NutritionFacts.org

diabetes

Plant-based diets (especially whole food) may successfully prevent, treat, and even reverse type 2 diabetes (see also here, here). Excluding meat, milk (see also here), and other animal products may reduce the risk of diabetes by boosting hormone-binding proteins, eliminating obesity, and reducing exposure to arsenic, BPA, dioxins, nitrites, and PCBs. Eggs (see also here) may be particularly risky, whereas cinnamon (Ceylon is safest), Indian gooseberries, coffee, soy, green tea, chamomile tea, purple potatoes, alkalinized water, and vinegar may be especially protective. Diabetes drugs, on the other hand, have been found to increase the risks of heart attack, heart failure, and death.

Type 2 diabetes has been found to negatively affect skin vascularization, which results in a less attractive skin coloration. Furthermore, if left untreated, diabetes can cause blindness. And untreated type 1 diabetes can even be fatal.

Dr. Greger covers diabetes in his full-length presentation, Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, where he explores the role diet may play in preventing, treating, and even reversing our top 15 killers.

See also the related blog posts: Paula Deen: diabetes drug spokesperson, Amla: Indian gooseberries vs. cancer, diabetes, and cholesterol

Topic summary contributed by Jennifer Greene.
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Watch videos about diabetes

  • Diabetics Should Take Their Pulses
    Diabetics Should Take Their Pulses
    There is a reason that professional diabetes associations recommend bean, chickpea, split pea, and lentil consumption as a means of optimizing diabetes control.
  • Preventing Prediabetes By Eating More
    Preventing Prediabetes By Eating More
    A head-to-head test of adding beans versus portion control for metabolic syndrome.
  • What Diet Should Physicians Recommend?
    What Diet Should Physicians Recommend?
    Kaiser Permanente, the largest U.S. managed care organization, publishes patient education materials to help make plant-based diets the “new normal” for patients and physicians.
  • Cooking to Live Longer
    Cooking to Live Longer
    Does cooking meals at home lead to improved health outcomes? And how do TV dinners compare nutritionally to TV chef recipes?
  • Broccoli: Sprouts vs. Supplements
    Broccoli: Sprouts vs. Supplements
    Broccoli sprouts are compared to “Broccomax” supplements.
  • When Low Risk Means High Risk
    When Low Risk Means High Risk
    Dr. Rose’s sick population concept may explain why many nutrition studies underestimate the role of diet in disease.
  • Cadmium and Cancer: Plant vs. Animal Foods
    Cadmium and Cancer: Plant vs. Animal Foods
    Though the most concentrated sources of the toxic metal cadmium are cigarette smoke, seafood, and organ meats, does greater consumption from whole grains and vegetables present a concern?
  • Do Vegetarians Get Enough Protein?
    Do Vegetarians Get Enough Protein?
    Nutritional quality indices show plant-based diets are the healthiest, but do vegetarians and vegans reach the recommended daily intake of protein?
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