cholesterol — will consume the sandwiches along with study tablets for six months. Random assignment will be used to determine which combination of sandwich and pill will be given to each participant in the trial.

    Participants’ cholesterol, blood pressure, blood-clotting ability and antioxidant levels will be monitored periodically.

    Volunteers must be between ages 30 and 65 and in good health but have moderately elevated cholesterol (LDL of 130-190). And, they must agree to eat their allotted “study sandwiches” six days a week.

    “We only want people who like our sandwiches,” Gardner said, adding, “We’ve gone to enormous lengths to make sure they’re excellent.”

  37. What is the difference between the garlic powder and the raw garlic, in term of effectiveness. Because I knew of processing has effect on nutrients content of most plant?

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