Does Tea Tree Oil Work for Nail Fungus?

Does Tea Tree Oil Work for Nail Fungus?
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Tea tree essential oil is pitted against the antifungal cream lotrimin for the treatment of fungal nail infection, but what about treating the underlying cause?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Onychomycosis is a fungal infection” of our nails—usually toenails, but sometimes fingernails—characterized by nail discoloration, deformity, detachment, “thickening, crumbling, ridging.” Here’s an example of what it can look like.

Reported prevalence is estimated to be about 1 in 25 people, though “it is more common in older individuals;” one in five over 60, and like half of 70-year-olds. Unfortunately, it’s really hard to treat, because the fungus can hide deep inside the nail, protected from the blood supply on one side, or anything you want to put on topically on the other. So, “recurrence after treatment is common due to residual [fungus],” even if you are able to beat it back. Many of the oral systemic treatments can be toxic, and “many topical [applications] require long treatment courses, which may limit patient compliance”—especially in patients who want to use nail polish or something to cover it up.

So, given all the problems with a lot of the prescription antifungals, “there has been a renewed interest in natural remedies.” Well, if tea tree oil can affect athlete’s foot and dandruff fungus, what about nail fungus?

Well, there was this study of a combination of the antifungal drug in Lotrimin cream with tea tree oil that seemed pretty effective—compared to nothing. But, what about compared to each other? Well, there was one head-to-head study comparing tea tree oil with a common antifungal drug; a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. “…Twice-daily application” of either the drug or pure tea tree oil on the nail “for 6 months.” Debridement was performed every few months, where some of the fungal mass is debulked, scraped, or ground off.

And, after six months, the drug only wiped the fungus out completely in about one in 10 cases, but looked better, with partial or full resolution of the appearance, in the majority of patients, either from the doctor’s assessment or the patient’s. And, the tea tree oil did just as well.

“The two preparations were comparable in efficacy of cure, clinical assessment, and subjective improvement”—even their cost was comparable. So, “[f]or patients desiring a ‘natural’ treatment for [athlete’s foot or nail fungus], topical tea tree oil is a reasonable alternative to prescription or over-the-counter antifungals.”

Speaking of natural treatments, how about a truly natural treatment? “One potential reason for the poor long-term benefits of any therapy [for nail fungus] is that it may be treating only a manifestation of underlying disease, such as generalized immune suppression or peripheral micro- or macrovascular disease.” Maybe fungal nail infections are just a manifestation of poor peripheral blood circulation that would normally allow your body’s natural defenses to keep the fungus from taking root in the first place. Evidently, there was a non-English language study of 400 patients that looked at the “relationship between blood circulation of the skin and the development of fungus disease”—that was the title—and “found a greater than 50% reduction in blood flow in patients with [athlete’s foot and nail fungus]…compared with patients without these disorders.” So, If fungal nail infections are “just a symptom of an underlying process, then treatment aimed at eradication of a pathogen may be unrealistic.” No wonder it just grows right back. “A more appropriate goal,” then, may be to just give up and live with it. But wait! If it’s a circulation problem, why not try to instead improve the circulation?

We’ve known since the 1950s that you can effectively switch peripheral artery circulation on and off, like a light switch, within days by switching people between a low-fat plant-based diet and the more conventional diet that contributed to the problem in the first place.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Dandandandandandandan2014 via Wikimedia Commons. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

“Onychomycosis is a fungal infection” of our nails—usually toenails, but sometimes fingernails—characterized by nail discoloration, deformity, detachment, “thickening, crumbling, ridging.” Here’s an example of what it can look like.

Reported prevalence is estimated to be about 1 in 25 people, though “it is more common in older individuals;” one in five over 60, and like half of 70-year-olds. Unfortunately, it’s really hard to treat, because the fungus can hide deep inside the nail, protected from the blood supply on one side, or anything you want to put on topically on the other. So, “recurrence after treatment is common due to residual [fungus],” even if you are able to beat it back. Many of the oral systemic treatments can be toxic, and “many topical [applications] require long treatment courses, which may limit patient compliance”—especially in patients who want to use nail polish or something to cover it up.

So, given all the problems with a lot of the prescription antifungals, “there has been a renewed interest in natural remedies.” Well, if tea tree oil can affect athlete’s foot and dandruff fungus, what about nail fungus?

Well, there was this study of a combination of the antifungal drug in Lotrimin cream with tea tree oil that seemed pretty effective—compared to nothing. But, what about compared to each other? Well, there was one head-to-head study comparing tea tree oil with a common antifungal drug; a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. “…Twice-daily application” of either the drug or pure tea tree oil on the nail “for 6 months.” Debridement was performed every few months, where some of the fungal mass is debulked, scraped, or ground off.

And, after six months, the drug only wiped the fungus out completely in about one in 10 cases, but looked better, with partial or full resolution of the appearance, in the majority of patients, either from the doctor’s assessment or the patient’s. And, the tea tree oil did just as well.

“The two preparations were comparable in efficacy of cure, clinical assessment, and subjective improvement”—even their cost was comparable. So, “[f]or patients desiring a ‘natural’ treatment for [athlete’s foot or nail fungus], topical tea tree oil is a reasonable alternative to prescription or over-the-counter antifungals.”

Speaking of natural treatments, how about a truly natural treatment? “One potential reason for the poor long-term benefits of any therapy [for nail fungus] is that it may be treating only a manifestation of underlying disease, such as generalized immune suppression or peripheral micro- or macrovascular disease.” Maybe fungal nail infections are just a manifestation of poor peripheral blood circulation that would normally allow your body’s natural defenses to keep the fungus from taking root in the first place. Evidently, there was a non-English language study of 400 patients that looked at the “relationship between blood circulation of the skin and the development of fungus disease”—that was the title—and “found a greater than 50% reduction in blood flow in patients with [athlete’s foot and nail fungus]…compared with patients without these disorders.” So, If fungal nail infections are “just a symptom of an underlying process, then treatment aimed at eradication of a pathogen may be unrealistic.” No wonder it just grows right back. “A more appropriate goal,” then, may be to just give up and live with it. But wait! If it’s a circulation problem, why not try to instead improve the circulation?

We’ve known since the 1950s that you can effectively switch peripheral artery circulation on and off, like a light switch, within days by switching people between a low-fat plant-based diet and the more conventional diet that contributed to the problem in the first place.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Dandandandandandandan2014 via Wikimedia Commons. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

I just did a video about improving peripheral circulation. See: Benefits of Beans for Peripheral Vascular Disease.

What about other fungal infections? Check out my last video, Does Tea Tree Oil Work for Dandruff & Athlete’s Foot?

Other tea tree oil videos include:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and to my audio podcast here (subscribe by clicking on your mobile device’s icon). 

148 responses to “Does Tea Tree Oil Work for Nail Fungus?

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  1. Coming from a systems engineering background, treating the underlying cause of a disease makes a lot of sense to me. I’m also a fan of T. Colin Campbell, who also realizes that the reductionist approach has many limitations, so it needs to be combined with a more systemic approach to understanding any phenomena.

    1. I believe dogs are not supposed to be treated with tea tree oil. I, however used it daily for the fungal nail infection picked up from my one and only pedicure, and it has worked a treat.

  2. That is one nasty looking foot malady. I would persuaded to switch to a low fat, plant based diet it it held out the possibility of curing that condition.
    Wait a minute… I was persuaded to switch to a low fat, plant based diet.

  3. I have seen people literally get rid of nail fungus using nothing but fresh garlic pieces attached to the toenail with a adhesive bandage. However one must be careful to create a barrier around the toenail (by cutting a hole in a band-aid to match) so the garlic piece does not touch the skin around the toe or it may blister.

  4. Coconut oil works well for nail issues; although you may have to be a little patient. I got in the habit of applying a little coconut oil to my feet and nails after bathing, and then I started to notice my one bad toenail began healing. I don’t like the scent of tea tree oil, but I know it’s good for some things. I use a little when I make my natural deodorant; which I’ve found is better than anything they sell on the market!

    1. I can’t stand the smell of tea tree oil. And I make my own deodorant, too – have been for 25 years. It uses a couple of essential oils that kill the bacteria that cause odor, mixed with zinc oxide ointment, but not tea tree oil. I only need to apply it weekly, because the effect lasts at least 10 days.

      1. I stopped needing deodorant since going vegan and WFPB. There is just no odor there even when I work out, and it’s been tested by others (who I’m very close to of course lol) and nothing!
        Himalayan salt eggs are also said to work at inhibiting bacteria growth.

        I’ve found tea tree to work amazingly at keeping mosquitos away! But then of course you smell like tea tree which I personally don’t mind but don’t want to smell horrible to the baby who can’t stand it.

          1. Ha, it probably hasn’t worked for them either. They may have just got used to the smell. But on the contrary lowering you fats and animal consumptions lowers body odor. And some people naturally less smelly.

            1. DArmstrong, why would some people get “used to the smell” and not others? Also, how does one get used to body odor unless they don’t shower… I mean, you’d have to reallyyy sit with it for a while to get used to it… gross. Like I said though, others have even tested it because I wanted be sure. It’s not that rare of a thing. The cleaner our bodies, the less odors, or so it should seem.

        1. S, I’ve been using a pinch of baking soda but am interested in knowing what essential oils Rebecca uses, the proportions, etc.

          Store bought chemical deodorants give me a rash. It’s like having poison ivy under my arms. I used to use crystal deodorant until that gave me a slight rash.

        1. I squirt about half a tube of zinc oxide ointment into a little jar, then stir in 8-10 drops of both calendula oil and comfrey oil. Both are from Herb Pharm.

          I have at times used one of the natural diaper rash creams instead of the zinc oxide ointment, because it is organic and has no petroleum products.
          However, it costs a LOT more than the zinc oxide and I don’t like the runny texture.

          This lasts a long time, since I’m the only one using it and I only use it once a week. It costs a bit to buy the two herbals, but they last for years. I now make smaller batches than I used to, so maybe 1/4 of a tube of the zinc oxide ointment and half as many drops. Since the mastectomy (and a few lymph nodes gone) I now only need it on the other side. Weird.

      2. Hey Rebecca! :) I am so amazed of the fact that you are making your own deodorant and I am so attracted, that is so smart and sounds so efficient! Would you mind if I ask in favor for further detail about the essential oil used in making the deodorant? Thanks in advance!

        Best wishes.
        Jennifer. Y

        1. Jennifer Yang,

          It’s so easy to make deodorant that’s better than anything you can buy. It is a rub-on, but that’s only once a week, so not a big deal.

          Squirt a tube, or half a tube, of zinc oxide ointment into a small jar.
          Squirt in one eyedropper each full of extracts of comfrey and calendula – both from Herb Pharm. Stir to combine. That’s it! If you want a scent you can add what you like. I don’t. There are many herbal extracts that kill bacteria, but I find these work best.

          Apply the resulting cream daily for the first three days. This kills the bacteria that causes odor. It takes about 10 days to repopulate, so if you use it weekly after that you’re good to go all the time.

          The cream will make your armpit whitish for awhile, so it’s probably best to do it when you won’t be going sleeveless, or before bed.

          Easy peasy!

    2. Hi this is Dr. Sozanski PhD in Naturopathy, health support volunteer with Nutritionfacts. I have heard from many people who are making their own deodorants. Would you mind sharing your recipe, particularly if you feel it better than anything you could buy? Many thanks, Dr. Sozanski

    1. George …. how do you conclude that?

      All the abstract says is ‘Mint, basil, lavender, tea tree oil, winter savory and oregano essential oils inhibited both the growth and the activity of C. albicans more efficiently than clotrimazole. Damages induced by essential oils at the cellular level were stronger than those caused by clotrimazole.’

      1. HI TG: The paper has a table comparing quantitatively the efficacy of these essential oils against C. albicans. Again, it’s only in vitro.

      2. Hi this is Dr. Sozanski again, health support volunteer with Nutritionfacts. Thank you for the study, I loved the list of the essential oils. With little effort an oil extract of the above in equal quantities can be done and used for antifungal properties. Another interesting aspect of the study was the correlation with Candida albicans… as it is known that fungal toe infections can be associated with Candida overgrowth. A number of natural remedies can then come in handy, such as Resveratrol, Goldenseal and/or Berberine, with the help of a health practitioner.. . but it takes in my experience a drastic change in diet for everything to come together effectively.

      1. dr Cobalt, I think that means wild oregano. Powerful stuff from what I’ve read, supposedly able to kill STAPH and even MRSA. Would love a video on wild oregano oil/wild oregano! It’s also said to be anti-viral.

  5. sorry, but based on my own experiment, the hypothesis of the blood circulation is just crap.
    1/ Not only do I eat vegetalian for more than 5 years, but
    2/ I focus a part of my diet on blood flow as I’m a (ultra trail) runner.
    3/ and last but not least I wear large toebox zero drop shoes (altra, vivo, vibram FF) for 5 years too (and that increase feet bloodflow a lot)., sometimes wearing correct toes.

    Believe me, that hypothesis is just plain garbage.

    I also do not have a depressed immune system. Better look at other factors like imbalance in gut bacteria, some gluten intolerance or whatever.

    1. Something makes it affect 70 year old people more than younger people and circulation might well be an explanation for that.

      But, you have a point. Athlete’s get Athlete’s foot and for them it isn’t circulation.

      Things like sweating and exposure through locker rooms would be what I think of as associated with that.

      1. Personally I really think it may be a stress component. Old age is a stressor in a way. Long distance runners for instance are often beset by respiratory infections prior to a big event when they are training hardest. Training to that extend is a stress.

        Seems we all don’t have problems with these things, athletes are under physical stress usually but to varying degrees. A medical condition or age that produces low peripheral blood flow would be a stressor. Do our bodies normally protect from these things despite exposure….seems so.

        But I base my feeling mostly on personal experience.
        Is the low circulation just showing a stress of a sort being existant which compromises skin immune function.

        1. Seems the elderly always have a decreased immune function response. The very less proportional response to flu immunization speaks to that.
          And elderly usually have lower peripheral circulation. And do diabetics. But do we really have more athletes foot in diabetics?

          1. Or toe nail fungus….seems not. Is it more present in diabetics? That is your lower peripheral circulation study group there not fully managed diabetics,

      2. I agree with Deb. It’s likely another cause for athletes… although over-training can result in a compromised immune system (nutritional yeast can help with that as shown in one of Dr. Greger’s videos). But just because something may be a common cause in some or even a majority of people, doesn’t mean it’s the case for everyone. Therefore one or some people’s experience doesn’t make the blood flow explanation “garbage.”

    2. Atlantis – not necssarily, poor blood circulation may be one of a number of potential risk factors but wouldn’t be the sole risk factor

      1. TG : if it was a factor, then things would have been better as I went through optimising my feet blood flow (above comments didn’t even get it when I spoke about large toebox zero drop, as explained really well on correct toes youtube video channel for years now). It didn’t. Could even said it worsen since then (dispite my attempts using essential oils or living most of my time home barefoot too). Seriously, that trail is *waste of time*, better investigate something else right now.
        Scientists didn’t even tried to know what kind of chemical terrain was the best to make that fungus thrive. All we have currently is vague leads about moisture/lack of light/UV exposure : what a breakthrough for a fungus symptom disease, really …

        1. Atlantis, I’m an elite level ultra athlete, vegan for 8 years, high raw (fruitarian for 3 years), always super low fat and high carb, whole food, tons of fiber and very careful about how and what I eat. Done plenty blood tests over the years, always in perfect desired ranges. The blood circulation thing doesn’t make much sense to me, nor the low fat plant based diet being the cure for the underlying cause. My toenail fungus issue started about 2 years back and is definitely not a strong one, you can barely notice it, most people would probably not notice it, but I’ve identified it on both of my big toes and it hasn’t gone worse, but hasn’t completely gone away either over the last 2 years now — I’ve tried natural remedies and pharmaceutical solutions, it only goes better from time to time where it seems like it’s almos gone, but then seems to start reappearing again. I don’t go to any public gyms or anything like that and due to my personality I’m quite a neat freak, but I have a suspicion that I might have picked it up during travelling. So the only explanation that I would guess in my case is that I spend at least 3-4 hours (often up to 40+ h per week) outdoors training wearing very tight and stiff carbon soled road cycling shoes (though they fit me perfectly), actually I wear them often longer when I go shopping for groceries after my rides as well, so possibly up to 5-6 hours per day. Rest of the time though I usually spend at home barefoot and wearing nothing, most of the year I live in tropical climates. So, I think it’s more to do with the fact that once the toe nail has the fungus under it, it is very hard to get rid of it completely physically, specially for athletes who spend a lot of time wearing very specific shoes every day. By the way, I was an ultra runner also years back and used to run in Vivobarefoot shoes, also the Tarahumara inspired Luna sandals, I didn’t have any toenail issues back then luckily, although I suffered a lot of damage to the toenails often when running crazy long ultra distances, but not as bad as many others do from what I’ve seen. That is another aspect actually why the toenail fungus is hard to beat I think — constant damage to the toes and toenails for athletes.

    3. Atlantis, Most people with fungal problems that I see have high blood sugar. Get HgA1C done.
      Ideal is 4.6-5.2. Probably the reason this is more common in older people is depressed immune function, and pre-diabetes. Fasting blood sugar needs to be no higher than 92.
      Oil of oregano used orally helps, often olive leaf does also. People rarely eat enough vegetables, even those who are vegan.
      Processed, prepared foods won’t heal the body,

      1. My blood sugar was tested sometimes and is fine.
        I’ll investigate oregano oil, thanks. I already have olive leaf in infusion at breakfast (along with many other antioxidant providing herbs), but I don’t know if that is the best way, I’ll search the internet about it, thanks.
        I usually don’t eat that much processed food either. If had something else to investigate would be a gluten free (vegan oil free) diet but that’s would be another burden currently (have a busy job and many other things to take car of too).

        1. I wonder if taking olive leaf and other anti-bacterial herbs are part of the problem. Antibiotics tend to kill off the good bacteria in our gut etc along with the bad.

          There is no evidence that olive leaf does not work in exactly the same way as any other antibiotic, whatever people selling/promoting olive leaf products might think..

          If your microbiome has been altered by taking a number of herbs/herbal extracts, that might possibly explain why your body hasn’t been able tofight off this infection. Just a thought.

          1. But so many things have antibacterial properties, I doubt that they’d work the same way as antibiotics do, plants seem to be much more intelligent in design. Of course I’m thinking in whole food terms, not extracts or supplements.

            1. S

              Everyone selling this stuff insists that it only kills harmful bacteria. However, I have never seen evidence that it leaves ALL ‘good’ bacteria alone although I am aware of one study that showed it had weak or no effects on 79 species. However, our microbiome is home to many, many hundreds of different bacterial species.

              Olive leaf compounds, epecially when consumed chronically, will enter the blood stream and suffuse the entire system. It is not just a matter of their effects on the gut or esophageal microbiomes, they have the potential to eg affect our skin microbiome also. I am a little less confident than you are that their effects will universally be positive and consider that since they are antibacterial, they have at least the potential to aversely affect alter our skin microbiome.

              Plants of course are the original poisons and many contain toxins/bitter tasting components that deter grazing by mammals and consumption by insects etc, as well as fighting viral/fungal/bacterial attack on the plants. They develop these features to protect themselves, however, not to promote human health.

              1. TG, I was really just speaking generally. I don’t know anything about olive leaf. I would just imagine that eating things like oregano, thyme, garlic, etc. aren’t going to have any or virtually any negative impact on our good bacteria (but maybe even help it by fighting off some of the bad bacteria?). Even if it doesn’t fall under the theory of plants’ only design being that to protect themselves, to me it seems wonderfully apparent that our bodies were designed to consume plant foods. Of course that isn’t to say that all plants are edible or that taking something in extracted form can’t be too powerful. And of course I’m just sharing my thinking on it, not making claims.
                I
                f there are natural alternatives that can be taken in place of antibiotics (apart from when there’s a serious infection present which I don’t think people tend to grasp how immediately dangerous that can be), you’d think (in an ideal world) they would have done that research, it would be really helpful to know. In general, I wish they would research natural treatments more.

                1. I tell my wife and daughter about the power of tumeric and clove and ginger. They look at me like I’m just stupid, while they are popping ibuprofen like candy and killing their kidneys. They know I research this stuff, but it’s too much a burden to eat a real food with added benefits than to pop what ever the Dr gives us with out trying a healthy solution.

                  1. DArmstrong, wife and daughter? Maybe try appealing to their vanity… the healthier our bodies, the healthier and better looking our skin and hair. In fact, apart from a balanced WFPB diet providing abundant nutrients needed to maintain hair color, a WFPB diet can lengthen telomeres which can help to prevent graying hair.
                    And all those antioxidants are able to work as built in sun protection. Meanwhile I read something from the FDA talking about certain things increasing photosensitivity and quite a few drugs were on that list.
                    Plus, the less toxins we have in our system, the nicer we smell.

                    Many women (and even men) buy so many products from anti aging creams to hair dye to make up and yet most are eating a westernized crap diet. I don’t think they realize that our outer appearance comes from our internal health and that healthy telomeres are FAR more effective at preventing and reversing the signs of aging than any serums being sold out there.

                    I hope my comment didn’t come off as implying that all women care about is their looks, definitely NOT what I meant. But it is a factor, not just with women, and there’s nothing wrong with it (to healthy extents).

                    Plus, I think people disassociate from internal health because we’re not constantly reminded about what’s going on inside us (until we are). So we tend to focus on the visible and take the rest for granted. So I think reminding people that how they look (and smell!) is very much related to internal health. Might make it click for some people.

      2. Hello – I have had toenail fungus for decades. I’m not sure where I picked it up. For the most part it doesn’t seem to increase in size in each of my big toes. It is in both of my big toes but has not traveled to any of the other smaller toes on either foot. At 65, I’ve had this situation ongoing for decades. It doesn’t bother me visually or physically.
        But I’d like to also add that my fasting blood sugar is 88 and my A1c is 4.7 and I am WFPB for 10 years. So for me it doesn’t seem to be related to blood sugar.
        Fugus is notoriously difficult to get rid of no matter where it is. Think of houses with fungus in them (as in black mold). Molds can be eradicated with a bleach solution. Warm, moist areas are heaven to molds. I live in a very dry high mountain desert climate which is dry, dry, dry and still have toenail fungus. I may try the oregano oil and may also try a bleach solution just to see what happens. It may be that debridement of the thickened nail will need to be a part of the plan to get the solution in touch with the fungus.
        If I have any success I will report back.
        Thank you!!

    4. I would not characterize the circulation hypothesis is ‘crap’ but I lean more towards the issue being immune related. One may have an overall well-functioning immune system, but have problems with a specific component. The nail bed is actually one of the sites of immune privilege in the body and so relies on innate immune function. Other sites of immune privilege in the body are the eyes, the brain and hair follicles. Aging causes certain types of dysfunction in all these tissues that appear to be influenced by dysregulated macrophage activity. For example, in the brain we have Alzheimer’s (microglia are the tissue-resident macrophages of the brain) and in the eyes we have macular degeneration. I suspect that hair graying and the development of nail ridges are signs of macrophage dysregulation. If the innate immune response is impaired, chronic infection could result and the toes are particularly vulnerable to fungal infections.

      Another commenter pointed out that high % urea cream seems to help; I’ve noticed it reduces nail ridging. Curcumin and a curcumin deriviative, J147, is being investigated as a way to correct microglia function in Alzheimer’s disease, but I don’t know if I want to stain my fingers yellow to find out if it fixes nail ridges. I have a hunch that fucoidan (a component of sea kelp bioferment, which is used in some high-end skin products) might be useful and I want to make a DIY serum using it, but I have not tried it yet. Topical melatonin might have some effect, but I use a topical melatonin serum on my scalp and though it helps with hair growth (that’s why I use it), it does nothing for graying.

      1. CD, I read something on pubmed about topical melatonin providing sun protection, so that might be another benefit!

        Interestingly, both melatonin and serotonin are able to function as antioxidants and apparently serotonin protects against lipid peroxidation.

        1. ^I believe melatonin may do the same but the paper I read (a separate one from the topical melatonin use) was more focused on serotonin.

          1. Btw, CD, sorry for the row of comments but how has the melatonin worked for hair growth with you? I have someone asking for my advise on this subject and I haven’t heard of that. Also, do you make your own product or buy a product containing melatonin? If you don’t mind me asking.

            1. I used a commercial scalp tonic that contained melatonin and a long list of other ingredients; it was expensive so I tried to pick out the really useful ingredients based on PubMed searches. I came up with 6% niacinamide, 2% caffeine, and 1% melatonin solution in distilled water plus optional ~ 6% glycerine and ~3% propylene glycol (both food grade, for ‘slip’). Typically melatonin is difficult to dissolve in water, but in this combination it dissolves easily using a stick blender/latte frother. If you make it up every few days or so, no need for preservatives. Another topical that works for hair growth is castor oil. Since I’m female and have thinning hair rather than outright bald patches I apply scalp topicals by putting a small amount in a shot glass, dipping in a Q-tip and running the Q-tip over my scalp.

              Internal stuff: wild blueberries and porcini mushrooms (ergothioneine).

            2. I should probably mention that ‘laser’ hair combs also work. I tried one first for post-partum hair loss but stopped because although it produced some growth, it came in coarse and wiry (my hair came back anyway when my hormones righted themselves after finishing breastfeeding). I put it away and tried it again when I started getting peri-menopausal (androgenic alopecia) hair loss. It seemed to work and my hair is not any coarser than it would be otherwise (my ‘gray’ hair tends to be coarse and it is not actually gray, it is a mix of clear and jet black). Perhaps the topicals are helping with that. Of course, it is not truly a ‘laser’ hair comb, but uses LEDs. It does not matter since it has the required output in terms of wavelength and intensity.

              Forgot to mention – it is important to patch test everything. First, I patch test for a few days on my wrist to check for irritation.. Then I try on a patch on my scalp for a week or more, up front so I can see if whatever it is is in fact doing whatever it is supposed to do (and not making things worse).

  6. I am 60 yrs old. I had been an athlete most of my life, and currently am healthy and fit. I have been a vegetarian 48 yrs, and lean heavily towards raw foods. I have had various degrees of nail foot fungus for the past 3 yrs–getting better on and off. I’ve tried everything. I’m currently settling for good-enough, keeping my nails as short as possible, applying whatever whenever I think of it, and using nail polish. Oh well. Will probably die with nail fungus. This video didn’t offer any hope in my situation.

    1. Well congrats on being vegetarian for 4 years though…;)
      Karma is a wicked B some say. In any event it has led me to conclude the worst things happen often to the best of peoples….but I think this place a demon inspired one;) so find that easy to see with multiple examples.

    2. Hi this is Dr. Sozanski, Phd in Naturopathy and health support volunteer for Nutritionfacts. I understand your predicament. Sometimes it feels like no matter what you do, it won’t work… so only one suggestion, though it’s hard to believe, based on your dietary habits that it may even be possible, did you ever talk to a health practitioner about Candida Albicans… one of the symptoms is recurrent toe fungal infections. He/she may be able to recommend Resveratrol as anti fungal, Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) which contains berberine, emerging for a number of health benefits such as lowering LDL and high blood sugar but also as anti fungal. In addition garlic… which in addition of all health benefits that you already know of, also has powerful anti fungal properties. But no one needs to recommend garlic, you can easily include it in your daily diet. Just a thought. Dr. Sozanski

    3. Also try using a topically applied paste of fenugreek, and eating foods with fenugreek as well. Fenugreek has pretty strong anti-fungal properties.
      It was tested on strawberries as a method to prevent mold growth. I don’t know if it would do anything to toenail fungus, but it may be worth a try, since it seems pretty low risk using a spice that has already been established as being safe for consumption.

  7. Interesting stuff, never though of it as being circulatory related.

    What would I do if I suddenly came down with it…probably spend a week at the ocean body surfing to see if it could survive. A hobby I like I would first try that ;)

    1. To be honest though I cheated….hate to look at this stuff it grosses me out, disgusting with a capital D…..so I just read the transcript. ;)
      Seeing now a big hawk descending on a thing I use to give water to birds, 10 feet away now….why are humans so gross overall in comparison to such a thing?. And we say, some of us, God must look just like us…..if she did exist I would certainly hope not.

      1. Hawk still there…thing is in love we me or finds my eyeballs my fingers toes or such enticing. Hitting this to see how long by time stamp…;)

          1. Toe nail fungus I think it is…
            A delightful subject bound to inspire nobility in all who consider it.

            1. I can only hope hemorrhoids repleat with numerous very close up shots of diseased anuses will be next.

                    1. I have had several jobs that required me to deal with a***holes every day. Unfortunately, none of them paid anywhere near $395k per year.

                  1. Oops! I just now saw your link.

                    Speaking of proctologists, has anybody else noticed that certain medical specialities seem to attract similar personality types? I never visited a proctologist until I married at 57, after many fun years of being single.
                    But my husband sees them and we have noticed that proctologists seem to be less personable than, say, GPs. Of course, our research is quite limited and very unscientific.

            2. Frank Zappa wrote a song for his album, “We’re Only In it for the Money,” which lyrics include: “What’s the ugliest part of your body?
              Some say your nose, some say your toes,
              But I think it’s your mind…”

              Frank died at age 52. Had he lived into his 70s, I’m guessing that he might have changed his conclusion…and gone with the toes. Who knows?

              1. Poor Frank…. I forget the specifics of it, but he was treated I think it was for asthma, as a child, and once they did things like measure feet for shoes with xrays believe it or not. I think they treated him in that fashion with some radioactive things. His early death by prostate cancer was probably no coincidence.

                I disagree with him on the mind thing….seems a tool is all, what can be ugly about a tool? Are my rakes and hoes ugly,,
                A foot with toenail fungus is not a pretty thing. Yes he should have lived longer and likely changed his opinion.

                1. I guess however any thing can be made to look ugly depending on distance from it. Our local TV station is inclined to show whenever a story is about mosquitoes, a picture of a very very close up of a incredibly hairy mans arm with mosquito biting it… Probably the arm looks just fine with a bit of distance to it.

                  Like vagrants always trashing the place they live…is there some reason in some of the darkest recesses of the mind why peoples(some) want us human to live and be ugly…..I guess there is. Don’t have to try so hard by my guess, compared to about most other animals we are not so pretty to look at.

        1. MVR, just be glad it’s not a low-flying vulture….checking to see if you might be a tasty (?) meal possibility. :-)

  8. A WFPB diet might help, but I believe it has to do more with personal hygiene. It is a must to wash your feet everyday (with plain water, no soap) and dry them thoroughly. First I rub them gently with a towel and then use a hair dryer since it doesn’t harm the skin and it’s the best tool to remove excess moisture. It only takes 2 or 3 minutes and I haven´t had a problem in years. Also use 100% cotton socks when possible and stay barefoot as much as you can (after returning home from work for example) Fungus hate cool and dry feet

  9. Thanks for this one! The circulation aspect makes a lot of sense, as does the immune system deterioration, as to why older people are more affected. On the topic of underlying circulation issues, I’d love to see anything useful on Raynaud’s syndrome. Everything I’ve read describes it as idiopathic, but how could it not have a cause?

    1. It just means that we do not know the cause not that there isn’t one. It’s probably genetic.

      In evolutionary terms, it may keep people alive in cold climates by conserving core warmth – better to lose a toe or two than die of hypothermia perhaps? But that is speculation. It might just be a mutation that hasn’t been either selected against or for.

      1. Hi this is Dr. Sozanski PhD in Naturopathy, health support volunteer with Nutritionfacts. I assume you are talking about the Raynaud syndrome of type one or primary, as secondary type is clearly associated with scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions. Even primary Raynaud’s has a number of suspected causes, such as food allergies, which can cause market coldness in the extremities, also Magnesium deficiency, as abnormalities in Magnesium metabolism have been demonstrated in patients with primary Raynaud’s; vitamin D levels may also be included, as supplementation with vitamin D was shown to be effective. Finally, hypothyroidism, where sensitivity to cold is a common symptom; after receiving thyroid hormone treatment, the symptoms disappeared (Shagan BP, Friedman SA, Raynaud’s phenomena in hypothyroidism, 1976).
        So if you or a loved one suffers from Raynaud’s, a holistic approach should be taken to understand if apparently unrelated factors can actually have an effect. I hope this helps, Dr. Sozanski

  10. What about peppermint oil, or eucalyptus or thyme oil. peppermint would seriously get the blood flow going, and eucalyptus is suppose to be strong antifungals? That might be a good one to see someone do that test. ;)

    1. cinnemon is said to be one of the strongest antifungal and didn’t do a thing to me. Not tried ecalypsus so far, will do that.

      1. The one time in my life I had jock itch, I tired everything. I was alternating between the two major spays and light bleach mixture. It would go away, but kept coming right back. Even tried, medicated powder, onion , or rubbing alcohol. I think it was in some of my cycling clothing and it kept infecting me. It wasn’t until I started using coconut oil with clove, peppermint, and eucalyptus, Especially before I would ride. Anecdotal evidence but it hasn’t been back.

  11. as usual the problem is in the lack of detail. in the studies do they alway test to see what is the causative agent ( ie. which species)? and do they
    test to see if the infection is in the nail matrix or maybe just the nail bed or nail root? also a good way to help with topical treatment is using
    urea in very high concentrations to eat away at the damaged nail plate ( keratin ).

    1. ptrjnf, I read about an older fellow who was successful in treating toe nail fungus with nightly applications of urea-containing cream. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urea-containing_cream There are many on the market, and quite a few creams sold to treat cracked heels also contain urea. He applied it nightly if I recall his post, and also did epsom salt soaks 2 or 3 nights per as well. Persistance is key.

        1. Actually DArmstrong, in various cultures through time, urine has been viewed as a respected substance of medicinal qualities. There are better links out there but this gives you an idea https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/mar/10/unusual-uses-of-urine There is mention of using the urea cream to defeat (LOL) nail fungus on both of these pages. Look under ‘medical use’ at the wiki link.
          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urea It’s absolutely amazing how many uses there are for urea.

          1. There’s actually vegan-friendly urea available. So that’s good. No idea how they manage it. If that doesn’t work for those interested, there’s always the cruelty free option of using our own.

        2. Many years ago I read about a woman whose skin remained young and wrinkle free as she aged. Her secret was capturing her first morning urine and putting it on her face. I couldn’t bring myself to do that, but I once mentioned it to a naturopath and she immediately said, “It’s the urea.”

          I’ve since noticed that many cosmetics contain urea.

          1. Nice . I always heard that about semen too, but I don’t know anyone who’s actually tried it.

            It just sounds like a really bad practice joke.

            Also if you have a yeast infection might not want to spread that on your face. No telling what’s in that stuff. “ just making a point, I know most people wouldn’t do that, but there are a number of people who lose hands mowing the lawn.

            1. Truly these comments remind us that some things are much more important than looks… and not rubbing bodily secretions on our faces is one of those things.

              I see lots of wrinkle free, lovely ladies whose skin is accredited to their WFPB diet. They probably have a much better day-to-day experience as well.

              1. Urea is man-made in the lab for use in cosmetics.
                One can also get a nice exfoliation of the skin – which is what urea does – using a 2% salysalic acid solution. This can be found in, for example, in Neutrogena’s Acne Face Wash. Look on any product for 2% salysalic acid as the active ingredient. However, for older folks, like myself, who don’t produce lots of face oil anymore, be sure to replenish some peptides or moisturizer to your face afterword or you may find this use of salysalic acid very drying to your skin.

  12. That would be a great experiment; take some people on the SAD that have a nail fungus infection and switch to a nutritious plant based diet and see what it does to their nail infection. Has this been done?

    1. Agree It should be done. But a couple here, Karen, Atlantis, seem to speak of having it despite active lifestyles and good WFPB diets.

    2. Omg Steve, after reading DArmstrong’s comment above yours I thought you were going to say that it would be a great experiment to take some people on the SAD & have them pee on their feet!

      I have to stop reading these on my phone.

    3. Yes, Steven, I have done it. Made no difference. I’ve had the nail fungus for decades. I’ve been WFPB for 10 years. No difference.

  13. It seems like if it’s as common as they say then we’d all know people with it. I have a lot of flip flop-wearing friends and family and I never recall seeing anyone with nail fungus. Anyway, great video! I love that the actual root of the problem was addressed. I was wondering if foods said to have antifungal properties couldn’t also play a role in keeping fungus away (treating it internally). Incidentally a lot of those foods would help with blood flow.

    I also love the results that tea tree works as well as the drug. It irritates me how pharmaceuticals take a natural solution and then turns it into a vat of chemical crap, but how else would they make money. Imagine if natural solutions were given the attention they deserved in research… I suspect we would get far! Ah, to think… science for the pure sake of learning…

  14. Infrared and Laser had similar rates to the medicine.

    I say it for the people who hate the smell of all of it.

    I bought a $7 infrared heat lamp a few years and got rid of skin conditions, which I couldn’t get rid of any other way.

    I had been on medicated ointments and had tried so many things for 6 months to no avail, but there was a marked improvement after one infrared session, with “close enough” to complete improvement in 5 days. It was still there, sort of, but no longer bothering me at all.

    When they suggested a mechanism to how it worked, they said that it improved circulation as one mechanism.

    Some, but not all, Planet Fitness centers have red light treatments available.

      1. S

        Yes, some infrared wavelength lights are LED. Those don’t get hot.

        Don’t underestimate LED lights though.

        The vie light switched some of their Laser lights to LED, because it turned out that LED works.

        I liked the mini-heat lamp infrared in the Winter, because it adds warmth.

        In the Summer, LED seems like the way to go.

        This guy has Cold Laser before and after images, which got me to buy a cold laser, too.

        I say it, because he had some success reversing gangrene and that means increasing circulation by quite a bit.

        Warning, there are things like fingers missing and a seriously black foot, starting to get skin color back.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJunHg5VFUM

        Looking at gadgets again tonight, Cold laser isn’t good for Cancer, but PEMF might be, and not just the hyped reason of the blood being more oxygenated. It turns out that it affects VEGF and mTor and inhibits tumors.

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5119968/

        “PEMFs inhibit cancer growth by disrupting the mitotic spindle in a process mediated by interference of spindle tubulin orientation and induction of dielectrophoresis. Furthermore, PEMF therapy modulates gene expression and protein synthesis interacting with specific DNA sequences within gene promoter regions 18, 38, 40, 41, 58, 103. In addition, PEMFs inhibit angiogenesis in tumor tissues, suppressing tumor vascularization and reducing tumor growth, as shown by in vivo studies 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 104.

        The specific claim, supported by the described in vivo studies, is that all treated groups showed slower tumor growth rate if compared with untreated control group, confirming that PEMF therapy can modulate the physiology and electrochemistry of cancer cells and influence cell membrane systems and mitosis. In addition, PEMFs induce some changes in membrane transport capacity through impacting the osmotic potential, ionic valves and leading to reduction in cellular stress factors, increase in the rate of DNA transcription, and modulation of immune response 105.”

        I asked my cousin if he is actually using my Micropulse ICES. Feels like it would be a good thing to try on the days my dog doesn’t feel like taking the foods as medicines.

        If he is using it, I will get another one, but if he isn’t using my gadgets, I can find things to do with them.

  15. I like the video on YouTube where the podiatrist grinds off the toe nail completely using a Dremel Tool and attachment. I would then suggest using ProClearz brush-on Antifungal Liquid (tolnaftate as the active ingredient). I suggest not using tea tree oil.

    1. Why use pharmaceutical crap when the natural stuff is shown to work just as well? Especially after going through the trouble of having you nail ground off. All natural and no animal testing involved!

  16. Some of the mice studies interested me.

    Mice exposed for 60 and 180 min daily showed a 30% and 70% tumor reduction, respectively, at week 4, if compared to baseline. (I think this one was breast cancer)

    The mice / melanoma data was fascinating. I don’t understand all the words, but: “All mice exhibited significant pyknosis, shrinkage of the tumor cell nuclei by 54% within a few minutes after PEMF therapy and by 68% within 3 h and reduction in the blood flow in about 15 min following PEMF therapy Melanoma cells shrank within an hour post PEMF therapy, exhibiting pyknosis within 24 h post treatment. PEMFs‐treated mice showed complete remission of melanoma 100”

    Seems like I would be trying PEMF if I had Melanoma.

    1. I don’t know anything about PEMF. Perhaps it works, and I hope so. However, many things (think chemo) shrink tumors but don’t cure cancer, because they don’t kill cancer STEM cells. It’s the STEM cells that cause metastases.

    1. Thanks YR!

      My dog had passed his 14 year physical with flying colors and I paid extra to have all of his organ functions tested.

      That whole process missed the basketball sized tumor somehow.

      He looks so good today. Better than he did before the collapse.

      I found out that Yunnan Baiyao has dragons blood and myrrh in it.

      Though the difference started when I switched to Triphala and Dandelion Root and systemic enzymes.

      He looks so good that I ended up adding the turmeric back in today, because there is such a big change and I feel like the Cancer is on the ropes.

      I just need my Micropulse ICES device and maybe I can finish this.

      I am aware that vegan dogs need certain supplements or they developed heart problems. I am wondering about strokes in dogs? Is that from meat or vegsn?

      1. Wow, Deb. To me, the fact that Doggie passed his physical “with flying colors” sounds like he’s healed. Not to worry anymore? But what kind of a physical would miss the basketball sized tumor? I assume your vet does know about the tumor, yes?

        I sure wouldn’t know about strokes in dogs. Had cats most of the time. The one dog I had growing up got hit by a car when she was 13 or thereabouts. I think she couldn’t see, or maybe hear, so well by then. Coulda been all that damn chocolate fudge we fed her. (For many years after her death I could feel her jump on my bed; she used to share a small bunk with me. Every time I’d move a little, she’d go “Grrrrrrrrrrrr!” Hyper little thing, she was.)

        1. I can say this about the vet. He comes to my house and he loves my dog and he doesn’t pressure me to do expensive things or toxic things and he did warn me this might be coming, but didn’t give me the details and I am someone who needs the details and that is my fault, I inherited a dog and didn’t research what diseases his breed is prone to and we never had this breed before. I think that I thought that I understood enough about dogs, but some breeds have very specific things.

          He said, “Your dog is the age, where I genuinely expected him to die already and he seems to be thriving, but I would like to test all of his organ functions to see if we can catch anything and maybe head it off at the pass.”

          If he had talked about Hemangiosarcoma, I would have been a happy owner and if he was holistic, he would be absolutely perfect for me, but he is open to holistic and that comes pretty close to perfect and I have said it before, I looked for WFPB in my State and didn’t find anything. I found one continuing education class on vegan cooking by someone who couldn’t cook at all and she is doing things like the cheese sauce recipe shown in “Eating You Alive” which is sort of helpful, if I want cheese sauce, but it isn’t very sophisticated or healthy oriented and she is in no way an expert.

          I appear to be the only person my vet has ever had who wants to know all of the details about everything and who wants to do research and try every single thing.

          I am lucky to have him.

          If he had warned me about hemangiosarcoma, I would have already changed his diet.

          If I were a vet, I would be using a thermography camera every single visit. I found a vet on-line who actually does that process and I know it isn’t a perfect process, but it would have made me happy if we had found this tumor 4 months ago.

          It seems like it couldn’t have been in his liver back then, because the liver function tests were good back then.

          I am not giving up. Tomorrow, I get my Micropulse ICES back and I am still looking at everything possible to help him.

          Tonight, I found a few more things to try.

          One is SAMe – I found a woman who succeeded and she had a few things I haven’t tried yet and one of them was SAMe.

          Then, I found a doctor who explained how methyl donors are involved in the Cancer healing process.

          He also explained using

          Modified Pectin to inhibit Gelectin 3 Protein

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12488479

          Yes, every sentence of everything is still way over my head, but I can pull out enough information to keep trying things.

          1. Deb, no matter how this scenario turns out, Doggie is helping you evolve and grow just as much as you’re helping him. It’s something you two — maybe you could include the vet — agreed to do before you incarnated. :-) Think about it. Woo-woo!

            1. YeahRight,

              You are right about my doggie helping me evolve and grow and learn.

              This process is about so much more than Cancer.

              I was talking with my cousin today and he is finally doing dialysis and never tried WFPB. His decision and I respect that. The thing is, he said that he has been Diabetic for 25 years and medical has changed from kind, supportive, caring people who listen to this strong sense of being a cow at a market where they are examining how much money to get from you. He said it changed within the past 5 years. He said that the dialysis people and visiting nurses are so ice cold authoritative and he said he almost regrets letting them talk him into dialysis, because he would rather put his life and death in God’s hands than be treated this way.

              I just listened, but that is why I left medical, more than the fact that I felt like they were doing all things, which were wrong for me and wouldn’t try more holistic things and weren’t flexible about what they do and it was all too expensive and holistic made everything fun and had more hope, even if some of it might be false hope. I love my morning cup of placebo effect Matcha green tea latte, with soy milk neutralizing the possible real effect, but the placebo effect brightens my day so much and I genuinely feel better.

              Anyway, tonight, I found a doctor who treats Cancer patient with Vegan Keto. I am pondering whether I can do that for a week or two for my dog. They do one or two weeks vegan keto, one or two weeks vegan, one or two weeks vegan keto, one or two weeks vegan.

              I looked up Vegan Keto and people were doing Tempeh, which he is eating. Artichoke, which he is eating. Chick peas in small amounts, which he is eating. Walnuts, which he is eating. I am halfway there. They make wraps out of Flaxseed meal, which I bought, not knowing it was Keto. And do things like Tahini. Not sure if he would eat Tahini.

              Having him go Keto would be Calorie Restriction, because I am not loading him up with oil, but I have contemplated using Calorie Restriction with him, which is hard, because he likes food very much, even when he is sick.

              I know that it sounds ridiculous thinking about doing this, even to me.

              I think it means that Keto logic and the Keto Pet dog getting healed has gotten under my skin, even though I read about Vegan dogs also getting cured of Cancer.

              His dog food is fairly low glycemic index, which is the logic I was doing, up until I watched one video too many.

              They are succeeding, too, with Cancer with Keto, when it is Vegan.

              I mess up with the whole oil thing. I just don’t want to load him up with oils.

              I don’t mind the concept of Calorie Restriction, but I already know that he will be bugging me for food all night long and that I can handle that, if that is what it would take.

              1. The vet telling me that he wouldn’t make it two more weeks probably messed with me more than anything.

                He still looks good.

                I need to get over this “death sentence” hump.

                1. I add flax seeds to his low glycemic index dog food. I wonder if I can add walnuts and flax seed and change the carb to fiber ratio.

                  Does that do anything?

                  I honestly don’t understand if the tumor is shrinking yet. The vet said that he didn’t want to re-check it until the third month, if he is still alive. It took 120 days for Keto Pet to shrink golf ball sized tumors, so shrinking a basketball is probably going to take a while.

                  He loves Dandelion Root Extract is something I found out. I was putting it in capsules, until I knocked the bottle off the table this morning and he lapped it up and asked for more. Easier than hiding pills.

                  1. I think high doses of the Modified Citrus Pectin is the answer, because of how it inhibits Galectin-3, a carbohydrate-binding protein in a dose dependent manner.

                    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10702407/

                    Does inhibiting the carbohydrate-binding protein mean it accomplishes the same thing as Keto?

                    I am trying to understand the whole dosage thing, but he is going to be getting a lot.

                    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2782490/

                    These are the sentences, which I am trying to understand. (Note the word: hemangiosarcoma)

                    “The effect of MCP on clonogenic survival and growth of SVR hemangiosarcoma cells. SVR cells were plated at low density (200 cell/well) in 24-well plates in the presence of increasing concentrations of MCP (from 0 to 0.5%). Seven days later, the colonies ≥ 15 cells were scored. Note dose-dependent inhibition of clonogenic survival and growth of SVR hemangiosarcoma cells by MCP. Reproduced with permission from Ref. 10.”

                    “Galectin-3 has been shown to be intimately involved in endothelial cell morphogenesis and angiogenesis.28–31 The ability of Gal-3 to act as a chemoattractant for endothelial cells and induce endothelial cell motility, invasion through matrigel and capillary tube formation, thus functioning as a potent angiogenic factor was demonstrated6.6,28 Hence, the ability of MCP to inhibit Gal-3 angiogenic activity was thought and successfully confirmed.28 MCP blocked chemotaxis of human endothelial cells toward galectin-3 in a dose-dependent manner, reducing it by 68% at 0.005% (P<.001) and inhibiting it completely at 0.1%"

                    1. I have decided the Modified Citrus Pectin and PEMF are my last add-on’s.

                      I can’t afford the time to keep researching or the money.

                      I feel like I have figured out enough to give him a real shot.

                      Now it is just prayer, figuring out dosages and then, just, wait and see.

                    2. “Now it is just prayer, figuring out dosages and then, just, wait and see.”

                      Yer an amazing lady, Deb! Yes, maybe it’s (finally?) time to “let go and let God.”

  17. The blood circulation issue is garbage

    I’m an athlete, not old, no issues with hyperlipidemia or blood glucose. I’m in a lot of gyms and have issues with toe-nail fungus. In fact, my podiatrist just removed two nails so they can grow back.

    I tried tea tree oil for months and it did nothing for the fungus.

    1. Yes, all that science stuff is just garbage.

      Have you conidered though that there might possibly be more than one risk factor for this particular problem? And that even if poor circulation isn’t a risk factor for you, it might be for other people?

      1. Exactly what TG said.

        Imagine if I said that the blood circulation issue was THE factor because I was a lazy couch potato living off of deep fried salt crisps (I made that up.. though it sounds like I just defined potato chips) and the problem went away when I started running and eating better. That’s why anecdotal claims don’t work (though can be helpful), especially since there are usually multiple factors and causes to things.

  18. I had a toenail fungus from wearing some non leather pvc shoes in the hot summer. I guess my foot could not breathe.
    I used tea tree for a long time then one day i read that patchouli oil was often used to treat garden plants for fungus. So i added that to my daily routine of tea tree oil and the healing was quite speedy. I do not seem to be troubled with circulation or other problems. I follow a plant based diet.

  19. Now everyone don’t come unglued when i tell u i have cured my toenail fungus with borax.
    I read as much as i could on it’s toxicity and found it is quite innocuous.
    1/4 cup is 6 cups very warm water in a tub, tilted to just submerge the toes.
    Once a week. I took pedicure instruments and literally dug out white jelly like substances from under all my nailbeds. It was incredible! It has been 10 years since my small toes had a nail and within 8 weeks i have distinguishable ones that i coukd paint (but I won’t).
    Anyone have heard or tried this homeopathic recipe?
    Dr. gregor care to comment, would love to hear your thoughts.
    Is this remedy safe?

  20. I tried to post two times, but not accepted?
    For the last two years I have used the “Clear Touch” electronic device that emits heat and light to penetrate and kill/suppress the fungus. Look for my 2017 review on Amazon. I won’t copy and paste it here so maybe my post is accepted. A 16 year Dr McDougall clinic graduate!

    1. The “Clear Touch” gadget cost me $190. I have photos of my toes that shows the improvement. Read reviews on Amazon from more users. I am 82, probably picked up the fungus in the shower area at the gym.

  21. Hello Dr. Greger,

    I read somewhere that tea tree oil’s active compound is a phytoestrogen. Do you know whether it is one of the hormonally active / feminizing ones, like hops, or is it more like the weak phytoestrogens in flax and soy, which are non-feminizing?

  22. Yay to increasing circulation, but I don’t think that’s the exclusive answer. I have a friend in his late 60’s who’s been vegan for 40 years and practices yoga daily. He has wicked toenail fungus and skin flaking on his feet. He is otherwise hygienic and super health-conscientious.

  23. I swim a lot and therefore inevitably end up with fungal infections. I’ve tried several things, including tee tree oil. But what really works best for me is vinegar. Fungal infections like an alkaline environment, so adjusting the pH just a bit seems to be the answer. Soaking my feet seems to help the nail fungus issues and gets rid of the athlete’s foot. For swimmers ear, I mix white vinegar and rubbing alcohol 50/50 and rinse after swimming and showers. For general fungal itching, I just use a cotton ball with vinegar on the affected area. I just buy the gallon jugs for $2-3, inexpensive and effective for my conditions.

      1. I actually use straight vinegar. If it causes irritation, then I would add some water. But, it hasn’t been a problem for me.

        1. I soak once a day for a few days, then symptoms resolve. I resume as needed. I should probably do it more regularly, but I get busy and forget… until it bothers me again. Obviously, the nails will take time to grow out normally.

  24. Could the doc make a video regarding which herb or plant (like valerian, for instance) helps with insomnia? I’ve had this condition all my adult life and I would love to find a natural remedy.

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