Benefits of Green Tea for Boosting Antiviral Immune Function

Benefits of Green Tea for Boosting Antiviral Immune Function
5 (100%) 12 votes

Unlike most antiviral drugs, green tea appears to work by boosting the immune system to combat diseases such as genital warts (caused by HPV) and the flu (caused by the influenza virus).

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“The belief of green tea as a ‘wonder weapon’ against diseases dates back thousands of years.” I’ve talked about it in relation to chronic disease, but what about infectious disease? Interest in the antimicrobial activity of tea dates back to a military medical journal in 1906, suggesting that servicemen fill their canteens with tea to kill off the bugs that caused typhoid fever. However, this effect of tea was not studied further until the late 1980s, when tea compounds were pitted against viruses and bacteria in test tubes and petri dishes.

But, what we care about is do they work in people? I had dismissed this entire field of inquiry as clinically irrelevant—until genital warts. “External genital warts,” caused by human wart viruses, “are one of the most common and fastest-spreading venereal diseases worldwide.”

“Patients with [external genital warts] present with one or several cauliflower-like growths on the genitals and/or anal regions,” considerably impairing people’s “emotional and sexual well-being.” But, rub some green tea ointment on, and you can achieve “complete clearance of all warts” in more than 50% of cases.

Wow. If it works so well for wart viruses, what about flu viruses? Works great in a petri dish, but what about in people? Tea-drinking schoolchildren do seem to be protected. But, you don’t know until it’s put to the test. If you give healthcare workers green tea compounds, they come down with the flu about three times less often than those given placebo. In fact, just gargling with green tea may help. While a similar effect was not found in high school students, gargling with green tea may drop the risk of influenza infection seven- or eight-fold, compared to gargling with water, in elderly nursing home residents, where flu can get really serious.

Unlike antiviral drugs, green tea appears to help by boosting the immune system, enhancing the proliferation and activity of gamma delta T cells, a type of immune cell that acts as “a first-line defense against infection.” “Subjects who drank six cups of tea per day had up to a 15-fold increase in [infection-fighting] interferon…production in as little as one week”—but why?

There’s actually a molecular pattern shared by cancer cells and pathogens with “edible plant products, such as tea, apples, mushrooms, and wine.” And so, eating healthy foods may help maintain our immune cells on ready alert, effectively priming our gamma delta T cells “that then can provide natural resistance to microbial infections, and perhaps tumors.”

I guess I shouldn’t have been so surprised—tea, after all, is “a vegetable infusion.” You’re basically drinking a hot water extraction of a dark green leafy vegetable.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: gadost0 via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Video credit: Tyler McReynolds, Teetotalin LLC.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“The belief of green tea as a ‘wonder weapon’ against diseases dates back thousands of years.” I’ve talked about it in relation to chronic disease, but what about infectious disease? Interest in the antimicrobial activity of tea dates back to a military medical journal in 1906, suggesting that servicemen fill their canteens with tea to kill off the bugs that caused typhoid fever. However, this effect of tea was not studied further until the late 1980s, when tea compounds were pitted against viruses and bacteria in test tubes and petri dishes.

But, what we care about is do they work in people? I had dismissed this entire field of inquiry as clinically irrelevant—until genital warts. “External genital warts,” caused by human wart viruses, “are one of the most common and fastest-spreading venereal diseases worldwide.”

“Patients with [external genital warts] present with one or several cauliflower-like growths on the genitals and/or anal regions,” considerably impairing people’s “emotional and sexual well-being.” But, rub some green tea ointment on, and you can achieve “complete clearance of all warts” in more than 50% of cases.

Wow. If it works so well for wart viruses, what about flu viruses? Works great in a petri dish, but what about in people? Tea-drinking schoolchildren do seem to be protected. But, you don’t know until it’s put to the test. If you give healthcare workers green tea compounds, they come down with the flu about three times less often than those given placebo. In fact, just gargling with green tea may help. While a similar effect was not found in high school students, gargling with green tea may drop the risk of influenza infection seven- or eight-fold, compared to gargling with water, in elderly nursing home residents, where flu can get really serious.

Unlike antiviral drugs, green tea appears to help by boosting the immune system, enhancing the proliferation and activity of gamma delta T cells, a type of immune cell that acts as “a first-line defense against infection.” “Subjects who drank six cups of tea per day had up to a 15-fold increase in [infection-fighting] interferon…production in as little as one week”—but why?

There’s actually a molecular pattern shared by cancer cells and pathogens with “edible plant products, such as tea, apples, mushrooms, and wine.” And so, eating healthy foods may help maintain our immune cells on ready alert, effectively priming our gamma delta T cells “that then can provide natural resistance to microbial infections, and perhaps tumors.”

I guess I shouldn’t have been so surprised—tea, after all, is “a vegetable infusion.” You’re basically drinking a hot water extraction of a dark green leafy vegetable.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: gadost0 via pixabay. Image has been modified.

Video credit: Tyler McReynolds, Teetotalin LLC.

Doctor's Note

As I’m sure you noticed by now, we are shifting from the old way we were doing videos to pulling in motion graphics design specialists to improve the look of our videos. This one was done by Tyler McReynolds of Teetotalin LLC, one of four teams of contractors we’re currently working with. Tyler is an independent video production specialist in Austin, TX involved with live action filming, motion graphics, and everything in between. This is what he had to say about working with us: “It’s truly been a pleasure to work with the NutritionFacts.org team – their strong dedication to offering free, transparent, and verifiable nutrition information is a unique and much needed service that I’m happy to be a part of.”

Tomorrow’s video will be created by a different team. It’s up to you to tell us which you like better. In the comments, please include your thoughts on the new look, and which format you like better.

In other words, did you like Daniel’s style in the last video—Should Vitamin D Supplements Be Taken to Prevent Falls in the Elderly?—better than Tyler’s style in this one? Please let me know!

And, if you or someone you know is an expert in motion graphics software, and would like to become team number five, please check out our Employment Opportunities page.

For more on what green tea can (and cannot) do, check out videos such as:

How else can we improve our immune function? See, for example:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

136 responses to “Benefits of Green Tea for Boosting Antiviral Immune Function

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  1. Both new graphics options don’t flow well. I can’t judge which one is better, because the flow to the videos becomes disjointed with the new graphics.




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    1. In my opinion, both yesterday and today’s videos have too much movement. I find all these images moving around, to be disconcerting. I don’t think movement adds anything to the content; it only detracts from the message. However, of the two, I find yesterday’s video a little easier to watch because the movement is slower, thus reducing any vertigo effects. I recommend the only “animation” that should be used is the “cross dissolve” from one scene to the next because it does not “move”. Even the “Ken Burns” effect I find to be annoying. I think the web-page should concentrate on the message, not the animation. Being distracted by animation makes it more difficult for me to remember the message, because all I remember is the animation.




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      1. I agree with the comments – I liked the previous simpler formats. Too much movement which makes it difficult to concentrate on the content/ hear what is going on.




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    2. I agree. While some of the motion makes for some great interactivity, some seems to be there simply for effect and some, are actually a little jarring. What I also found, in yesterday’s as well as this one, is that there are these spots of dead air where for a moment you think perhaps something has gone wrong with the audio.

      In general though, I like the direction, but it needs some tweaking to get to the sweet spot. As always though, thanks so much for this amazing site and all of the information shared.




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  2. I liked it. Nice job Tyler. I did prefer it to Fridays video because the papers weren’t shown on an angle. The video highlights how Dr. Gregor relies on research for the information. This one was probably busier than normal because he is referencing many papers.




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    1. I liked this format a little better than the previous video (on Vitamin D supplements) because it seemed a little quieter in the graphics. But I do not like the way this one so abruptly moves away from the study’s title line when the video pans over to and then zooms in to a section of the report’s text. In many cases the same level of zoom to the quote could be maintained but without panning away so the title line moves out of view. In short, I’d like another second or so more time so I can read the report title and author. So try to keep the paper’s title line in view when possible.




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    2. I agree about the angled pages being hard to read. I also wasn’t fond of the transitions in the Vitamin D supplement video — too much movement before they finally came to a stop.




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    3. I agree with all the comments on the graphics, BUT the tea set in the beginning is so beautiful! What a beautiful and enriching way to start a video! Thanks for that!




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    1. I’m also curious about this. For example, are the immune boosting effects similar whether we drink steeped green tea leaves or matcha? Or is matcha superior because we’re consuming the whole ground tea leaf? I’m going to guess the latter, but I’m not sure which tea has been used in these studies.




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      1. Lindsey:
        I recently spent some time online looking into this question and what I found was that genuine matcha has more EGCG than any other kind of green tea but when the price is factored in, it’s far from being the best. Even the ubiquitous Lipton’s green tea has more EGCG per serving per dollar.




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        1. Thanks George! If I understand what you’re saying, matcha has a higher content of the ‘good stuff’ but since it’s cost prohibitive for many to drink on a daily basis, the regular green tea (steepable) is better to consume since it’s accessible daily? This does make sense to me.




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  3. Here’s one vote for the look of this video over the previous one. The nearly perpetual movement of the text in the last video made me resist reading it. Todays video was easy on the eyes and a relief. It also feels consistent in style with the NF videos of the last couple of years.




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  4. I far prefer your earlier videos to these two new formats. When reviewing “Tea & Artery Function,” it is much easier to keep track of where information is coming from. I like seeing the title, journal, year, & first author throughout the time each paper is being explained.
    (It would be wonderful if the links to commentaries & letters to the editors could bring up the letters, too. People without access to the journals can’t read them.)
    I love your work!!




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    1. I ate a pretty good vegan diet for almost 15 years but always had trouble with my teeth. An occasional cavity, and painful teeth and gums. Not severe but enough to worry about. I then switched to a very low fat WFPB diet, and eliminated all refined sugar and fat. No more problems with my teeth. I’m thinking about trying the green tea tooth wash. The only thing I don’t like is that I assume it has to be refrigerated.




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      1. Ooops, I haven’t been keeping mine cold. Didn’t even think of it; thank you. I only steep 2 cups at a time, so it goes pretty quickly. Haven’t noticed a difference. I’d best look into it. Again, thanks for mentioning it.




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      2. I get 6 monthly cleans and checks, and ever since I started washing my teeth with a WterPik my gums and teeth have become amazingly healthy. This of course is in addition to regular brushing and flossing.




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  5. I like to read the citation information on the journals. I feel like in this video the articles were presented too quickly to actually read the charts, quotes, or citations. Overall, I appreciate the work you do to present this information to the public.




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  6. Overall I did not care for today’s video graphics. Seemed like the text was pulled away too suddenly. I’d be looking at something, then–gone! And new visuals came on too quickly. Made for a choppy video. I guess I like the gradual approach.




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  7. I have a question about infectious diseases, not necessarily related to green tea… Out here in Arizona we have a phenomenon called “Valley Fever,” which they say is caused by a fungal spore (coccidioidmycosis). This spore is supposed to be buried in the sand out in the Sonora Desert, but when a weather front blows through the spores can be picked up by the wind and spread throughout the Phoenix Valley – then people and animals breathe it. Fever symptoms include all the usual flu-like symptoms, but some people can be hospitalized from it. I’ve lived here for 25 years and have not been infected; but the really scary part of the story is that health experts here say it’s just a matter of time before you get it. Are there any nutrition related studies about this disease (green tea or other) that I can research?

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/valley-fever/basics/symptoms/con-20027390




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  8. This video seemed to use a lot more graphics in its content, so that is probably why I was feeling a bit motion/graphics overloaded. There was a good deal of abrupt movement, and I like gradual better. Less scary! Still great information.




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  9. I definitely like the old style of videos better. It’s hard to describe exactly why, but I think I was reading the text more and they seem to have flowed better.




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  10. I too prefer the original graphics format over this. The journal insets wooshing by continuously is distracting and its difficult to catch the citation information.
    Thanks for all the great research though!! Very interesting and helpful!!!




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  11. Only once in this video was the amount of green tea referenced, 6 cups of green tea per day. That amount is typical of other studies demonstrating the good effects of green tea on health.
    But for me and others very sensitive to it’s effect, that is way too much caffeine. Although caffeine’s effect of raising blood pressure as been show to be temporary (I believe 1 – 2 hours), six cups per day would keep your blood pressure high throughout the day.
    I have been able to lower my blood pressure to a normal level by reducing sodium & caffeine as well as increasing exercise, yoga and meditation.
    I would love to know if any studies have been done that show if de-caffeinated green tea still has the compounds that help the immune system.




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    1. I’m in the same boat as you. If I have one cup of green tea in the morning, I often have problems sleeping that night – so ridiculously over-sensitive to caffeine. But I love the flavor and health benefits so I’m also not wanting to cut it out completely. I’m interested to hear if anyone has read about the health benefits of decaffeinated tea.




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      1. Lindsey, Wow, you are sensitive to caffeine. I have reduced my green tea drinking from 2 cups per day (1 teaspoon of tea each) down to one cup around 4 pm, made with 1/2 teaspoon of tea, plus 2 teaspoons of roasted barley to boost the flavor. That amount does not effect my sleep, yet noticeably increases my alertness for reading. If you are only using teabags, consider moving to brewing loose tea, with much more control over caffeine. I am continuing to experiment with other herbs, dried fruit, roasted grains to boost the flavor when only using a small amount of green tea. By the way, peppermint tea in the morning has a very tea like taste and appears to boost my alertness. Even if it is a placebo effect, well, that is real also, isn’t it? David




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  12. I drink a fair amount of green tea (gunpowder green, from China) during the week. I have “missed” the last two illnesses in my home, including the flu. Coincidence?




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  13. Although not related to green tea, I’m a pediatrician, and love your work. I have started some of my patients on low fat, whole food plant based diet as well as encouraged my staff and family. I’m seeing very good results so far. I send everyone to your website. My biggest issue is with a type 1 diabetic who would love to do this but needs to use so much insulin to compensate for the high carbs in this kind of diet. I think it’s really good for type 2, but I can’t find enough info on how to adjust insulin intake when eating healthier carbs. With type 1, a carb is a carb. she just tells her pump how many carbs she’s eating and it calculates accordingly. People on the web talk about how they have been successful with type 1 but don’t elaborate on how they adjusted their Insulin. On the day she tried it, she had to use a whole vial of insulin. I don’t think using so much insulin is a good thing. Any advise regarding type 1 and dosing of insulin using a pump would be appreciated.




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    1. Hi Rachel,
      I follow mindfuldiabeticrobby (Robby Barbora) on Instagram and YouTube, he eats a raw plant based diet, but seems to have lots of info on the subject and has started masteringdiabtes.org
      Perhaps he or his colleagues could point you in the right direction for your patient.




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    2. Hi Rachel. My daughter has had T1 diabetes for over a decade. Although Humalog used in insulin pumps is a “fast-acting” insulin, it still can take 4 hours to clear. My daughter only uses Humalog when she eats a meal higher in fat/protein with slower-acting carbs. Eat 46 grams of a high glycemic banana and dates and your food is clear in 1 hour while the insulin has only just gotten started. This can lead to a lot of mis-match. For fast-acting carbs my daughter has much better success using Apidra.

      For the diet, make sure your patient follows Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen. There are a lot of vegetables in there! https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/dr-gregers-daily-dozen/id1060700802?mt=8 Encouraging selections of low-glycemic, and lower carb foods should help. Also make sure all foods are intact (not ground) so less carb is absorbed and more is leftover for gut bacteria. http://nutritionfacts.org/video/are-green-smoothies-bad-for-you/

      Daily Dozen ideas:

      Bean Servings (3): Make 1-2 servings from soy foods (less carb) and the other intact whole beans.
      Fruits: Berries and cherries are very low glycemic, while bananas and dates are blood sugar spikers.
      Greens and vegetables total 5 servings. Avoid starchy veggies with lots of carb like potato, corn, squash.
      Flaxseeds and nuts–very low carb, no problem
      Whole Grains (3). Very important that these are intact whole grains. Whole oat groats, buckwheat groats are much better than ground oat/buckwheat flour. They also have a lower glycemic index than wheat or rice.




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    3. Rachel:

      John McDougall, MD works regularly with type 1 diabetics and reports that their insulin needs drop dramatically on a starch-based diet. Check out his site for more information. He also responds to most of the personal emails he receives if you have specific questions. If you have time, check out his webinars. He brings up type 1 in nearly all of his videos.

      The comments system won’t let me add a URL, so just go to drmcdougall.com.




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    4. Rachel: I think Josh’s idea of working with Dr. McDougall is an excellent one. I’ll also refer your post our volunteer medical moderators in case someone has experience with this. We don’t have enough volunteers to get everyone’s question answered. So, I wouldn’t count on an answer from them.

      In the meantime, I’ll mention that (adult) T1s who participate on this site have reported reduced insulin needs. (I’m hoping Stewart will see your post as he has lots of great personal experience as well as some technical knowledge.) I keyed in on the part where you said, “…she just tells her pump how many carbs she’s eating and it calculates accordingly.” That may be the problem? From what I have heard others say in their experience (I’m not an expert nor diabetic), I don’t think “a carb is a carb” is accurate when it comes to figuring out insulin needs. I’m hoping someone can share a better system with you.

      Thanks for your comment. I love seeing doctors participating on this site. I hope you get your question answered.




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      1. I’m not an expert or a doctor, but one thing that Dr. McDougall hates is insulin pumps. He likes to talk about how they “ruin lives.” I’m not even diabetic, but since Dr. McDougall brings it up in every weekly webinar, it’s hard to miss.

        There is only one drug he prescribes which I won’t mention here, but again if you watch almost any of his videos, he will bring it up. His YouTube channel is full of great information, and the search feature on his site is fantastic.

        Of all the plant-based doctors out there, relatively few seem to have as much experience with type 1 diabetes as Dr. McDougall, so I think he would be your best bet. And as I said he’s pretty good about responding to emails, so give it a shot.




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        1. I’m curious why Dr. McDougall says insulin pumps ruin lives. I know why we don’t use one anymore. After years of use, the infusion sets sitting under the skin create such scarring (even with excellent rotation of sites) that eventually no insulin can be absorbed. This creates a dangerous situation. No insulin gets into the bloodstream, user pumps in more and more insulin, then eventually without warning the dam breaks; all that extra insulin surges into the blood at once, quickly creating dangerous hypoglycemia.




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      2. As a T1 Diabetic, I follow the starch based Dr McDougall diet, with good results. Don’t use a pump, just old fashioned 70/30 Humulin (9U am, 5U pm) and 10 U Lantus (late pm). Just a thought, perhaps your patient is using a lot of oil, and causing insulin resistance.




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    5. hi Rachel, I’m sure you will receive responses from members of this community who have drastically improved their health and changed the course of their diabetes. In the meantime, can I suggest this documentary ? https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2pjkC71exKU The group of people in this film who changed to wfpb eating included type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Its approximately one hour and I found it time well spent.




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    6. Rachel,
      I have two kids with type 1. Both have been vegetarians for over 10 years and now we have gone plant based (they used to drink lots of milk and I wonder if that has anything to do with their diagnosis of type 1 as teenagers). Since they have eliminated dairy and eggs, their A1Cs have both dropped! My son was at 7.5 before omitting milk and eggs, and at his last endo visit, he dropped to 6.8! His ratios have now dropped and he is taking less lantus, as well (he is not on the pump). My daughter has also been using less insulin, as her ratio has also dropped. Hope this helps!




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  14. I have loved the info presented by Dr.Greger for years now. However I feel that most of the graphs and articles shown fly by way too fast to absorb without pausing the video multiple times. Maybe it’s because I am not a speed reader, however I’m thinking that for many all this great info needs more time, even if it means a slightly longer video. I’ve switched mostly now to just reading the transcript, but feel a less hurried pace on video would allow me to enjoy those again. Thanks for listening.




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  15. As a non native speaker, I’s hard to me to juge which team is better.
    But I like very much the so clear way the text is narrated by Dr. Gregor. The more paceful and metrical division of each word, the easier for a non native speaker to anderstand what is said. Your narration is great, one of the best to be understood. Thank you!




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  16. I love both the video options but feel like some of the new graphic elements go by way to quickly and then leave me feeling like I’ve missed some important information. Perhaps the pace is just a little too fast.




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  17. Unfortunately, I definately prefer the Traditional videos by a wide margin. Rapidl changes of text or charts are disconcerting. Tables like in the first minute that are blurred are upsetting. Citation info gives a usefup prospective during the reference to that citation, ie reading the citations separately is not desirable for me. Flashing pull quotes is distracting especially when the audio is earlier or later.




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  18. I prefer the classic – less animated – format. For me the old format is less distracting and I can follow the text and speech better. A simple fade and page turn lets you focus on content.




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  19. I drink several teas every day and they truly have changed my health. I have been drinking spearmint tea for my hormonal acne and I have noticed a huge difference. Also everyone I know has the flu this year, I have not had a flu shot in over 6 years I’ve been vegan for 3 years and I did not get the flu.




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  20. Thank you for the video and all the work you do!

    Unfortunately the old style of video is so much better. I still appreciate the information, but you are speaking way too slowly and don’t need to stop talking to let people take in the graphics and text. That’s what the pause button is for.

    I realize you have very smart professionals coming up with these new ideas, but I have to wonder if this is truly how to broaden your appeal. Most health-conscious people I know don’t really care how modern and animated their sources are. In fact, most people I know prefer simplicity and intellectual rigor, two elements present in the old videos that really don’t come through in the new ones.

    Wasn’t it the old style of video that made you so popular to begin with? I have forwarded hundreds of your videos to family and friends over the years, but I would hesitate before sending these new ones off to anyone. I just don’t think they would watch it from beginning to end because the new videos are simply not engaging if only due to all the dead air. People are not stupid–if you continue speaking, they can keep up with you.

    Quite frankly I will probably just start reading the transcripts rather than watching the videos if this or Friday’s installment is any indication of what we have to expect from now on. These new formats are just too frustrating for me to watch. While I still think you’re doing great work, this method of delivery conveys too little information over too long a period with too many distractions.

    As always, thank you for everything you do! But please go back to the old format with quicker speech, more information, fewer pauses, and no extraneous special effects.




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  21. As a long time regular visitor to this site, I prefer the videos the way they have been presented during the last two or three years before these last couple of months of experimentation. And the real early videos with the “Traffic Lights”, although useful, were much to short and were lacking in depth. I think around 5 minutes is the right length.

    If you’re paying contractors to spiff up the videos, I would recommend using that money to improve the site in other ways. For example, here are several suggestions:

    1. Hiring more researchers.

    2. Somehow incorporating knowledge from the comments section into the follow-up blog summaries. Sometimes knowledgeable people will make excellent unique comments and even include references. These, of course, would have to be verified, but it’s hard to find these good comments after a period of time has gone by.

    3. Creating a section on the website that guides a person through the transition period from being on a SAD diet to a WFPB diet. A lot of people that I talk to finally become convinced of the benefits of WFPB, but they just don’t know where to start.

    These are just a few of the ways that I think the money could be better spent to improve an already GREAT website!




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      1. These are great ideas, especially the “how to transition” section. That’s a prominent feature on nearly all plant-based sites that is conspicuously missing here. I know Dr. Greger doesn’t want to have a “Dr. Greger Diet,” as he himself states in How not to Die, but so many people just don’t know where to begin. Also, isn’t the Daily Dozen sort of a Dr. Greger Diet anyway?

        I’m wondering where the impetus for change even came from in the first place. I’ve rewatched some videos from the past two or three years lately and noticed that the views go up pretty consistently over time, especially on popular ones like turmeric where the increase is dramatic.




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        1. Josh: I’m just a volunteer. I’m sometimes privy to some information, but not much! To answer your question about why they are messing with the video format, the answer is: I don’t really know. Unless I missed the key point in some communication, the only reason I’ve seen given is that they got some new software. Maybe we could ditch the new software and implement some of those ideas instead??? (Don’t know if that would really save any money. Just saying.)

          I agree that the Daily Dozen is Dr. Greger’s recommended diet. I also agree that a “How To Transition” page would be a great idea. I have a good post on “How To Transition”, but that’s not necessarily Dr. Greger’s ideas nor easy to find for someone just visiting. As I said, I did forward WFPB-Hal’s post to staff. FYI: I got an immediate reply. My contact also thinks a “How To Transition” page is a good idea. The idea is on the list for future changes!




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  22. I agree with some of the other comments that both of the new formats are a little dis-jointed but maybe it just takes time t get used to it. I prefer this format to the one of Vitamin D because I prefer that the highlighted text not move – it just makes it a bit harder to read. I love the work you are doing and turn people on to your site every chance I get! Thanks for all you do!




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  23. I like both of the new video formats. Neither are difficult for me to read or make me seasick. However, it’s the pauses in the audio that are a little off putting. Dr. G had a great rhythm & timing while narrating the older videos. Maybe it will take some time for him to develop a new rhythm for the new format?




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  24. I, too, prefer the way videos were done previously. The visuals go past too quickly to get anything out of them – just a frustrating experience!!




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  25. Doesn’t look like this was answered yet, and many are wondering, is there a way to get the benefits of 6 cups of green tea per day without also getting 6 cups of green tea caffeine per day? I can’t sleep if I have caffeine past 2:00pm.




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  26. I just don’t need the extra motion and certainly HATE the audio dead spaces.

    I keep thinking my speakers went out, my audio card died, or the stereo is on the wrong setting. Unsettling. I have no idea what the great need for snazzier videos was/is in the first place. Michael Greger’s “previous” or “regular” production/editing crew has been doing fine for me. I’ve never once looked at any video here (and I’ve seen nearly each and every one since I found this site just over 2 years ago) and thought,

    GEE-it needs more. I would totally grasp the concepts and share with my friends if ONLY it were a little bit fancier. Oh but it’s sooooo outdated, I won’t.

    Nope, not once have I ever said that about any video made and shown here. Not the shorts anyway. For me it’s about the information and as I struggle constantly with attention distractions, I am probably a bit more sensitive to hyper-active video and ESPECIALLY uber-busy audio.

    Do as you like, I have shared my thoughts. Keep up the research and let the videos be SIMPLE!




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  27. As usual, I learned from the information Dr. Gregor shares. As a green tea drinker I appreciate enjoy finding out about the health benefits of a drink I enjoy.

    I find this new motion graphic format very intrusive. First there are the breaks in narration when waiting for a graphic. Secondly, it seems like there are special effects for the sake of special effects. The places where the relevant citation was highlighted were helpful. The rest? Not so much.




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  28. I enjoyed both. They illustrate and deliver the science. If it’s going too fast hit the pause button. I enjoy Dr. G occasional humor balanced with the graphs, hard science studies cited …. either selection would be a win.




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  29. I just noticed it moving faster than normal. It was Ok, but slightly distracting. I liked the highlighting of words. Keep experimenting and you will come up with the perfect solution!!!




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  30. Did you even ask for our opinion on the video format? Don’t know, but I’d always opt for the simpler, slower style, being able to see more text and less movement, a slower pace. I think the object should be whether we can read the text that’s important.

    What about the aluminum in green tea? I thought you had mentioned a while back that all tea has aluminum which can end up in the brain. Maybe I’m wrong… Can you clarify, and do you drink green tea? Regular or matcha?




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  31. Style is good! Better than yesterday. Maybe an adjustment later could be voted on. I like that the front page of studies is featured.




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  32. Thank you for everything you do, Dr Greger. Especially informing us of the sickening and destructive effect on our health of a meat and dairy diet. PLEASE no moving camera at all! Makes me sick! Won’t watch! Slow and tidy.




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  33. Came across this website, url listed above (not mine), selling some enzyme supplement,

    Enzymes and Your Health continued
    The fact is, when I use an endoscope to examine the stomachs of people who regularly drink tea (green tea, Chinese tea, English black tea) or coffee containing lots of tannic acid, I usually find their gastric mucosa has thinned due to atrophic changes. That all-important stomach lining is literally wasting away. It is a well-known fact that chronic atrophic changes or chronic gastritis can easily become stomach cancer.

    I am not the only medical professional to have noticed the ill effects of drinking coffee and tea. At the Japanese Cancer Conference in September 2003, Professor Masayuki Kawanishi of Mie University’s School of Hygiene presented a report stating that antioxidants can damage DNA . Moreover, many kinds of teas that are sold in the supermarket today use agricultural chemicals during the cultivation process.

    When you consider the effects of tannic acid, agricultural chemical remnants and caffeine put together, you know why I strongly recommend drinking plain water instead of tea. However, for those of you who like tea and cannot stop drinking it, I advise you to use organically grown tea leaves, drink it after meals instead of on an empty stomach to avoid excess stress on your stomach lining, and limit it to about 2-3 cups per day.

    Many people fall for mistaken common beliefs regarding their health because medicine today does not look at the human body as a whole. For many years there has been a trend for doctors to specialize, looking at and treating just one part of the body. We can’t see the forest for the trees. Everything in the human body is interconnected. Just because a component found in a food helps one part of the body function well, it does not mean that it is good for the entire body. When picking your food and drink, consider the big picture. You cannot decide whether a food is good or bad simply by looking at one ingredient found in that food.

    About Us
    shinyaHiromi Shinya, MD, is one of the world’s leading gastroenterologists whose book The Enzyme Factor has sold millions of copies in the United States, Japan and other countries. He pioneered the Shinya Technique, the now-standard procedure for the removal of polyps from the colon without invasive surgery. Over a career of 40 years Dr. Shinya has treated thousands of patients. It has been his routine to get diet and nutrition histories from his patients and, by comparing this with the evidence of their colonoscopies, has developed a set of lifestyle and diet suggestions that will enable us to live a vital, healthy life into a good old age. This he has named the Shinya Biozyme.




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  34. I found the jerky movement so distracting that I finally had to close my eyes to hear the content. I really prefer the old style with pictures of the subject, and some text. this all text, and so jerky that it’s impossible to read/absorb any of it is just useless. Sorry guys who worked hard on this, it just didn’t work. I too felt kind of motion sick. Not sure who talked who into changing what was working just fine, but gut instinct obviously is at work here, or the question wouldn’t be asked. Go back, you had it right the first time.




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  35. I prefer the older videos hands down. The animations are distracting and even annoying. There are strange pauses in the dialog to give the animations time to finish. For that matter, I wish the videos were LESS story telling and more to the point.




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  36. I didn’t see the VitD video yesterday. Today’s (tea) is too fussy, cuts too quickly not allowing info to be adsorbed, and often doesn’t show which paper is being referenced. Go back to the original format.




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    1. I agree, it cuts too quickly and seems to make artificial charts. I like it where the full pages are on screen so I can pause and take it all in. So far I don’t like this video format but the Vitamin D one was ok. Maybe a poll is appropriate




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    2. Agreed. Both new formats are too busy. Stick to the flax… sorry, I mean the facts ;-) Much prefer the existing format/style whereby one could easily read the journal text.

      Although I appreciate the artistic merit of both trial formats, they are difficult to read on a mobile/cell device, which is by far the most popular way people view.




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  37. I liked that the highlighted text being emphasized had the background in light shade. It allowed me to read it at the same time listening to the video. Though I’d have to pause the video. The presentation of data boxes and information moved too fast. I would’ve liked it to be displayed longer so I could read it.




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  38. I found this tea video really difficult. I literally had to close my eyes and just listen. The frenetic movement was jarring and distracting. Why are you fixing something that isn’t broken? The old format works great.




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      1. I think our man is barking up the wrong tree, full speed up a dead-end street.

        The answer is not in “snazziness”. The snazzier stuff is, the more it looks like someone is busy SELLING a product (and sellers are BIASED by definition). It’s all simply unnecessary from more angles than one. I’m thankful that it appears that a majority of viewers agree that the “old style” was plenty fancy enough. They were good enough already.




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  39. What do I do if green tea causes me increased heartbeat rate, insomnia, too much stimulation even at small doses, like one cup?
    Too much of a good thing…
    It’s rather not the caffeine because after taking decaffeinated EGCG supplement, the effect is the same. All polyphenols e.g. resveratrol have similar action on me. My feeling is that my metabolism is too fast (I feel warm) and green tea makes it even faster. Despite these symptoms of fast metabolism I have all the symptoms of slow metabolism – like slow healing, overall inflammation, fatigue.
    Right now I take EGCG equivalent to 1/3 of a tea cup. It’s the smallest dose that I can somehow manage (though still feel wired).
    I know it’s a supplement so it’s kind of bad but the added benefit is that it doesn’t contain lead etc. I suppose the difference between the liquid tea and powdered EGCG is not that big afterall (compared to other foods and suplements derived from them).
    Though it looks hopeless to find an answer I’m still hoping to find it (and it’s not only because it’s annoying to divide these capsules into 3 :-) ) because green tea is really something good and worth pursuing…




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    1. Someone asked a similar question a few months ago during a live Q&A with Dr. Greger. it wasn’t green tea but something else purportedly healthy that made the viewer very ill. Dr. Greger responded that you have to “listen to your body.”

      If I were reacting that way to something, I would avoid it completely. In How Not to Die Dr. Greger cites the case of a woman who develops psychosis following chlorella supplementation. After reading that I would be wary of consuming anything that made me feel even slightly strange.




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  40. Better than last Vit D video but has problems too. The last D video had “innovations” that made reading almost impossible – perspectival distortion, slow zooms (both zooms in and even…zooms out??)…everything is moving too much! Not only distracting, hard to read (small text) but nausea-inducing – such effects can create mild motion sickness (like reading in a moving car). The speed of the motion in D was very slow and frustrating/annoying (a snail’s pace). Better to keep the pace up. I know you’re trying to get “pop out” and a “3d” effect to make it more “real” etc but really, is it needed? What is real is the INFORMATION – the message not the medium. if you want clear transmission of information, lose the bells and whistles. These distort one’s ability to pay attention – the most important thing of all! All this is distracting. The current video Tea is better than D but it has problems:
    The slight lift off before the page exits is superfluous and unnecessary distraction – could be eliminated.
    Sliding pages – entry right, exit left, takes more time to slide than for the page to turn as in your old videos – I liked the turning better.
    2:54 – Page zooms inwards are unnecessary. Why zoom in after full page – the zoom (more motion!) is distracting. Just show full page…highlight the text segment…and zoom THAT outwards. No need to zoom in slightly the full page first – it buys you nothing. It’s what others are complaining about – “too many cuts”.
    The speed is much better than D – nice and swift. Overall better than D which was awful.




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  41. What recommendations do you have for those who suffer acne? I have been vegan for over a year and live a healthy lifestyle but still suffer from acne. I don’t want to have to take antibiotics but I’m seeing it as my only option now.




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    1. I can’t know for sure if your diet and lifestyle is healthy enough… so it’s difficult to give advice without detailed information but… Try adding supplementation. Not necessarily everything can be done with the diet – sometimes it’s simply impossible like in case of vit. D.
      So you should take vit. D – it has antibacterial action. You should take zinc (I can’t stress enough how good effects a high dose of zinc can have) – it’s good for healing. Omega-3 oils (in supllements or diet) too.
      What else is helpful for skin in general and acne in particular? – you can probably google that. Almost any food that is anti-inflammatory.
      Needless to say that sometimes the simplest way is good (antibacterial) soap with/without moisturizer and shortly cut hair. Sometimes skin exfoliating helps. Sometimes benzoyl peroxide (or other medications like that) can be used. It all depends what the source of your problems is, where it is…
      Taking antibiotics, even for short periods of time is not recommended – your gut flora will be decimated and it will not be rebuilt and believe me – if I knew how it all would turn out for me I’d never have gone for antibiotics. Oh, yeah – if the source of your problem is gut flora and/or your immune system you can try add probiotics to your diet. Supplemental tablets/capsules are an easy way (and there are probably specific strains helpful in this condition) but pickled vegetables are a much much better (and tastier) way.




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      1. I would be careful with supplements if you have acne.

        As i mentioned in a post below, supplements were huge triggers when I had acne. I don’t know why, but pills of all kinds made it so much worse. I threw everything away long ago, and all I take now is B12. In the past my doctors made me take ridiculous amounts of vitamins, minerals, herbs, prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, etc., and my skin was horrible.

        Also, according to Dr. Neal Barnard, mineral supplements are potentially dangerous due to how difficult they can be to eliminate. He wrote about it in Power Foods for the Brain and has brought it up in numerous talks in the past few years. In the book he talks about how zinc can be “potentially toxic.”

        For me it wouldn’t be worth the risk.




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        1. I go low dose zinc. I come up short on the RDA for zinc, so I will take about 5 milligrams of zinc per day and that usually gets me to 15 mg total, the daily requirement. So one 15 mg zinc capsule lasts me 3 days. I like zinc picolinate. But Barnard is right, those negative effects happen with the high doses that many people take.




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    2. Hi Ab. Sorry to hear you suffer from acne. I used to have it when I was a teenager and off and on as an adult.

      In my experience, antibiotics don’t work very well for acne and can cause persistent gut and systemic problems if you take them over long periods of time. It took about two years for my digestion to go back to normal after getting off them. I would recommend looking into all the potential risks and side effects before taking any pills, prescription or otherwise. Remember, according to Dr. Greger himself, the sixth leading cause of death in the United States is prescription drugs.

      But don’t just rely on your doctor or pharmacist for details on side effects, since they often exaggerate drug safety. MayoClinic’s website has a pretty good list of all the bad things that can happen with specific medications. Otherwise you can check out the extended drug monographs at NIH.gov. These lists tend to be more honest and exhaustive than the tiny sheet you get from a pharmacist that mentions maybe four or five potential side effects. It will shock you what commonly prescribed drugs are capable of.

      One of the biggest risks with antibiotics is liver failure, which can lead to transplant necessity or death. There is a semi-famous doctor/author whose sibling recently suffered from liver failure after taking a common 5-day course of antibiotics. I also know someone who died of Stevens-Johnson syndrome from a common antibiotic. Despite medical intervention, the condition killed him pretty fast. For me antibiotics are now something I would take only in a true life-or-death situation, and quite frankly I’d have to be pretty close to death before consenting to treatment after seeing what they can do.

      I’m going to repeat myself, because this is important: read up especially on what these drugs can do over time, because there are some very unpleasant, persistent conditions you can develop from chronic antibiotic use.

      Fortunately there are also some plant-based experts who have weighed in on treating acne with diet.

      Check out Jeff Nelson’s video and article he wrote about his twin daughters’ acne over at VegSource.com. They had severe, potentially disfiguring cystic acne while eating a vegan diet. To cure it, they cut out all nuts, nut butters, seeds, soy products, avocados, and oils from their diet. The before and after pictures are striking. To this day they are still free of acne.

      John McDougall has also spoken at length about the role of dietary fat from all sources in developing acne. It should be listed under “Hot Topics” on his website, DrMcDougall.com, or you can use the search function there to get more details. It also comes up frequently in his webinars. Most of the studies he cites point the finger specifically at dairy, but in his clinical experience any plant fat, whole or not, can cause it, too.

      Other than that, there are testimonials from other plant-based eaters on the internet if you look around. In many cases, the culprits are fatty foods, especially oils, but also nuts, seeds, soy products, and avocados. You will generally find that they recommend a plant-based diet that is extremely low in fat. If you are an omnivore, the most likely culprit is dairy, at least according to my personal experience. Thankfully I haven’t consumed dairy in years now.

      As an adult, my biggest triggers were prescription and over-the-counter medications, as well as supplements. In my experience, any pill can cause acne, which frankly is a little odd. Fortunately the only pill i take now is B12, 3000 mcg per week. I also eat an extremely low-fat, whole food, plant-based diet, which means I have a total of maybe one serving of nuts per month.

      It can take anywhere from 3 days to 3 weeks for your skin to respond to low-fat eating, so you may need to be patient.

      Good luck!




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    3. Hi Ab,

      My name is Megan and I am volunteer for NutritionFacts and a medical assistant in dermatology. The dermatologist I work for treats acne all the time, and is also a WFPB advocate. I have the utmost respect for him and his integrity as a physician. He always recommends that his acne patients first and foremost get rid of any and all dairy in the diet, as the hormones in dairy products can contribute to overactive oil glands, causing acne. But of course, since you’re already vegan, that doesn’t do you much good. My employer only uses low-dose antibiotics (Doxycycline 20 mg), due to the potential negative effects of long-term, higher dose antibiotics. He also uses topical medications (Adapalene/Differin (this is about to become OTC), Clindamycin, and Benzoyl peroxide (this is in OTC washes).) For really stubborn cases of acne and patients who are willing to go through the tedious process, he will put them on Isotretinoin, which requires registration in a highly regulated program due to the potential for extreme birth defects. This is definitely the most painstaking, but also the most effective medication I’ve seen him use for patients. Hopefully this helps you! Sometimes medication is the only way to go for acne, unfortunately!




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  42. I preferred the Vitamin D video to the Green Tea video. I found the Green Tea video to be too busy; I had a hard time concentrating on what you were saying. I thought the old videos were just fine — it’s the information that I’m after — but the Vitamin D video did have a nice professional look. Thanks for all that you do!!!




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  43. Better than the Vit D video, but still not as comfortable to watch as the old ones – it cuts too often and quickly, no time to see where the papers are from, quotes are too small, and there are still awkward audio pauses that break the rhythm. The old format was great – please go back to it!




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  44. No doubt it would be very easy to find research on positive effects of tea consumption . The tea industry is very large and powerful , they are growing the industry by about 5% a year . The tea industry themselves have studied why this has increased and in their studies it was determined that people felt tea was more healthy , than other drinks . This is the real reason why there is so many studies being done on health benefits of tea , it help sales. Hopefully the studies are being done correctly and tea really does have some benefits . The tea industry along with cocoa and coffee are some of the most cruel industries known . I n India it’s estimated there are 100,000 slaves , a lot of them underage girls , who live in horrific conditions , of near starvation, sexual abuse, etc.
    What about some of the herb teas ? I like raspberry leaf tea , which to me is the herb tea that most closely tastes like black tea .
    Hibiscus tea is very good also , plus most likely another thousand different things people have tried to make tea of.




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  45. I don’t like any of the formats shown. I think the information is great, however, most of the time I am watching on my phone. The words flying by add nothing to the information spoken. I would change to related visuals with occasional writing that can be read in the time it is shown on screen. Food for thought ;)




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    1. Thanks for your question Jackie,

      Please find the following article:

      Is Decaf Green Tea as Healthy as Regular Green Tea?

      Green tea doesn’t have as much caffeine as regular tea or coffee, but it does have some caffeine. You can find decaffeinated green tea, but does it have the same health benefits?

      Flavonols, including catechins, are the phytochemicals that give green tea much of its antioxidant potential. Caffeine doesn’t really have anything to do with the function of those antioxidants, but the removal of the caffeine reduces some of the flavonols too.

      Hope this answer helps.




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    1. As far as I know it does have the same health effects. I can’t imagine it could be any other way. Caffeine is only responsible for the stimulating effect of green tea. It’s the polyphenol (mainly EGCG) quality and diversity that counts. But when speaking of actual content of polyphenols in decaf tea – this is where the problem lies.

      According to:
      http://www.amazing-green-tea.com/egcg-content-in-green-tea.html
      Top of the list is regular green tea. One cup has a whopping 180 milligrams of EGCG..
      Decaffeinated brewed green tea has only 60 milligrams, about a third of regular tea.

      So qualitatively speaking it does, quantitatively speaking you need to use thrice as much.




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    2. Thanks for your question Linda,

      Please find the following article:

      Is Decaf Green Tea as Healthy as Regular Green Tea?

      Green tea doesn’t have as much caffeine as regular tea or coffee, but it does have some caffeine. You can find decaffeinated green tea, but does it have the same health benefits?

      Flavonols, including catechins, are the phytochemicals that give green tea much of its antioxidant potential. Caffeine doesn’t really have anything to do with the function of those antioxidants, but the removal of the caffeine reduces some of the flavonols too.

      Hope this answer helps.




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  46. i like the highlighting in this one – Tyler’s – the best. Greying out the background makes the text box POP OUT nicely – simple and effective. better than the slice-and-cut-and-reformat of the Supps video.




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    1. I just experienced my first nail fungus (at age 75) and did a lot of research to avoid the dangerous drugs. I settled on Emuaid, a homeopathic cream. Check it out. You must apply and rub in 3x a day. It took 3 months, but it is gone.




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    2. Thanks for your comment Stephen.

      I may not be answering your question directly, but it seems that, & like Dr Greger mentioned, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a component of green tea, does have anti-infective properties (see here). And in this review, it does state that catechin EGCG has antifungal activity against human-pathogenic yeasts like Candida albicans.

      Another study, has also examined similar scenario and came to the following conclusion (see here):

      These results indicate that EGCg enhances the antifungal effect of amphotericin B or fluconazole against antimycotic-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans. Combined treatment with catechin allows the use of lower doses of antimycotics and induces multiple antifungal effects. It is hoped that this may help to avoid the side effects of antimycotics.

      Hope this answer helps.




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  47. I don’t care for this style. Way too fast. Agree with other commenters that the old style wasn’t broken. The old style allowed me to absorb the info and actually read the print material shown in the video without having to press pause.




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  48. I like this video style by Tyler much better than the last one by Daniel, although I might like the simpler style of previous videos even better. In my opinion, less is more, and too much animation is distracting. I prefer the quick and simple animations that highlight the content instead of distracting attention to the movement. Really, the animations themselves should be hardly noticed.




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  49. I like the video effect of highlighting pertinent text.

    The dramatic turning of pages effect is distracting and wastes time that could otherwise be spent showing pertinent text.

    Please tell your designers that they have one goal: Enhance the message delivery.

    If a special effect is used, it should only be used to enhance the message, not dazzle us by making a flat screen of text suddenly curl up as if turning a page. That gets old very quickly and is distracting and does nothing for highlighting and conveying your content.

    There is no scarcity of special effects online. There is a scarcity of solid nutrition information. That is why we come to this site. Please make sure your designers (and you) understand this as a foundational element.




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  50. Great information. But very busy and too fast. I like the older format. I tried to see the studies so I could go back and look at them myself, but unable to see enough information to do so. I bought your book, so I’ll look there to see if you discuss this in there. We use green tea in all of our skin care products and have for years, so it is always nice to see those kinds of decisions validated. Thanks for all you do!




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  51. I have vision problems due to MS and can’t watch any of these new motion-filled videos. I can listen, and read the transcripts and comments. I liked the old style




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  52. I want to read your reports than watch video. However when you highlight/flip pages TOO FAST so that I can’t follow! In other words I wish prefer to read articles you write!




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