Duct Tape & Wart Removal

Duct Tape & Wart Removal
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Duct tape beat out cryotherapy (freezing) for treating warts in a randomized controlled head-to-head trial.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

When I was reviewing the science behind common over-the-counter remedies used in dermatology, such as tea tree oil for acne or nail fungus, I was surprised to see on the same page a section on duct tape. Duct tape?! The only time I remember seeing duct tape used in a medical study was on the “[i]dentification of the gases responsible for the odor of human [farts],” which involved a collection system comprised of “gas tight pantaloons…sealed to the skin” with duct tape. (That’s the study where they assessed the wind-breaking ability of a cushion called the “Toot Trapper.”)

But what the dermatology journal was talking about is warts. “Duct tape brings out our inventive, slightly kooky side.” “Given this versatility, it wasn’t so surprising a few years ago when a group of doctors…reported that duct tape could get rid of warts.” As I noted in my last wart video, all sorts of strange things are purported to cure warts, because most go away on their own. A thousand kids were followed for two years, and two-thirds of the warts disappeared without doing a thing. So maybe we should just leave them alone—”although there are cases [that] may warrant treatment.” Otherwise, we can just let our own body take care of them.

Warts are caused by wart viruses, and so, spontaneous wart disappearance is assumed to be an immune response, where our body finally wakes up and takes notice. This assumption is based on studies like this, where foreign proteins were injected into the wart itself—like a measles-mumps-rubella vaccine straight into the wart, which compared to placebo, appeared to accelerate the immune clearance process. The problem, of course, is that injections hurt, and 30 percent of the kids that got their warts injected with the vaccine suffered a flu-like syndrome. Yikes! Okay, scratch that. What else do we got?

Within a few months, any placebo treatment will work in about a quarter of the cases. So, if you put duct tape on 100 warts, and 23 went away, that wouldn’t mean much. The traditional medical therapies—acid treatments and freezing treatments—bump the cure rate up to about 50 percent. So, if you were really serious about testing the efficacy of duct tape, you would pit it head to head against one of those. And that’s exactly what happened. “The efficacy of duct tape vs cryotherapy in the treatment of…(the common wart).” Cryotherapy is the current treatment of choice for many pediatricians.

“Objective: To determine if application of duct tape is as effective as cryotherapy in the treatment of common warts.” Patients were randomized to receive either liquid nitrogen applied to each wart, or “duct tape occlusion.” When I heard about treating warts with duct tape, I had this image where they were like trying to rip them off or something. But no; they are just applying a little circle of duct tape every week or so. Here are the details.

Although there had been a few anecdotal reports of using tape, “no prospective, randomized controlled trial had yet [been] performed,” until this study, which found that the duct tape was “not only equal to but [exceeded] the efficacy of cryotherapy,” which worked in 60 percent of the cases. But 85 percent of the duct tape patients were cured—significantly more effective than cryotherapy for treatment of the common wart. More effective, and fewer side effects. “The only adverse effect observed in the duct tape group during our study was a [small] minimal amount of local irritation and [redness]”—whereas cryotherapy hurts.

Oh, you want to hear the saddest thing? “1 young child actually vomited in fear of pain before each [cryotherapy session.]” They were like torturing the poor kid.

Cryotherapy can cause pain, and bloody blisters that can get infected, and mess up your nail bed.

So, duct tape: more effective, fewer side effects, and more convenient. Compare applying a little duct tape at home to making multiple clinic visits, dragging the poor kid back every two weeks. I mean it’s like a win-win-win.

Duct tape can now be “offered as a nonthreatening, painless, and inexpensive technique for the treatment of warts in children.” I mean, how much does a little piece of duct tape cost? So, it’s like a win-win-win-win. Ah, but the money you save is the money the doctor loses. There’s no way the medical profession is going to just let this go unchallenged. Further studies were performed, and failed to show an effect, and so we end up in the medical literature with conclusions like this: “Is duct tape effective for treating warts?” “Bottom line? No.”

Huh. Is duct tape really not effective after all, or was there some kind of critical design flaw in the follow-up studies? We’ll find out, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Maximilian via Adobe Stock Photos. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

When I was reviewing the science behind common over-the-counter remedies used in dermatology, such as tea tree oil for acne or nail fungus, I was surprised to see on the same page a section on duct tape. Duct tape?! The only time I remember seeing duct tape used in a medical study was on the “[i]dentification of the gases responsible for the odor of human [farts],” which involved a collection system comprised of “gas tight pantaloons…sealed to the skin” with duct tape. (That’s the study where they assessed the wind-breaking ability of a cushion called the “Toot Trapper.”)

But what the dermatology journal was talking about is warts. “Duct tape brings out our inventive, slightly kooky side.” “Given this versatility, it wasn’t so surprising a few years ago when a group of doctors…reported that duct tape could get rid of warts.” As I noted in my last wart video, all sorts of strange things are purported to cure warts, because most go away on their own. A thousand kids were followed for two years, and two-thirds of the warts disappeared without doing a thing. So maybe we should just leave them alone—”although there are cases [that] may warrant treatment.” Otherwise, we can just let our own body take care of them.

Warts are caused by wart viruses, and so, spontaneous wart disappearance is assumed to be an immune response, where our body finally wakes up and takes notice. This assumption is based on studies like this, where foreign proteins were injected into the wart itself—like a measles-mumps-rubella vaccine straight into the wart, which compared to placebo, appeared to accelerate the immune clearance process. The problem, of course, is that injections hurt, and 30 percent of the kids that got their warts injected with the vaccine suffered a flu-like syndrome. Yikes! Okay, scratch that. What else do we got?

Within a few months, any placebo treatment will work in about a quarter of the cases. So, if you put duct tape on 100 warts, and 23 went away, that wouldn’t mean much. The traditional medical therapies—acid treatments and freezing treatments—bump the cure rate up to about 50 percent. So, if you were really serious about testing the efficacy of duct tape, you would pit it head to head against one of those. And that’s exactly what happened. “The efficacy of duct tape vs cryotherapy in the treatment of…(the common wart).” Cryotherapy is the current treatment of choice for many pediatricians.

“Objective: To determine if application of duct tape is as effective as cryotherapy in the treatment of common warts.” Patients were randomized to receive either liquid nitrogen applied to each wart, or “duct tape occlusion.” When I heard about treating warts with duct tape, I had this image where they were like trying to rip them off or something. But no; they are just applying a little circle of duct tape every week or so. Here are the details.

Although there had been a few anecdotal reports of using tape, “no prospective, randomized controlled trial had yet [been] performed,” until this study, which found that the duct tape was “not only equal to but [exceeded] the efficacy of cryotherapy,” which worked in 60 percent of the cases. But 85 percent of the duct tape patients were cured—significantly more effective than cryotherapy for treatment of the common wart. More effective, and fewer side effects. “The only adverse effect observed in the duct tape group during our study was a [small] minimal amount of local irritation and [redness]”—whereas cryotherapy hurts.

Oh, you want to hear the saddest thing? “1 young child actually vomited in fear of pain before each [cryotherapy session.]” They were like torturing the poor kid.

Cryotherapy can cause pain, and bloody blisters that can get infected, and mess up your nail bed.

So, duct tape: more effective, fewer side effects, and more convenient. Compare applying a little duct tape at home to making multiple clinic visits, dragging the poor kid back every two weeks. I mean it’s like a win-win-win.

Duct tape can now be “offered as a nonthreatening, painless, and inexpensive technique for the treatment of warts in children.” I mean, how much does a little piece of duct tape cost? So, it’s like a win-win-win-win. Ah, but the money you save is the money the doctor loses. There’s no way the medical profession is going to just let this go unchallenged. Further studies were performed, and failed to show an effect, and so we end up in the medical literature with conclusions like this: “Is duct tape effective for treating warts?” “Bottom line? No.”

Huh. Is duct tape really not effective after all, or was there some kind of critical design flaw in the follow-up studies? We’ll find out, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Maximilian via Adobe Stock Photos. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is the first in a three-video series on duct tape for wart removal. Stay tuned for Can You Really Remove Warts with Duct Tape? and Which Type of Duct Tape Is Best for Wart Removal?

I never heard of using duct tape for warts until I was researching other dermatological remedies, like the ones found in Benzoyl Peroxide vs. Tea Tree Oil for Acne, Does Tea Tree Oil Work for Nail Fungus?, and Benefits of Tea Tree Oil for Warts & Cold Sores.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

74 responses to “Duct Tape & Wart Removal

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  1. I’m curious about the reason why duct tape works. Is it simply shielding off the skin, or is there some chemical involved? Would a simple plaster work too?

    I’m also curious if this could stand a chance as an alternative to topical application of liquid nitrogen to mend skin damage due to over-exposure to UVA radiation [just learnt that sunscreen tends to block UVB, not UVA].

    1. About the sunscreens: The Environmental Working Group has done sunscreen ‘reviews’ for years. The second link gives some background info on the uvs/uvb topic, and some suggestions for products if you use the chemical type of sunscreens. The first link gives a product example of a mineral based sunscreen which will give excellent uva/uvb coverage. There are many mineral sunscreens on the market now in all kinds of formulations. Look for zinc and/or titanium on the ingredient list.

      https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/about-the-sunscreens/827979/La_Roche-Posay_Anthelios_Mineral_Sunscreen-Gentle_Lotion%2C_SPF_50_/

      https://www.ewg.org/release/Sunscreens-Get-Flunking-Grade-for-UVA-Protection

      The duct tape works … though it can be a bit tough on surrounding skin. If I was going to use duct tape treatment on a child’s hand for example, I would apply a 1/2 inch square of tape on the wart, and then cover with a regular band-aid over top. The band-aids today are breathable, and might help deter messing with the duct tape. Took a week to 10 days, but the tape has to remain on 24/7

    2. The quick spritz at the dermatologist office is what, only uncomfortable for the 2-3 seconds the doctor is pushing the trigger. There never is lingering discomfort or blistering in my experience. I would much rather deal with that than walking around with duct tape stuck to my body for the average of EIGHT WEEKS. There are also all kinds of nasty volatile compounds in the adhesive that are not ideal for human skin contact. And duct tape contains latex, something many people are allergic to. Many reports online of people who tried duct tape just getting a allergic rash around their warts.

    3. Regarding UVA sunscreen protection, your information is outdated. Currently Consumer Reports lists 28 lotions and 20 sprays with ‘excellent’ UVA protection.

      According to CR: The UVA test we use allows us to differentiate the degree of UVA protection among sunscreens. To test for UVA, we smear sunscreen onto plastic plates and pass UV light through and measure the amount of UVA and UVB rays that are absorbed. That information is then used to calculate our UVA score.

      1. Yeah, but recent tests showed undesirable, perhaps carcinogenic chemicals get into the blood stream.

    4. Hi Rick,

      I am a volunteer for Dr. Greger. Thank you so much for your question.

      It is uncertain how/why duct tape works for treating warts, but the leading hypothesis is that application of duct tape causes irritation at the site of the wart, thus drawing an increased immune response to the area. This immune response can “take down” the virus that causes the wart. One could say that any sticky tape should then work to treat the wart. Therefore, there may be other mechanisms involved, which I suspect Dr. Greger may talk about in his upcoming Monday video.

      As far as your other question, I do not believe it has been tested for skin damage due to excessive sun exposure. Therefore, I cannot say whether the duct tape concept could work for the situation you suggested.

      I hope this helps answer your question!

  2. Guffaw Laugh Chuckle Snort!

    at the title. I use a sharp instruments and cut ’em out. The plantar type bleed a lot, but that’s normal. Wart-cutting is easy if can reach it and trust your skills. Duct tape!

    1. And I’ve found that Turmeric will dry up and remove some small “blemishes”. Have removed two. One has come back. I’ll turmeric cover it again and it will shrivel and fall off. Anybody wants to send that sample to the lab, let me know. I don’t has lab!

    2. Doctors do not cut warts as the primary therapy because the amount of scarring is much higher. Who wants an excision scar on their visible body parts? Most freezing leaves little to no scarring.

  3. Can’t prove a connection, but.. I did have a very persistent wart on my wrist until I started to consume about a 1/8 cup of spices, (which included matcha and amla) every day. I also haven’t had a cold in almost 3 years. I figure that isn’t bad for a 69 yr old diabetic who travels a lot. Anyway, the wart is gone so I’ll keep my duck tape for important stuff like furniture repair.

      1. Sure. Basically it is anything that boosts the immune system. So 2 parts amla, 2 parts matcha, 2 parts turmeric, 1 ginger, 1 cloves, 1 cinnamon, 1 nutmeg, 1 cardamom and 1/2 black pepper. That pretty much gives me the spice pick up for the day. It goes in my morning oatmeal and blueberries along with coco powder and ground flax. Because of the coco, I don’t worry about spices for flavor and the rest of the day I am only concerned about spices for their culinary attributes. My primary point, (that I think you understood very well) was that because warts are caused by virus, boosting the immune system would likely help. At least I’m sticking to that story. Heh heh, I have a neighbor who is chronically ill with something or another and misses work at least one day per month, yet she keeps telling me I need more protein in my diet. (OK so I’m amused by life’s little absurdities.)

    1. I am wondering how water fasting or Whole Food Plant Based superfood to improve the immune system would fare?

      Blueberries and double the Natural Killer Cells, Broccoli and the foot soldiers.

  4. Unrelated question.But for those who do not like the taste of nutritional yeast I saw that it is available in pill form.I know that way would be easier to take more regularly.How many pills or mg/grams would be needed for the 2tbsps Dr.G recommends?
    Thanks!

    1. Nutritional yeast disappears in many recipes and can not even be detected. Also be sure to not confuse nutritional yeast with brewers yeast. The latter is bitter.

      1. Thanks,but the packaging says not to heat it up & I can’t eat most spices & dried herbs.I would usually mix it in with peanut butter but have eaten it so often I’m not tempted to eat any more peanut butter.Mine (EU) is from Carls-Bergh Pharma Ab not sure if Red Star sell their products in the EU.

    1. You can see where Dr.G talks about nutritional yeast by typing nutritional yeast in the search box at the top of the page.
      More specifically from this article https://nutritionfacts.org/2015/07/30/three-brands-of-nutritional-yeast-contain-detectable-lead-levels-but-the-risk-is-minimal/ and here : https://nutritionfacts.org/video/best-food-to-counter-stress-induced-immune-suppression/

      Quote from 1st article linked above:
      So what do all those numbers mean? None of the brands tested exceeded California prop 65 standards. No matter what brand, consuming a typical serving (2 tablespoons) per day is still well within safe limits. I will certainly continue to include the stuff in my diet. Dr. Neal Barnard once said, “It’s not about ALL foods in moderation, it’s about healthy foods in moderation. Broccoli is great, but you don’t want to just eat broccoli. Kids exercising is wonderful, but you don’t want them to exercise all the time.”

      1. Most all of the ‘brands’ of nutritional yeast Dr Gregor reported on are ALL MADE BY THE SAME COMPANY AND SOLD TO THE OTHERS WHO JUST BOTTLE IT. It is made by Red Star. The other brands even say Red Star made the product on their labels. The only other producer is in Bulgaria and they make the imported kind without additional nutrients.

        Red Star’s formula T-6635+ is made specifically for supporting the needs of vegans and vegetarians with added vitamins and minerals you won’t find in other brands. Personally I find the NOW brand the least expensive.

        1. I use so much nooch that I order it in 6 pound drums from Vegan Essentials. It’s good for one year, and that’s about how long it lasts for me. When I’m getting low, I just order another one, and find I never run out. It’s a great source for B12, although I still supplement since I’m now in my late 60s.

        2. I get organic nutritional yeast because it is not fortified with folic acid. I want to avoid folic acid because of some things I remember about it from Greger’s other videos. Yes, it’s expensive, but I have to choose health when I spend my money….

        1. Thanks, Barb. I can send it to my kids who have young kids.

          I don’t use sunscreen – either I cover up or I get some sun, which I am not adverse to.

  5. Callus adhesive patch circles are available cheap at the pharmacy. Duct tape is cheaper. I treated my long time foot callus with adhesive patches and the dissolving fluid that comes with it with little result. I may have had success with salt foot bath combined with using a callus scraper file. After about the fifth treatment doing this, my callus went away and stayed gone.
    Okay, I know a callus is not a wart. I have tried green tea, petroleum jelly and honey (one at a time) on some minor facial exema. I think I favor the honey.
    My instinct on these skin treatments is, if you make a conscious effort on treatment (try any number of things–that are safe), you may get a placebo healing affect / effect from the real healer–your body.

    1. Hi, Dan, I found my eczema was really helped by a low fat diet. Prior to changing to a low-fat WFPB diet, I was using peanut butter, tahini, and eating olive oil on food purchased “out” while away from home. This change made a real difference which even I can see and recognize.

  6. Years ago I used Band-aid products that were so air-tight and unbreathable that after 30 hours on a wound the surrounding skin would turn bleached white and look as if it were “dying” or something. I wonder if duct tape is just shutting off the air to the wart so effectively that it is killing the warty tissues inside.

    Just thinking out loud…

    1. You can’t kill a wart by smothering it to stop it from getting oxygen from the air. The simple biological reason is that the wart growing in your skin gets its needed oxygen from the blood circulating through the skin normally.

      All wart treatments, freezing, topical (even prescription) all work by causing a change that stimulates the immune system. An irritant like a piece of tape will certainly cause an immune response if left on long enough.

      1. I’m not sure that is correct.
        When I was a child, I had three warts, just below my knee.
        After I broke my leg and was in a cast for six weeks, the warts fell off, never to return.
        I assumed it was because they were starved of oxygen.

  7. Applying a juice from Chelidonium majus, commonly known as greater celandine, helps. By the time you realise your wart is gone.

  8. Yes, I have tried duct tape on a large wart on my foot, I’d shave it down, put tea tree oil on it and then the duct tape (to the point of the detriment of the surrounding skin). That would keep the growth down, but would always grow back w/o the duct tape. I’ve had cryo therapy on this, even used an anti viral cream from the dermatologist on this ~ no permanent response. I’m thinking of checking out laser surgery on this. Has anyone had good results? Does the laser therapy only go as “deep” as the cryo therapy?

    1. My dad was a chemist and when I had some warts on my hand, he put some acid on them very carefully in the center of each wart. They all disappeared and never returned. He used a very thin glass tube to do this.

        1. There used to be an OTC acidic wart remover, for those of us without the chemist Pop. Maybe the same stuff, and might still be on the market. I haven’t looked. I shaved/cut mine until they quit coming back-as a kid and never had any scarring.

  9. I had two warts on one of my fingers, years ago that would not ago away no matter what therapy I tried. Then someone told me to scrub them twice a day with antibacterial soap and water with a toothbrush. Amazingly, they were gone within a few weeks, with no discomfort….totally normal skin!

    The person who told me about this removal method explained that the wart virus gets weakened by the scrubbing and goes away.

  10. I know this is not a forum for nutritional yeast but since Jimbo mentioned it, is there a difference in nutritional value between flakes and powder? For some reason, the flakes are more expensive than the powder at Amazon.

    1. Great Dot Fong! It’s great stuff… and better than cryotherapy… emphasis on cry ! I had plantar warts once and the doctor dragged the big canister of liquid nitrogen into the room. He applied it couple of times, holding the huge soaked swab on each one for 20 sec. It took many visits :(

  11. As a teen I had a plantar wart on my foot. I had it frozen and cut out multiple times (could hardly walk afterwards). Another one eventually popped up next to it. This went on for years. Continued to use doctors and at home kits. Nothing helped. I finally tried duct tape when my aunt, a nurse practitioner, suggested it. Within a couple weeks they were gone. And 10 years later still gone. Recently another one appeared on my other foot. For 2 weeks I covered it with a small piece of duct tape and band aid (to keep it from falling off), and now it’s gone. Quick, painless and cheap. A year ago my 8 year old son developed a cluster around his toes. I took him in to have them frozen off, thinking it’d be better. Nope. He screamed in pain, couldn’t walk on his foot or even put on a shoe for a few days, developed massive blisters filled with blood, and they still didn’t go away. We had to go back for a second treatment a couple months later. So yeah, I’d say putting a piece of duct tape on for a couple weeks is a better and faster treatment.

  12. My son had major warts on his feet(19 I counted) when he was 10(22 now) I used cotton balls dipped in vineagar overnight till the skin got( billowy?) The duct tape for 10 days. Totally removed them all except 1. Pulled it out with tweezers(1/4 inch root and all.) This REALLY works. Beat ya to it. Lol.

  13. I know the pain of cryotherapy. I had a wart on my thumb and went to a dermatologist in S.F. He applied liquid nitrogen with a swab for about 10 visits over the course of several months. Each time it hurt like hell. I dreaded going each time. Finally stopped seeing him because my patience and my wallet were depleted, but the wart was still there with no change. I then bought a tube of Compound W wart removal gel (salicyclic acid) and put one drop on the wart each night. After about 6 weeks the wart was completely gone and has never returned. Go figure.

  14. Surprised no one brought up using banana peels. Just cut a small piece to cover the wart, gooey side down. Attach it by winding some bandage tape around it. Take it off, clean and replace daily. No sanding and it works in a few days (at least it always has for me).

  15. NO SOAP

    Many years ago I used to get many warts in my arm pits – especially in the summer.

    Then I stopped using soap (except on my hands). I shower using only plain water.

    No more warts. Nope. None.

  16. I had a wart on the bottom of my foot that got more and more annoying, like having a pebble stuck to my foot. For two years I tried many home remedies, separately. Nothing got rid of the wart UNTIL I used all the remedies together, at the same time. First I put a small piece of fresh garlic (it feels like a burn for a few hours), a few drops of bloodroot tincture, then a piece of banana peel (organic) over the garlic, then covered the whole thing with a piece of duct tape. A day later, the wart was almost ready to lift out. Reapplied the application. Two days later it came out, painlessly, and has not returned for the last 10 years!

  17. About 10 years ago I had a plantars wart on the bottom of my foot which was very painful. I went to the podiatrist and they wanted to take it off at later appointment. I came home and researched it mainly to see if really was a planters wart when I discovered the duct tape method. I had to buy a small bottle of some kind of acid and put it on the wart and a tiny square of tape on top. Within 10 days it was gone an it has never come back.

    1. That’s what my husband did for my son years ago when he had warts all over his palms. He had been hiding them from us!! My husband held his hands over the sink and poured hydrogen peroxide over them. And wrapped them loosely in gauze for sleep. All the warts went away on about a week!
      In my twenties, I covered warts with bandaids so they weren’t visible and was surprised when they would just disappear. I also thought it was because they weren’t exposed to air (oxygen). It worked! My daughter used a light nail polish to smother hers. Worked!

  18. It is nice that people are sharing all their concepts.

    I might have had a wart once.

    On the side of my pointer finger. It was there for years.

    I think infrared or PEMF must have made it go away or Whole Food Plant Based. It was so small that I never did anything about it and I thought it would be there forever, but it disappeared. Serrapeptase, maybe?

    It was there for so long that my finger almost looks strange without it.

    It would have suited my family to try the duct tape because my family had race cars when I was growing up and they always called duct tape something like 90 mile an hour tape because it could hold the whole car together.

    1. Maybe it was the broccoli or blueberries or something?

      Well, I thought I could do a test of whether site would make it go away but it is already gone.

  19. I read about removing warts with some garlic. Put some garlic on the wart with a bandage. Leave it on until the wart is gone. This worked for a friend of mine.

  20. Any enlightening research or studies on the efficacy of nail fungus treatments would be greatly appreciated. One infected big toenail x 5 years of countless over the counter treatments, Vick’s vapor rub, oregano oil….etc etc and still nothing! It always comes back.

    1. Suzy, Dr G has done one video on nail fungus in the past, (see link and excerpt below)

      Link:
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-tea-tree-oil-work-for-nail-fungus/

      Excerpt:
      “One potential reason for the poor long-term benefits of any therapy [for nail fungus] is that it may be treating only a manifestation of underlying disease, such as generalized immune suppression or peripheral micro- or macrovascular disease.” Maybe fungal nail infections are just a manifestation of poor peripheral blood circulation that would normally allow your body’s natural defenses to keep the fungus from taking root in the first place. Evidently, there was a non-English language study of 400 patients that looked at the “relationship between blood circulation of the skin and the development of fungus disease”—that was the title—and “found a greater than 50% reduction in blood flow in patients with [athlete’s foot and nail fungus]…compared with patients without these disorders.” So, If fungal nail infections are “just a symptom of an underlying process, then treatment aimed at eradication of a pathogen may be unrealistic.” No wonder it just grows right back. We’ve known since the 1950s that you can effectively switch peripheral artery circulation on and off, like a light switch, within days by switching people between a low-fat plant-based diet and the more conventional diet that contributed to the problem in the first place.”

  21. What I saw in the ending of the video is that Duct tape is no more effective than moleskin. Could that be turned around and state Moleskin is as effective as Duct tape? Moleskin would surely look better on a wart.

  22. When I was a kid, I remember my mom using a potato peel to remove a wart on my hand. Can’t recall how she made it stay on (bandaids?), but it worked!

  23. My personal opinion is that duct tape is not an uniform product. Different brands of duct tapes differ in quality and components, and testimonies exist where the duct tape technique has worked and other where it hasn’t.

    An hypothesis could be that a chemical compound in the part that is in contact with the skin could be responsible for the effect, but that it is not present in all the tapes. Possibly this chemical could be part of the glue.

    My supposition is that a more reactive chemical could be present in lower quality and cheaper products. So to be truly scientific, the experiment should test different brands of duct tape, and then the next step once the brand (or brands) of tape that works to kill warts was identified, would be to analyze and test the different chemical components found in the product.

    Otherwise this type of study and the articles that transmit them have exactly no scientific value and are of no help to anyone.

  24. Annie,

    Your right on the mark…… there are different adhesives and compositions of duct tape. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duct_tape The key appears to be from the irritation of the wart more than the chemistry. You will see a host of ideas out there as noted on the video, etc. Also due to the difference compositions and individual reactions I hesitate to use tape as it can create an allergic reaction.

    My go to as a cheap and easy approach grind up an aspirin, placed on a wetted bandage and place on the wart, replaced daily. Seems to work for a high majority of patients and yes I have done the classic cryo and cutting, with limited results.

    Dr. Alan Kadish moderator for Dr. Greger http://www.Centerofhealth.com

    1. I tried aspirins too. Because they are composed of acetylsalicylic acid and the active ingredient of wart compound is salicylic acid, these chemicals are somewhat similar.
      In the case of my daughter, aspirins didn’t seem to do much. Probably because they couldn’t reach the wart which tended to ‘dig in’ and hide in the sole of her big toe. She had sweaty feet and soft skin on the underside of her feet that seemed to close over the wart.
      I still think that the effect of any wart medicine is somehow to disrupt the conditions warts need to thrive. I suppose they don’t like a very acidic medium nor very alcaline conditions either. After all, life mostly happens at or around a neutral pH.
      Aspirins are said to be very acidic. Could they cause any damage to the skin if they remained in contact with a patient’s skin for longer periods of time?

  25. Ah, warts. One of the pains of childhood and of parenting. Here is a synthesis of my experiences with these bothersome invaders.

    Nitrogen burning followed by scalpel scraping was painful for my daughter. The lengthy wait at the clinic was tiring. After 3 weekly visits, there was no real progress, the wart was still there under her big toe, hidden in the thick sole skin. And she was tired of these treatments.

    Over the counter products didn’t work.
    I saw the duct tape advice on the internet. The results seemed iffy, and how to know if I had the right type of duct tape, because all makes didn’t seem to work.

    I tried the apple cider vinegar method instead. It was painless and a breeze to do compared with other methods.

    Each night I soaked a cotton pad with apple cider vinegar, put it on the affected area, wrapped with kitchen plastic film, held it in place with a bit of bandage tape, put a sock on so the wrap wouldn’t fall with the child’s movements during the night. She reported very slight inconfort. I never tried to touch or remove any part of the wart. After about 3 weeks she had no pain when she stood on her foot and the wart was definitively gone.

    My impression is that we pickled the thing, the same way that vinegar is used to pickle vegetables. I have tried white vinegar vs apple cider on other fungal skin problems. Apple cider vinegar was much more effective than white vinegar. Unpasteurized apple cider vinegar has a great advantage over white vinegar in that it contains live bacteria and yeasts that can have a remanent effect and colonize the skin with good bacteria and yeasts, thus helping the skin’s microbioma.

    The pH of the human body is very close to 7, but skin should be much more acidic in order to prevent the installation and growth of pathogenic bacteria or viruses. Warts probably prefer a more neutral pH as it colonizes the skin by burrowing under its surface and does not live so much on top of the surface. It is possible that they are unable to thrive in an acidic environment, like when soaked in vinegar, whereas the pH of apple cider vinegar doesn’t affect skin negatively. I have seen in some warts that vinegar coagulates the blood in the tiny vessel at the center of the wart “root”, so that the wart doesn’t get feeding supply from the blood.

    My son grew many warts on the top of his toes. He reacted negatively to my wrapping each of them at night with vinegar soaked cotton, tape, plastic film and sock. Fortunately he went to camp for a couple of weeks and spent most of his days in the lake, playing, swimming, sailing, etc. He came back with clean toes, not one wart left. I supposed that he had drowned them, that possibly warts weren’t happy to be waterlogged all day.

    Maybe somewhere there are some real research results on the ecology of warts and the conditions under which they thrive or not. That would be interesting. But not much of a money maker for pharmaceutical companies.

  26. At one stage in my life I was covered from head to toe in warts. It was costing me a lot of money to burn at the doctors office plus it was too painful. I battled for 5 years. I even had plantar warts. Nothing worked. One went, two more appeared. Then I changed my diet. Started juicing and making green smoothies daily. Within 2 months… Yes, 2 months, most were shrunk and a month later they were all gone, and 8 Years later, not returned.

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