Benefits of Tea Tree Oil for Warts & Cold Sores

Benefits of Tea Tree Oil for Warts & Cold Sores
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Does tea tree oil have enough antiviral activity to combat HSV-1 and papilloma viruses, the causes of cold sores and common warts respectively?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“It has been reported that essential oils show not only anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities, but also antiviral activity.” But, it’s also been reported that “Bigfoot Kept Lumberjack as Love Slave.”

What does the science show? How about pitting essential oils against HSV-1, the herpes virus that causes cold sores?

There’s a drug called acyclovir that helps, but now there are drug-resistant strains. And so, they were looking for other alternatives, and they found that a variety of essential oils at a concentration of just one percent could totally suppress the replication of the virus—including tea tree oil, peppermint, and on down the list. But, this was in a petri dish—what about in people?

Recurrent cold sores affect as many as 20–40 percent. Tea tree oil appeared to work in vitro, so they undertook a randomized, placebo-controlled study “to evaluate the efficacy of topically applied [tea tree oil] in the treatment of [recurrent cold sores].” A 6 percent tea tree oil gel versus placebo gel five times a day and…the average healing time seemed to be a few days shorter, and the virus wiped out a little earlier. But, “none of the differences between groups reached statistical significance”—meaning that small a difference could have just been due to chance. They blamed the sample size, but maybe tea tree oil just didn’t work. 

It would be interesting to put lemongrass oil to the test, since it was the only one still effective at wiping out viral activity at even a 10 times lower dose—0.1 percent—but it doesn’t look like that’s ever been done.

What about warts? Warts are caused by viruses, too. Irish researchers reported a case of successful topical treatment of hand warts in a pediatric patient with tea tree oil. A seven-year-old girl with six warts on the tip of one of her fingers, so heavily clustered as to distort the appearance of her finger, interfering with her writing and piano lessons. She had undergone the standard caustic treatment where you paint them with acid, but they just came back with a vengeance. So, her doctors figured, what the heck, and suggested applying straight tea tree oil. And, after five days, all warts had considerably reduced in size, and in another week, they were all gone. And they didn’t come back.

Not bad compared to conventional wart treatments, which can be really painful; whereas, in this case, the tea tree oil appeared to work with no side effects—only affecting the warts, in contrast to the standard acid treatments, which can damage the surrounding tissue. So, they make an urgent call for randomized, controlled trials, but who’s gonna fund that? It’s like pennies per dose.

But the reason we’d particularly like to see randomized trials for wart treatments is that they tend to get better on their own, disappearing without any treatment typically within a year or two. That’s why “since antiquity it has been believed that warts can be removed by various magical processes.” You pay some witch doctor, your warts go away on their own, and they take the credit. 

Surprisingly, such “charming” of warts was actually put to the test, and… had no effect on the warts. It’s interesting how they do these studies, though. Like this study on whether warts can be prayed away. They used like a placebo prayer, so people didn’t know whether they were in the prayed-for group or not, to exclude the possibility that they mind-over-mattered their own wart cure. That’s been put to the test, too; they used a “magic wand” secretly connected to a circuit such that it tingled when the wand touched the wart, to maximize any placebo effect. And the patients were mostly “unsophisticated Negroes,” wrote these Sixties scientists. Yet, despite their purported “deep belief in magic,” more warts actually disappeared spontaneously in the untreated group compared to the magic-wanded ones, with “no hint of [the mere] suggestion of magical cures being effective.”

I was surprised studies like this were not only performed, but published in decent journals. Evidently, publication followed a considerable debate among the journal editors, but they wanted to “keep an open mind,” they said—”but not so open that [their] brains fall out.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Jojo via wikimedia.org. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“It has been reported that essential oils show not only anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities, but also antiviral activity.” But, it’s also been reported that “Bigfoot Kept Lumberjack as Love Slave.”

What does the science show? How about pitting essential oils against HSV-1, the herpes virus that causes cold sores?

There’s a drug called acyclovir that helps, but now there are drug-resistant strains. And so, they were looking for other alternatives, and they found that a variety of essential oils at a concentration of just one percent could totally suppress the replication of the virus—including tea tree oil, peppermint, and on down the list. But, this was in a petri dish—what about in people?

Recurrent cold sores affect as many as 20–40 percent. Tea tree oil appeared to work in vitro, so they undertook a randomized, placebo-controlled study “to evaluate the efficacy of topically applied [tea tree oil] in the treatment of [recurrent cold sores].” A 6 percent tea tree oil gel versus placebo gel five times a day and…the average healing time seemed to be a few days shorter, and the virus wiped out a little earlier. But, “none of the differences between groups reached statistical significance”—meaning that small a difference could have just been due to chance. They blamed the sample size, but maybe tea tree oil just didn’t work. 

It would be interesting to put lemongrass oil to the test, since it was the only one still effective at wiping out viral activity at even a 10 times lower dose—0.1 percent—but it doesn’t look like that’s ever been done.

What about warts? Warts are caused by viruses, too. Irish researchers reported a case of successful topical treatment of hand warts in a pediatric patient with tea tree oil. A seven-year-old girl with six warts on the tip of one of her fingers, so heavily clustered as to distort the appearance of her finger, interfering with her writing and piano lessons. She had undergone the standard caustic treatment where you paint them with acid, but they just came back with a vengeance. So, her doctors figured, what the heck, and suggested applying straight tea tree oil. And, after five days, all warts had considerably reduced in size, and in another week, they were all gone. And they didn’t come back.

Not bad compared to conventional wart treatments, which can be really painful; whereas, in this case, the tea tree oil appeared to work with no side effects—only affecting the warts, in contrast to the standard acid treatments, which can damage the surrounding tissue. So, they make an urgent call for randomized, controlled trials, but who’s gonna fund that? It’s like pennies per dose.

But the reason we’d particularly like to see randomized trials for wart treatments is that they tend to get better on their own, disappearing without any treatment typically within a year or two. That’s why “since antiquity it has been believed that warts can be removed by various magical processes.” You pay some witch doctor, your warts go away on their own, and they take the credit. 

Surprisingly, such “charming” of warts was actually put to the test, and… had no effect on the warts. It’s interesting how they do these studies, though. Like this study on whether warts can be prayed away. They used like a placebo prayer, so people didn’t know whether they were in the prayed-for group or not, to exclude the possibility that they mind-over-mattered their own wart cure. That’s been put to the test, too; they used a “magic wand” secretly connected to a circuit such that it tingled when the wand touched the wart, to maximize any placebo effect. And the patients were mostly “unsophisticated Negroes,” wrote these Sixties scientists. Yet, despite their purported “deep belief in magic,” more warts actually disappeared spontaneously in the untreated group compared to the magic-wanded ones, with “no hint of [the mere] suggestion of magical cures being effective.”

I was surprised studies like this were not only performed, but published in decent journals. Evidently, publication followed a considerable debate among the journal editors, but they wanted to “keep an open mind,” they said—”but not so open that [their] brains fall out.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Jojo via wikimedia.org. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Isn’t that crazy about wart “charming”? Got some videos coming up in a few months on the use of duct tape for warts—stay tuned!

I think this is my first video on treating common warts. For genital warts (which is caused by a different virus), see:

This is part of my extended video series on tea tree oil. For more on what it can and can’t do, check out:

For treating canker sores (like on the inside of your lip), see:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

59 responses to “Benefits of Tea Tree Oil for Warts & Cold Sores

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    1. “Due to stress” is indeed what I learned in my virology class at university. Was taught that after an outbreak the virus remains in the nerves as a latent infection, which can be triggered into outbreak state again by stress – either ‘psychological’ or physical e.g. exposure to cold or other environmental stressors.

    2. Have been using 500 mg lysine to keep cold sores at bay for many years. Recent studies show a link between herpes simplex and alzheimers…so I now take 2xs per day. Supposed to be a conflict between arginine and lysine….arginine tends to encourage herpes?

      Lysine tends to repress some viral infections? I never had serious issues…just occasional outbreaks…long ago….usually during stressful periods.

      Not sure what the effect of “discouraging” arginine is though. Hope I’m not hurting it’s feelings…

  1. Your thoughts on Licopenes as the cause of a leaky gut? Dr.Stephen Grundy’s philosophy that whole wheat, tomatoes,eggplant, and other grains that contain licopenes cause leaky gut.
    This seams to go against the grain of what i thought??

    thanks
    tony

    1. Gundy makes tons of money on his lectins theory because every desperate person with gut problems will buy his book to read his nonsense, Drs. get no nutritional training in med school, they essentially know nothing more than the population as a whole, and often less, so the impressive Dr. in his title means nothing. (I also wouldn’t doubt he gets a hefty “incentive” from the big industries who sponsor this kind of propaganda). There are of course doctors who did pursue nutrition separately, and that’s is precisely why this site exists… FREE of any financial gain or sponsorship, and any proceeds from his books going to charity. From the effects of all the pesticides, chemicals, and antibiotics used in agriculture, to the effects of the S.A.D. on our poor microbiomes, there are plenty of desperate suffering people willing to buy into the OPINION of some supposed authority, who actually have no science to back them. In fact, all good science has disproven his and others flights of imagination in their quest for popularity and wealth. Stick with evidence based science… https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gundrys-the-plant-paradox-is-wrong/

    2. Hi, Tony! Please check out this video for Dr. Greger’s input on Dr. Gundry’s “The Plant Paradox”: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gundrys-the-plant-paradox-is-wrong/?lang=buffer58386&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer. Diets centered on whole plant foods such as whole grains, tomatoes, eggplant, etc. are a common thread among Blue Zones around the world (areas containing the healthiest, longest-lived populations). Whole grains in particular are “associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, strokes, total cancer, and mortality from all causes put together, meaning people who eat whole grains tend to live longer, and, get fewer ‘respiratory diseases, infectious diseases, diabetes, and all non-cardiovascular, non-cancer causes'”. Tomatoes too have been shown to reduce systemic inflammation, aid in weight loss, reduce cholesterol, and act as inflammatory mediators. Lycopene obtained from whole foods such as tomatoes is a powerful antioxidant that can prevent cancer and protect against DNA damage (see here: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/lycopene-supplements-vs-prostate-cancer/ and here: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/tomato-sauce-vs-prostate-cancer/).

      For more information on leaky gut and gut health, please see these topics pages:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/leaky-gut-theory/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/microbiome/

    1. I had a plantar’s wart on my little toe that could not be killed after 3 months of using the various over the counter products. Then I got out the Apple Cider Vinegar and within a month the wart was gone. No more funding of the pharmaceutical companies for me. Apple Cider Vinegar with the Mother is my wart treatment of choice.

  2. If I look at the evidence and use some common sense nothing topical could possibly kill a wart off as they go fairly deep, too deep for a topical to affect it.
    There are two practical ways to kill a wart. One is to let your immune system kill it. The other is to remove it by freezing it to it’s base or cutting it out or similarly destroying the whole thing. So if we want to get fancy we need to figure out a way to get the immune system to get rid of that wart sooner than later.
    In this way it is similar to cancer treatments that involve the immune system. Do that consistently I bet you will win a Nobel Prize.

    1. I’ve killed plantar warts with duct tape. You have to keep it covered without a break for six weeks, so that means new tape after showers and maybe wearing a sock at night to keep the tape from working loose in the bedclothes, but it sure worked for me many years ago. Maybe it worked because the wart needed an air supply, which was cut off by the constant covering. I don’t know.

      1. Hey Rebecca, I didn’t know duct tape would work for plantar’s warts.. good to know! I suggested the tape to Bree this morning for ordinary warts ..but worked for our son and didn’t take long.

        I was going to ask you Rebecca if you saw the link I left for you last week? https://www.bbc.com/news/health-46291919 I thought I recalled you saying that you used d-mannose at one point. Forgive me if I’m wrong, but I thought this link interesting anyway!

        1. Barb,

          Thanks for this. I missed your message last week. I don’t always click the button that sends all the email from the entire world of Dr G’s commenters, and with company and Thanksgiving last week, I didn’t click any.

          That is an interesting article. My husband and my cousin’s husband are both prone to UTIs (old guys and their prostates, you know?) so they take d mannose daily to help prevent a return. It sure beats getting an UTI and having Cipro prescribed. That stuff is truly ugly. Some people have suffered permanent damage to their abilities to function with as little of one dose of Cipro or its’ cousins. Maybe our guys are also staving off cancer.

    2. Yes they go deep…they have “roots”. Many moons ago I had one start on my face next to my nose and I said…no way.

      So I used a combo of nail clippers and tweezers to eventually remove it. Actually a minor operation. There was a slight infection…but things healed within a month to where you couldn’t see where it had been.

      I’m a professional idiot…do not try this at home…go to a neighbor’s house?

  3. Really great video, maybe your best to date. I laughed so hard at one point that I fell from my chair. May have broken left wrist. . . .X rays are pending. HA HA.

    When any experiment does not yield results that are “statistically significant” it is a too-common, yet really stupid, tactic in discussion sections of papers to either overtly state (or more commonly plant a hint via subtle verbiage) that a significant treatment effect would of course have been observed “had the sample size been larger”. NO !! Not necessarily!! Such statements have all sorts of concealed assumptions that are crude, corrupting, and just BS.

    The only way that a significant result could issue would be if a significant difference were in fact obtained from a Repeat Experiment properly designed ahead of time, and in which said Repeat Experiment had the capability up front to detect with a very low error rate some arbitrarily chosen clinical difference (i.e. “detect” meaning signal significant departure from null if observed p-value less than .05, or .01, etc.). Whenever I encounter any article using the odious “if only sample size had been larger” gambit to weasel around the failure to obtain a significant experimental result, I conclude that I am reading the output of an inexperienced, lost, and statistically naive scientist. Mr. Hemingway argued that a good writer needed a mind equipped with a reliable BS detector. That is also good advice for all who would READ the literature of our various healthcare branches — it is particularly, but sadly, the case even for stuff published in our “best journals”.

  4. Disappointed in this video. A serious cause of stress for many people, and instead of serious information we get minutes of Greger seemingly implicitly linking a known antiviral with albeit limited clinical evidence to witchcraft and woo-woo for no real reason. Yes we all know the limits of case studies compared to the almighty randomized double blind placebo controlled study. Could leave it at that (with a “it costs pennies, so why not?” that he applies to so many plant based foods), instead of adding on minutes of unrelated nonsense. I have a loved one who suffers with the same issue of warts on the hands, has tried the Dr’s treatments of liquid N2 and salicylic acid to no avail. While not painful (though the treatments are) it does cause him emotional distress. Saw that there was a 5 minute video on the topic and was looking forward to lots of good information, instead got minutes of listening to someone make fun of the situation on the topic of medieval magic tricks as if they have any comparison to a demonstrated in vitro (and limitied clinical) antiviral. Maybe wait until you have the “until now” info next time. How foolish would it sound were someone to have made content like this every time we had initial but not optimal studies yet on various plant foods for disease.

    As far as the actual info contained in the video, thanks, will pass it along (the journal article, not the video).

    1. Bree,

      I understand that you are frustrated, though I thought the tea tree oil information, which Dr. Greger shared might actually help your relative and if he used your standard, he wouldn’t have shared it.

      Some of us don’t mind that Dr. Greger shares the historical things, which are found in the journals.

      I like history and do like that he shares things like that. I find it adds to the entertainment value of the videos, but, yes, I do not have warts.

      I also don’t mind him sharing that the tea tree oil worked as well as it did for their warts, even if there haven’t been studies.

      If I had warts, I would be thrilled and out buying a bottle of tea tree oil this afternoon.

      1. I just came back because I just mentally, “heard” your words.

        You think he is making fun of people with warts?

        He is making fun of the history of this country, which had professionals, which used unsophisticated mental processes, and called patients, “unsophisticated Negroes.” I have been watching so many documentaries of embarrassing things in our countries history. So many people groups have been dehumanized and demoralized and devalued and downright abused.

    1. I laugh at that one. Race car drivers used to call duct tape 100 mile an hour tape and use it to hold their cars together long before it became a mainstream product.

      When I think of duct tape nowadays, I think of the woman in California whose boyfriend tried his new 4-wheel drive vehicle on a closed road and they got stuck and he died, but she gave him her socks and used kleenex and duct tape on her feet and she is the one who stayed dry and lived.

      Made me throw a roll of duct tape in my trunk.

      If I ever get a wart, I can pull it out.

  5. Warts and herpes cold sores, genital herpes, etc all go away quickly by applying mild DC current. Using 6 volt battery, flexible wire like speaker or extension cord wire wound into the springs of the 6 volt battery, wrap stripped ends with cloth a few turns, tie with thread, apply water mixed with a pinch of baking soda, apply one end to the sore lip, the other behind the neck to pass current through both skin and nerve, this way it will not come back. warts just apply to wart and some nearby spot. It may help to reverse the current by swapping positions of the wires every 5 minutes or so. Takes about 20 minutes, repeat in a few hours and carry on for a few days. Do not use 9 volt battery, it’s uncomfortable and does not work any better. This has been tested here: https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/microelectricitygermkiller/info

      1. I like it that this topic is bringing out the Macgyver in everybody.

        Did you try a 9-volt battery? Or did someone else?

        It sounds like someone is saying that statement based on experience.

        I watched a video of a man who accidentally burned his house down after changing the 9-volt batteries in his smoke detectors.

        Two hit together and he videotaped the “Don’t try this at your home” message.

        1. It caused me to stop buying bigger packs of 9-volt batteries.

          You don’t want them sitting in your junk drawer (for those of us who have a junk drawer – I know there are doctors on this site who are probably organized enough to not know what a junk drawer is.)

          Tape them before recycling them.

    1. As a nurse and volunteer for NutritionFacts.org, I must point out that the suggestion to use a batery to treat wards, cold sores, etc involves some serious safety concerns. Lest anyone be inclined to try this treatment please review https://courses.lumenlearning.com/physics/chapter/20-6-electric-hazards-and-the-human-body/
      Note that the site mentioned clearly warns readers; “The opinion of the moderator is that you should NOT abandon standard medical treatments in order to do this, as it is still experimental”

  6. “Keep an open mind,” they said—”but not so open that [their] brains fall out.” is the best advice that someone can get in this modern culture.

  7. I will add water fasting for 5 to 7 days for those who are suffering as something to try. It was in the water fasting videos on YouTube and there are people who say they got rid of their warts that way.

    Water fasting lowers the viral load and 7 days you get a new immune system and that has to be good for things like this.

  8. Anecdotal observation – tea tree oil (used in a diffuser) was identified as the most likely cause of the near death of a local dog

  9. Tea tree has NEVER been big for warts or cold sores in the natural product industry.

    Lemon balm oil, which is also called Melissa extract, may have an antiviral effect on the herpes simplex virus. One study indicated that the oil prevents the herpes virus from penetrating the cells.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18693101

    And warts, there is this thing called ‘freezing’ that most doctors and patients know about that works better than any topical ointment.

  10. Hi.since you are changing things on the website I thought if you haven’t already planned on having a night mode on the site,it would be a great feature

    1. thanks Chrisitine,I think it would be great to have a special section for what can be done after getting diagnosed with one of the top 10 killers (prevention is obviously best but sadly most people only change their diet & lifestyle after a diagnosis/medical emergency…) I think many people would really appreciate it! Followers of NF do you agree?

  11. Who the hell uses a 1% concentration of an essential oil? Would you drink 10ml if you were thirsty? This sort of “science” really irritates me.

      1. In my haste, I didn’t notice that the topical application was 6% essential oil. Even so, that’s soooo not enough. But, hey, it makes a natural therapy look ineffective and that’s the idea. Natural medicines are to be labelled highly dangerous or ineffective – anything to stop people using or buying them $$$$$$$

        1. Looks like you’ve got some paid big pharma employees amongst your “volunteers”, Dr Greger. They’re a desperate bunch. Will do anything for money.

            1. Steven, pharmaceutical drugs are big business. It would be naive to think that they would not attempt to infiltrate the ranks of volunteers of a organisation like Nutrition Facts. Wikipedia similarly runs on the contributions of volunteers, some of whom put forth their “science” as unbiased truth. Have a look at Amygdalin on Wikipedia – absolute rubbish. I personally consume about 10 apricot kernels every day for my health and it does not lead to cyanide poisoning and death. I’ve studied many natural therapies and have repeatedly been harassed by people in the medical profession who have been brainwashed by the pharmaceutical industry into believing that natural therapies are either dangerous or ineffective. It’s pure bias. To run an experiment using such a low concentration of an essential oil and then claim that the experiment proves it’s not effective is just a ploy that they use. It’s like running an experiment on a toxic cancer drug and not publishing the results that occur after several weeks because that’s when they really, really bad side effects start occurring. I mean, what can I say? Surely, you must realise that it’s likely these profit-seekers will do whatever they can to prevent people from getting healthy or using natural treatments, both of which “erode their customer base”. Marijuana is made illegal so that people don’t use it as a natural pain reliever. There are wars fought in Afghanistan over the poppy fields which are a supply of opiates for the pharmaceutical industry. Sending wolves in sheep’s clothing to infiltrate and undermine the competition is basic war strategy.

              1. The pharmaceutical industry will throw money and support behind the meat industry because that’s their main customer! Far more antibiotics and other drugs are sold to livestock farms than people going to their doctor. As if the meat industry would have enough money to do all their own advertising and promotion and bribing of politicians …

                1. Steven, a good way to screen volunteers (both for their competency and any possible “agenda”) would be to give them tasks which have already been completed by someone else who you know has integrity and you can trust. You can then compare the work of the volunteer to the work of the trusted person. This doubling-up of work can be done until you are sure that the volunteer can be trusted or is competent to a standard you are happy with.
                  I hope this helps :) I love Nutrition Facts, I love Michael Greger, and I want everything to be great.

  12. I don’t get cold sores often, or canker sores, but I have found taking the supplement l-lysine is very helpful. One person I know who’d had cold sores regularly for years tried this and said her sores cleared up more quickly than usual. I’d suggest you do a blog or video on this.

  13. What about Oregano oil? I use Oregano oil for a number of skin such as cuts, scrapes, thorn punctures, and mouth conditions such as bleeding gums when flossing, ( all of which which are rare occurences sine going WFPB) , and Oregano oil is very effective.
    I also mix a couple drops into my nightly mouthwash, and my trips to the dentist are now simple cleanings. Nothing else needed for the past couple of years.
    Just get a good brand- that means expensive, but a little bottle lasts for ages.

  14. If someone had genital herpes, how would you compel them to zap that with batteries?!?!? Is this a subject to broach with the neighbors???
    Hahahahaha-thank you for that. If laughter adds to one’s life, I believe I just added about 25 years to mine.

    1. Pnadams,

      I’d like to suggest a quick look at the evaluation of where this information comes from first: neither-lavender-oil-nor-tea-tree-oil-can-be-linked-to-breast-growth-in-you (https://naha.org/naha-blog/neither-lavender-oil-nor-tea-tree-oil-can-be-linked-to-breast-growth-in-you) followed by the video from Dr. Greger ( https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-tea-tree-oil-have-hormonal-side-effects/) . It does appear that the combination of both tea tree and lavender may indeed have an estrogenic effect however, tea tree alone still has questionable estrogenic effects, at best.

      With that said there will always be some potential interaction and side effects for specific individuals.

      I found it interesting that we have two considerations not taken into effect but complementary for todays videos’s. The combination of components in a product (lead in the cosmetics) and the concentrations/ purity along with the area and amount of application over a period of time are certainly appropriate for evaluation for any and all products.

      Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

  15. The transcript contained the statement “the tea tree oil appeared to work with no side effects”. But isn’t tea tree oil known to be an estrogen mimic? It has been associated with causing breast development in boys treated with tea tree oil and with early breast develpment in girls.
    This, I think, disqualifies it from having “no side effects”. Do any of you have info that supports or contradicts this?

  16. I got so stressed during the 2008 economic crash, I developed a wart on my hand and ever since then, when I get rid of one, another wart starts growing on a different finger, it’s frustrating. I have never had a wart before 2008. I used Tea Tree oil and that never worked.I used the salicylic acid goop and that had mixed results but never really cleared one up by itself and it has to be applied frequently if the wart is on your hands. I did have success with apple cider vinegar on cotton, held in place by a band-aid but it takes a while. I have also had success with duct tape, it takes a while for those methods to work and the wart has to be in a place where the duct tape or band-aid won’t fall off.

    Those methods works faster if you do it right when you discover the wart. It takes longer on an old established wart. I have one that’s been going on 2 years on a finger and I’ve done everything to kill it but it’s in a place that’s hard to treat, the duct tape won’t stay on for long, the acid would come off and the bandaid with cotton falls off as well. I cut this wart with scissors all the time but it grows right back.

    I had a tiny wart starting to form that I actually cut out it’s center before it got established and used tea tree to keep from getting an infection. It eventually did die away but it took a few weeks and I wore duct tape after cutting the center of the wart out. As it died, another was starting on my little finger’s knuckle and I cut that one off and it never came back. Some warts are easier to kill than others.

    I must carry the gene for warts because my youngest son got 4 of them on his hand and it cost $400+ to have them frozen. So, the going rate here is $100 per wart to freeze plus the doctors fee, which I think was $150. It’s not cheap.

  17. Thank you for sharing your experience. It sounds like those warts are persistent–buy then so are you! As a nurse I just want to encourage you to be careful to not expose yourself to infection by practicing careful hygiene if you cut the wart off yourself.

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