The Best Diet for Weight Loss and Disease Prevention

The Best Diet for Weight Loss and Disease Prevention
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The most effective diet for weight loss may also be the healthiest.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Why are vegetarian diets so effective in preventing and treating diabetes? Maybe it’s because of the weight loss. Those eating more plant-based tend to be significantly slimmer, and not just based on looking at a cross-section of the population, but you can do interventional trials and put it to the test: A randomized, controlled community-based trial of a whole food plant-based diet.

The key difference between plant-based nutrition “and other approaches to weight loss [is] that participants were informed to eat the whole food plant-based diet ad libitum,” meaning eat as much as you want, no calorie-counting, no portion control, just eat. It’s about improving the quality of the food rather than restricting the quantity of food. And then, in this study, they had people just focus on diet rather than increasing exercise, just because they wanted to isolate out the effects of eating healthier.

So, what happened? No restrictions on portions, eat all the healthy foods you want. Here’s where they started out: on average, obese at nearly 210 pounds; the average height was about 5’5”. Three months in, they were down about 18 pounds; 6 months in, more like 26 pounds down. But you know how these weight loss trials go. This wasn’t an institutional study where they locked people up and fed them; no meals were provided. They just informed people about the benefits of plant-based eating, and encouraged them to do it in their own lives, their own families, their own homes and communities. And so, yeah, typically what you see in these so-called “free-living” studies is weight loss at six months, but then by a year, the weight creeps back or even worse. But in this study, they were able to maintain that weight loss all year.

And of course, their cholesterol got better too, but their claim to fame is that they “achieved greater weight loss at 6 and 12 months than any other trial that does not limit [calorie] intake or mandate regular exercise.” That’s worth repeating. A whole food plant-based diet achieved the greatest weight loss ever recorded at 6 and 12 months compared to any other such intervention published in the medical literature. Now, obviously, with very low-calorie starvation diets you can drop people down to any weight. However, these medically supervised liquid diets are obviously just short-term fixes, associated with high costs, high attrition rates, and a high probability of regaining most of the weight, whereas the whole point of whole food plant-based nutrition is to maximize long-term health and longevity. Even if, for example, low-carb diets were as effective, the point of weight loss is not to fit into a skinnier casket. “Studies on the effects of low-carbohydrate diets have shown higher rates of all-cause mortality”—meaning a shorter lifespan—”decreased [artery function], worsening of coronary artery disease, and increased rates of constipation, headaches, bad breath, muscle cramps, general weakness and rash.” And yet, still not as effective as the diet that actually has all the good side effects, like decreasing risk of diabetes beyond just the weight loss.

Yes, “the lower risk of type 2 diabetes among vegetarians may be explained in part by improved weight status. However, the lower risk also may be explained by higher amounts of ingested dietary fiber and plant protein, the absence of meat- and egg-derived protein and heme iron, and lower intake of saturated fat. Most studies report the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes among those who adhere to [strictly plant-based] diets.” This may be explained by the fact that vegans, in contrast to vegetarians, do not eat eggs, which appear to be linked to higher diabetes risk.

Maybe it’s eating lower on the food chain; so, you avoid the highest levels of persistent organic pollutants like dioxins, PCBs, DDT in animal products, which have been implicated as a diabetes risk factor. Maybe it has to do with the gut microbiome. With all that fiber, it’s no surprise there would be less disease-causing bugs and more protective gut flora, which can lead to less inflammation throughout the body that may be the key feature linking the heathier gut with beneficial health effects—including the metabolic dysfunction you can see in type 2 diabetes. And it’s that multiplicity of benefits that can help with compliance and family buy-in. “Whereas a household that includes people who do not have diabetes may be unlikely to enthusiastically follow a quote-unquote ‘diabetic diet,’ a [healthy diet] is not disease-specific” and can improve other chronic conditions, too. So, while the diabetic patient will likely see improvement in their blood sugar control, a spouse suffering from constipation or high blood pressure may also see improvements, as may overweight children if you make healthy eating a family affair.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Why are vegetarian diets so effective in preventing and treating diabetes? Maybe it’s because of the weight loss. Those eating more plant-based tend to be significantly slimmer, and not just based on looking at a cross-section of the population, but you can do interventional trials and put it to the test: A randomized, controlled community-based trial of a whole food plant-based diet.

The key difference between plant-based nutrition “and other approaches to weight loss [is] that participants were informed to eat the whole food plant-based diet ad libitum,” meaning eat as much as you want, no calorie-counting, no portion control, just eat. It’s about improving the quality of the food rather than restricting the quantity of food. And then, in this study, they had people just focus on diet rather than increasing exercise, just because they wanted to isolate out the effects of eating healthier.

So, what happened? No restrictions on portions, eat all the healthy foods you want. Here’s where they started out: on average, obese at nearly 210 pounds; the average height was about 5’5”. Three months in, they were down about 18 pounds; 6 months in, more like 26 pounds down. But you know how these weight loss trials go. This wasn’t an institutional study where they locked people up and fed them; no meals were provided. They just informed people about the benefits of plant-based eating, and encouraged them to do it in their own lives, their own families, their own homes and communities. And so, yeah, typically what you see in these so-called “free-living” studies is weight loss at six months, but then by a year, the weight creeps back or even worse. But in this study, they were able to maintain that weight loss all year.

And of course, their cholesterol got better too, but their claim to fame is that they “achieved greater weight loss at 6 and 12 months than any other trial that does not limit [calorie] intake or mandate regular exercise.” That’s worth repeating. A whole food plant-based diet achieved the greatest weight loss ever recorded at 6 and 12 months compared to any other such intervention published in the medical literature. Now, obviously, with very low-calorie starvation diets you can drop people down to any weight. However, these medically supervised liquid diets are obviously just short-term fixes, associated with high costs, high attrition rates, and a high probability of regaining most of the weight, whereas the whole point of whole food plant-based nutrition is to maximize long-term health and longevity. Even if, for example, low-carb diets were as effective, the point of weight loss is not to fit into a skinnier casket. “Studies on the effects of low-carbohydrate diets have shown higher rates of all-cause mortality”—meaning a shorter lifespan—”decreased [artery function], worsening of coronary artery disease, and increased rates of constipation, headaches, bad breath, muscle cramps, general weakness and rash.” And yet, still not as effective as the diet that actually has all the good side effects, like decreasing risk of diabetes beyond just the weight loss.

Yes, “the lower risk of type 2 diabetes among vegetarians may be explained in part by improved weight status. However, the lower risk also may be explained by higher amounts of ingested dietary fiber and plant protein, the absence of meat- and egg-derived protein and heme iron, and lower intake of saturated fat. Most studies report the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes among those who adhere to [strictly plant-based] diets.” This may be explained by the fact that vegans, in contrast to vegetarians, do not eat eggs, which appear to be linked to higher diabetes risk.

Maybe it’s eating lower on the food chain; so, you avoid the highest levels of persistent organic pollutants like dioxins, PCBs, DDT in animal products, which have been implicated as a diabetes risk factor. Maybe it has to do with the gut microbiome. With all that fiber, it’s no surprise there would be less disease-causing bugs and more protective gut flora, which can lead to less inflammation throughout the body that may be the key feature linking the heathier gut with beneficial health effects—including the metabolic dysfunction you can see in type 2 diabetes. And it’s that multiplicity of benefits that can help with compliance and family buy-in. “Whereas a household that includes people who do not have diabetes may be unlikely to enthusiastically follow a quote-unquote ‘diabetic diet,’ a [healthy diet] is not disease-specific” and can improve other chronic conditions, too. So, while the diabetic patient will likely see improvement in their blood sugar control, a spouse suffering from constipation or high blood pressure may also see improvements, as may overweight children if you make healthy eating a family affair.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is just a taste of what’s on order in my New York Times Bestseller How Not to Diet (all proceeds for which I received went to charity, like all my books). Watch the book trailer. This December, I’m releasing the The How Not to Diet Cookbook; pre-order now for perfect holiday and New Year’s resolution presents.

Check out my hour-long Evidence-Based Weight Loss lecture for more.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

124 responses to “The Best Diet for Weight Loss and Disease Prevention

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  1. The high audio level of the bumpers is just too much for my ears in the morning. My dogs suffer too.

    I try to remember to turn the volume down when starting these or to FFWD over the bumper explosion of sound, it’s always WAY LOUDER than any of the other audio. It’s LOUD HOWARD every time.

    Then I turn up the volume to hear the spoken audio and BAM get blown out at the end by a loud bumper. Dogs are trying to nap here.

    Just thought I’d mention it for the technical development department. This has been an issue for me since the change in the bumpers from the old, delightfully short “original” bumper than was used for so many years. I waited to see if it would get modified or get worse. I think the latter. Cheers.

    1. There are countless reasons why many of us completely ignore the videos and read the transcripts and ‘sources cited’ instead. Not listening to feedback about the videos being number one.

      1. True, to each his own. However dr. Greger’s exertions deserve some feedback now and then. I wonder about the subordinate screening of the research, the speed with which dr. Greger talks and the waving of his hands at us. But yes, his message is loud and clear….

      2. Reality Bites: I agree fully. Older videos, apparently low tech, were wonderful: easy to listen to, easy to understand, short and sweet and always containing something that could be put to use immediately.

        1. I only look at the video if I want to see a graph.

          It would help greatly if quoted material in the transcript where a companied by a reference to the source.

          1. 言語学者 (gengo-gakusha) says: It would help greatly if quoted material in the transcript where a companied by a reference to the source.

            All sources quoated are listed for each video. I often pause to read the un-highlighted contexts.

            BUT many of them are behind pay-walls and inaccessible to those who cannot pay the fees.

            I have looked many times to see the fuller context of what the study is about, but often get stopped by pay-walls. But technically speaking I have the “source” Just no access. I understand that Dr. G can’t pay the for all of us to have access-for a license to re-distribute in effect, but I’m not holding my breath. I’m sure that very few folks ever look at the cited papers.

      1. Thanks for the confirmation Lee.

        Yes the old one was a “model bumper” before – when it was so short and sweet.

        The long or loud ones are obnoxious and I usually try to dodge them by skipping or muting the beginnings. By ‘them’ I’m referring to videos made similarly with big hooty bumpers. As far as I recall we’ve only had two bumpers here (three if you count the Friday one–it’s a bit much too).

        Some of use are much more aurally-sensitive than others. I’ll admit that. But it doesn’t change how we perceive things we can ONLY change how we outwardly respond, we cannot change how it hits our sensory organs and brain before we add our filters.

        At least here we don’t get so much begging for likes and subs as is the “way of the Tubers”. That’s sucky too, super sucky.

  2. This video reiterates my thinking of the benefits of eating plant based.
    –How many calories are you eating? What calories? Stop counting. EAT! Eat till you can eat no more.
    –You don’t even have to exercise. Exercise is very beneficial though.
    –The only way of eating known to reverse heart disease, glandular (breast, prostate) disease, diabetes (2 weeks possibly).
    –The best way to eat for loss of excess weight and not gaining the weight back.

    1. But Dan, that’s just not true. Maybe true for you, being well over 6′ tall, working a physically demanding job etc, but not true for so many others. Women have very different response to food and may have to limit categories /serving sizes. Call it what you will, but for many of us, calories do count, whether you count them or not.

      Dr Greger’s Daily Dozen is, imo, brilliant. The nutrition balancing has been done for us, as well as serving sizes. For people with disordered eating this can be important.

      1. Dan C and Barb:
        The insurmountable challenge of nutrition researchers is that no two human bodies are alike. Thanks to genetic polymorphism, at the end of the day, each one of us is an experiment with just one subject.

      2. Barb,

        The only time I practice portion control is when I eat a bit of processed or “junk” food (such as store bought cookies, etc). Otherwise, I eat as much as I want. Both my husband and I have noticed that we seem to have “shrunk”our stomachs, in that we can’t eat as much at one sitting as we used to be able to. And we each lost more weight after starting to eat whole plant foods. For us, it was a slow transition from vegetarian, occurring over about a year, so the weight loss was also slower. But we have maintained our new weights (the same as in high school — and we are 69 and 77 yo) for several years now. Oh, and we didn’t increase our activity levels; we are only moderately active at best.

        And I agree with you: I love the Daily Dozen as guidelines, helping me to keep on track and even improve every day. As well as the question: “Now, how can I make this meal or dish healthier?”

      3. Barb,
        I hear what you are saying about some who have more dificulty. Not that I even have a good grip on the extensive science of nutrition. And I do think I have it easier than others. I can reasonably see a pattern of benefit between what several doctors / nutritionists / researchers / science writers are saying about WFPB. I find the broad debate on nutrition and health interesting.

    2. Dan,

      The study did show that, so I will agree with you.

      But I will also agree with Barb and I will suggest that it wasn’t a study of post-menopausal women, that’s for sure.

    3. How many calories am I eating? I don’t know without looking it up, but it’s really easy to find out by entering your weight, sex, height, and activity level into a “calculator”.

      I do that when I want to calculate what percentage of junk food calories I have consumed. I find out how many calories I must consume per week per my size/age/activity level, and then add up the few bits of junk I might have and calculate a weekly % of calories. Sometimes, when curious.

      Not really curious much these days, rocking a 21BMI and feeling fine eating 90% or better WFPB every week for 5.5 years now.

    4. Exactly! Why waste time counting calories? Put that mental energy into figuring out a series of meals you enjoy that are WFPB.

      Partial to this, for me anyhow, is having cheat days. I let myself eat whatever on Friday night. And I allow myself to drink beer Friday and Saturdays.

  3. As Dr Greger jumps around citing 6-7 year old data and uses terms like might/maybe could all I think is that anyone on any side of the discussion could cherry-pick the information that supports their idealism. Other studies have shown very little difference in chronic disease patterns between vegans and vegetarians. Like so many others Dr Greger presents good food for thought, research and discussion.

    1. Paul,

      Yes, but this study was about Whole Food Plant-Based where most vegan and vegetarian studies are not anywhere near Whole Food Plant-Based.

      And Dr. Greger has presented those types of studies, too.

      He has not shrunk back when the results weren’t as rosy for the vegans and vegetarians. He has looked deeper into what they ate in those studies and it was not Whole Food Plant-Based versions of vegan and vegetarian.

    1. I am familiar with the Ma Pi studies…(so named after the first two initials of the first and last name of the researcher: Marco Pianesi…who was under investigation for his wife’s death. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/oct/15/police-italy-macrobiotic-guru-mario-pianesi-wife-death)
      In the MaPi study, subjects ate all their meals at a Macrobiotic Center …where the food was prepared for them. I believe the study even paid for their transportation to the center for all meals. The results seem almost to good to be true…and given the cloud the researcher is under, there may have been some funny business going on. Unfortunately researchers are known to fudge their results.

      I would love to see this study replicated in a free living population cooking for themselves. And not under the sway of a diet guru.
      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21483296/

      1. mims, thanks for the link. I remember when Dr G’s video came out I said to Dr J , where were we when they chose the group? Italian hotel, eating organic freshly grown food, immaculately served etc. That’s the kind of study I would enroll in. If I could bicycle around the countryside during my stay, all the better!

        You make a good point about testing a diet in free-living circumstance, but frankly, I think the hotel setting is exactly what helped the people the most. Those suffering lifestyle disease often also suffer some form of food addiction. The structured setting of the study, plus the built-in community support would go a long way to aiding a subject’s success. Several wfpb doctors model this approach in the programs they sell. (very expensive)
        The zen macrobiotic plan has changed a bit over the years, but Dr Greger was not adverse to it. Could use a few pieces of fruit here and there maybe.

        1. Barb,

          There must be a LOT of food addicts! Because so many of the US population suffer from at least one form of lifestyle disease, while many suffer from more. I’ve read numbers of 60% suffering from at least one chronic disease, and 40% from two or more. Most of the population is overweight: “ Percent of adults aged 20 and over with overweight, including obesity: 71.6% (2015-2016)”. (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/obesity-overweight.htm) Can this all be due to food addiction?

          And oh, I so agree with you about the study! But what if we were in the control group?

          1. LOL ok, enjoying so the control group sat around poolside enjoying crustinis before the bus whisked them off to tour local wineries and olive growers. It’s all good:)

            Remember we were talking about folks who refused to change their way of eating even when faced with a dire diagnosis? Not sure what you would call it but it sounds like a type of addiction to me. Maybe I should have called it something else, but yes, we have a problem, whatever we choose to call it ! The stats are shocking, and it makes me sad.

    2. Barb,

      Just reviewed the video.

      Powerful stuff!

      Next time I come across someone with “pre-diabetes” – I will add this ovideo to their homework.

      Thank you for posting it –

      Vivamus

      1. Mims,

        Then, again – perhaps it’s all too good to be true –

        Bizarre rules of Italian macrobiotic ‘cult’ revealed by victims
        https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/mar/23/bizarre-rules-of-italian-macrobiotic-cult-revealed-by-victims

        I am not seeing any news items about Mario Pianesi in English since 2018, so I do not know where the investigations led.

        Anybody see anything more recent?

        I wonder how a similar investigation would affect the “cult” of NutritionfFacts.org?

        “NutritionFacts cult Guru assailed for claiming that diet and lifestyle can treat or even cure many chronic diseases. Questions conventional medical guidance in regards to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and other chronic ailments. Even claims that diet can influence cancer. Enslaved volunteers moderate site for years at no pay.”

        I know, I know – it could never happen here –

        Vivamus

        1. ‘“NutritionFacts cult Guru assailed for claiming that diet and lifestyle can treat or even cure many chronic diseases. Questions conventional medical guidance in regards to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and other chronic ailments. Even claims that diet can influence cancer. Enslaved volunteers moderate site for years at no pay.”

          That sounds a bit silly to me Viv.

          After all, the US Government has been has been saying for many years that diet and lifestyle can prevent and even treat many chronic diseases. It has also been saying for a long time that diet can influence cancer.

          And many medical guidelines now recognise that diet and lifestyle improvements should be the first-line treatment for many conditions.

          That’s precisely why they issue dietary guidelines and physical activity guidelines. .

          1. Mr. Fumblefingers,

            Intended as irony.

            In the spirit of what has happened to Mario Pianesi.

            ————————————————————————-

            I have, of late, considered different nationalities and what they would be if they were games

            Russians? Chess, of course. Thought and logic and force.

            Americans? The Sacred Game of Poker. The art of the bluff – and the times when they are not bluffing.
            If you have the patience, return now to 1967 – yes, I do know the author’s origins and his arc:
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZqlR5D0y23s

            Canadians? Curling. What else?

            Brits? Bridge. Brains. A subtle crew. Reserve. Understatement.

            One needs all one’s wits about one when dealing with Brits.

            Australians? Rugby. Raucous humor. Larger than life!

            From a bumper sticker seen in North Carolina on a passing car long ago – “Rugby Players Eat Their Dead.”

            I can still remember it as if it were decades ago.

            (Hanging out with four Aussies gone AWOL from their destroyer during a goodwill tour of U.S ports. Stories are forgotten – the spirit of tall tales stacked amid taller tales and drink and laughter is, however, well remembered.)

            —————————

            Go ahead – tell me you can’t generalize.

            I double dare ya.

            Me?

            Would I ever do a thing like that?

            ————————–

            At issue was the thought of Brits and smilies.

            To me the essence of British humor is understatement.

            You gotta stay on your toes – or it’ll pass right by you and will miss it.

            And that’s the whole point of the exercise.

            To point it all out with a smiley would be to botch the whole thing.

            Like having to explain a joke.

            Perhaps.

            Australian Brits?

            A different style.

            Caught between cultures.

            ————————————-

            Intercultural communication is fraught if one lets it be so.

            I tend to deal with the matter by assuming the likelihood of imperfect communication – yet the best of will with all involved.

            Mr. Fumblefingers.

            All the best –

            Vivamus

            ——————————

            “We have men of exactly the same stock, and speaking the same language, growing in Great Britain, in Ireland, and in America. The result is three of the most distinctly marked nationalities under the sun.”

            Shaw
            1906

            1. Too subtle for me, Viv.

              it’s just that Pianesi has long had a questionable reputation and is primarily a businessman. A comparison between him and Greger therefore struck me as a little unfortunate.

        2. I agree. There is definitely a cult here and its prime members are those who visit each adn every day and post many times. Its getting scary.

  4. I have really been enjoying listening to How Not To Diet again.

    The effects of fats on the brain part of it already is something I am trying to memorize. Eating even just one higher fat meal per day already messes up the brain in 4 days is something I am hoping will keep me away from Amy’s vegan pizza.

    I feel like I will succeed next year. Yes, I say next year.

    Some of us need to find recipes and figure out the whole meal planning and meal prep and how to sleep again at night and not eat dinner at midnight and skip breakfast, etc. But now I know the issues and I am just about finished with my house and just about finished lowering my bills and it feels like crossing everything else off the list will pay off and I can just focus on the food.

    I have learned so much here over the almost 3 years that I have been here and the good news is that if you keep up with it, the information never becomes as overwhelmingly confusing as it used to be.

    I have graduated to the point of not needing to learn it from the keto and paleo and other perspectives along with WFPB.

    I could not have learned this much this quickly without Dr. Greger and his team.

    Grateful. Extremely grateful.

  5. As long as you mix it up, and dont add salt, oil, fat, I challenge anyone in the world to gain weight by trying to eat from this randomly pulled and incomplete list of veggies, three 5lb buckets, each and every day, with reckless abandon:

    Acorn Squash
    Ahipa
    Amaranth
    American Groundnut
    Aonori
    Arame
    Arracacha
    Arrowroot
    Artichoke
    Arugula
    Asparagus
    Adzuki Bean
    Bamboo Shoots
    Banana Squash
    Beetroot
    Belgian Endive
    Bell Peppers
    Black Eyed Pea
    Black Radish
    Black Salsify
    Bok Choy
    Broadleaf Arrowhead
    Broccoflower
    Broccoli
    Broccolini
    Brussel Sprouts
    Burdock Roots
    Buttercup Squash
    Butternut Squash
    Cabbage
    Cactus
    Camas
    Canna
    Caper
    Cardoon
    Carrot
    Cassava
    Catsear
    Cauliflower
    Celeriac
    Celery
    Celtuce
    Chaya
    Chayote Squash
    Cherry Tomato
    Chick Pea
    Chickweed
    Chicory
    Chives
    Chrysanthemum
    Collard Greens
    Common Beans
    Crookneck Squash
    Common Purslane
    Courgette Flowers
    Cress
    Cucumbers
    Dabberlocks
    Daikon
    Dandelion
    Delicata Squash
    Daylily
    Dill
    Dolichos
    Drumstick
    Dulse
    Earthnut Pea
    Eggplant
    Elephant Foot Yam
    Elephant Garlic
    Endive
    Ensete
    Fat Hen
    Fava bean
    Fennel
    Fiddlehead Green
    Florence Fennel
    Fluted Pumpkin
    Galangal
    Garbanzo
    Garden Rocket
    Garlic
    Garlic Chives
    Ginger
    Golden Samphire
    Good King Henry
    Greater Plantain
    Green Beans
    Green Soybeans
    Guar
    Hamburg Parsley
    Hijiki
    Horse Gram
    Horseradish
    Indian Pea
    Kale
    Kohlrabi
    Komatsuna
    Kombu
    Kurrat
    Lagos Bologi
    Land Cress
    Laver
    Leek
    Lemongrass
    Lentil
    Lettuce
    Lima Bean
    Lotus Root
    Malabar Spinach
    Mangetout
    Manoa
    Mashua
    Mulukhiyah
    Mizuna
    Morel Mushrooms
    Moth Bean
    Mozuku
    Mung Bean
    Mushrooms
    Mustard Greens
    Napa Cabbage
    New Zealand Spinach
    Nopal
    Nori
    Ogonori
    Okra
    Onion
    Orache
    Pak Choy
    Paracress
    Parsnip
    Peas
    Pearl Onion
    Pigeon Pea
    Pignut
    Potato
    Prussian Asparagus
    Prairie Turnip
    Pumpkin
    Radicchio
    Radish
    Ramp
    Rapini
    Red Leaf Lettuce
    Ricebean
    Runner Bean
    Rutabaga
    Salad Savoy
    Salsify
    Samphire
    Scorzonera
    Sculpit
    Sea Beet
    Sea Grape
    Sea Kale
    Sea Lettuce
    Shallot
    Sierra Leone Bologi
    Skirret
    Snap Pea
    Snow Pea
    Soko
    Sorrel
    Sour Cabbage
    Soybean
    Spinach
    Spring Onion
    Scallion
    Squash Blossoms
    Summer Squash
    Swede
    Sweet Potato
    Taro
    Tarwi
    Tatsoi
    Tepary Bean
    Tigernut
    Tomatillo
    Tomato
    Tree Onion
    Turmeric
    Turnip
    Urad Bean
    Ulluco
    Wasabi
    Water Chestnut
    Water Caltrop
    Water Spinach
    Watercress
    Welsh Onion
    Wheatgrass
    Wild Leek
    Winged Bean
    Winter Squash
    Yam
    Yao Choy
    Yardlong Bean
    Yarrow
    Yuca Root
    Yukon Gold Potatoes
    Zucchini

    Of course if you should save room for some B12 and a few other supplementary items as dessert.

    1. You left out corn, oats and whole grains. Which would complete the McDougall, Starch Solution, diet. I agree, it’s impossible to be overweight on a McDougall style diet.

    2. It’s a lot easier to comprehend calories per pound of whole foods than to read your list. Scanning I see nothing over the “magic” number of CPP below which humans aren’t normally capable of ingesting enough calories to gain weight.

      That’s the whole food reason we fill up on food before we overload on calories. Works every time that caloric intake is the problem.

      Jeff Novick has great video that lays it all out, done years ago at a McDougall retreat. It’s still a hoot to watch and very helpful when folks PERSIST on thinking they have to restrict their intake of clean whole plant foods. You don’t. Eat 10 ears of corn, it won’t hurt so long as you don’t add oil/fat/sugar to it. I’ll bet most cannot. I might. I ate two ears last night for an appetizer. Nuked in shucks, zero seasonings-just pure corn goodness.

        1. Jeez how bored must you be to read this entire list? lol

          Anyway I love Ambrosia and Nectar, its the key to longevity for sure! (especially nectar….mmmmm…nectar. [spoken in the voice of Homer Simpson])

          So, this was a randomly pulled list, and I also had a laugh at some of the inclusions but truly this statement that “women respond differently to food” , in response to a prior post recapitulating what the video said, was in need of a counterpoint.

          This diet is self regulating unless you are eating crap under the disguise as healthfood. You just can teat enough kale to gain weight. Well I suppose if you weigh yourself before you throw up you might have gained a few pounds, but out it will go if you do try to consume 15 pounds of the stuff.

          Now I must include Freekeh as a missing grain but this was supposed to be a veggie list so I figured many things were left out.

          I do recommend we all get freekeh though, and I actually just had some with lunch, so nice!

          1. On the BBC evo diet, people were eating (up to) 5 kilos of fruit and vegetables a day and still lost weight.

            ‘Over 12 days he lost 5.7kg (12.5lbs), and reduced his cholesterol by 20%. His blood pressure also fell.’
            http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/6248975.stm

            The key might bethere were a lot of raw foods supplied on the evo diet. . The net energy obtained from cooked and highly processed foods appears to be significantly higher than from the same foods in uncooked form.
            https://www.pnas.org/content/108/48/19199

            1. Fumbles, great point. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/plant-based-atkins-diet/

              When I first started wfpb, I ate mostly raw. I had porridge as my cooked meal of the day (and only grain), and the rest raw.

              I went from 128 to 97-98 lbs in under 6 weeks, and didn’t start to regain until I added cooked foods in. I am 5’5″

              Some folks on this forum include foods like pasta, bread, crackers, tortillas, pancakes/waffles, condiments, faux meat and cheese in their diet for whatever reason, or go to restaurants. I don’t consider those foods “whole foods” and don’t use them even if there is like 3 or 4 ingredients in them. (wish I could!!) I just couldn’t keep the weight off if I did…. I guess it’s just me :(

        2. Jeff Novick’s video about calorie density is awesome as are the many other videos he has made. Does a great job on the how-to videos about creating fast wfpb meals too. Highly recommended… makes things simple.

          The ideas of eating whole foods and watching out for calorie density are not ‘new’. The marketing efforts behind ‘wfpb promoting book sales may be newer, but not the ideas themselves.

          The orthodox Christians have been wfpb vegan no sos fasting for many days per year (257?) for decades.
          Jethro Loss (Adventist) wrote Back to Eden in the late 1930’s, and even Weight Watcher’s of the 1960’s had their “Unlimited Foods” list (kind of looked like Jazz Bass’ list, above). Sure the veg were unlimited, eat as much as you want, but that’s safe to say when it’s difficult to get lots of people to eat ANY at all. Whole foods continued to be featured through the 70s, 80s, 90s with Nathan Pritikin, Dr Ornish, publications like Harrowsmith etc. For ‘volume eaters’, heavy veg plans work well. For ‘particular eaters’, not so much.

          1. Barb,

            You wrote: “The Orthodox Christians have been wfpb vegan no sos fasting for many days per year (257?) for decades.”

            I have had one Ukrainian Orthodox girlfriend and one Greek Orthodox girlfriend. I currently have one Macedonian Orthodox friend.

            Here and there, over the decades. For a lot longer than 257 days.

            I have dined in their homes.

            I have eaten their bread and salt.

            (Apologies to Kipling)

            No indication of Vegan eating. None. Quite the contrary.

            They have tended to be real foodies. Cooking school, restaurant business – that sort of thing.

            Holiday feast / family celebrations.

            Lamb seems to be particularly big.

            Baklava. Olive oil.

            Good food. Good company.

            Barb.

            All the best –

            Vivamus

            ———————————-

            Prelude

            I HAVE eaten your bread and salt.
            I have drunk your water and wine.
            The deaths ye died I have watched beside,
            And the lives ye led were mine.

            Was there aught that I did not share
            In vigil or toil or ease,—
            One joy or woe that I did not know,
            Dear hearts across the seas?

            I have written the tale of our life
            For a sheltered people’s mirth,
            In jesting guise—but ye are wise,
            And ye know what the jest is worth.

            Rudyard Kipling

            1. That sounds lovely Vivamus! My friends were Coptic Christians. Fasting mon, wed, fridays, lent, advent, and other holy days. Vegan.. only vegetables, no oil allowed. Fasting prohibited on sundays though. I fasted lent, advent, fridays and other days of obligation.

              I told a friend ( not an hour ago!) that I memorized a poem in grade 3 lol. If, by Rudyard Kipling.

              1. Barb,

                But – but what’s a girl memorizing “If” for?

                C’mon, now. Look in the mirror.

                Makes no sense!

                ——————————————-

                This being a Vegan-oriented board – with it’s core emphasis on Ethics in All Things – I bring you to the strict Code of Morals – the somber approach to all things epitomized by Monsieur Kipling.

                A stolid favorite.

                Translated into English from Kipling’s original Russian:

                Нравственный кодекс
                (A Code of Morals)
                http://www.eng-poetry.ru/PoemE.php?PoemId=8119

                Be good –

                Vivamus

                1. Vivamus,

                  If was one of my favorite poems, too.

                  I think it is something I would put up on a wall next to Mother Teresa’s similar wisdom and I could read it every day.

                  I feel like dealing with disappointment without losing our character is universal.

                  Plus, I read those words and there are a handful or three of males who come to mind.

                  I have worked with 5 of them. Maybe more, but 5 come strongly to mind.

                  We have also hired the opposite and I don’t regret that. Sometimes people need second and third and fourth and fifth chances.

                  I have a suicidal, alcoholic man with us right now and we can give him time to figure it out where he might be thrown to the lions for his behaviors most places. I am devastated for him because he is old enough now that he may have a life that is hard to recover from. If only someone had placed “If” before him when he was young in a way that it penetrated his soul.

                  I also have an elderly suicidal person and they will get to die because elderly people can speed things up and will get help with that versus help with depression.

                  Definitely in prayer tonight.

                  But “If” and Mother Teresa’s similar words definitely shaped my life.

                  Made me want to figure out how to be like that.

                  1. COVID has deeply affected alcoholism. Not being able to go to a bar and be with friends or hook up romantically has forced addicts to face the void in their souls.

                    It has also affected suicidal processes. They aren’t admitting people the same way they used to.

                    It has also affected end of life in general. And wakes and funerals and COVID has decreased the ability to be there for people after.

                    I need Dear Abby or Anne Landers to give the etiquette for how to do all of this.

      1. Wade TN,

        That’s how I eat and cook my corn on the cob these days. It’s fantastic!

        I’m eating more and more of my veggies plain. Though I like seasoning at times to spice things up.

    3. “I challenge anyone in the world to gain weight by trying to eat from this randomly pulled and incomplete list of veggies, three 5lb buckets, each and every day, with reckless abandon:”

      I AGREE…!

      Lot’s of people talking the talk, but never get off their butts to walk the walk.

  6. On the COVID and Vitamin D end.

    Dr. John Campbell talked about the first Vitamin D clinical trial where they gave people Vitamin D supplementation and 2% ended up in the ICU versus 50% of the control group.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8Ks9fUh2k8&ab_channel=Dr.JohnCampbell

    And, yet, the black and brown communities jumped 80% in COVID deaths in August so the summer didn’t do it for them. The white communities also saw a spike in deaths.

    I guess I say it because some people stop supplementing Vitamin D and they might still need it.

  7. I always like to see the Broad Study highlighted. Nic Wright MD and his colleagues in New Zealand did an excellent study. It was on doubt influenced by his internships at TrueNorth and with the McDougall program. For individuals I try and keep it simple. Insulin resistance caused by fat… fat on body and fat in diet.
    See NF video’s:
    1. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-spillover-effect-links-obesity-to-diabetes/

    2. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-insulin-resistance/
    For those folks who want to do non fat dairy beyond a transition period I mention the tie in with branched chain amino acids which are more prevalent in animal products.
    See NF video: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/are-bcaa-branched-chain-amino-acids-healthy/

    I’m not a fan of whole food plant BASED diet. I prefer Whole Plant Food Diet with minimal Salt Oil or Sugar (SOS) or as Jeff Novick RD has said cut out the CRAP (Concentrated Refined and Processed).

    All this knowledge lays the foundation for successful long term “fat” loss but doesn’t make losing the last 10 pounds easier.

    Keep subscribed as the science keeps coming.

    Best,
    Don Forrester MD FACPE

  8. About 18 months ago I was 220 pounds (six feet tall), but with a combination of a whole food, plant based diet and several months of calorie counting (a miserable experience I now see was a mistake) I was able to reach 171 pounds. Since then, I’ve maintained the whole food vegan diet and weigh in anywhere between 173-180, depending on the fibre and water content of recent meals. To reach an ideal BMI of 22-23 I need to achieve and maintain 165 pounds. I’ve read How Not To Diet a couple times now, and am implementing some of the 21 tweaks, and already don’t use cooking oils, added sugars, or eat floury foods (bread). I wonder what part of my diet is keeping me from achieving my ideal weight/losing the last 10 pounds. So, I have the following questions:

    1) Should I remove nut and seed butters from my diet? I use these sparingly (peanut butter drizzled on my steel-cut oats in the morning and homemade tahini salad dressing a couple times a week). They bring a lot of joy to my life.

    2) Is my spelt pasta a problem? I was having it frequently, but have cut back recently, introducing more black bean meals instead.

    3) Might a Fasting-Mimicking Diet (FMD), as outlines by Dr Longo in his book, The Longevity Diet, work or help?

    Thanks,

    ~Zack

    1. Zack,

      The tahini salad dressing and drizzled peanut butter bring joy to your life.

      I had the same problem with the salad dressing with tahini. I ended up switching to microgreens to have smaller salads in an attempt to lower my salad dressing intake. I also switched to powder peanut butter. There are brands with just peanuts. It doesn’t taste exactly the same but it might be close enough. For me, the first time I ate it, I was suddenly aware of what fat tastes like because that was the taste that was missing, but it tastes pretty good after a few days pang of “This doesn’t taste quite right, but it isn’t bad.”

      You might try some new salad dressing recipes using apple cider vinegar or citrus fruits. There are recipes on YouTube.

      Getting rid of them might help you reach your goal but if you remove the joy from your life, you might end up doing what I did and suddenly wanting Gardein meat-alternatives out of not feeling satisfied. It depends on what you are like.

      So I would ask, have you tried loading your calories earlier in the day?
      Do you sleep at night?
      Maybe try adding in some exercise?

      1. Zack,

        Buy the peanut butter powder online.

        I say it because it is almost impossible to find it without sugar and salt in the stores and it is easy to find it that way online.

        1. My peanut butter is 100 per cent peanuts, no added oils or salt or sugar. It just has the natural peanut oils, which Dr Greger warns against in his chapter “Wall Off Your Calories.”

      2. I’ve tried alternative salad dressings but couldn’t create anything palatable without nuts, and without nut dressing I wasn’t eating my salads, so I reintroduced tahini, figuring it was better to have both than it was to have neither. I’m waiting for the How Not To Diet Bookbook for additional ideas. I sleep as well as my cats will allow, and tried front-loading my calories for a while, but it meant not eating suppers with my wife, who works late, and the social cost was too high. As for exercise, 3-5 times a week I run 11km and lift weights at the gym for 45 minutes. Still can’t kill the belly fat.

        1. Zack,

          I hear ya.

          I didn’t do all that well with weight loss with the tahini salad dressing and I felt the same.

          Many of the doctors give salad dressing recipes on YouTube. But I agree with you that no-oil tahini dressings taste so much better.

          I have the same problem with eating late and it definitely makes things more challenging because even a low glycemic index food becomes higher glycemic index if eaten at night.

          Have you tried some of the tweaks from Dr. Greger’s books? The spices, etc?

          1. I also didn’t do well with the peanut butter – even the natural peanut butter at Whole Foods where you grind it right there.

            If you can find a way to succeed and keep those, good for you.

        2. Zack,

          Congrats!

          A few thoughts:

          (1) Take the time to check out Jeff Novick ‘s full classic video:

          Calorie Density: How To Eat More, Weigh Less and Live Longer
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CdwWliv7Hg&feature=youtu.be

          With it, your will have the knowledge you need to lose weight, to stay stable, or to gain weight – presented in a very clear and memorable way.

          E.g. – when I need to lose weight, thinking of Novik’s charts, I rev up the vegetables and decrease the fats (avocado, nuts and seeds, olive oil), beans and grains.

          When I need to gain weight – it’s rev up the beans and grains.

          You get a very actionable road map with Novick’s video.

          (2) You wrote: “Still can’t kill the belly fat.”

          Oh-ho!

          Yup.

          I had a friend call me – he had lost a substantial amount of weight.

          Very pleased with himself. Except –

          He stated that he went from being a big fat guy with a pot belly – to being a skinny little guy with a pot belly.

          Not exactly what he’d had in mind.

          Oh, well.

          I have found that effect in myself as I went from a BMI – over a decade or two – of 29 > 28 > 27 > 26 > 25 > 24 > 23.

          At 22 – I saw significantly accelerated reduction of the pot belly.

          At 21 – a very noticeable reduction. The way pants fit has now changed entirely – from a tight belt across the rounded belly girth holding everything up at BMI 23 – requiring pulling up the pants here and there throughout the day – to the hips actually holding up the pants, and relief on the beltline at BMI 21.

          All smaller pants and belts, of course. I guess that I am on my fourth pants size reduction.

          A BMI of 21 has long been my goal – based on many pieces of evidence over the last 25 years have shown it as optimal in population groups. I intend to stay here at 21 for a while and work on building muscle instead of merely losing any more weight. I think that additional belly fat reduction will ensue with that strategy.

          My thought for you: I think that belly fat – once we have it – for some of us, anyway – may be that last thing to go.

          A BMI of 23 or 22 may not be sufficient.

          YMMV.

          ——————————–

          From what I have seen over the years, there are three related optimal physical metrics to shoot for. I am going for all three. Heck – why not? (I am not a body builder)

          BMI – 21. This may be may be low for athletes, as muscle is heavier than fat . But read on . . .

          If skeptical of the applicability of BMI in your own case – you might look at the following two metrics:

          Waist / Hip ratio – less than or equal to .95 in males, .85 in females. Mine is currently running .97 – still have a ways to go. Reduction accelerated noticeably from ~1.00 to .99-.98 only after hitting a BMI of 22. Now at .97 at a BMI of 21.

          Waist / Height ratio – 50% or lower. Mine is currently running 51%. Note that reduction accelerated noticeably from greater than this only after hitting a BMI of 22. Then lower still at a BMI of 21.

          YMMV.

          ——————————–

          “Should I remove nut and seed butters from my diet?”

          Only if you want to lose weight.

          Again – see Novick’s video. All will become clear.

          You will absorb roughly 1/2 the fat from nuts if you eat them as whole nuts than if you eat them as nut butters – Dr. Greger has a video on that somewhere.

          As far as the peanuts are concerned – peanuts are one of the most pesticided foods on the planet – they are grown in the damp ground in the hot, humid South – think Plains, Georgia. Perfect breeding ground for fungi. Mites. Insects.

          My uncle was a peanut farmer. Trust me.

          We are talking insecticide, miteacide, and – particularly – fungicide.

          Going organic might seem the way to go – but then the fungal levels increase by about 5 times.

          We are now talking significant levels of aflatoxin: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aflatoxin

          This is a real farming issue – not just an abstract theoretical problem.

          Despite the family history – I no longer eat peanuts.

          Hey – a man always has a choice.

          ——————————–

          You might want to slow down your weight loss trajectory.

          The faster people lose weight – the faster people tend to gain it back.

          If you go gradual – it may be easier to keep it off for the long haul.

          I like to see around two pounds month – that way serum lab values tend to stay fine, and progress can continue for years.

          24 pounds a year should be quite sufficient for most people.

          ——————————

          A question – has your resting pulse rate changed as you have lost weight?

          Mine has gone from 88 at the beginning to 57 this morning.

          Lotsa factors, I am sure – the following is not scientific – but I visualize my arteries opening right up, as per Ornish and Esselstyn.

          Along with a tremendous improvement in labs over the years.

          ——————————————-

          It sounds like you are doing well.

          You are in the right place.

          Consider also the work of John A. McDougall, M.D.; Dean Ornish, M.D.; Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr., M.D. – among others.
          https://www.drmcdougall.com/
          https://www.ornish.com/
          http://www.dresselstyn.com/site/

          You may also find the following web sites of interest:
          http://www.whfoods.com/
          https://www.bluezones.com/

          Zack.

          All the best –

          Vivamus

    2. Hey Zack its really easy to find saltless and sugarless peanut butter. Richards comes to mind, and most places now have a few to choose from and even their bargain home brands are now catching on…or shop at a natural foods place and they always have a peanut or almond nut butter grinder, and man Dr G says nuts are good for you – even necessary, and studies show eating nuts makes you lose weight as well. (seems counter intuitive I know)

      Someone mentioned buying powdered nuts? (not a good idea to powder your nuts, as extra processing is painful)

      BMI is also a function of muscle as you know so something like swimming could get you to the BMI you want faster, but your weight might stay where it is, and you’ll have to watch getting hungrier, so have lots of veggies on hand. :)

      Dr Gregers daily dozen has an additional part called 21 tweaks on his app. There you will find you get points for not eating powdered foods which includes pasta, bread, chips, cookies, yada yada. Its a goal not a requirement, and its called “Deflour your diet”. Its fun to have days when you check that one off and get the point applied towards your 21 tweaks.

      Lastly, wow brother 7 pounds differential in a day seems enormous even if weighing at opposite times of the day.

      I wonder if others here have this sort of fluctuation?

      1. jazzBass,

        You wrote: “I wonder if others here have this sort of fluctuation?”

        Nope.

        Maximum three pounds the day after a restaurant meal (largely salt – > water retention).

        Takes two days to return to baseline – which it does – reliably and predictably.

        Seven pounds?

        Outhouses come to mind.

        Vivamus

        1. Vivamus,

          I do have at least 5 pounds day to night weight fluctuation.

          And have had up to 8 pounds, so I bear witness to what jazzBass is saying.

          It was so frustrating to me and made weight loss so confusing.

          I bought 3 or 4 different scales but it is there.

          Water weight may be the answer.

          Not sure.

          But it sure did make this process more confusing.

      2. jazzBass,

        Yes, time of day is a big factor.

        Plus, whether you are weighing on a home scale versus doctor scale.

        Home scales are known for glitching, even the best home scales. Even just moving it a few inches on the floor can change the reading or stepping even slightly differently on it can change results by a few pounds.

        Plus, weighing yourself before or after going to the bathroom can be a few pound difference per Dr. Greger’s video and it is the truth.

        Also, plus, lifting weights, you can even gain weight from building muscle, so that can be a factor.

    3. Congratulations on the positive steps you’ve taken to reach your ideal BMI. As you’ve identified, the nuts and seed butters could be contributing to a little more fat than you can handle to lose those stubborn last few pounds. Perhaps just cutting down without totally eliminating might help. And you’re already implementing a helpful step in adding more black bean and perhaps a little less pasta. De Greger certainly recommends considering at least eating your calories earlier in the day and then stopping eating earlier so you can have a modified fast, so you might experiment with timing your meals and giving yourself a longer period when you are not eating. All these things can help, as well as the many other tweaks you can implement over time, such as making sure you’re getting adequate exercise/sleep, trying cider vinegar, etc. You sound determined and I’m sure you’ll get rid of those last few pounds in a healthy way.
      Joan-Nurse Educator and Volunteer for NutritionFacts.org.

  9. Dr. Greger said that fruit juice reduced Alzheimer’s by more than 70 percent. How about an interventional study? I heard green tea reduced the risk a similar amount, and nickel was found independently to reduce the risk. Green tea is rich in nickel and other more superior nutrients. How about an interventional study of green tea and fruit juice and Alzheimer’s?

    1. Matthew,

      There aren’t interventional studies yet but green tea does have mechanisms.

      You caused me to look up sulforaphane and Alzheimer’s and I came across the concept of affecting aquaporin 4 that sounds interesting to me over in the TBI section but it was also in the Alzheimer’s section.

      https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7553333_Sulforaphane_enhances_aquaporin-4_expression_and_decreases_cerebral_edema_following_traumatic_brain_injury

      https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0028390818304714

      This one is how intermittent fasting can protect against Alzheimer’s by restoring the polarity of aquaporin 4

      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29238290/

    2. Matthew

      I’m pretty sure that Dr Greger has never said that ‘fruit juice reduced Alzheimer’s by more than 70 percent’
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/alzheimers-and-apple-juice/

      However, there is an Alzheimer’s Association press release that talks about something that could reduce Alzheimer’s risk by a very substantial amount. I haven’t fact-checked its statements though. Nevertheless, it’s so extraordinary and will enrage some groups so much that I can’t resist posting it ………………

      ‘At least one flu vaccination was associated with a 17% reduction in Alzheimer’s incidence. More frequent flu vaccination was associated with another 13% reduction in Alzheimer’s incidence.
      Vaccination against pneumonia between ages 65 and 75 reduced Alzheimer’s risk by up to 40% depending on individual genes.
      Individuals with dementia have a higher risk of dying (6-fold) after infections than those without dementia (3-fold).

      “With the COVID-19 pandemic, vaccines are at the forefront of public health discussions. It is important to explore their benefit in not only protecting against viral or bacterial infection but also improving long-term health outcomes,” said Maria C. Carrillo, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association chief science officer.

      “It may turn out to be as simple as if you’re taking care of your health in this way — getting vaccinated — you’re also taking care of yourself in other ways, and these things add up to lower risk of Alzheimer’s and other dementias,” Carrillo said. “This research, while early, calls for further studies in large, diverse clinical trials to inform whether vaccinations as a public health strategy decrease our risk for developing dementia as we age.”

      https://www.alz.org/aaic/releases_2020/vaccines-dementia-risk.asp

  10. I, on the other hand, need to gain weight. How do I do that? After being diagnosed with CLL I have been so stressed, along with the state of the world during the pandemic and what we are all going through, that I lost weight, and that is not good for me. I want to control my disease through diet as much as possible , but I need to put on weight if I want to avoid going on drugs.It almost seems impossible. I know Dr. Greger is primarily looking at research for good diet for the general population, but I truly wish there was someone scanning the literature for information to help people like me who have an illness to deal with.

  11. I just watched NOVA explaining CRISPR as an immune system response.

    Funny how some people are such excellent teachers.

    I suddenly understand what cas 9 does

    1. Deb,
      I watched the CRISPR NOVA program. Quite awesome coding discovery. The composition of the video is very high quality. One scientist likened CRISPR to a bigger event than the impact of the Internet. Pros & cons were presented, with the pros (use the technology to improve things) winning out. The following program showed CRISPR being used to select for male cattle because they produce more meat. I could see where this was going and turned the TV off.

  12. I’ve recently learned I have Spinal Stenosis, but hoped someone might know what food types might help reduce the pain? I’m already plant-based, but would love to learn if someone knows of a certain vegetable or fruit that might help reduce (or eliminate) the pain (in my legs. lower back and neck)?

    1. Michael,

      I looked it up and the pages on it are mostly recommending anti-inflammatory foods.

      It gave a few hints such as Omega 3’s, like flax seeds and walnuts, green vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, and kale, plus, vegetables like carrots and peppers which lower a substance in the blood that’s related to inflammation.

      They also mentioned spices. I think Dr. Greger did a video on the spices and inflammation. Seems like Turmeric, Ginger, Rosemary, and one more….cloves…
      I had to cheat. https://nutritionfacts.org/2015/01/20/the-top-four-anti-inflammatory-spices/

      They mentioned making sure you got enough B12 and ate enough foods with Vitamin C.

      I will also say that once you have tried all of the anti-inflammatory foods, I have used ICES-PEMF and Infrared and those both help lower inflammation and have been used with that condition. There are some studies on both with back pain. Small ones. But one of the articles that I looked at emphasized increasing blood flow to the spine and either the ICES-PEMF or Infrared will accomplish that. I do use both. I am saying “ICES-PEMF” because I don’t know which other PEMF’s are good or not. A lot of them are very old technology sold for ridiculously high prices. Bob Denis is who designed mine and he seems like a straight-up guy and you can get one for $500 to $1500 depending on which one you choose. The competitors often charge $10,000 to $20,000 for things that don’t work. He had back problems is how the ICES came to be. Depending on the type of injury, it can take a while but I have used it successfully on multiple things and it may only be bringing down inflammation and increasing blood flow, but those two things accomplish so much. I know that Dr. Burke in his infrared talk pointed to Nitric Oxide as one of the things infrared adds to the picture and infrared also increases blood flow and improves inflammation. Both could be in my medicine cabinet is why I bought them. They both cause wounds to heal faster and both are effective with pain. ICES-PEMF can cause bone to grow back and there was a PEMF study where PEMF was an equivalent to a mild opiate for pain relief and not needing opiates is a very good thing. There have been studies where there was some success with PEMF and growing back knee cartilage and hip cartilage. I say that because there is cartilage in the spine. I don’t think PEMF has ever been tested for that but the fact that it has been tested for hip cartilage and knee cartilage, it might take 2 years and you might only have a 34% chance of having it grow back, but it is something that might be worth playing with.

    2. Michael Dahlin –
      I use this device for my back. https://www.amazon.com/Sit-Decompress-Inversion-Alternative-Stretcher/dp/B00OFATD8Q/ref=asc_df_B00OFATD8Q/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309760615398&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=18296236445436123818&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9028727&hvtargid=pla-569815141153&psc=1

      It really helps. Just go slow and easy. My chiropractor recommended it. It allows for relief of the pressure of gravity on the spine using gravity traction. He also recommended that I take Cosamin ASU which I take for my hip which was injured – crushed – years ago. The cartilage is damaged and almost gone. When the pain is searing I take the Cosamine ASU and it slowly goes away. I should take it every day but I am not a great pill-taker. I also take Nature’s Lab Hyaluronic Acid. Here’s the link:
      https://www.costco.com/nature's-lab-hyaluronic-acid-with-biocell-collagen%2C-180-vegetarian-capsules.product.100227743.html The best price for both is via Costco. I notice that when I get lazy about taking it the pain returns. The Cosamin ASU has additives (herbs) that help with inflammation and healing. Has made a slow but huge difference in my life as there had been months when I could not walk at all. I am now back to my gardening business where I am on my feet all day.
      ALSO though, . . .I also make sure that I stretch the muscles regularly. The muscles tighten up and put pressure on the joints – lengthening and relaxing the muscles is imperative to relieving pressure on the joints.
      I also make an anti-inflammatory tea: ginger root (fresh), cinnamon, clove, turmeric root (fresh) smashed (add black pepper) and steeped in hot water. Strain after steeping, add sweetener.
      I am so sorry for your pain; I hope something helps you.

    3. I shared this resource, (NF) with a young friend who can most benefit from changing his lifestyle early on and Gregers style spoke to him. He said, “Hey, I like this guy”. The lighthearted delivery packed with information was a winner for him because he is young and open. He is also smart, and realizes the purposefulness of the delivery and he quickly appreciated it for its obvious intent and the underlying information, as do I.

      Perhaps there are reasons for this format which you could understand (tolerate, overlook in trust) beyond a gut reaction to it.

      When someone has to earn his audience, he adapts to the benefit of effectiveness. It simply cannot please all.

      If any of you have a website who’s goal it is to reach as many as you can with some important info, you may also find that you must do it in a way that is effective, no matter if some early adopters feel betrayed by a change.

      I have heard Greger say he wishes you, yes you, to go start a website and deliver this message of health in your own way.

      Can you? If so, take all those reasons you do not like this place and do it better, and please let us have the link and we will be sure to check it out. I suspect Greger would as well. If he knew you were inspired to further this message he’d be happy, whatever the reason, I am sure of it.

    1. George: we don’t know for sure, but it’s likely both. Animal protein (the egg white) causes insulin resistance and so does fat, especially saturated fat which the yolk is full of.

    1. Steve,

      He makes his videos for a whole year at a time but he has already asked for feedback and has heard that people preferred the old videos.

      And, the Pandemic videos which came out were a sign of good faith to the vocal part of the community.

      Unfortunately, he still has How Not To Diet videos and a few more webinars in this format to go. Maybe more than that.

      I am not sure how many videos he does at one time but he said that he does videos one year, writes a book the next year, travels and speaks the next year and then comes back and does it all over again. And posts it all so we can watch it for free.

  13. I have a question about the sugar alcohols you would find as excipients in b12 supplements. It says online that mannitol and sorbitol are bad for tooth health because bad mouth bacteria like s.mutans can feed on these sugar alcohols and cause tooth decay/erosion. Since i take a sublingual on the tongue on an empty stomach, what can I do to protect my teeth? I am thinking of drinking some water after i’ve dissolved the tablet to rinse my mouth out a little. I’m not sure how effective that will be. I’m starting to consider going to a compounding pharmacist to make a customised supplement. Is that expensive?

      1. I have been chewing 21st Century Cyano B12 and it has a fairly neutral chalky taste. Not bitter. Not flavored. It does feel sometimes like it might get stuck in my teeth but I might chew it too well. I don’t think I have to chew it as well as I do but I would have to review the webinar about that.

        1. Which is one is it? The 500mcg one has calcium and is a tablet. I would take one that had calcium and it was chalky too. I stopped taking that one because I wanted a sublingual one instead. Also I swallowed one of those on an empty stomach and it caused problems with my stomach (pain, reflux).

  14. It really helps. Just go slow and easy. My chiropractor recommended it. It allows for relief of the pressure of gravity on the spine using gravity traction. He also recommended that I take Cosamin ASU which I take for my hip which was injured – crushed – years ago. The cartilage is damaged and almost gone. When the pain is searing I take the Cosamine ASU and it slowly goes away. I should take it every day but I am not a great pill-taker. I also take Nature’s Lab Hyaluronic Acid

    https://bit.ly/2Esd1AR
    bit.ly/3jCSusi

  15. Today, in the COVID news they were talking about how 4 teachers have died from COVID since the beginning of the school semester.

    Those were just the ones since the semester began. Hundreds of educators have died since January. Not all of them were teachers. Principals, school administrators, teachers, school nurses, guidance counselors, and school cafeteria workers have died.

    This is going to be a very long school year.

    1. (Essential workers have been dying the whole time. My thought is that teachers may be important enough essential workers that the dialogue may change in a few months and, no, I am not putting down the other essential workers, I am just saying that we don’t care all that much when it is meat-plant workers, in general. Teachers are way more outspoken and way more likely to stand up for themselves.)

      1. Deb,

        Essential workers? When you are receive this label, you know what the powers that be are thinking.

        This is from the airline stewardesses, but it applies to all:

        “‘When airlines call us essential, what they mean is expendable,’ one flight attendant posted in the group.”

        “‘Collateral damage, acceptable casualties,’ wrote another.”

        https://time.com/5815492/flight-attendants-coronavirus/

        If you are labeled an “essential worker” – it’s every man for himself.

        ‘Cause no one else is going to help you.

        Or care.

        ————————————

        I have a friend who likes to do substitute teaching twice a week. He delights in it. It gives him energy!

        He informed the school system that he would not be coming in this year.

        I mentioned that the authorities were saying that children did not give the Coronavirus to adults. He laughed.

        He stated that most of his work was covering teachers who were ill from diseases they caught from their students. That is the very reason that there are substitute teachers.Elementary school is a well known cauldron of infectious disease. And that he always got ill several times a year when he was substitute teaching.

        But that he did not get ill at all one year that he did not go in.

        “If the kids don’t give the coronavirus to adults, it’s the only disease in the world that kids don’t give to adults.”

        Since then I noticed in newspaper articles that schools were facing a substitute teacher shortage.

        I wondered why . . .

        ————————————

        My brother is keeping his kids sheltered safe at home. For them – and for his wife and himself. I called him last night and asked –

        No regrets.

        Schools?

        I’m not worried about them.

        Not our problem.

        Deb,

        You stay safe –

        Vivamus

        1. Vivamus,

          Yes, my brother is keeping his step-granddaughter home, too, and that is a relief to me.

          He is doing it because of COVID and because of the changes in schools but he also got mad at the schools last year because he had taught her multiplication and started division before the school year and she lost the understanding of both and so did her friends. They confused the children so much that he just wants to redo last year and this year himself.

          The concept that hundreds of educators had already died last semester makes me uncomfortable about the whole thing.

          Also, kids have already become orphans back then when both of their parents died from it.

          I have a lot of friends who are teachers or who work in the school system in other capacities.

          1. Deb,

            As a child in elementary schooI I transitioned from Pennsylvania schools (Traditional Math: 2+2=4) to California schools (“New Math”: 2+2=1+3 OR 2+2=3+1).

            I was amazed at how stupid adults really are. I could get it – but I knew that I was smart. I could see that my fellow students couldn’t get it. And that this is no way to teach children math.

            OK if you already know math. But not a place to start.

            Real math is about results. New Math was all about process: results are unimportant.

            So – I zoomed ahead of my peers. They thought I caught on really quickly. “Your son is gifted!”

            But I knew that I was just a dog jumping through silly hoops held in the air by silly adults in order to keep them happy.

            Which kept my parents happy. And all was well with the world.

            The Pennsylvania teachers cared about the kids. The California teachers cared about the concepts.

            The contrast was as clear as can be.

            An early lesson in one child’s application of the wisdom of the Emperor’s New Clothes.

            Deb.

            Your brother is not doing the wrong thing.

            All the best –

            Vivamus

            ————————–

            New Math
            Tom Lehrer
            1965
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWPn3esuDgU

            The Emperor’s New Clothes
            Hans Christian Andersen
            1837
            http://www.online-literature.com/hans_christian_andersen/967/

            1. Laughing.

              Yes, Real math is about results. New Math was all about process: results are unimportant.

              Honestly, she already had understood and memorized her multiplication tables because my brother is an engineer and machinist and believes that you do use math and knew they didn’t believe in teaching multiplication anymore. I had tutored an 8th grader years ago when New Math really was new and I knew that he was special needs but wasn’t sure what he was capable of learning or what he would understand so I made up an easy basics test. But it was not easy. The first question was 7 x 0 = and he had no idea. He also turned out to not know phonics. I taught him multiplication, division and how to read that summer but he went up to 9th grade and I attended the parent teachers conference with his mother and they said, “No, we do not have them multiply. We give them a chart and when I suggested that his reading got much better once he started reading aloud, the teacher almost cried out, “No, do not ask us to have him read. We will not be doing that.”

              The thing is, he learned enough reading to read, “Goosebumps” and enough math to do long division but within a month, he had learned that it was not something that he had to learn and he promptly forgot it and that is the same thing my brother went through with his step-granddaughter.

              She learned it all through repetition and then she went to school, but they wanted her to demonstrate that she understood repeat addition so she got the answers wrong when she put the mathematical answers. She had to draw 5 sets of 8 dots and then count them and mid-drawing them, it became an art project and she would mess up and get the wrong answer counting the dots and even lost addition, to some degree.

              All math came back down to counting.

            2. Vivamus,

              He said, “If she can’t do multiplication, how will she ever do area or algebra?” but he knows that they have already removed all of the logic of algebra and mixed it with geometry willy-nilly and they removed all of the textbooks so parents don’t know how to follow what they are doing and they removed all of the repetitions so that the kids can’t learn through repetition. He was hoping that when they had her start learning from home that they would at least have online resources but the resources didn’t give feedback or good enough explanations that an engineer who has used math every day for his whole adult life could figure out what they were doing. They mixed together different types of math and gave 1 or 2 examples of each versus the 10 or 20 homework questions that we used to get. She genuinely backed up to counting and once she was back there, she started drawing dots instead of adding, too. She honestly backed up to what I would consider pre-math concepts.

              I did tutor a high school student once and he had the algebra mixed with geometry erasing the logic of how to do either and maybe throwing in a little pre-calculus at the same time type lessons, too. Why erase logic? I know that they don’t want kids to feel intimidated by the math, but they really have erased the logic of the math entirely.

              My brother honestly got so upset that he argued with the teacher which is not his personality. He said, “Do you understand that repeat addition with little dots means that she is now working on her counting skills again?”

              I don’t know who is in charge of that concept or where it came from.

              I was not good at math until I reached logic and then I went back and taught myself the rest. Mostly, we had really scary teachers back in the day and they could hit you and put gum on your nose and throw chalk across the room at you. I would hide in the nurse’s room because she was on lunch break at that time and then, a substitute teacher would come in and I would attend and catch up. The teachers also tried to trick the students and I came from abuse and didn’t like tricks or violence at all at all at all.

    2. Deb when did this semester of Death begin in your neck of the woods?

      Today is the 10th of September. These teachers were in full, half empty classrooms?

      These teachers were fit, active, healthy?

      These teachers caught and died from Covid in 1-2 weeks then?

      Parents of these vector kids are fine?

      All kids in contact with these kids, went home and gave this accelerated 1-2 week death sentence to how many?

      These hundreds of educators affirmed as having got it from the school and nowhere else, also epitome of health?

      Which schools were open in January during the height of the lockdown?

      Finally Id like to check the source of this information, can you share that?

        1. It is hard to find the old articles.

          Here is one in May where in NY City alone 72 school employees died.

          https://www.asumag.com/covid-19/article/21130609/72-employees-in-the-new-york-city-district-have-died-from-covid19-virus

          Okay, here is one where in NY City alone 100 school employees have died.

          https://nypost.com/2020/08/18/1-in-10-nyc-school-principals-will-work-remote-this-year-doe/

          I know that NJ and Mass and Florida and California and Colorado also had losses.

          It would take quite a while to add them up, but I will start with 100 in NY city.

          1. They only looked at the deaths in Missouri, Mississippi, South Carolina, Iowa and Oklahoma.

            The news has been surprisingly bad at compiling the deaths of educators.

            If you Google any state, you will get the more recent ones and you will notice that the article with the very most recent only named ones from there and if you Google, suddenly, you will find Superintendent in TX, Preschool teacher in TX, Kindergarten teacher in TX, some academy teacher in TX.

            It is a total pain-in-the-neck because almost nobody has been keeping a running total.

            There is a memorial site someplace that had so many names that it was ridiculous and I scrolled for a few minutes before even reaching a NY teacher.

  16. Deb,

    All state Health Departments have the following information on all state deaths readily available in their computerized databases: individual identifying information, cause of death, contributing factors, occupation, sex and age.

    I have often pondered if smokers should have “suicide” listed as the cause of death on their death certificates – with cancer or M.I or what-have-you listed secondarily. But that might upset some people.

    Best to keep a low profile.

    You can call up you local coroner if you would like to confirm. Where I live, coroner is an elected office – they are equipped to handle inquiries from the public.

    Or you can contact you local or state health departments. Consider asking to speak to the head honcho – you can find out who it is prior to calling.

    What is interesting is that, in regards to Coronavirus deaths, occupation information is not being made available to the public in ~90% of jurisdictions as of April or so. I think it may have gotten worse since then.

    Lotsa claims as to why.

    “We don’t have the information.” They do.

    We can’t separate out that information.” They can.

    “It would be a HIPAA privacy violation.” It would not.

    It’s a Strange Game.

    News organizations could sniff this out if they wanted to – though it might take a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit – but they have experience in doing exactly that sort of thing.

    They have largely chosen not to do so.

    The absence of this information in the public sphere is very conspicuous – an enormous black hole.

    Of course – you cannot see a black whole. So a lot of people cannot not see this. You know –

    “If you don’t take a temperature you can’t find a fever.”

    I have been seeing this since April.

    You are seeing it now.

    You will not be able to obtain the full information that jazzBass seeks.

    No member of the public can.

    Our society seems to have made a societal decision in this matter.

    But that does not deny the reality that things are happening.

    And that people are flying blind.

    Deb.

    Do you play chess?

    All the beat –

    Vivamus

    —————————————-

    GREETINGS PROFESSOR FALKEN

    HELLO

    A STRANGE GAME.
    THE ONLY WINNING MOVE IS
    NOT TO PLAY.

    HOW ABOUT A NICE GAME OF CHESS?

    JOSHUA
    WARGAMES
    1983

  17. Heres what happened to me. Been eating literally junk food only for most of my life and got over 200 pounds then in the beginning of the last year radically switched to a all natural food only diet with no gluten, no dairy and i started losing alot of weight.. i am still sedentary but i eat 3-5x (yes 3 to 5 times) more food than i used to and my body weight is back to being the normal for my height (~154lbs). I eat ridiculous amounts of food per day and they are mostly carbs which is usually brown or black rice, lentils and alot of sweet potatoes, cherry tomatoes, onions, celery , cinnamon, ALOT of garlic and chicken breast since i haven’t gone full plant based yet but only consume lean white meat… i think i been eating like atleast 5 to 7 pounds of food per day, my servings are HUGE with the plate overflowing like a pyramid of food and im actually finding hard to GAIN weight since i ended up losing more weight than i wanted so now i been eating 3 huge overflowing servings of food per day

  18. A lot of messages posted are off-topic. It would be nice if a direction is provided to viewers to stay on the topic so it makes it a worthwhile experience for the ones who come to this site to seek genuine information. Thank you.

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