Will Cannabis Turn into Big Tobacco?

Will Cannabis Turn into Big Tobacco?
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There are some serious public health concerns about the legalization of marijuana, but they are probably not what you might expect.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Opinions on marijuana legalization range from regarding it as “a landmark human rights advance… to one of a disastrous, anarchic profiteering sham.” Most may agree, though, that the trillion dollar war on weed has been a failed policy, “a vehicle for the hideous expression of [our] racism,” diverting law enforcement resources away from violent crime and yet having “no appreciable effect” on marijuana availability. Yes, legalization might free up law enforcement, but opponents argue that legalization may increase marijuana use among the youth—not because they couldn’t get it before, but because it will be cheaper and more acceptable. In other words, the argument goes: think about the children.

So, what happened in states like Washington and Colorado after they legalized marijuana? Among teens in Washington state, “perceived harmfulness” indeed went down, and marijuana use went up, doubling from 2 to 4%. In contrast, no change in Colorado, but presumably that’s because they had five years of commercialized medical marijuana before recreational use became legal. And, indeed, with the original liberalization in Colorado, perceptions of risk among teens dropped more than elsewhere, and rates of dependence went up.

“A frequently cited concern with legalization is that it will allow the rise of Big Cannabis, similar to Big Tobacco and Big Alcohol.” After the cannabis industry successfully beat back pesticide regulations in Colorado, public health advocates experienced a feeling of déjà vu trying “to mitigate [the] adverse public health consequences” in the face of an industry that just “aims to maximise profit.”

The biggest concern, though, may not be Big Cannabis turning into Big Tobacco, but rather Big Tobacco turning into Big Cannabis. “Marijuana legalization advocates [may] not have considered the potential effects of the multinational tobacco companies entering the market.” Internal memos show that Big Tobacco has just been waiting in the wings for the right time to strike. The fact that they created perhaps the leading cause of preventable death in the world shows how much they care about people compared to profits; so, that should raise some red flags.

Big Tobacco is expected to profit from legalization whether or not it takes over, though, as frequent cannabis use is a predictor of future cigarette addiction. For teen non-smokers, “weekly cannabis use…predicted a more than eightfold increase” in the odds of moving from just joints to cigarettes. This may be because “[t]obacco is [commonly] mixed with cannabis” to help it burn more smoothly. “Thus, cannabis use may indirectly [expose one] to tobacco,” which may be seven or eight times more addictive than cannabis.

Or, it may just be that teens who smoke marijuana are hanging out more with a crowd that tends to smoke more cigarettes, and that’s the reason.  Though, even after “controlling for peer use,” cannabis does still seem to be a gateway drug to tobacco—perhaps as a way to deal with cannabis withdrawal. Either way, one of the most potentially harmful effects of cannabis use is that it may lead to nicotine addiction, which wipes out nearly five million lives every year, about 24 times more than all illegal drugs combined.

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Image credit: Myriams-Fotos via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Opinions on marijuana legalization range from regarding it as “a landmark human rights advance… to one of a disastrous, anarchic profiteering sham.” Most may agree, though, that the trillion dollar war on weed has been a failed policy, “a vehicle for the hideous expression of [our] racism,” diverting law enforcement resources away from violent crime and yet having “no appreciable effect” on marijuana availability. Yes, legalization might free up law enforcement, but opponents argue that legalization may increase marijuana use among the youth—not because they couldn’t get it before, but because it will be cheaper and more acceptable. In other words, the argument goes: think about the children.

So, what happened in states like Washington and Colorado after they legalized marijuana? Among teens in Washington state, “perceived harmfulness” indeed went down, and marijuana use went up, doubling from 2 to 4%. In contrast, no change in Colorado, but presumably that’s because they had five years of commercialized medical marijuana before recreational use became legal. And, indeed, with the original liberalization in Colorado, perceptions of risk among teens dropped more than elsewhere, and rates of dependence went up.

“A frequently cited concern with legalization is that it will allow the rise of Big Cannabis, similar to Big Tobacco and Big Alcohol.” After the cannabis industry successfully beat back pesticide regulations in Colorado, public health advocates experienced a feeling of déjà vu trying “to mitigate [the] adverse public health consequences” in the face of an industry that just “aims to maximise profit.”

The biggest concern, though, may not be Big Cannabis turning into Big Tobacco, but rather Big Tobacco turning into Big Cannabis. “Marijuana legalization advocates [may] not have considered the potential effects of the multinational tobacco companies entering the market.” Internal memos show that Big Tobacco has just been waiting in the wings for the right time to strike. The fact that they created perhaps the leading cause of preventable death in the world shows how much they care about people compared to profits; so, that should raise some red flags.

Big Tobacco is expected to profit from legalization whether or not it takes over, though, as frequent cannabis use is a predictor of future cigarette addiction. For teen non-smokers, “weekly cannabis use…predicted a more than eightfold increase” in the odds of moving from just joints to cigarettes. This may be because “[t]obacco is [commonly] mixed with cannabis” to help it burn more smoothly. “Thus, cannabis use may indirectly [expose one] to tobacco,” which may be seven or eight times more addictive than cannabis.

Or, it may just be that teens who smoke marijuana are hanging out more with a crowd that tends to smoke more cigarettes, and that’s the reason.  Though, even after “controlling for peer use,” cannabis does still seem to be a gateway drug to tobacco—perhaps as a way to deal with cannabis withdrawal. Either way, one of the most potentially harmful effects of cannabis use is that it may lead to nicotine addiction, which wipes out nearly five million lives every year, about 24 times more than all illegal drugs combined.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Myriams-Fotos via Pixabay. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Stay tuned for Marijuana Legalization and the Opioid Epidemic in a couple of weeks, but I have a whole treasure chest of cannabis videos that are going to be dribbling every month or so until the end of 2019. If you want to see them all now, I put them all in a digital DVD (all proceeds go to charity).

You can catch my previous cannabis videos here:

And more are coming, so visit the marijuana topic page to see all of the latest. 

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

96 responses to “Will Cannabis Turn into Big Tobacco?

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  1. Hard for me to imagine Big Tobacco not taking it over completely. As the medical benefits become more well researched and publicized, more govt officials are switching sides to support legalization. Likely there will be legislation designed to force out small growers and also to ban private growing. That’s how it works in Moneyland.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEViORbmEVY

    1. Out here in Colorado Land the Marijuana Industry is doing just fine without any “take over” by Big Tobacco. Republican Representative Cory Gardner went to bat for MJ just recently. Why? Because MONEY is GOP dope.

      Dr. Greger would prefer that the AMA and Big Pharma remain in control THE PEOPLES’ drug cabinet.

      1. Corpsman- You’ve been on the website for how long and you still think Dr. Greger supports big Pharma? He routinely makes videos on the dangers of pharmaceuticals, the plants that are just as effective as pills, and how to avoid drugs all together using a plant based diet.

        Don’t get pissy with him just because you don’t like what the research says. If MJ leads to more people smoking tobacco, that’s a big problem

          1. The political junkies just can’t stay off internet comment sections. Wherever you go, there they are. Bottom line is – it has always been about the money. Everyone, from doctors to scientists, can be bought.

    2. Due to pretreatment of wastewater regulations & permit regulations, it will require a million dollars to be street legal. In California, unpermitted growing farms will be shut down. Only personal use and the big boys will survive.

  2. It’s also worth considering if cannabis can be an exit drug from tobacco and opioid use–helping users wean off the harder stuff. I’ve seen lots of indications that it is.

    1. 8Mango: You and your sources all seem to have biases & agendas. How pretentious to assume the presenter (Greger) has no personal experience. This video presented concepts I hadn’t thought about. There may be more videos on this topic to come and you’re jumping the gun wanting everything in one 5 min video.

      1. E.P.:

        How pretentious of me to assume that Dr. Greger is a not a stoner! I stand (happily) corrected.

        Biased sources? You must be speaking of my earlier post, since I gave no references in the one you responded to. There I gave a link to a 30-year study of the effects of cannabis vs cigarette smoking on the lungs by a pulmonologist at UCLA, which studied thousands of smokers of each, or both, and was funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse…and that’s biased? When it found results diametrically opposed to its own presumptions and initial indications? As Stephen Colbert famously said, “The facts have a liberal bias.” Damn those facts!

        And, no, I’m not just responding to a 5-minute video, but to several videos Dr. Greger has made on the subject. However, each person must be responsible for their own claims, however long or short, and in this one Dr. Greger put out what I, in my decades of experience in cannabis, consider to be a complete whopper –that tobacco is commonly mixed with cannabis. What’s he been smoking?

  3. I just don’t get it – we spent how many billions trying to get people to stop smoking, banned cigarette advertising on TV, shamed the Marlboro Man – and now somehow magical marijuana is safe to smoke and going to be socially acceptable? We’ve outlawed smoking in public parks, but marijuana will be allowed; just watch, it will happen. Not to mention marijuana makes you stupid. This legalization will be a disastrous mistake.

      1. #Navy Corpsman you are much right!
        The problem always is, when people talking about stuff the have never have hat on experiences made – like, sorry my friend, Dr. Greger an Co. On one hand, it’s right, nobody should use a consciousness drugs only for fun – because the powers of the other side you hould never underestimate.
        In the other hand, this whole discussion it seems leading away from the point behind the scenes. There is always in the public only the diskussion about one use of hemp, about one incredience of the wonderful plant hemp – THC and his effect of the brain. But it seems most brains are already in disfunction nowadays, without using THC to much.
        Not THC is the problem for the big companies and there marionettes the gouverment – it’s the whole plant hemp! Hemp is one of the best sources for paper and paperproducts, for clothing, for food for the animals, it’s a fast renewable resouce without the negativ effect for the soil. Tabacco likes to use cannabis for his buisness – come one, that’s peanuts. Imaging, if you don’t need cotton wool anymore, you have not to recycling plastic to make some clothes, you even need less until no plastic because you can made most of the plastic things from hemp and, if it is broken or out of order you can put it in the natur back, willy-nilly because it will be composted easely.
        And in addition # AZ Cowboy and other people thinking in the same way, that cannabis ue makes stupied – do you know that the gouverment of the Nederlands have stop the ban on cannabis since the 1970? Have you ever heard of that the whole people of nederland are going crazy since this time? You can alos buy cannabis products in switzerland in the stores, in Danmark, Sweden and Austria is the use not longer forbitten… so could it be, that your gouverment will lead your mind to a wrong conclusion – beliefe me, THC is a secondary battlefield. Open your mind and eyes and look behind the scenes.
        Like Aldous Huxley already sad: „If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.“
        Cheers Steffen from Germany

    1. Well I’m not ok with smoking anything being allowed in public and I don’t care how it sounds to anyone. It pisses me off when I have to breathe in someone else’s choice when I’m just going shopping or something. I also think about wildlife. Someone could be smoking under a tree where there’s a bird’s nest or squirrels nest. No one thinks about how their actions impact others though, especially non-human others, humanity is very “me” orientated.

      1. AZ Cowboy and S, there are alternatives to smoking; they include vaping and edibles. And other activities in which we engage, such as driving cars and traveling by air, heating our homes, using electricity, using disposable plastic goods, etc., are much worse for the public good — which includes wildlife — than consuming marijuana.

        1. Dr. J, you’re trying to deflect a concern by raising other concerns. Driving and electricity are essential in the world we live in, now personally I’d prefer a more Eloi type of society (The Time Machine) but we have to work with what we’ve got.
          And as far as driving goes, already being under the influence of legalized things like alcohol make it much more dangerous for everyone.
          I’m not ok with someone vaping around me either as I don’t want to breathe in their choice either, of course I think it’s safer but I also don’t know what exactly it consists of.
          Plastic is certainly an epidemic that needs to be more drastically addressed on a global scale, but I’m not sure what that has to do with concerns about public smoking.

      2. I agree human beings have such huge egos that we do so many things w/o concern for the impacts it has on all other sentient beings and the environment. Not to worry the AI computers and robots are coming to give us a dose of what it feels like to be downstream of the species who is in control experience?

  4. When considering the very evident negative health effects of tobacco use (cigarettes, etc), it is important not to confuse these issues with the vaping craze among teenagers. If teens (or anyone else for that matter) go from cannabis to vaping, they will indeed be switching to a more addictive substance, but the terrible adverse health effects will not be there. I am not proposing that vaping is a good thing, but compared with sucking on a cigarette, it’s relatively much less of a health problem.

    1. Hey Theodore, I’m all for smokers switching to vaping as the balance of evidence shows it’s much safer (not to mention more pleasant to be around.) Unfortunately the current research also shows that teens that take up vaping are much more likely to smoke cigarettes down the road…

  5. Dr Greger is a fine scientist. He regularly reports the different studies, pro and con, on a variety of subjects central to dietary health. He gets into the weeds for us, and tells us the weaknesses in the studies and their poorly resolved conclusions. He does that on everything from dairy to meat to vitamins, but he takes a completely different and wholly bias path when it comes to marijuana. How could one not notice that none of the quotes in today’s article is supported by anything. I suppose we are expected to just take his word that it’s real.
    Joseph in Missoula

    1. Ok Joseph, so you’re suggesting that Dr. Greger is making this up? Can you please provide evidence to that? I could make a “paranoid” joke but it will be too easy. Apart from that implied accusation, I agree about Greger which is why he is my favorite source for all things science.

    2. Joseph, you know Dr. Greger always includes a sources cited section under the videos right? You can find them under the transcript button. This video includes 12 sources. I hope this helps

    1. Is tobacco illegal? Is Alcohol? Canabis does have some negative consequences, though, based on best reearch available, less that the aforementioned pair. That’s a matter of education (as we do with alcohol and tobacco). It should not be the government’s business to protect us from ourselves.

      1. Oh, but the government HAS taken it upon itself to protect us from ourselves! Seat belts, riding in the bed of a pickup, schools not having swings, all because someone might get hurt. An I naive to the dangers? No. Remember the Viking’s Ed White? His college-bound daughter fell out of the pickup and eventually died. We were friends with Ed’s mother, sister, and brother. I have another friend who fell and has life-long disability. But that is the risk they, as adults, took! Nope. Big Daddy won’t allow us anymore.

        1. Sweet god in heaven, you cannot seriously be comparing the cuddling of no swings at school because a kid could fall to drinking and driving, not wearing seat belts which are proven to significantly protect people in car accidents which regularly occur including legally making adolescence buckle up, and things of more serious matters. Yes some things are ridiculous. I’ve heard of a school that stopped allowing sports balls and only allowed plush balls!! Pah-freaking-thetic. But helmets, seat belts, not driving under the influence? There is a middle ground people and that’s usually where rationality lives.

          1. If seat belts are proven to save lives why are they not on school buses? Not cost effective??? Seat belts should not be the governments business. Freedom of choice. I do agree in mandating the use of seat belts for children.

            1. According to The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration over 15,000 lives are saved per year due to drivers and passengers wearing seat belts. I’m not sure why they don’t have them in school busses. Personally I don’t mind a law that could make sure my adult loved ones buckle up when they might otherwise be careless. But agreed that it’s at least no argument when it comes to kids.

            2. A libertarian teaching moment here. Think of it like a coin. Individual liberty on one side and individual responsibility on the other. Never a 2 headed / tailed coin allowed. For every liberty you get a responsibility.

              If you choose to ride a car without a seat belt or a motorbike without a helmet you should be allowed to do so. You need to clear this behaviour with your insurance company before hand and pay the extra premiums or you are not covered in an accident for injuries that statistically could be prevented.

              So you need to spell it out for people before hand very clearly. Sadly most people are too stubborn or stupid to do things that are smart unless you make it a law. That says more about the people in society than the laws.

      2. If it’s not the government’s business to offer protection, why are there laws? And isn’t gun control then resolved as in, guns for whoever wants ’em? I mean I’m just saying… based on that logic…

        There should be more laws on smoking, there should be stricter laws on drinking and driving, texting and driving, etc. The problems isn’t necessarily too little or too many laws, it’s that the laws are not thorough and often stupid.

    2. I live in a state where Cannabis is legal. CBD oil is very useful for pain before and after exercise. It is apparently more effective when mixed in with a smaller amount of THC. I haven’t found anything else as effective, although I do use stretching, massage, and a lot of high nutrient foods to ease the pain, nothing is as effective as CBD oil at this point. I don’t smoke but I am very glad it’s legal.
      JohN S

      1. CBD and THC compete for the receptors so the CBD works harder in the presence of THC. At a 15:1 ratio (CBD:THC) or higher there is no high or impairment (mental or physical). CBD is the real deal. There are also the acidic forms (CBDA & THCA) that don’t get you high and have just started being looked into.

  6. i live as a straight edged vegan and do not even consume caffeine but see nothing wrong with people who choose to use marijuana. the one’s really worried about pot legalization are big pharma and the companies who sell alcohol as it would greatly eat into their profits. since legalization also often allows for people to grow their own cannabis plants, it is unlikely that there could or would be the same situation as with tobacco.

    for those against legalization, do the research. how many documented cases of death caused by weed consumption are there? in addition, smoking is not the only method-vaping and eatibles are also options. it’s funny how people have always talked about pot being a “gateway” drug while the connection of prescription drugs to heroin addiction is only recently being considered.

    if the government were truly concerned about human health instead of it being about the all mighty dollar, they would legalize cannabis and outlaw alcohol & tobacco, not to mention of course flesh, diary and eggs-all of which would save millions of human lives and billions of non-human lives every single year.

    1. I agree with what you have to say about animal agriculture, etc. but not legalization of marijuana. Many are concerned for very relevant reasons. It can lower IQ permanently in teens and impacts the brains in adults (which I believe can be permanent only if you smoke excessively). It slows reaction time among other things and you have to take into consideration that there would most likely be an increase of smoking when it’s not only legal and thus cheaper but more socially acceptable and there are significantly more people high while driving or on the job. Already there are doctors who agree they should, but do not all disclose when they’ve been drinking and they’re on call, now imagine adding another common substance to that equation, one that slows our thinking. I have tried playing a trivia game while high in the past and while it was hilarious (my brain has never been that slow), I couldn’t imagine how that would affect an important job to do or an animal running out in the round or something similar while driving, for example. And not to be too “conspiracy theory” here, but hey, we all know the government is riddled with conspiracy, let’s not put it past the government that they would WANT a more docile, easy-to-control and even dumbed down society.

      I used to think it should be legalized, especially since it so ridiculously restrictive with growing hemp which is one of the most sustainable and useful crops on the planet (there is no reason they have to make that so difficult in my opinion, whether recreational use of pot is legal or not), but the more I think about it the more I don’t think it’s such a great idea. That isn’t to say I wouldn’t be open to hearing other points of view as to why it should be, after all I’m not just trying to make up my mind and then sink my feet in the ground – I make up my mind based on collective information that I keep learning. But if they did legalize it everything I think that they would need to make it more complicated then just saying it’s legal, they’d have to make other laws to address the above concerns and other concerns… I don’t have much faith in our legal system though or the world in general. I certainly have no problem with those who feel it should be legalized, but I definitely have an issue with people who believe so who tend to blow off everyone with opposing stances and some very relevant concerns.

      To put it bluntly (no pun intended), one thought that keeps popping up for me is… can our society afford to get even dumber?

          1. I agree with you about the edit button but I sure can live without the “likes.” They were too intimidating and ego-glorifying.

              1. Well, it can still feel engaging; all it takes is a click on the Reply button. :-) I should have added that some posters might feel their whole day has been ruined simply because nobody “liked” their brilliant, well-constructed comment. *sob sob* It’s the old ego thing.

                1. Lol, but we can’t make decisions based on coddling (got it right this time) each other’s egos. Plus, with a healthy WFPB diet, their egos will be able to repair themselves pretty quickly.

      1. S, the problem with our current drug laws is that they were enacted to subdue and destroy minority communities, Chinese, Mexican, and African American initially. (See “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness” by Michelle Alexander) And then eventually to subdue or delegitimate “long-haired hippie liberals.” And these laws have been very effective for these purposes. I think that legalization, regulation, taxation, and education, with available treatment when necessary, is a far better approach, to all drugs.

        1. I thought that about the hippie movement as well from what I heard went on back then and how suspiciously easy it was to get drugs. But that’s as far as my understanding goes on that, thanks for the reference.

  7. I presently grow my own broccoli sprouts . If it was legal I would grow my own cannabis. Does any one have a good vegan eligible recipe ?

    1. Used to have a fabulous cookbook on that very issue; making your own edibles. Have severely damaged lungs from a catastrophic childhood illness.

      Research then (’60’s) was three substances activated THC fastest – butter, nuts and alcohol. I would saute MJ in butter; strain, then use the butter to make peanut butter cookies. Two of the three ingredients. Added chocolate chips as that made the cookies taste even better. Would freeze them.

      Eating two, carefully titrated, small PB MJ cookies would take effect, on an empty stomach, in roughly 20 minutes.

      Remember the cookbook recommended adding a glop of the MJ butter in an Irish coffee or some such warm.hot, alcoholic beverage. Never tried this approach – as was a wine drinker – so can’t vouch for the efficacy.

      1. Simply don’t know if one could saute MJ in an oil other than butter and get the same effect; but might be worth a try as cost in Oregon and WA has dropped by 50% or more – even NYTimes did an article on this precipitous decline – as Big Money moves into the industry.

      2. When visiting family in Oregon we made some chocolate brownies . After baking 4 grams of cannabis to a golden brown we fried the cannabis in 4 oz. of organic butter and included this in a brownie recipe with organic eggs. It made about 32 servings that made my spinal arthritis pain stop hurting. But I do not normally eat butter or eggs. Maybe the lesser of two evils like canola or olive oil would work in a recipe for a salad dressing ? My state has medical cannabis but it is illegal to grow your own medical cannabis so that big business has foothold in the future cannabis industry. Unfortunately campaign contributions control legislation in this state. Even when they profit from the sick and the dying.

        1. Hi, Mary Jane. I don’t know that the frying, the butter, or the eggs had anything to do with your pain relief. We generally recommend avoiding oils here at NutritionFacts due to the potential for adverse effects on blood vessels. If you want to bake cannabis into brownies, try making some oil-free, whole food plant-based ones. Recipes abound! I don’t use cannabis myself, but I do bake brownie bites made with black beans, cacao powder, dates, bananas and peanut butter. They are very popular when I share them with others! I hope that helps.

  8. I’ve been VERY familiar with cannabis use for nearly 50 years, including 10 years spent as a large scale commercial indoor cannabis grower prior to any legalization of the herb (1983-1994 –I was Big Cannabis before cannabis was big!) I find the claim at 3:04 in this video that “tobacco is commonly mixed with cannabis in large part to ensure it burns smoothly.” is beyond preposterous. I have heard of such practices, especially in Europe but I have NEVER encountered it in the U.S.A., except once in college when someone was rolling sample joints of poor quality weed trying to sell bags of it. He was caught and called out for the adulteration. The cannabis users I knew or know as a group tend to be more health conscious than the average population. Adulteration with tobacco would be abhorrent to them. Even friends who smoked both tobacco and pot never mixed the two. Adulteration of street drugs is a valid concern, but it’s also often pushed to absurd lengths to support fear-based anti-drug propaganda.

    Here I think Dr. Greger has been suckered by the anti-legalization crowd, still a very powerful lobby of Big Government, which has profited for years from research contracts trying desperately to find some horrid examples of cannabis harm. Constantly failing in that attempt they have cast about desperately for anything to throw at the wall, hoping something will stick.

    Dr. Greger’s own prejudices or lack of real cannabis experience may have left him susceptible to their pitches, as well. Why hasn’t he shown us the 30-year research of Dr. Donald Tashkin at UCLA?

    “In summary, the accumulated weight of evidence implies far lower risks for pulmonary complications of even regular heavy use of marijuana compared with the grave pulmonary consequences of tobacco.” Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2013 Jun;10(3):239-47. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201212-127FR. Tashkin even went on to theorize the cannabis smoke was having an anti-cancer effect in the lungs of heavy, long time users. After being a NIDA-supported researcher for his career, Tashkin came out and stated that he thought cannabis should be legalized.

    “Early on, when our research appeared as if there would be a negative impact on lung health, I was opposed to legalization because I thought it would lead to increased use and that would lead to increased health effects,” Tashkin says. “But at this point, I’d be in favor of legalization. I wouldn’t encourage anybody to smoke any substances. But I don’t think it should be stigmatized as an illegal substance. Tobacco smoking causes far more harm. And in terms of an intoxicant, alcohol causes far more harm.” http://komornlaw.com/the-research-of-dr-donald-tashkin/

    Or why hasn’t Dr. Greger mentioned the 50 years of research in Israel by Dr. Rafael Mechoulam, who discovered THC and other cannabinoids? Dr. Mechoulam speaks humbly but eloquently about the positives of cannabis.

    “When Darwin finished his ideas on evolution he put them in a drawer for 20 years because he feared what the Church would say,” says Zach Klein, the writer, producer, editor of The Scientist. “Mechoulam was never vilified because he is such a great scientist, but the world has been slow to understand his findings because of the demonization that cannabis suffered since the beginning of the war on drugs.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrRqbS6jVKA

    Or why is Dr. Greger citing addiction specialists but not mentioning the research or publications of a small group of dedicated cannabis doctors–The Society of Cannabis Clinicians? https://www.facebook.com/cannaclinicians/

    As someone who has been a research guinea pig for medical experimentation during my college years, and much later hired top level scientists who published one peer-reviewed paper about their work, and seen various scientific experts testify in federal and state courtrooms about marijuana issues, as well as being very involved in medical/scientific/political disputes wholly unrelated to cannabis, I have no illusions that science is free of bias or even at times chicanery, particularly in Big Government-declared wartime. For instance, my researcher, who was probably the world’s leading expert in olfaction, contacted the USDA to inquire about testing the odor of cannabis where it was grown in one of their labs. He was told that the lab would only cooperate with government agencies–the DEA and the like. Real science can’t occur in that kind of controlled and suppressed environment.

    Then there is the selection bias of which peer-reviewed reports to build a case with. As such, I think that Dr. Greger could widen the scope of his cannabis presentations, and that he should certainly be aware that without some personal knowledge and experience in the field, that science can be intellectually sterile and unrepresentative of the real world, and even manipulated to produce false results, or support long-existing prejudices.

    1. I’ve witnessed the opposite with the people I’ve known. Everyone or nearly everyone I’ve known who smoked pot regularly also smoked cigarettes and they usually would follow up pot with cigarettes but smoked cigarettes more often. Often how I’ll see friends and people I know smoke more when they’re drunk, I’ve known some circles to smoke more when they’re high. I don’t doubt that others who smoke could be more health conscious, that has just been my experience.

      To me he’s not coming across as one way or another in this or his other videos. But it seems some of the commenters here (referring mostly to conversations under past videos) who strongly feel it should be legalized like to accuse him of being bias or “suckered” because he isn’t saying it’s all simple or something.

      It doesn’t make a lot of sense to go around accusing people of prejudices or even writing them off as naïve due to “lack of experience” simply because they’re not saying what you would like them to. Isn’t that in itself a form of prejudice?

      The way you’re accusing Dr. Greger of these things, so could I accuse you based on your own experience, preferences, and clear position. So maybe we should share our thoughts without going around accusing everyone of this or that so quickly.

      Dr. Greger is well aware of agenda and imperfections in the science world and has long pointed them out. But he’s presenting what the evidence has to show, not coming up with his own opinion and theories.

      Personally, I think the subject deserves discussion, not just a black and white yelling contest of why it should or shouldn’t be legalized.

      1. Shalen,

        I didn’t read or hear the quote Dr. Greger used as pertaining to people who smoke both pot and tobacco. As quoted it clearly says that tobacco is mixed with marijuana to make it burn smoother. I’ve certainly known my share of people who use both substances, but they smoke them separately and with a very different style of inhalation. Anyone I’ve ever met who would spend several hundred dollars per ounce of marijuana would be outraged to find it adulterated with tobacco, even if they smoke tobacco regularly. And those who roll their own tobacco cigarettes, and thus have loose tobacco readily at hand, don’t do that–at least in my experience.

        I say the quote he relies on here is a near complete crock. Where once MJ was banned because the government told us it would lead to “drug-crazed negros” raping white women, the latest acceptable bete noir of the anti-MJ crowd is to associate it with tobacco.

        1. 8Mango, he did say in the video that marijuana appears to be a gateway to cigarette smoking and adulteration with tobacco is one idea as to why that might be. I was simply commenting that my experience differs from yours in that those I’ve know who regularly use marijuana did smoke cigarettes and were overall less health conscious than the average person, but I’m only sharing my experience, I’m absolutely not trying to generalize every person who uses pot, clearly there are all different types.

          I’m sure you’re right that people would be angry to find adalteration with tobacco and wouldn’t do so on their own, typically (I’ve never heard of it), but they’d also be angry to learn that lead has been added to their product and wouldn’t do so on their own… Dealers have long made adalterations on an attempt to charge more for less and so on.

          That’s certainly a sickening quote you provided, but it doesn’t mean or prove a government conspiracy, it just proves that human society has always consisted of a large portion of idiots (to say the least). And it certainly doesn’t then conclude that any evidence that may shed a negative light on marijuana use is all made up nonsense.

          1. Shalen,

            It’s a well-established fact, perhaps the one we can be most certain of in this entire controversy, that the government has conspired to suppress any science showing benefit, or even lack of harm, from marijuana research. It has been doing so since the 1930s. The leader at that time was the head of the Bureau of Narcotics, Harry Anslinger, who cooked up a campaign to distinguish the then-acceptable medical uses of cannabis from the recreation uses. He borrowed the Latino term, anglicized it with an “h” and called it “Marihuana, the Assassin of Youth.” Yet at that time cannabis was widely available at pharmacies, and probably in much stronger doses since they were pharmaceutical extracts produced by non other than the Eli Lilly company, and probably others. https://www.google.com/search?q=Eli+lilly+cannabis&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjpgbKeu7rbAhUBMawKHTX8A9IQsAQIRg&biw=1344&bih=735

            “Prior to the end of alcohol prohibition, Anslinger had claimed that cannabis was not a problem, did not harm people, and “there is no more absurd fallacy” than the idea it makes people violent. His critics argue he shifted not due to objective evidence but self-interest due to the obsolescence of the Department of Prohibition he headed when alcohol prohibition ceased – campaigning for a new Prohibition against its use.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_J._Anslinger

            Medical cannabis remained listed in the official government medical drug index, the U.S. Pharmocopeia until the mid-1940s.

            In the 1970s after Richard Nixon created the Drug Enforcement Administration to replace the Bureau of Narcotics after he named drug use Public Enemy #1.

            “Nixon rejected the pro-decriminalization findings of Canada’s Le Dain Commission and the British Wootton Report.[4]

            “In the early 1970s, Nixon formed the National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse (Shafer Commission), telling Shafer “I want a goddam strong statement… one that just tears the ass out of” cannabis supporters. However, the Shafer Commission’s 1972 report stated that cannabis should be decriminalized, and that prosecuting cannabis was a distraction from the fight against heroin. Nixon was infuriated by this betrayal from Shafer, and refused to appoint him a federal judgeship.[5]” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabis_policy_of_the_Richard_Nixon_administration

            All cannabis research was heavily influenced by the government, which also completely controlled the single source of cannabis used. Approval was only given for studies seeking to find harm.

            Yet one of these biased attempts turned up an anomaly:

            “In 1974 researchers at the Medical College of Virginia, who had been funded by the National Institute of Health to find evidence that marijuana damages the immune system, found instead that THC slowed the growth of three kinds of cancer in mice — lung and breast cancer, and a virus-induced leukemia.” https://www.alternet.org/story/9257/pot_shrinks_tumors%3B_government_knew_in_%2774

            …”In 1983 the Reagan/Bush Administration tried to persuade American universities and researchers to destroy all 1966-76 cannabis research work, including compendiums in libraries, reports Jack Herer, who states, “We know that large amounts of information have since disappeared.”

            “[Spanish researcher] Guzman provided the title of the work — “Antineoplastic activity of cannabinoids,” an article in a 1975 Journal of the National Cancer Institute — and this writer obtained a copy at the University of California medical school library in Davis and faxed it to Madrid.” Ibid.

            If the government sponsored decades of attempts to find only negatives about cannabis, and then the actual attempt to destroy cannabis research do not constitute a conspiracy, then what does?

    2. 8Mango, I enjoyed reading your comment, and will look for some publications by the researchers you mention. Do you have any citations you could recommend?

      1. Dr. J,

        I don’t peruse scientific publications. Usually I just watch to see if authors and critics are citing them. The comment I posted gives you the health related articles as good as you or I can find them on Google. The Society of Cannabis Clinicians publishes a very long newsletter ina newspaper tabloid format. I’m not sure it it meets peer-review standards in and of itself, but they certainly would link to any articles which do.
        The journal is called “O’Shaughnessy’s” It’s online at http://www.beyondthc.com/

        I also referred to a peer reviewed article published about ability of police to detect marijuana odors–a lie they commonly use to obtain search warrants. It was published in 2004 in an American Psychological Assn journal called “Law and Human Behavior”

        Here it is, via Google http://www.jstor.org/stable/i388117

        Law and Human Behavior

    3. Thank you 8Mango. You said it well. Thank you for taking the time and effort to bring a little bit of rationality into today’s column.

      I have been following Dr. G for a couple of years and have contributed to the website.
      Every time he gets to this topic, though, he loses his mind and his discipline. His comparing the addictive qualities of tobacco with those of marijuana (3:08 of the video), when marijuana is NOT addictive, made me mutter to myself “I’m through with this website and he’ll never get another dime from me.”

      If he is so benighted in his prejudice about marijuana, what other topics does he manipulate for his own purposes? I wish he’d smoke a joint and think about what he’s doing. He’s about to lose a friend.

      1. So you define rationality as all things which you personally agree with or deem acceptable truths? And irrationality as anyone who regards anything that you’d prefer be disregarded? Interesting…. do I need to point out the irony here? I hope this will suffice.

        I wouldn’t say you’re being a good example of whatever argument you’re trying to make. Or then, maybe you are?

        1. There is really nothing to cover about fluoride in water as it prevents tooth decay and has never been shown to increase any rates of disease in the amounts used. It’s blown out of proportion by alarmists. There are many vital nutrients that are highly toxic in large amounts but an absolute requirement for human health. Chromium is a great example. Its a very toxic heavy metal in large amounts, but if your consumption is truly zero, you’ll end up with impaired glucose tolerance.

          Dr. Ben

    4. “tobacco is commonly mixed with cannabis in large part to ensure it burns smoothly.” is beyond preposterous. – True. I found that a laugh myself. Totally divorced from reality.

      The pesticide issue includes stuff like paraquat but was done to kill the plants and prevent their sale. Unfortunately the farmers just harvested and shipped it anyway. So a lot of people had damage to them by government program.

      https://www.intellihub.com/us-gov-admitted-to-spraying-paraquat-poison-on-marijuana-in-1980s/

      I think Dr G should look at Canada and see how it goes there. It will be legal in one month and has been defacto legal for years. You can order in online like anything else and it shows up or you can get your ACMPR at dozens of clinics in large cities. The legal grow operations are indoors and as low pesticide & herbicide as you can get. Not because they are concerned about their customers health but just due to cost.

      By the way I grew up in BC, Canada (Better Cannabis) in the 1970s so I’m rather familiar with the effects of THC. I quit smoking it 35+ years ago and have zero desire to ever smoke it again. It made me apathetic and complacent. I read “Brave New World” as a teen and always thought of pot as Soma. “A gram is better than a damn”. :)

    1. “Retards” was perhaps not the best choice of words. Mentally handicapped people aren’t stupid. But no condemnation here, I’ve used the word so many times without thinking it through.

  9. That is fascinating that it is a gateway drug to tobacco. That tells me that it probably isn’t going to help my cousin stop smoking tobacco. Bummer.

    Happy Memorial Day, Dr. Greger,

    I wasn’t sure you would be posting today. You are a man of a disciplined schedule and we benefit greatly.

    I lost 4 more pounds, since the first 20. Easy peasy.

    Your site, helping me to learn about healthy foods and helping me to want to try fruits and vegetables has helped me tremendously. I am eating turmeric and blueberries and pomegranate seeds and broccoli sprouts and kale nearly every single day. I am laughing, because I have been eating super foods and transition foods, but haven’t started with things like potatoes or any of the traditional foods, which are part of what I grew up on, partly, because I haven’t solved for gravy or butter or salt yet, but, today, for the holiday, I looked on Amazon and typed in vegan gravy and I am about to add in some potatoes, mostly, because I want to sling shot off the transition foods and it means figuring out what things I can bring in to make it a happier time. I laugh, because I have been eating my salads in a wrap every day and today, I tried to just eat a great big salad with no wrap and it was boring to me, so no just plain salads for me. Funny, that I can eat the exact same foods every single day and love them, and put them in a bowl without my wrap and only eat half of it. Psychology maybe? Thinking that I probably went through a diet phase where I ate salads and felt deprived and somehow that kicked in. But I have been eating superfoods and inventing my super heroes and watching videos on all of the good things they do and the whole process I have been doing up until todays salad has been so exciting and I am not gonna eat just plain salad anymore.

    1. I wanted to add, my brother was eating guacamole when we went out for a birthday party the other day and he said, “I hate tomatoes, onions and avocado, but I love guacamole. I wonder why.”

      That type of thing fascinates me.

      1. It is fascinating to me, because all of this – including these addiction topics are such mind experiences.

        I haven’t been able to get myself to eat potatoes in over a year and a half, because I can’t make them “associate” positively, without thinking about butter, salt or gravy or cheese.

        Today, though, I wandered onto Potato Strong site and he has photos with his recipes and I looked at his hash brown and veggie omelet and it looked delicious and suddenly, I want to try potatoes. It is like I have had an emotional mental block and it is like a shut door and now, one video of something simple to prepare with lots of color and visual appeal and it is like the door opened a crack. I have to get a Cuisinart 5 in 1 to make it like he did and he just made me want to buy a gadget and eat potatoes. I used to test perfect in logic, but my brain is not logical at all.

    2. Cannabidiol reduces cigarette consumption in tobacco smokers: Preliminary findings Author links open overlay panelCelia J.A.Morgan Ravi K.Das AlyssaJoye H.
      ValerieCurran Sunjeev K.Kamboj Marijuana may contain a chemical that can help fight cigarette addiction, according to new research out of Britain.

      Researchers at the University College London found that a non-psychoactive chemical in marijuana, cannabidiol (CBD), given via inhaler could significantly reduce the number of cigarettes consumed by smokers that wanted to quit.

      Celia Morgan, Ph.D, who co-authored the study, explained that CBD may help in a number of ways. One way could be how it affects memories, or cues, that underlie the desire to smoke.

      “We found that CBD seems to reduce the salience of cues. It also can reduce anxiety and may affect a memory process called ‘reconsolidation,’ which is where when a memory of the reward of smoking is re-activated by seeing someone smoking, it is rendered vulnerable to destruction.”

      “CBD might mean these positive smoking memories are gradually erased,” Dr.
      Morgan adds.

      The study was published last month in the journal Addictive Behaviors .

  10. Alcohol, what about a first sip of dandelion wine given to relieve some childhood symptom and feeling a bit warm? Could have been among many other home remedies such as a little coffee, various herbal teas, plant based topical ointments such as milkweed on a bee sting.

    Remember set and setting, part of the past contributes to the future.

    Challenging us is a system that distorts the value of consumed goods and services for profit rather than protecting our common good, especially health care information imho.

  11. I don’t smoke. I never have and I feel strongly about smoking being made unacceptable everywhere – a walk outside for fresh air, living down town? almost impossible. Everyone heads out for smoke breaks outside of the buildings. I am a chronic migraine sufferer with two breaks in my spine. I take CBD oil for pain and for me it works enough of the time to continue. I don’t have any issue with MJ being legal for recreational use, social anxiety, pain management etc. I do have an issue with what we will accept as a safe delivery system. We know smoking harms the lungs, period.

  12. Ok, WAY off subject here but I felt like a lot of the WFPB people on these boards might appreciate this, and Dr. Greger as well perhaps! I avoid faux meats because they’re typically junk food, but I just saw on Veganessentials, they came out with a whole foods vegan salami! I have no idea how it tastes, though they claim it’s good, but it’s actually healthy and whole foods plant based! So I was pretty excited to see this come out, hopefully the first of many products available as people shift towards healthier eating. The company is Hellenic Farms and it’s called Vegan Fig Salami, on veganessentials they have 3 flavors available… I worry I’ll be perceived as advertising here but I’m definitely not, I was just so excited and wanted to share.

  13. RE: “Among teens in Washington state, “perceived harmfulness” indeed went down, and marijuana use went up, doubling from 2 to 4%. In contrast, no change in Colorado, but presumably that’s because they had five years of commercialized medical marijuana before recreational use became legal.”

    Medical marijuana was legalized in Washington in 1998, a full 14 years prior to the legalization of recreational marijuana.

  14. For all of you who react to criticism of these marijuana diatribes, and suggest that Dr. G is only following the science and that we shouldn’t take him to task, do I have to remind you that this is not a question of whether to smoke cigarettes, eat meat, drink liquor or become addicted to 24/7 cellphone use?

    The status of marijuana as a Class One drug (the equal of heroin), under Nixon’s War on Drugs, was just an extension of the lies promulgated by Harry Anslinger, the Godfather of Marijuana prohibition. The demonization of the plant has led to the long term incarceration of hundreds of thousands of human beings, the terrorizing of minority neighborhoods by over-funded, over-armed agencies, and the murder of thousands more, in other countries, paid for by American funds under the auspices of the US War on Drugs.

    We are talking about thousands of lives being ruined NOT by the plant, but by the prejudice against it. What Dr. G is now peddling is prejudice, not science. And the consequences aren’t obesity, they are all too often death and poverty. This is not potato-potato, tomato-tomato, this is criminal justice (?).

    1. steve, yes, absolutely, you are correct!!! This is so eloquently researched and explained in “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness” by Michelle Alexander. But she is not alone in her conclusions. Our drug laws are a travesty.

      Which makes me wonder: are those who are against marijuana legalization unaware of this?

      1. Dr. J Either way one responds to your question, “are those who are against marijuana legalization unaware of this?” it is a sad conclusion. If they are aware of the consequences and history of the criminalized weed in this country, in which case how can someone be so callous and thoughtless as to promote a set of laws so empty of reason, with so heartless a result? On the other hand, if they aren’t aware of any “of this,” it reminds me of the opportunity for anyone with a keyboard to discuss any issue without the slightness knowledge, skill or understanding of the topic under review. Then, they get to share their ignorance with the rest of us. I’m unsure which I wish to be the real answer.

    2. Oh Steve… Ok I’ll star here: calling Dr. Greger or anyone presenting scientific findings prejudice makes you sound like an absolutely ridiculous person.

      The concerns about the legalization of marijuana for recreational use are serious ones. It too could drastically impact lives in both direct and indirect ways. To disregard the evidence and relevant topics of concern as unworthy of consideration over a predecided stance based on opinion, theory or in this case issues with the law, is foolish.

      I agree it is wrong to ruin someone’s life over possession of marijuana, without question, but that is an example of a severely flawed justice system. To try and correct this by legalizing the substance as opposed to addressing the flawed justice system is like putting a blanket over the problem and another example of why the justice system and world is so broken in the first place.

  15. The legalization of cannabis is just another legal excuse for junkies to get high. America leads the world in drug consumption. That says a lot right there about the perversities in the culture…fat and drugged. While many are high-fiving each other regarding the laxed legislation, I predict that down the road we will find that regular consumption over the years will prove to be far more harmful than beneficial. I would be curious to hear what Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn has to say on the subject.

  16. The fact that Cannabis may relive some symptoms of illness developed from 20, 30, 40, 50+ years of consumption of meat, poultry, fish, dairy, eggs, oil, salt, sugar, fat, and all manner of processed foods, and a lack of vigorous daily exercise, etc., does not validate it’s usage. Jeez…get a clue. There are no short cuts. You have to do the work.

  17. Hi guys,
    Sorry this is off topic I just need help analysing my blood results as my GP couldn’t . The way cholesterol and blood sugar are discussed is in American standards in Australia they are different so could someone please convert mine so I can see where I fit in.
    My fasting glucose is 4.9 mmol/L the recommendation is between 3.6-6.0 .
    My cholesterol : 5.38 mmol/L
    Triglycerides: 1.42 mmol/L
    HDL: 1.30 mmol/L
    Chol/HDL ratio: 4.1 mmol/L
    LDL: 3.4 mmol/L
    Non HDLC: 4.08 mmol/L
    However Dr Gregor has often said even if we are considered within the ‘normal’ limits this may still not be conducive to optimal health.
    Dr Gregor says LDL should be between 50-79 mg/dL as you can see the units are completely different so I have no idea how to interpret please help as I have alot of health issues.

    1. hi Rachel, I’m sure some medical proffessional will comment for you but in the meantime I can offer just a suggestion. We have the same units in Canada. For myself, I try to keep LDL under 3 mmol/L , and the closer to 2, the better – nigh impossible for me however (even with no oils, sugar, avocado, nuts etc). The chol/HDL ratio I try to keep under 3 too.. exercise works for me on this. Triglycerides for me are usually 0.70 to 1.4 with little rhyme or reason, but flour in anything I eat will put it up to 1.4 range. You dont mention what your issues are, but for me (with heart issues) I would not be distressed if I had your numbers and I was eating a whole food plant diet. A little tweaking here and there maybe. Odd that your doctor does not take the time… I would make an appt for expressly the purpose of going over your results – he is in the best position to offer feedback knowing what your current health status is.

    2. Sorry, I meant to find you an online converter so you can compare your numbers Rachel. http://www.onlineconversion.com/cholesterol.htm 3.4 mmol/L LDL works out to be about 131.4 mg/dc For someone with heart disease in canada, they recommend LDL under 2mmol/l which is approx. 77.3 gm/l (I have never achieved that even with wfpb diet and taking statins!) Hope that helps

      1. Hi Sally, Thanks so much for your reply. Well that helps hopefully I can lower mine a bit though . How low have you managed to go?
        Thanks Rach

        Get Outlook for Android

    3. Hello Rachel, many thanks for your question. Accorging to your lab results, the same data expressed on mg/dL would be:

      My fasting glucose 88,2 mg/dL
      My cholesterol: 208,26 mg/dL
      Triglycerides: 124,56 mg/dL
      HDL: 50,31 mg/dL
      LDL: 131,58 mg/dL
      Non HDLC: 187,89 mg/dL

      To Convert From mmol/L to mg/dL.
      For total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol multiply mmol/L by 38.67.
      e.g. 3.5 mmol/L = 3.5 mmol/L * 38.67 = 135 mg/dL.
      For triglycerides multiply mmol/L by 88.57.

      Hope that helps

  18. I am an MD who who isn’t enamored of pharmaceuticals, and have been a proponent of healthy lifestyle, vegetarianism, organic foods, for decades. I read the research literature on cannabis fairly regularly, and I have attended a number of conferences on the science/findings about cannabis over the past 3 or 4 years. (To be specific — I do *not* attend the conferences/events sponsored by people/professionals who are making money off cannabis, as those conferences/programs have major risk of bias, very similar to the risks of bias of a pharmaceutical industry sponsored lecture about whatever big Pharma is promoting. I avoid Pharma-biased research, also.) As a result of reading the actual cannabis data, I do not support most of the medical uses which are touted by marijuana believers. For example, the PTSD trial out of New Mexico in the mid-1990s which seems to be touted as “showing benefit” actually included only self-report of participants,, who, if they did *NOT* report benefit, were dropped from the trial and lost their access to the marijuana in the study. Now, how is that for a motivation to say it was helpful, if you want to keep smoking what the trial provided! (This was just before the NM legislature approved medical MJ.).
    I know many people will say they know people who are helped, or it helps them, but, so do opiate users about pain, despite the data clearly showing that opiate users become less functional, and have more pain, with ongoing use. There are more effective PTSD treatments, only minimally involving any pharmaceutical, cannabis included. And PTSD is just one example. Just because a state legislature has said it is legal for some purpose doesn’t mean it is actually effective for those purposes. It only means the non-scientist legislators were persuaded enough by whomever lobbied them. (Glaucoma is a great example — need to smoke multiple times a day to keep eye pressures down.) I agree with Dr Greger’s assessment here. And, to those who are saying marijuana doesn’t cause dependence — well, that is not what studies show. There is a well-recognized withdrawal syndrome that lasts a few days to a few weeks for many people who use frequently. In my experience in the office, the perception of harm among middle school and high school aged teens began dropping around the time that many more states were legalizing medical cannabis (2008-2010 or so), and then skyrocketed in acceptance when Colorado legalized it. (This was well before my state legalized it for medical use). So, there is definitely a wave of public acceptance, and increasing teen acceptance and use, but this is not correlated with actual medical effectiveness or drug safety. And, nicotine use is certainly increasing (vaping esp) in the teen population. While there will only be retrospective research possible in the future about how/when Big Tobacco becomes heavily involved, I suspect Dr Greger is correct that this is happening.

  19. You might want to mention in that last fact, that deaths “from all illegal drugs combined” does not contain a single death from marijuana.

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