The Best Supplement for Fibromyalgia

The Best Supplement for Fibromyalgia
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Vitamin D supplements are put to the test for fibromyalgia.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Fibromyalgia is one of the most common joint and muscle diseases, affecting millions of Americans, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, and often accompanied by other symptoms, such as fatigue. The medical profession used to think it was all in people’s heads, “but today there is irrefutable evidence” that it is, indeed, a disorder of the body and not just the mind.

Back in 2003, an influential paper was published out of the Mayo Clinic, in which a shocking 93% of fibromyalgia-type patients were found to be vitamin D deficient; and so, they concluded that all such patients are at high risk of severe vitamin D deficiency. But wait a second, said the skeptics, there was no control group. Where’s the Mayo Clinic located? Minnesota. Maybe 90% of everyone in Minnesota is D deficient.

When controlled studies were done, some did, indeed, find that those suffering from these kinds of pain syndromes were significantly more likely to be D deficient, but other studies did not. Even if all the studies did, though, that doesn’t mean that low vitamin D levels cause fibromyalgia. Maybe, chronic widespread pain disorders, like fibromyalgia, cause low vitamin D. It’s the sunshine vitamin, after all, and fibromyalgia patients may not be running around outside as much as healthy controls. To know if vitamin D is contributing to the disease, you have to put it to the test. 

Studies like this found that the majority of those with pain syndromes and low D levels appeared to benefit from vitamin D supplementation. Clinical improvement in up to 90% of patients. (You can imagine how rife vitamin D deficiency is among Arab women in the Middle East.) But these studies weren’t controlled either. Maybe they would have gotten better on their own without the supplements, or maybe it was the placebo effect? There are many examples in the medical literature of treatments that looked great in uncontrolled trials, like hyperbaric oxygen therapy for multiple sclerosis, but when put to the test in randomized controlled trials, they failed miserably.

And, that’s what seemed to happen in the first randomized controlled trial of vitamin D for a fibromyalgia-type syndrome in 2008. No significant difference in pain scores, though the study only lasted three months, and in that time, the treatment was only able to get the vitamin D blood levels up to about 30. Unfortunately, no controlled study had ever been done pushing levels any higher, until 2014. Fibromyalgia patients were given up to 2400 units of D a day for 20 weeks; and their D levels rose up to about 50 and then, once they stopped the vitamin D, levels came back down to match the placebo. That was reflected in their pain scores, a significant drop in pain severity while they were on the D and then, back to baseline when they came off of it. The researchers concluded “that this economical—[in fact, over-the-counter]—therapy with a low side effect profile may well be considered in patients with [fibromyalgia syndrome.]”

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Icons created by Valery from The Noun Project.

Image credit: sielemann via 123RF. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Fibromyalgia is one of the most common joint and muscle diseases, affecting millions of Americans, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, and often accompanied by other symptoms, such as fatigue. The medical profession used to think it was all in people’s heads, “but today there is irrefutable evidence” that it is, indeed, a disorder of the body and not just the mind.

Back in 2003, an influential paper was published out of the Mayo Clinic, in which a shocking 93% of fibromyalgia-type patients were found to be vitamin D deficient; and so, they concluded that all such patients are at high risk of severe vitamin D deficiency. But wait a second, said the skeptics, there was no control group. Where’s the Mayo Clinic located? Minnesota. Maybe 90% of everyone in Minnesota is D deficient.

When controlled studies were done, some did, indeed, find that those suffering from these kinds of pain syndromes were significantly more likely to be D deficient, but other studies did not. Even if all the studies did, though, that doesn’t mean that low vitamin D levels cause fibromyalgia. Maybe, chronic widespread pain disorders, like fibromyalgia, cause low vitamin D. It’s the sunshine vitamin, after all, and fibromyalgia patients may not be running around outside as much as healthy controls. To know if vitamin D is contributing to the disease, you have to put it to the test. 

Studies like this found that the majority of those with pain syndromes and low D levels appeared to benefit from vitamin D supplementation. Clinical improvement in up to 90% of patients. (You can imagine how rife vitamin D deficiency is among Arab women in the Middle East.) But these studies weren’t controlled either. Maybe they would have gotten better on their own without the supplements, or maybe it was the placebo effect? There are many examples in the medical literature of treatments that looked great in uncontrolled trials, like hyperbaric oxygen therapy for multiple sclerosis, but when put to the test in randomized controlled trials, they failed miserably.

And, that’s what seemed to happen in the first randomized controlled trial of vitamin D for a fibromyalgia-type syndrome in 2008. No significant difference in pain scores, though the study only lasted three months, and in that time, the treatment was only able to get the vitamin D blood levels up to about 30. Unfortunately, no controlled study had ever been done pushing levels any higher, until 2014. Fibromyalgia patients were given up to 2400 units of D a day for 20 weeks; and their D levels rose up to about 50 and then, once they stopped the vitamin D, levels came back down to match the placebo. That was reflected in their pain scores, a significant drop in pain severity while they were on the D and then, back to baseline when they came off of it. The researchers concluded “that this economical—[in fact, over-the-counter]—therapy with a low side effect profile may well be considered in patients with [fibromyalgia syndrome.]”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Valery from The Noun Project.

Image credit: sielemann via 123RF. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

89 responses to “The Best Supplement for Fibromyalgia

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      1. Dairy has nothing to do with Fibromyalgia. It happens to vegans as well.

        Similarly to heart diseases and Alzheimer’s, the rate is the same among healthy meat eaters and healthy vegans. I don’t count those who eat processed foods as healthy meat eaters. Same with vegans who eat potato chip.




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        1. The most positive study that I am familiar regarding yogurt was this NIH funded Harvard study that has to do with weight gain:
          Changes in Diet and Lifestyle and Long-Term Weight Gain in Women and Men
          http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1014296#t=article

          “Inverse associations with weight gain, per serving per day, were seen for increased consumption of vegetables (−0.22 lb), whole grains (−0.37 lb), fruits (−0.49 lb), nuts (−0.57 lb), and yogurt (−0.82 lb).”

          As you can see, whole plant foods also did rather well in this study with nut consumption taking the silver and increased fruit consumption bringing home the bronze.

          Meat and potatoes took a hit in this study, but it is unclear if weight gain associated with potatoes consumption was due to increased fat intake that usually accompanies potato ingestion such as bacon bits, butter, margarine, sour cream, deep frying, etc, etc:
          “The dietary factors with the largest positive associations with weight changes, per serving per day, were increases in the consumption of potato chips (1.69 lb), potatoes (1.28 lb), sugar-sweetened beverages (1.00 lb), unprocessed red meats (0.95 lb), and processed meats (0.93 lb). A secondary analysis of potato subtypes showed that weight changes were positively associated with increases in the consumption of french fries (3.35 lb) and of boiled, baked, or mashed potatoes (0.57 lb).”

          Weight management is important to good health, but it is not the only consideration. Dairy can be problematic in other areas pertaining to optimal health.
          I’ll just stick with the whole plant foods thank you very much.




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  1. What do you think about the link between fibromyalgia and Lyme? And rheumatoid arthritis and Lyme? and Lupus and Lyme?




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    1. I had lyme about 15 years ago and read about it extensively. The spirochette is closely related to that of syphilis and like syphilis, it can mimic a great many other diseases, in addition to what you suggest, MS, environmental mold poisoning, emotional depression, quite possibly neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, and many more.




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  2. I used to suffer from debilitating FMS and tons of other health issues until going WFPB, all of which either improved dramatically or became history. Not saying it would work for everyone, but what is the harm in giving it a real trial? No animal products and nothing processed, especially oils, just real, whole food for a full month and see what happens!




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    1. I went WFPB almost two years ago and make 80%+improvement in overall health. I am looking to continue my health. I have very painfully sore soft tissue areas in three parts of my body and would like to know if raw vs mixed cooked/raw vegan would make a di difference




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      1. Kathleen, As a moderator on this site, I see several gave you the answer to what WFPB stands for. Beyond that I wanted to encourage you to not feel a “dud” for asking a basic question. The fact that you’re on this website and willing to ask a question shows you’re ahead of most. If you are new to this website, may I encourage you to read the introductory videos Dr. Greger has wisely prepared to cover basics. I think you may find them helpful. You just need t go to the “Video Library” button on the upper click down until you see “Introductory Videos” and choose one or two that will help outline some of the concepts of whole food nutrition. Then stay with us and you’ll learn so much. Glad you found NutritionFacts.org.




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        1. Joan, thank you for your comment. I have been a visitor to nutrition facts.org for several years now. I am noticing that the comments are sounding belligerent, ill mannered, and self-righteous. It seems to me, that this website serves as a forum for all different walks of life to gather information. To utilize this information it so that we may all find ourselves healthier. Many of us wish to avoid the clutches of our bankrupt , inefficient healthcare system. Hopefully , this website returns to a place where individuals can have civil discourse even when they disagree. Perhaps, those who have need to be antagonistic and sarcastic could just stick to their own Facebook Page and use that as a forum to take postulate their ego while exhibiting their overall hostility towards others?




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  3. Thank you Michael for toning down the cliffhanger pauses and excessive voice inflections I’ve observed in some of your other videos. This video was much easier (for me) to listen too. Your research and info are spot on. I’ll keep subscribing!




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  4. Dr. G, more cliffhangers and inflections please!!! We love you for that since that’s your true personality coming through!!! That’s what invokes some smiles and giggles!




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  5. Dear NF.org Staff

    Is there any research done on raw Vegan vs. Mixed Vegan eating plans? Meaning only eating raw plant based or eating a combination of cooked and raw veggies.
    Since we get all our protein from beans and nuts it dought my body could digest raw beans. But what about brocoli and other veggies. What are the “Facts of Life” concerning raw vs cooked for enzyme adsorption, etc, etc,…

    Thanks
    Holly




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    1. Holly, some other benefits of going mixed vs raw include:

      (1) Steaming Crucifers for Sulforaphane
      (2) Cooking Mushrooms for Aromatase inhibitors
      (3) Drinking Green Tea for EGCG
      (4) Consuming Tofu/Tempeh for Isoflavones
      (5) Cooking Beans to reduce Phytates
      (6) Cooking enhances bioavailability of Curcumin (especially when combining peperine (black pepper))




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      1. I do all the above already, I follow Dr. G’s daily videos 100%. I was just wondering if going raw was my next step but apparently I just need to stay the course. I have only been eating 100% less than 2 years. Maybe my body just needs a little more time to heal from paleo, and the typical American yuck. Thank you all for you input. I haven’t read all the emails yet but will soon.
        My independence day from pain started 2 months before Dr. G published his boom, which I bought on audio so I could listen to while biking…. . I am very greatful for the whole team and email responders. I have seen soooooo many wonderful changes like going from using a walker to riding a bike.
        Staying in bed till noon to getting up at five to see the deer outside my living room window.
        This country girl is making a come back, grin.




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        1. Raw and mixed plant based doesn’t really matter since both are far superior to including animal sources. It’s just a matter of preference and how limited you want to get with your cooking methods.




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        2. Hi Holly ,

          First off congratulations to your new and improved health. I’ve been on the WFPB diet for just about two years myself which I believe in 100%.
          I do find if very difficult to persuade other family members as well as friends to the benefits though. I even purchased Dr. G’s book as well as Forks over Knives for many of them.
          Maybe I need more patience, and to remember the quote, ” the truth has a way of never going away “.

          Enjoy the Fourth,
          Mike




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        3. Holly, Congratulations on your recovery! Another WFPB success story! May your good health continue and grow even better every day.

          Rebecca Cody




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        4. The raw only eaters seem to eat a lot of nuts, perhaps adding too much fat in the diet. However, I ate raw only in 2010 as part of cancer treatment and I’ve not had such strong fingernails since I was a teen. You could certainly try a month of raw only to see if it helps your specific problem. You would likely need to add cooked food (say 20-50%) in fall when the weather cools. I found I was cold all the time on raw only.




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  6. We had a big debate a few weeks back about raw vs mixed. If you’re going 100% raw, just be clear and understand that you must sprout your Grains and Legumes. It’s recommended never to eat phytate-based foods raw. Also you’d need to blend (using min. 1200w) your Carotenoid foods to make them bioavailable if consuming raw.




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  7. Hyponatremia (low blood sodium) is what the MD just told me of my recent bloodwork. I’ve also noticed this in my Mom’s blood tests, but attributed to her consumption of Rx drugs. I don’t take Rx drugs on any regular basis.

    My question for the nutritionally astute is of course: What gives? He implicated my consumption of alcohol, which I have reduced by 50% in recent weeks (from ~6 to ~3 per day). Liver function is fine BTW. Also I’m borderline anemic by one measure. I won’t have the lab analysis in hand for a few days. But he calls to go over the particulars. Cholesterol is “good” he says. Re-checking the blood in three-months.

    Are these things genetically influenced? Mom says the other side of the family tends toward anemia. Am I getting that from them and low Na from her?

    What can I do to improve it? Thanks

    WP




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    1. When I was borderline anemic years ago (probably from distance running) my doc did followup tests to check for blood in stool, Celiacs disease, and B12 deficiency).

      Lentils are very rich in iron.

      Over the past two years, I’ve found that switching from 99% compliant to 100% compliant with the McDougall diet has resulted in noticeable improvement in several health conditions.

      In answer to your question, of course these things can be genetically influenced. However it is difficult to build a strong case that genetics deserved blame in your case because there are a lot of environmental factors, including food, that are difficult to completely identify and control for.




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      1. My doctor is old school when it comes to nutrition, and I do not expect him to change. He will offer me pills and potions or tell me to eat meat, although he used to be incensed by the over-bearing presence of the Rx industry in his line of work.

        I’ve always been highly sensitive to blood loss, I know from a surgery (accident repair), another accident (lots of stitches) and the one time I gave blood. This over the span of 30 years.

        Sodium? Mom eats more salt than I, and a much more animal-based daily fare, but keeps her calories down. I eat very little salt, but am considering ramping it up if it will help my blood. But I can find no relationship between increasing dietary NaCl and blood serum sodium levels. No one talks about the “low side” but for extreme cases and drug therapies.

        I eat mostly potatoes and rice and beans (preferring dried to canned), with tortillas, veggies, greens, berries, mushrooms. I use plenty of turmeric and garlic, onions, ground flaxseed and other such goodness. On the weekend I may have a few snacks of processed junk and one meal of animal/processed things and that’s pretty much it. Today, I’ll eat one burger and some chips. Then I’ll have another one on Labor Day. I have been neglecting my exercise, cycling for a good while. But am getting back after that-weather permitting. Thanks for reading and suggestions. I do not have funds to go chasing specialists and exotic foods.




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    2. I track my sodium intake and try to keep it ~1000 mg to keep my borderline low BP up. Eating WFPB could give ~ 300mg. For heavy sweating situations such as Hawaii Ironman they can see widespread hyponatremia without substantial sodium replacements.




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    3. Hey Wade.

      Congrats on working on your drinking problem!

      I’ve seen friends struggle with it and know how hard it can be. I’ve also seen “mysterious” health conditions completely disappear when people quit drinking entirely, so I wouldn’t rule out the possibility that your problems are simply due to the booze. If sobering up can bring about transformations in those eating the Standard American Diet, just imagine what it could do for you as a plant-based eater.

      Good luck!

      Nate




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      1. Yes, plant-based eating cleared up every common ailment I had _whilst_ yet consuming alcohol. I’m currently of the mind that 2-3 per evening isn’t highly detrimental. I was quite relieved to get a “good liver function” report. Thanks.




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    4. Wade. Your doctor is probably thinking of potomania where daily alcohol consumption can affect the body’s salt regulation system . There are other possible causes also, of course




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      1. Thanks for that direction, I looked into it. That all makes sense, but I never drank massively, just regularly and my daily average now is a liter or less per day. And had been reduced for weeks before the blood draw. I’m now curious how my sodium tests were as a younger man (the last time my blood was lab tested). I’ve been sensitive to blood loss and had lower than avg blood pressure my entire life.

        And then Mom’s blood sodium level is similarly low and she only has one or two drinks on the weekend, if at all. Plus her sodium intake and animal intake is higher than mine. We do not eat alike, though she eats much better now than before.




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    5. Wade, I eat a handful of pumpkin seeds everyday along with 16-32 oz. of fresh pressed vegetable juice (similar to V-8 with tomatoes for Vit.C). Pumpkin seeds are high in iron & the Vit.C helps with absorption. (Dr. G mentioned it in one of his videos, but I can’t find it at the moment.) Maybe you could substitute one or more of your alcoholic beverages with that? Just a thought…

      Also, if you’re going to increase your Na intake, just be careful. A couple of years ago I decided to add about a 1/4 tsp of salt to my daily diet (while cooking my morning oatmeal), and it made my blood pressure go up into the borderline zone. After stopping the salt, my BP went back to normal. Be sure to monitor your BP as you increase it.

      BTW, welcome back :)




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      1. Thanks, My bp tends toward the low side (always has despite SAD for so long) and I’ve yet to correlate it with NaCl intake.

        I won’t eat Na, it’s just too dang fizzy. 8-D




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    1. WFPB is the commonly used acronym for Whole Foods, Plant-Based. I’m sure if you look at more of Dr. Greger’s content you’ll see the term quite often. In my case It means I tend to avoid highly process foods-which includes sugars and oils, and animal products. 90% of my calories come from whole-foods of plant origin with no added oils or sugars. Thanks for asking. wp




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      1. And I would not equate WFPB and Veganism. Two different things.

        Veganism means you do not support any animal sources of anything…. no leather products (cloth car seats, furniture, etc.), and at the same time you can have processed veg food sources like French fries and soda.

        WFPB means you are mainly plant-based and up to 100% plant food sources in as close to “whole” as possible, but do not necessarily avoid leather products.




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  8. There are those of us who are vegan who don’t give a hoot about wearing leather or what our furniture is made of. It’s what goes into the mouth that counts.




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    1. True Brian. You follow a vegan diet. But, not Veganism. Doesn’t matter to me. I was just distinguishing Veganism vs WFPB.




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    2. You are not a vegan, you just eat a completely vegetarian diet. There is really no such thing as a “vegan” diet any more than there are the four corners of the Earth, even though many people use these terms. Vegans eat a completely vegetarian diet but not everybody who eats a completely vegetarian diet is a vegan.




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      1. This is why I try to avoid the term Vegan or Vegetarian, both can have multiple meanings.

        But of course to most people, they just mean “Weirdo”! Labels continue to be divisive, sigh.




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  9. Do a search on Fybro and Ribose. It’s amazing stuff. I use it when I work out too much and the soreness goes away immediately.




    1
  10. DR. Greger, please talk about Polymyalgia rheumatic…I have had it for a couple years. No one seems to know much about it. My nurse practitioner didn’t diagnose it properly till after 2 long months of misery. Prednisone seems to be the main med. for it and I stick to a whole foods diet. Would Vit. D be helpful? Any advise would be appreciated. Thanks.




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    1. Not giving medical advice. Medical advice comes from your doctor.

      Polymyalgia Rheumatica is a chronic inflammatory disease, so it is theoretically treatable by anti inflammatory foods.

      Think whole plant foods, omega 3s (flax seed), turmeric (with black pepper added).

      I’m going to do a quick pub med search for you, but I doubt it will show anything…. will post those results here shortly.




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  11. What’s the bottom line here? What’s the Doctor’s recommended dosage and form of D? I have severe chronic pain in 90+% of my body and have taken 5,000 mg of Vitamin D for some time. I’ve also used Curcumin as well.




    0
    1. Adam,

      What was your D level prior to taking 5000IU?

      How long precisely have you been talking it?

      Are you consistent?

      What is your most recent D level?

      What is the brand and form of D you’re taking?




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      1. Casper:

        I have taken 2,000 IU to 5,000 IU for about 8 years now, varying brands.

        The current form is a ShopRite brand gelatin type.

        I allegedly have fibromyalgia along with osteoarthritis, bursitis and bulging discs but the pain has spread & intensified.




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        1. Sorry to hear that, Adam!

          Have you been animal-free for years as well?

          What’s your current D level (clearly it’s not a factor, but just wondering)?

          Have you been to a plant-based doctor? If not, I’d seriously consider McDougall on the West or Fuhrman on the East.




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  12. I would love to see a talk about dysautonomia, particularly postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. I was diagnosed three months ago and went from good health to bed bound in the space of a month. I had been vegetarian and dairy free for a year at the time. I’m now advised to eat a very high sodium diet, drink 3L water per day, and I am also taking two medications. My symptoms are still not controlled and my condition affects every area of my life. I would love to find a way to heal naturally and get off the meds.




    1
  13. I want to get a supplement that has calcium as im very deficient and i cant eat organic salad everyday, i want to up my levels. I struggle to reach 500mg.

    Lithothamnion Calcareum seaweed:
    The ingredient above i can get a wholefood supplement, can anyone tell me is this a blue green algae or does anyone know anything more as i am depleted of calcium due to low vit D, now i need to up levels to preserve bone,




    0
    1. 3 Tbsp Organic Chia Seeds a day will give you about an extra 250mg of Calcium along with all its other benefits.

      What is your most recent D level?

      For how long and how many IU of D, and in what form have you been supplementing?

      Which brand?




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    2. I would recommend a good old calcium and vitamin D3 supplement if you have that much trouble maintaining calcium levels. You should talk to your doctor about what might be appropriate for you. It is most likely cheaper to get a regular calcium supplement rather than a seaweed supplement.




      1
      1. Its just i feel regular calcium isn’t as safe and will calcify arteries as its isolated where as the seaweed is in whole form so may release slower. Im worried as i will be taking such a dose of D3 its better not going with regular calcium as the studies om it show its negative.

        However studies on seaweed (Lithothamnion Calcareum) show it helped reverse bone loss and softening and help rebuild bone.

        Just i know some are neuro toxins so wondered if anyone knew as i don’t understand as well or maybe someone knew more before i bought.
        Maybe its proven to be relative to regular calcium, i just don’t know how to find out.

        I wish i made decisions easier is tricky :/. May even not go with but i dont know how much i need as i know my bones are fragile.




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      1. Yes i don’t know if they were checked but i heard him saying the vitamin D was causing a high/low PTH hormone and hypo/hyper parathyroidism.
        I cant remember which he said.
        I wondered if it was that way around, they took three/four years to find this and they dont seem to care, every doctor tells me different e.g. i was told after not being able to get up the stairs and hold onto my mom to walk that theres nothing wrong with me and laughed at.
        I just hope the vitamin d is behind this parathyroid thing.

        Do you know any relation to Vitamin D and parathyroid?




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    1. No i just got what the doctor gave me as its UK and NHS. It was 6 im not sure if the UK and US have different Measurements. Thanks for reply




      0
    2. Also i havent supplemented yet as i didnt know what to get but my doctor prescibed 25,000 one lozenge a week. But i dont like this idea nor the added ingredients.

      I didnt like this idea as all in one go seems a bad idea maybe toxic.

      SO i thought to buy this https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B018SDOA6U/ref=ya_st_dp_summary?ie=UTF8&psc=1

      Along with K2 and i plan to take 3 drops 3000IU D3 a day that adds up to 25,000 but is spread, dont know if i need that much but i think its best as my bones are very clicky and i need to get the level up,




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    3. Why? Is the ratio important i get:

      614mg Magnesium (154%RDA)
      4643mg Potassium (99% RDA)

      I eat the same foods with a little variation everyday tracked on cronometer so that’s how i know.




      0
      1. That’s great. I was just curious if you were getting enough Potassium and Magnesium through foods since these are often overlooked nutrients and many people don’t get nearly enough.




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  14. I want to become a health coach – teach people in online sessions about the whole foods plant based lifestyle.
    So far, I have no accreditation. I have read most plant based books, watched almost all nutritionfacts.org videos and also participated in the nutritionfacts.org research webinar with dr. Greger.
    I am looking to getting certified to be able to practice but I cannot afford the time or the money to become a RD or MD.
    Do you have any suggestions for me? (anyone :) I have so far looked into:

    http://nutritionstudies.org/
    http://wellnessforumhealth.com/health-professionals/become-a-certified-health-educator-with-wellness-forum-health/
    http://www.integrativenutrition.com/

    thanks




    1
    1. If I were planning to be a nutrition coach I’d take the eCornell course by T Colin Campbell.

      Several years ago I took a one year class through the Nutritional Therapy Association and became a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner, but it was all about eating meat, dairy, etc. I learned a lot, but there wasn’t anything up to date. It was all based on Weston A Price, Pottenger, and books which I now question as to the research references they claim. So I recommend you avoid that one!




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  15. Dr. McDougal talks about how d supplements could lead to fractures. I am a fibromialgia patient and am concerned about my supplement use of vitamin d because of possible worsening of my situation. Could you please investigate this? Thank you so much.




    1
  16. Hi, Cynthia Stinson. There is a lot of information on this site about vitamin D, and you can find most of it here:
    https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/vitamin-d-supplements/
    In addition, this abstract sums up the vitamin d situation nicely, in my opinion:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22461123
    In short, vitamin D deficiency is associated with many health risks. I would recommend getting your levels tested. If they are low, then sensible sun exposure is a good way to increase your levels if that is an option for your where you live. If not, then supplementation as recommended by Dr. Greger is probably a good idea.
    I hope that helps!




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