Saffron for Erectile Dysfunction

Saffron for Erectile Dysfunction
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The effects of both oral and topical application of the spice saffron for impotence in men.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The spice saffron has traditionally been considered an aphrodisiac. It has been shown to improve Prozac-induced sexual dysfunction in women, and men—significantly improving erectile function. If it works for drug-induced dysfunction, might it work for just regular erectile dysfunction?

Why not just use pills, like Viagra? They can work, but many men stop using them due to, for example, “adverse side-effects.” Nearly half of men decide the cons outweigh the pros. For men that don’t like drugs, there’s always surgery—the implantation of “penile prosthetic[s].” Unbelievably, “[p]enile implant usage [evidently] dates [back] to the 16th century. Early experiments involved transplanting a guy’s rib cartilage, or their actual rib, into their penis. Thankfully, space-age technologies in the 60s allowed men to keep their ribcages intact. Originally, the implants left men in a “permanently erect state,” but then the “Flexirod” was invented, with a hinge in the middle, so the guy could like bend it down in half “for improved concealment.” Of course, proper sizing is important. If the implants are too small, there can be drooping at the tip, leading to what’s called a “supersonic transport…deformity.” Why? “Because …its resemblance to the nose of [the] Concorde” jet. Whereas “[o]verlong prostheses can also be a problem,…with the semi-rigid rods [eroding out of the penis].” Although they “generally perforate…into the urethra, [the rods] can also extrude through the [tip] or []the shaft.” Ouch.

Now, there are inflatable devices, and perhaps one day there will be “expandable foams that respond to external magnetic fields,” or metal mesh technology “that could expand and retract in a cage-like fashion.” And, you thought it was hard to get through airport security now.

There’s got to be a better way. Twenty men with erectile dysfunction were followed for ten days taking 200 mg of saffron a day—that’s about a quarter teaspoon. But first, they were brought into “the RigiScan room,” where they were hooked up to a computer-controlled, battery-powered system for recording of penile tumescence, meaning swelling and rigidity. You can hook men up and have them watch a VHS video tape, though use of the device is controversial—described as an “expensive, complicated, and time-consuming effort.” But after the ten days of taking saffron, there did appear to be a significant improvement in tip and base rigidity and tumescence. “Whether it’s possible to replace [Viagra-type drugs] with this golden plant [will require] further research with a bigger sample size.” But, it’s not just size that matters; they didn’t use a control; so, this could have all just been one big placebo effect.

Finally, though, a head-to-head challenge—saffron versus Viagra. Now, normally, there’s a third group—a placebo group—as well. But evidently, they felt it would be unethical to let men go 12 weeks without an effective treatment. The saffron appeared safer—significantly fewer side effects, like severe “headaches,…hot flushes,…nasal congestion…and nausea,” but not effective at all. So, that’s why I never did a video on the subject—it just doesn’t seem to help.

But, maybe it’s because they made the mistake of taking the saffron orally, as opposed to rubbing it on their penis. The effects of topical saffron on erectile dysfunction. About half of middle-aged men appear to suffer; so, how about a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. “[A] gel containing 1% saffron,” or, instead of saffron, a gel containing a little “golden yellow food color[ing],” so they looked the same. Though presumably, half the penises smelled like paella; I guess they didn’t control for that. “Both groups were trained to rub a pea-sized amount of the gel on their penis half an hour before…sexual intercourse,” and then were re-assessed a month later. And, compared to the food coloring gel, the saffron did lead to significant improvements in function, and desire, and overall satisfaction. They attribute the effects to a compound in saffron that evidently enhances nitric oxide production in the arteries. But, if that’s the case, then probably better to treat the cause, and prevent the vascular dysfunction in the first place.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: sharonang via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

The spice saffron has traditionally been considered an aphrodisiac. It has been shown to improve Prozac-induced sexual dysfunction in women, and men—significantly improving erectile function. If it works for drug-induced dysfunction, might it work for just regular erectile dysfunction?

Why not just use pills, like Viagra? They can work, but many men stop using them due to, for example, “adverse side-effects.” Nearly half of men decide the cons outweigh the pros. For men that don’t like drugs, there’s always surgery—the implantation of “penile prosthetic[s].” Unbelievably, “[p]enile implant usage [evidently] dates [back] to the 16th century. Early experiments involved transplanting a guy’s rib cartilage, or their actual rib, into their penis. Thankfully, space-age technologies in the 60s allowed men to keep their ribcages intact. Originally, the implants left men in a “permanently erect state,” but then the “Flexirod” was invented, with a hinge in the middle, so the guy could like bend it down in half “for improved concealment.” Of course, proper sizing is important. If the implants are too small, there can be drooping at the tip, leading to what’s called a “supersonic transport…deformity.” Why? “Because …its resemblance to the nose of [the] Concorde” jet. Whereas “[o]verlong prostheses can also be a problem,…with the semi-rigid rods [eroding out of the penis].” Although they “generally perforate…into the urethra, [the rods] can also extrude through the [tip] or []the shaft.” Ouch.

Now, there are inflatable devices, and perhaps one day there will be “expandable foams that respond to external magnetic fields,” or metal mesh technology “that could expand and retract in a cage-like fashion.” And, you thought it was hard to get through airport security now.

There’s got to be a better way. Twenty men with erectile dysfunction were followed for ten days taking 200 mg of saffron a day—that’s about a quarter teaspoon. But first, they were brought into “the RigiScan room,” where they were hooked up to a computer-controlled, battery-powered system for recording of penile tumescence, meaning swelling and rigidity. You can hook men up and have them watch a VHS video tape, though use of the device is controversial—described as an “expensive, complicated, and time-consuming effort.” But after the ten days of taking saffron, there did appear to be a significant improvement in tip and base rigidity and tumescence. “Whether it’s possible to replace [Viagra-type drugs] with this golden plant [will require] further research with a bigger sample size.” But, it’s not just size that matters; they didn’t use a control; so, this could have all just been one big placebo effect.

Finally, though, a head-to-head challenge—saffron versus Viagra. Now, normally, there’s a third group—a placebo group—as well. But evidently, they felt it would be unethical to let men go 12 weeks without an effective treatment. The saffron appeared safer—significantly fewer side effects, like severe “headaches,…hot flushes,…nasal congestion…and nausea,” but not effective at all. So, that’s why I never did a video on the subject—it just doesn’t seem to help.

But, maybe it’s because they made the mistake of taking the saffron orally, as opposed to rubbing it on their penis. The effects of topical saffron on erectile dysfunction. About half of middle-aged men appear to suffer; so, how about a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. “[A] gel containing 1% saffron,” or, instead of saffron, a gel containing a little “golden yellow food color[ing],” so they looked the same. Though presumably, half the penises smelled like paella; I guess they didn’t control for that. “Both groups were trained to rub a pea-sized amount of the gel on their penis half an hour before…sexual intercourse,” and then were re-assessed a month later. And, compared to the food coloring gel, the saffron did lead to significant improvements in function, and desire, and overall satisfaction. They attribute the effects to a compound in saffron that evidently enhances nitric oxide production in the arteries. But, if that’s the case, then probably better to treat the cause, and prevent the vascular dysfunction in the first place.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: sharonang via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Those who want to clean out all their arteries and treat the cause may want to check out my video Survival of the Firmest: Erectile Dysfunction & Death.

The other video I mentioned earlier was Best Food for Antidepressant-Induced Sexual Dysfunction, and then I have a few others on the golden spice:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

54 responses to “Saffron for Erectile Dysfunction

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      1. Oh come on Joshua. Nothing says fantastic frolicking fun and sensationally satisfying sex like arsenic contaminated rice.
        It’s right up their with Kim and Kanye kandid home videos.
        Now, if that’s not click bait, I don’t know what is… (:




        2
    1. Yikes is right, Joe, especially that gruesome part on prosthetics. But this was a funny one, adding some levity after the previous weeks of lead & arsenic.




      5
  1. The last experiment mentioned leads to the following questions:

    1.If the saffron gel applied externally worked by enhancing the nitric oxide production in the arteries, why didn’t the saffron taken orally work well also?

    2. In previous videos, it was stated that nitrate rich foods, such as beets, cocoa, and arugula, also enhance nitric oxide production and relaxes arteries for better blood flow when taken orally. (See links below.) Would such foods work like saffron when applied topically in a gel?

    https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dark-chocolate-and-artery-function/

    https://nutritionfacts.org/video/oxygenating-blood-with-nitrate-rich-vegetables/




    7
    1. It would be interesting to see them do a similar trial using beets and beet greens to make the gel. Heck, that would be pretty easy to try at home. Juice beets, mix with gel from soaking flax or chia seeds. Of course, the red color could look a little weird. Maybe golden beets?




      6
      1. Yes, it would be interesting to try different concoctions to see if anything else works through skin absorption.

        Which leads to another question: Which chemicals in different foods are easily absorbed through the skin? Maybe Dr Greger and his team could do some research and make a video on this.




        3
        1. https://www.staustinreview.com/top-3-best-erectile-dysfunction-creams/

          What does the cream contain?

          All the products contain different ingredients but most of them contain some basic ingredients – I have made a short list of the ingredients and what they do to your body:

          erectile dysfunction cream ingredients

          L-Arginine – This is an amino acid that will increase your level of nitric oxide which expands the blood vessels in your penis so they can hold more blood.

          Panax ginseng – Helps to regulate the blood pressure and even helps to prevent premature ejaculation.

          Hawthorn berry – Increases your overall blood circulation system with is good for your entire body.

          Ginkgo biloba – These leaves will increase the blood flow to your penis.




          1
      1. Smilingbob,

        I’m guessing that guys with lower blood pressure have more and better erections than those with high blood pressure. After all, high blood pressure is associated with a host of unhealthy conditions, including heart disease. Clear out the arteries and circulation increases to the smallest blood vessels, and guess where they are?




        1
        1. Think about it? An erection involves blood pressure…try standing on your head and see how your erection goes? LOL.

          I’m not advocating high blood pressure and mine is good for my age.

          The whole issue of CVD in relation to ED has to do with blood flow….clogged blood vessels are the issue.

          If I had to guess, many ED issues are mental/emotional issues involving stress and previous experiences. People need to work through these issues on their own.




          0
      2. Hi smilingbob and thanks for your question. Eating beets is a great way to consume dietary nitrates and thereby improve arterial function throughout the body as you can see in this video: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/hearts-shouldnt-skip-a-beet/. Like all processed and packaged foods including powdered forms and nutritional supplements, knowing the source and composition of other ingredients contained within the product is important. My advice is to eat the whole food.




        0
    2. Clearly on this site, we turn to the science to answer these types of questions and I have not been able to locate a study that answers question #2. Certainly, consuming whole nitrate rich food is beneficial to the arteries throughout our body (thank you for referencing the previous videos on this!). Since we do not have a clear answer to question #1 as to why saffron taken orally did not have the desired effect, it begs the question if simply the topical gel application 30min prior to intercourse was the reason the saffron worked rather than the saffron itself.




      0
  2. I wonder if we could treat the underlying cause and use the saffron while the Patient is shifting their diet to 100% plant based diet to see local vascular improvements while the systemic vascular system heals and improves as we know this shift will not occur over night and our Patients want it to work now. Sexual dysfunction could improve enough to keep the patient eating plant based foods to then see marked improvements in BP, HR, and overall blood flow studies. But its the sexual improvement that will sustain happiness and well being that could be the missing factor to keep them on this lifestyle shift longer. The connection of sexual creatures we are to our overall health is something we need to evaluate more.




    3
  3. This has been very helpful. I’ve long had a curiosity about traditional food ingredients that seem to be prized with very little to offer in the “flavor” category. The category “staying alive” was and is in many places just as important.




    0
  4. So funny!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Thanks for the good laughs at the start of the day!!




    3
  5. And will there be a follow up study on the effects of saffron internally on the women? I’m sure that there has to be some interactions?!
    ” A paella smelling vagina” perhaps?




    0
    1. I’m not touching this one with a 10-foot…zucchini. SOMEONE’s feelings will be hurt. Women are an absolute gift – let’s leave it at that!




      0
  6. The answer? Put 1% saffron or saffron extract in some MCT oil….allow to sit for 24 hours. Use.

    * do not do this at home…do this under a doctors supervision…if you can find a good looking doctor….




    3
  7. As a previous sexual health RN, I can tell you that this problem is very serious for both the men, their partners and their families due to the other dysfunctions it can cause. I am also familiar with what a man will try to do gain back his function and have often thought about how they grieve at their loss in quiet desperation.

    If a whole food plant based diet can have efficacy, then why not spread the good word? Viagra is not without deadly risk in the cardiac or undiagnosed cardiac patient. Food as medicine would be a great alternative.

    I remember the man on the Forks over Knives film who tactfully commented with a grin on his recovered erectile dysfunction as his ability, ” to raise the flag again” and I was so impressed with that- he looked 70+. What a miracle!!!




    10
    1. I agree, I think it is important for guys to know that loss of sexual function is an early sign of artery disease, and changing to a WFPB diet can reverse both.




      9
      1. Excellent comment– amid the deluge of Viagra advertising (which relentlessly patronizes men), far too few men realize any circulatory problem needs to be taken very seriously. Most of our cells– the vast majority– live and die on capillary networks.




        3
        1. So true alphaa10. I would imagine that microperfusion is most successful in a more aqueous state; less fat. So if one wants to optimize perfusion to organs, just change your blood from oil to water and voila! My vision is getting better each time I go the optician- the power of perfusion.




          0
  8. Bad news for you guys. From the web:

    The absolute best things you can eat for your manhood.

    L-Arginine. L-arginine, or arginine, is an amino acid found in red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products that helps expand blood vessels and increase blood flow. …
    Vitamin D. …
    Yohimbine. …
    Horny Goat Weed. …
    Vitamin B3 (Niacin) …
    Panax Ginseng. …
    Folic Acid. …
    Ginkgo Biloba.




    1
    1. Yep, aliens have landed and are taking over your neighborhood, saw it on the web. WHY do you come here and challenge everything? Do us a favor and find someplace where they just echo your opinions instead of science, this is not your personal forum for criticism!
      Among other things, this board needs a block/ignore feature.




      19
    2. Jerry Lewis: It is only bad news for people who believe whatever they read on random websites. For people who care about what the science says, it’s all good news. As NutritionFacts shows, happily, there is no contradiction between eating healthy for the heart, for the brain, for kidneys, for the eyes, … and yes, even for the penis.




      17
    3. Jerry, does someone pay you to come here & spout garbage? Seriously, I can’t think of any other reason why you would continue to come here.




      9
    4. If you want to increase plasma levels of arginine, what you really want to eat is citrulline. The best food source of citrulline is watermelon rind. The easiest way to consume watermelon rind is to cube it, freeze it, and blend it into a smoothie.

      Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of oral l-citrulline and l-arginine: impact on nitric oxide metabolism
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Pharmacokinetic+and+pharmacodynamic+properties+of+oral+l-citrulline+and+l-arginine%3A+impact+on+nitric+oxide+metabolism




      2
  9. Bobbi you said it !
    Is there anyone on this page that doesn’t have a problem. Just wondering after reading the comments and suggestions . Yes it is a concerning problem for both male and female. No laughing matter. How about overuse huh!




    0
    1. ScottE: What you are missing is a very loooong history of comments, most making baseless claims without evidence to back it up. Also, enough of his comments indicate that he doesn’t even watch (or understand?) the information being presented and has no interest in learning. When he bothers to include links which are supposed to back up his claims, the links rarely do. It would be hard to fault any single post. The problem is his body of posts which together paint a picture of a troll–one that people who frequent here and want a sense of community are sick and tired of. Even trying to be as generous as possible, I can think of no legitimate reason for him to be commenting on this site.




      14
      1. You’re right, Thea. There’s no legitimate reason. He’s made it abundantly clear that he’s not interested in evidence-based science.

        ScottE, we’ve tried being friendly & nice with Jerry. We’ve tried reasoning with him. We’ve asked him for evidence to support his claims, which he has yet to do. We’ve given him plenty of opportunities. No one is trying to vilify him. But the only reason I can think of as to why he keeps coming here, is because some organization is paying him to be disruptive & antagonistic. Either that, or he’s just trolling.

        BTW, so nice to hear from you, Thea. I miss you!




        7
        1. Perhaps one response is to ignore the person, acknowledge choice is choice and experience the serenity that a WFPBD brings to our lives. Just saying.




          1
          1. Good point, Bobbi. People usually recommend not feeding trolls. The problem is that sometimes when new people come on the site, he spouts off information, making recommendations to them like he knows what he’s talking about & basically causing confusion.

            BTW, I’m not trying to vilify him, I merely asked a reasonable question that I think could very well be true. All is serene here in my WFPB world :-)




            2
  10. I have been researching this topic for years. Here ya go:
    Maca (it’s so good it’s gotten very expensive)
    Ashwaghanda
    Trubulus Terrestris
    Gotu Kola

    wait for it…..

    Fenugreek. It’s true! Look it up. Cheap. All of these are fairly cheap if ordered in bulk as a powder, or as a seed and ground into powder. Take them as a powder in water. Get organic of course. All of these plants have numerous other positive benefits and are mainstays of Ayurvedic medicine. Except Maca- that’s from South America. Hawthorne for heart health is a miracle. That’s from Ireland. Truly a miracle.

    By the way plenty more of these ED plants in Chinese medicine. Yes Panax ginseng but it is very stimulating- can interfere with sleep and is expensive. Yin Yang Huo, etc. etc.




    3
  11. Jerry trolls here because this is a “soft, target-rich” environment. Youtube is rife with trolls and he probably finds it very difficult to compete with such prolific and “professional” level trolling.

    He comes here because he can get a rise out of us-we’re easy. And as pointed out, we cannot let his garbage stand unchallenged (not feed the troll) lest the newbies come here and get confused by such.

    It’s pathetic that we don’t have “edit” or apparently any moderator controls like in the old days.




    5
  12. So true, Wade. And he’s definitely more likeable than the average troll. He’s more like a puppy that just chewed one of your favorite of hiking shoes.




    3
  13. My confusion comes from the fact that what I saw in his post regarding L-Arginine and where it is found, meat, which is anathema to this website is what caused you to unleash on him. The rest of what he posted regarding horny goat weed, panax ginseng, etc. was spot on. So without the context of history, I was rightly confused.

    I have been coming here, for years, and learning all kinds of great information, but I always put it in the context that it comes from a VERY biased community of vegans. I have no problem with that — live and let live. I just wonder if this community has the same philosophy. That was the tamest trolling I’ve ever seen if that was what it was, but again, I don’t have the historical context. But if that is representative of his comments, then I think this community is filled with snowflakes who can’t deal with disagreement of any kind. FWIW, I enjoy a good steak, fresh caught fish….and I harvest my own chaga, morel mushrooms, and cultivate my own herbs. My wife is a vegan, we get along just fine.




    0
    1. ScottE, if asking people to back up their claims with scientific facts is being a snowflake in your book, then so be it.

      And by the way, there are several meat eaters in my family. One of whom had a heart attack about 2 months ago. He had a blockage in his left anterior descending artery, the one they call the widow-maker. Fortunately for us, he made to the hospital in time. We all get along just fine, too, so whatever it was that you were insinuating is way off base.

      Peace.




      1

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