Benzoyl Peroxide vs. Tea Tree Oil for Acne

Benzoyl Peroxide vs. Tea Tree Oil for Acne
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A 5% tea-tree oil gel is pitted head-to-head against the leading over-the-counter treatment for pimples.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Acne…remains one of the commonest diseases to afflict humanity.” If you do online surveys, tea tree oil appears to be “the second most commonly used topical treatment” after benzoyl peroxide. Though crowdsourcing may be “a novel research method for evaluation of acne treatments,” before getting too enamored with popular wisdom, you should know there’s stuff like this circulating on the internet—the facial application of urine as a home remedy for acne.

“[U]rine therapy advocates cite historical use as proof of its therapeutic potential…as a ‘free cure’ for many systemic diseases,” apparently forgetting all the godawful, crazy skeletons crowding the closets of medical history. “While recycling what the body intentionally removes may seem counterintuitive to good health,” what about Premarin? The best argument this author could come up with for putting urine on your face is that hey—women, after all, swallow pills made from pregnant horse pee. I’m not exactly following the logic there.

Of course, there’s drugs for acne. There are always drugs, though, along with drugs come drug side-effects. Antibiotics that suppress the bacteria that cause acne “are the standard treatment for acne, but are becoming less effective, [presumably] because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains.” The prevalence of resistant strains has apparently grown rapidly, such that antibiotics for acne are no longer recommended just by themselves, with re-evaluations advised every six to eight weeks.

Well, the bacteria do seem to be susceptible to tea tree oil in a petri dish, but these kinds of studies were performed with free-floating bacteria, whereas in pimples, the bacteria form what’s called a biofilm, which makes them generally “more difficult to eradicate.” The bacteria forms like a glue that plugs up the follicle. So, petri dish studies can only tell you so much.

Even if tea tree oil couldn’t kill off the bugs, though, it has been shown to suppress skin inflammation. Like if you inflame people’s skin with an allergen and then try to calm it down, tea tree oil did a decent job, compared to an over-the-counter ointment, or a moderate potency prescription steroid cream. So potentially, tea tree oil could help with acne via an antibacterial mechanism, or from an anti-inflammatory standpoint. But you don’t know until you put it to the test.

A 20% tea tree oil gel applied twice a day, and a beautiful drop in acne lesions after one…two…three…months. About 24 pimples down to about 11. They conclude that the study showed that tea tree oil could “significantly improve…mild to moderate acne.” But, who can tell me the study’s fatal flaw?

Right, there was no control group. How do we know they wouldn’t have healed even faster without it? In this “systematic review of randomized clinical trials” on tea tree oil, their “most striking finding” is that they could hardly find any. Given “the widespread use” of tea tree oil, “this is both disappointing and important to note.” But finally, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a 5% topical tea tree oil gel in mild-to-moderate acne.

After six weeks in the tea tree oil group, a 40% drop in whiteheads and blackheads, a 40% drop in red and tender acne bumps, and a 47% drop in pus-filled pimples, compared to comparatively little change in the control group. Overall, in terms of total lesion count, the tea tree oil gel was three and a half times “more effective than placebo,”—three and a half times more effective than essentially doing nothing. But most teens don’t do nothing for their pimples. How does tea tree oil compare to the gold standard, benzoyl peroxide? We’ll find out…right now!

Benzoyl peroxide is by far the most popular over-the-counter acne therapy despite its side effects. It can be irritating, causing redness, dryness, peeling, stinging, or burning. However, the prescription option, “the long-term use of [topical or oral] antibiotics, is discouraged due to the development [and spread of antibiotic] resistance. As a result, [attention has turned to] non-antibiotic products such as tea tree oil.”

The benzoyl peroxide did cause more side effects—dryness, itching, stinging, redness, burning— but it worked better too, cutting the number of inflamed pimples by two-thirds within three months, versus only by half in the tea tree oil group, though the most recent study found them to be more comparable.

Putting all the studies together, and tea tree oil products not only beat out placebo but approximate more standard regimens like benzoyl peroxide or topical antibiotics, suggesting tea tree oil products may be “an appropriate option for treating mild-to-moderate acne.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Adobe via Adobe Stock images. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Acne…remains one of the commonest diseases to afflict humanity.” If you do online surveys, tea tree oil appears to be “the second most commonly used topical treatment” after benzoyl peroxide. Though crowdsourcing may be “a novel research method for evaluation of acne treatments,” before getting too enamored with popular wisdom, you should know there’s stuff like this circulating on the internet—the facial application of urine as a home remedy for acne.

“[U]rine therapy advocates cite historical use as proof of its therapeutic potential…as a ‘free cure’ for many systemic diseases,” apparently forgetting all the godawful, crazy skeletons crowding the closets of medical history. “While recycling what the body intentionally removes may seem counterintuitive to good health,” what about Premarin? The best argument this author could come up with for putting urine on your face is that hey—women, after all, swallow pills made from pregnant horse pee. I’m not exactly following the logic there.

Of course, there’s drugs for acne. There are always drugs, though, along with drugs come drug side-effects. Antibiotics that suppress the bacteria that cause acne “are the standard treatment for acne, but are becoming less effective, [presumably] because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains.” The prevalence of resistant strains has apparently grown rapidly, such that antibiotics for acne are no longer recommended just by themselves, with re-evaluations advised every six to eight weeks.

Well, the bacteria do seem to be susceptible to tea tree oil in a petri dish, but these kinds of studies were performed with free-floating bacteria, whereas in pimples, the bacteria form what’s called a biofilm, which makes them generally “more difficult to eradicate.” The bacteria forms like a glue that plugs up the follicle. So, petri dish studies can only tell you so much.

Even if tea tree oil couldn’t kill off the bugs, though, it has been shown to suppress skin inflammation. Like if you inflame people’s skin with an allergen and then try to calm it down, tea tree oil did a decent job, compared to an over-the-counter ointment, or a moderate potency prescription steroid cream. So potentially, tea tree oil could help with acne via an antibacterial mechanism, or from an anti-inflammatory standpoint. But you don’t know until you put it to the test.

A 20% tea tree oil gel applied twice a day, and a beautiful drop in acne lesions after one…two…three…months. About 24 pimples down to about 11. They conclude that the study showed that tea tree oil could “significantly improve…mild to moderate acne.” But, who can tell me the study’s fatal flaw?

Right, there was no control group. How do we know they wouldn’t have healed even faster without it? In this “systematic review of randomized clinical trials” on tea tree oil, their “most striking finding” is that they could hardly find any. Given “the widespread use” of tea tree oil, “this is both disappointing and important to note.” But finally, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a 5% topical tea tree oil gel in mild-to-moderate acne.

After six weeks in the tea tree oil group, a 40% drop in whiteheads and blackheads, a 40% drop in red and tender acne bumps, and a 47% drop in pus-filled pimples, compared to comparatively little change in the control group. Overall, in terms of total lesion count, the tea tree oil gel was three and a half times “more effective than placebo,”—three and a half times more effective than essentially doing nothing. But most teens don’t do nothing for their pimples. How does tea tree oil compare to the gold standard, benzoyl peroxide? We’ll find out…right now!

Benzoyl peroxide is by far the most popular over-the-counter acne therapy despite its side effects. It can be irritating, causing redness, dryness, peeling, stinging, or burning. However, the prescription option, “the long-term use of [topical or oral] antibiotics, is discouraged due to the development [and spread of antibiotic] resistance. As a result, [attention has turned to] non-antibiotic products such as tea tree oil.”

The benzoyl peroxide did cause more side effects—dryness, itching, stinging, redness, burning— but it worked better too, cutting the number of inflamed pimples by two-thirds within three months, versus only by half in the tea tree oil group, though the most recent study found them to be more comparable.

Putting all the studies together, and tea tree oil products not only beat out placebo but approximate more standard regimens like benzoyl peroxide or topical antibiotics, suggesting tea tree oil products may be “an appropriate option for treating mild-to-moderate acne.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Adobe via Adobe Stock images. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

61 responses to “Benzoyl Peroxide vs. Tea Tree Oil for Acne

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  1. Good stuff. This research related to diet and nutrition still begs reasoning behind the underlying causes of the skin inflammation brought on by P. acnes. I’m sure there are many clean, whole food plant-based dieters that struggle with skin issues whether they lie on the face or elsewhere.

    1. You’re sure based on????? I’ve seen many patients start an unprocessed plant diet and have seen their acne completely resolve.

      Dr. Ben

    1. That is interesting Maryann.

      I am guessing that there is quite a big difference in how you smell depending on which you choose.

      Lavender is a pretty powerful smell, but onion sounds downright repulsive to use that way.

      Did the smell dissipate quickly?

      1. Deb, I’m not sure about the face, but I heard that onion on your scalp made your hair grow a lot, so I tried it… NOT WORTH THE SMELL! I only left it on a few hours before my shower, but it was just a hideous feeling and scent to carry around. I smelled like an onion ring.

    2. I used an all too expensive serum on my face once, I was drawn to it because it had an impressive array of ingredients and they were all completely natural. It wasn’t for acne, just a moisturizer. Well it had lavender oil in it and some other essential oil. This stuff seriously messed with my skin, it became so red and irritated and I had all these tiny red bumps and it was like my skin just changed on my face. I stopped using it and it took a LONG time to get it back to normal–a few months but probably like 5 to get it completely back to its old self. I stick to pure authentic argan oil now.

      I would be weary about essential oils as serums or moisturizers, maybe in soaps it would be different because you wash them off. When I put drops of lavender oil in my body wash though, it dried my skin out too much. Nothing worked as brilliantly for a burn though, as lavender oil.

    1. Nancy, that was the same sentence I was going to say.

      I was so allergic to Benzoyl Peroxide AND I also drank so much milk.

      And I am also allergic to anything with Sulfur, so things like Pro-Active would make my face as red as a sunburn for 24 hours.

      1. Oh Deb, I was a big milk drinker. I had a real penchant for dairy in those days. My skin wasn’t too bad, but it really messed up my hormones at the time.

        1. WFPB Nancy, I, too, was a big milk drinker during my teenage years and had a bad case of acne all through that time period. Wish I had known the true story on milk many years ago, but the schools really pushed it back in those days, so we all drank the “kool-ade” so to speak. Looking back and now knowing the latest science, the milk was probably a causative factor in the acne.

  2. Tea tree oil has been found to be effective dealing with a topic many in the medical profession seem rather hesitant to even talk to their patients about even though it is a major cause of skin conditions……demodex. Demodex is a genus of tiny mites that live in or near hair follicles of mammals. Around 65 species of Demodex are known. Two species live on humans. Older people are much more likely to carry the mites; about a third of children and young adults, half of adults, and two-thirds of elderly people carried them. The lower rate in children may be because children produce less sebum. Recently, a study of 29 adults (18 and over) in North Carolina, US, found that 70% of those 18 years of age carried mites, and that all adults over 18 carried them. Evidence of a correlation between Demodex infection and acne vulgaris exists, suggesting it might play a role in promoting acne.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3296070/

          1. Thank you Barb. Perhaps you love terrible puns and bad jokes as much as I do.

            I was going to congratulate the NutritionFacts team on finding all these fascinating studies by commenting “Well spotted” but thought better of it.

  3. In Australia, there are whole ponds and lakes surrounded with tea trees turning the water black beautifully reflecting surrounding vegetation and wildlife. I wonder if swimming/soaking in these waters would help acne sufferers?

    1. Teenage dream vacations just switched from Disney to Australia!

      One of my friends who traveled there said that it was the longest plane flight of her entire life.

      I thought Europe was far enough.

  4. Well, in our family benzoyl peroxide was a God-send, especially the 10% prescription strength. Tea tree oil was ineffective and caused further irritation. The smell is horrible too imo. That being said, I agree with Blair that the first suggestion I would offer a suffering teenager would be to cut out all milk products, followed by perhaps an assessment by an allergist and/or endocrinologist. In my case, some grains, strawberries, b12, medications will cause breakouts.

    1. Laughing, what I am hearing is that I would have probably gotten just as irritated from tea tree oil, too.

      Let them not drink milk.

      Schools are the milk pushers. Some of us loved having our own little carton.

    1. I found a Hair website which said that there is no evidence that tea tree oil makes the hair less oily.

      They recommend a Micellar Shampoo like Redken.

      Dr. Axe disagrees with them.

      I had trouble finding an article in PubMed.

      1. Thanks for trying anyway,I appreciate it! Hopefully someone else will know something…
        I know some people have some improvement by not washing their hair every day(which I avoid) but after a week the greasy hair can clog pores in the skin…

      2. From the paper Spring 03 Listed :
        “The evaluation of a 5% TTO shampoo for mild to moderate dandruff demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the investigator-assessed whole scalp lesion score, total area of involvement score, and total severity score, as well as in the patient-assessed itchiness and greasiness scores, compared to placebo. Overall, the 5% TTO was well tolerated and appeared to be effective in the treatment of mild to moderate dandruff.”

        Keyword”greasiness scores”

      3. Axe is probably a great person to take advice from on entrepeneurship and starting a business. He’s also personable and plausible.
        https://medium.com/authority-magazine/have-written-goals-and-a-written-strategy-the-5-lessons-i-learned-being-a-20-something-founder-f2a4d9dd5015

        However, I wouldn’t take seriously anything he says on nutrition or medicine. He is not an MD or a Registered Dietitian for one thing. He is also beset by enormous financial conflicts of interest. Of course is going to disagree with statements that essential oils don’t work for this or that – he sells essential oils.
        https://store.draxe.com/

        Personally, I would want to know what the science says not what some bloke selling stuff says.

        All the best snake oil merchants are charming, glib and have bits of paper saying that they are doctors of some kind or other.

    2. Tea tree’s primary active ingredients include terpene hydrocarbons, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. It is these compounds that give tea tree its antibacterial, antiviral and anti fungal activity. These are some that is known. — terpinen-4-ol and alpha-terpineol are the most active — and various ranges of concentrations. The volatile hydrocarbons found in the oil are considered aromatic and capable of traveling through air, pores of the skin and mucus membranes. That’s why tea tree oil is commonly used aromatically and topically to kill germs, fight infections and soothe skin conditions.

      Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil: a Review of Antimicrobial and Other Medicinal Properties

  5. I was one of the lucky ones with virtually no acne as a teenager some 50 years ago. But I am very allergic to tea tree oil,, getting rhinitis from the smell and hives from contact. All in all, I’m very glad for my naturally clear skin!

  6. I can only tell you what worked for me and I cannot promise it will work for anyone else. I heard about the chocolate controversy when I was in high school. I thought chocolate wasn’t the culprit because sugar is always present in chocolate candy bars. So I stopped eating sugar from cane and I also avoided corn syrup which I was told is very similar to sugar. This is very difficult because they add sugar to practically every food on the store shelves and now they call it fancy names to confuse the consumer like “evaporated cane juice” and so on. Also, as was suggested in an old “Prevention” magazine I read long ago, I began taking 10 mg of Zinc 3x daily. A few months later my pimples were gone. Just to convince myself further, I began eating sugar again and my pimples came back. Also I found chocolate cookies which are vegan and sweetened only with fruit juice and my pimples did not come back so I think chocolate itself is not to blame but the sugar almost always present in chocolate candy bars and so many other foods. I know the sugar lobby is very powerful so I know my words will not make much difference for many.

  7. I notice the link to Youtube is gone and the video still does not fit on the screen. I made it a habit to always go to Youtube so I could see the whole video and give it a thumbs up. Please either reinstate the Youtube link or redesign your new website so the video fits (like it use to) or do both. Thanks.

    1. If you right click on the video you can choose the option to ‘copy the video URL’. Do so, then paste that in your browser and off to youtube you go.

      It also might be a change done by youtube and not this website.

      1. By the way, all of the videos fit in both Firefox and IE on my computer and always have. It likely is a browser setting on your own computer.

        1. Hi Jimbo,

          Thanks for the tips. Copying the URL works and I have reduced my video playback in Firefox to 90% and now it fits and the change also seems to stick.

  8. It is going to be a quiet weekend around here without Ron.

    My dog made it through another day of fasting.

    5 days, so far.

    Dr. Longo recommended that as a minimum.

    Dr. Fung recommends 7 days.

    I would like his owner to not punk out and do the whole time, but she is known to be emotional and she doesn’t like this whole process already.

    And by she, I do mean me.

    Two weeks would make me pretty happy.

    Three weeks is what they did to heal the dogs.

    1. He stopped asking for food.

      He got up off the slippery floor and came to the door when I got home. He usually doesn’t move until I get to him. He also stopped all coughing and lung fluid sounds.

      I have to bandage the upper chest wall where the rumor broke through in the morning and I will know whether that tumor shrank.

      But he is definitely peaceful after 5 days of fasting.

      I think I will stick with it because if I start feeding him meat again and it grows I will end up having to start over. If I shrink it, he might transition to food better

      1. The visible tumor on his upper Breast is no longer visible!

        It was fairly big and his fur had fallen off in a big clump where it came through so I could see it, but now it is just pink skin.

        Hooray!

        He is not going to be fed for a long time!

        1. Deb- 20 Weeks, Great news! You seem to be the kind of person who never gives up … the sign of a great care-giver. Hope he continues to have steady improvement.

          1. Thanks Hal!

            Stubborn, yes!

            Strong-willed!

            I have been told that.

            I was thinking about the book on radical remissions today and the author described the people who survived Cancer as doing things like following their own intuition. A woman who uses water fasting in her practice talked about how she has a 50% rate with Cancer versus a 5% rate and she said talked about the patients who succeed as being the ones who come to her in the middle of doing their own research process and they are seriously pro-active and are willing to try things, even if they seem to fail at first.

            This has been such a big learning curve. I would have been so happy if green tea and turmeric and soy and flaxseed and broccoli sprouts and cauliflower and medicinal mushrooms or blueberries and cardamom had killed it. Who knows, he might have been eating too much Tempeh or something.

            I would have been equally happy if it had been essential oils or modified citrus pectin or the yunan baiayo or amla or triphala.

            If he had even tasted one bite of the coconut oil or would have wanted heavy cream, or if Keto Pet Sanctuary had actually sent the food that I ordered, I would have been happy to learn about that.

            The things I tried have extended his life, but water fasting is the first thing that caused the visible tumor to shrink.

            Meat caused it to grow and that would be an example of going against the stream for a few days, while I tried to figure out what to try next.

            I am sooooooooooooooo happy that I keep reading and that I never leave that process.

            I have talked to several people whose dog died in a few weeks or they just put them down.

            What has surprised me is how many dog owners have said to me, “I would never have done any of the things you are doing” and my vet said that he has never seen anyone ever do anything like what I am doing.

            Are they just not curious enough? Or something?

            Or they just need 100% proof before they will try things?

            Or they are just in the 65% who obey authority figures no matter what the authority figures tell them and I don’t operate that way?

            I had an abusive authority figure when I was young, plus I was growing up highly influenced by the 60’s and 70’s culture.

            I think that might be it because I am the one who would watch “What the Health” when they would think of that as crazy.

            I also look up PubMed articles and they put doctors over PubMed and have an aversion to “internet doctors”

            Mostly, I have a rolling N of 1 study going on and it changes every single day and my vet would never change what he was doing mid-stream.

            He is: steroids and antibiotics for the rest of his life and I weaned him off even though we didn’t agree and he didn’t give me permission.

            Yes, I read a hundred resources about how to wean dogs off of steroids and most of them said, “Ask your vet” who wanted to have him go on a higher dose.

            He has never had a dog live longer than a month without surgery and my dog is still alive.

            I am not saying that with confidence.

            I am saying that he still doesn’t want me “playing around” with my dog’s health and I am still trying everything I can possibly find.

            1. Even here, most people wouldn’t try the water fasting.

              Not saying that they are wrong, it just is that they just are less willing to try things than I am.

              (I will say that there is a whole other world out there who would try things which I think are crazy, so I am not as radical as most people who try things. I didn’t do bloodroot or B-17 with him, for instance.)

                1. Hal,

                  You have encouraged me before and I just want to thank you for being such a nice person and I mean that sincerely.

                  This process has been so difficult for me and I mean all of it.

                  What I jumped over when I responded before was that I didn’t understand almost any sentences that the doctor with fasting talked about and that was sincerely discouraging. She was talking about the Mitochondrial theory of Cancer and I was happy that I could come back here and watch a video, but she was talking about things and was not from a WFPB perspective and I really do feel that people have to go to med school to understand which doctors to listen to. I couldn’t discern if she was Keto or not and it turned out that she is more like Tom Brady. Seasonal meat eater, Seasonal vegan. She got over Cancer going Vegan but switched. I understood that part, but you would think with all of the vocabulary words I have been learning about the Mitochondria that she would have landed on some of the subjects so we could overlap. It could get so discouraging. I don’t know what people who find out they have Stage 4 Cancer would even do at all. The information wars back and forth and it is so often presented in technical ways and she was a half hour of technical stuff without pictures or charts. It didn’t work for me at all. Scientifically, she said so much and I didn’t learn one thing from her and I can’t say that about many videos. I came away from her talk knowing that my brain problems and lack of education really does cause so many problems and has made this harder. I have said it before, but I am doing this with half of my brain tied behind my head.

                  1. I just listened to Thomas Seyfried talk about the Mitochondrial Theory of Cancer and with him and Dr Greger, I understood every sentence and I was wondering how that could possibly be that I didn’t understand anything the woman said and she was using medical jargon rather than science jargon. I have learned all of the cellular respiration vocabulary words but she was still capable of talking for an hour and not using any of them.

              1. Just had a thought about the study on spontaneous remission.

                I am going to hypothesize that the ones who die earliest might have people with the exact same description because of the, “saves your life or kills you faster” thing going on in the studies and culture.

      1. thanks,I tried switching from Gmail plain view (for slow connections ) to the “more advanced” view & it worked to unsubscribe,but maybe you had fixed the problem by then.I don’t need to unsubscribe from any other video pages,thanks!

        Does anybody know what was used in this TTO gel? (to form a gel) I’m wondering if a 5-20% TTO solution in water put in a spray bottle would work just as well,or does the gel part play an advantageous role?

  9. Yes, I still don’t know if this will work, but I genuinely am grateful that I get to try things and that he is still alive.

    My Keto friend had surgery and they think they got the margins and that is what she would try and it will cost her $13,000 most likely, because of her deductible. I already spent that on trying to heal my dog. Water Fasting is almost free. It is such a relief to be doing an “almost free” process for a change.

  10. Curious though… what about the testosterone blocking effects? Could the application of things like tea tree and lavender oil disrupt hormones? And what about males using it on themselves, could the tea tree oil unwantingly (not a word, but dammit it should be) reduce or eliminate their facial hair or does this only occur in females for some reason? So many other hair questions about those… like what about scalp hair or those tiny important hairs within the ears (I ask because I know people who use these things in their ears periodically)?

    I’m also curious about our own natural microbiome on our skin. I’ve read how there’s a tribe (I forget the specific location) who has an incredible skin microbiome count and how our own natural good bacteria protects our skin and some companies are actually putting probiotics in their skin care products because of this. So I’m wondering in general about the whole world of our skin’s own natural microbiome, but also might these antibacterial treatments disrupt that? So could long term use actually be counterproductive possibly? Or maybe they should only be used when there’s a relevant issue with acne if they might interfere… but this is all just me rambling on the hypothesis that these strong essential oils could disrupt our own beneficial bacteria.

    1. S

      That sounds entirely reasonable.

      I remember way back in the day reading reports of a study in Denmark that showed that treating minor cuts and abrasions with antiseptics delayed wound healhing compared to simple lavage with water or water and soap. They hypothised that antiseptics impaired the body’s defences (including the skin microbiome) as well as affecting possible infections. More serious wounds, burns and chronic minor wounds (ulcers) are a different matter

      To the extent that essential oils have antimicrobial activity, then regular use probably would alter our skin micrbiome.

      1. The skin microbiome is already a fascinating topic.

        So would you just leave the acne alone?

        Yes, we can point to diet, but I am literally surrounded by people who have diseases and still can’t go WFPB.

        I think I thought there would be things which happened which would motivate people to eat healthier but people who have the belief system of “I can’t do it.” Often really don’t.

        I assume they are the ones who have acne in the first place. Should they just leave it?

        The problem is that pock marks and scars can affect their employment and marital status and friendships throughout their lives.

        I am thinking that vanity would most often beat health issues in young people.

        Though if more children start having heart attacks and diabetes and Cancer things might change. Kids get strokes. Those things may start to affect the young culture more than obesity has.

        Obesity is often a loop between people getting rejected and comforting themselves with food.

        Heart attack at 17 is different.

      2. Thanks Tom. That makes sense to me.

        So sort of approaching Deb’s question of should people with acne just leave it alone, I’m kind of wondering if so much of the things we cover our skin in from our tween years on aren’t actually part of the cause in the first place.

  11. My dog made it through 7 days of fasting and just asked for food again. I am not caving in yet.

    He should have a new immune system as of today, if I got the science right.

    I have been contemplating the risk factors versus the successes. One woman who had heart problems died after a 21-day fast and a dog with Henangiosarcoma was healed in the same length of 21-days. Very few people who do extended fasts die and they have hundreds of years of fasting.

    Even if I wanted to stop tonight, I don’t know if he would eat anything other than Wendy’s burgers. That pushes me to try for at least 14 days. That is closer to the 18 days people have been healed using. What happens in the body changes at 14 days. If I can reach there, I would feel like I may genuinely extend his life again, even if it isn’t gone.

  12. Acne was not kind to me in my teens. Baking soda was advised. It may have helped. Currently, I am 59; do not have acne and opt for a shower once a week–with no soap. This is a natural approach. My hair remains conditioned and my skin may not get as dry in the winter. My shoot-from-the-hip on teenage acne is that you are going to get nailed by it no matter what topical treatment you use. I would leave out dairy if I had teens to do over.

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