Saffron for the Treatment of PMS

Saffron for the Treatment of PMS
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The spice saffron appears to improve both the emotional and physical symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

PMS is “among the most common health problems reported by women,” affecting approximately one in three, and there’s not much modern medicine has to offer. Ancient traditional medicine, though, in Asia and Persia, used a spice called saffron to treat menstrual disorders. But, what did they know? And, that was 3,500 years ago—in fact, the earliest recorded use of any medicinal plant.

Didn’t they know, though, that you can’t really know anything unless it’s put through a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial? Well, it took 3,500 years, but we finally have it.

Women experiencing PMS for at least six months were randomly assigned to a capsule of saffron, versus a capsule of nothing, and lo and behold, “saffron was found to be effective in relieving symptoms of PMS.”

Check it out. Reported PMS symptoms significantly dropped even within the first cycle, and continued to improve. This included changes in “mood (anxiety, irritability, depression, nervous tension, mood swings and [feelings of being] out of control), behaviour (poor coordination, insomnia, confusion, headache, crying and fatigue), pain (aches, cramps and tender breasts) and [other] physical [symptoms including]…craving[s] and swelling)…”

All thanks to a little spice, from the saffron crocus.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

PMS is “among the most common health problems reported by women,” affecting approximately one in three, and there’s not much modern medicine has to offer. Ancient traditional medicine, though, in Asia and Persia, used a spice called saffron to treat menstrual disorders. But, what did they know? And, that was 3,500 years ago—in fact, the earliest recorded use of any medicinal plant.

Didn’t they know, though, that you can’t really know anything unless it’s put through a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial? Well, it took 3,500 years, but we finally have it.

Women experiencing PMS for at least six months were randomly assigned to a capsule of saffron, versus a capsule of nothing, and lo and behold, “saffron was found to be effective in relieving symptoms of PMS.”

Check it out. Reported PMS symptoms significantly dropped even within the first cycle, and continued to improve. This included changes in “mood (anxiety, irritability, depression, nervous tension, mood swings and [feelings of being] out of control), behaviour (poor coordination, insomnia, confusion, headache, crying and fatigue), pain (aches, cramps and tender breasts) and [other] physical [symptoms including]…craving[s] and swelling)…”

All thanks to a little spice, from the saffron crocus.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Pixel Pro Photography South Africajasonippolito; and Gorgeoux via flickr

Doctor's Note

Remember saffron, from my videos Saffron for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s and Saffron vs. Aricept? See my blog post, Natural Alzheimer’s Treatment, for more context, as well as my post on other natural remedies: Amla: Indian gooseberries vs. cancer, diabetes, and cholesterol. I also have dozens of other videos on women’s health. This is the first of a three-part video series on the latest on this powerful spice (also see Power Plants). Next, Wake Up and Smell the Saffron is even more unbelievable. Finally, I wrap up with a head-to-head comparison: Saffron vs. Prozac.

For additional context, check out my associated blog posts: Treating PMS with SaffronHibiscus Tea: The Best Beverage?Cinnamon for Diabetes; and Treating Breast Pain with Diet.

Update: In summer 2017, I did a few new videos on saffron that might interest you: Best Food for Antidepressant-Induced Sexual Dysfunction and Saffron for Erectile Dysfunction.  

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

PS: How do you like the cool intro/outro? All thanks to Christi, our amazing web developer!

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