Can Vinegar Help with Blood Sugar Control?

Can Vinegar Help with Blood Sugar Control?
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The consumption of vinegar with meals was used as a folk remedy for diabetes before drugs came along, but it wasn’t put to the test until recently.

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A double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study found that body weight and belly fat were significantly reduced by adding just a single tablespoon of vinegar to one’s daily diet. But is there any benefit to vinegar consumption if you’re not overweight? Well, their triglycerides normalized, and on the two tablespoons a day dose, there was a dip in blood pressure. But those effects may have just been because of the weight loss.

Other than taste, is there any benefit to normal weight individuals sprinkling vinegar on their salads? What about vinegar for blood sugar control?

If you feed people a half a cup of table sugar, as their blood sugars spike, their artery function can become impaired, and the higher the blood sugars spike, the more their arteries become impaired. There’s a drug, though, that can block sugar absorption, and by blunting the blood sugar spike with the drug, you can prevent the arterial dysfunction, demonstrating that it’s probably good for your heart if you don’t have big blood sugar spikes after meals. And indeed, how high your blood sugars spike after a meal is a predictor for cardiovascular mortality. So, do people who eat lots of high-glycemic foods, like sugary foods and refined grains, tend to have more heart attacks and strokes? Yes. And, they appear more likely to get diabetes. But, maybe people who eat lots of Frosted Flakes and Wonder Bread have other bad dietary habits as well.

The diets that have been put to the test in randomized controlled trials and proven to prevent diabetes are the ones focusing on cutting down on saturated fat and ramping up the consumption of fiber-rich whole plant foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, without specific regard to lower or higher glycemic loads.

The drug has been put to the test, though, and blunting one’s mealtime blood sugar spikes does seem to reduce the risk of developing diabetes, as well as reduce the risk of heart attacks and high blood pressure. So, is there any way to prevent these blood sugar spikes without taking drugs? Well, one way would be to not sit down to a half cup of sugar!

Yes, the drug can slow the progression of your atherosclerosis. Instead of the arteries going to your brain narrowing this fast, on the drug, they only narrow this fast. Wouldn’t it be better to eat a diet that actually reverses heart disease? Reverses diabetes? The healthiest diet to prevent the meal-related blood sugar and fat spikes, the oxidation and inflammation, is a diet centered around whole plant foods.

But what if you really want a bagel? Instead of spreading drugs on it, spreading on some almond butter may help blunt the blood sugar spike from refined carbs. Another option is to dip your baguette in some balsamic vinegar.

The consumption of vinegar with meals was evidently used as a home remedy for diabetes before drugs came along, but it wasn’t put to the test until 1988. After all, how much money can be made from vinegar? According to The Vinegar Institute, millions of dollars, but a single diabetes drug, like Rezulin, can pull in billions—that is, before it was pulled from the market for killing too many people by shutting down their livers. The drug company still made out like a bandit, having to pay out less than a billion to the grieving families for covering up the danger.

No liver failure from a peanut butter-schmeared bagel, though, cutting the blood sugar response in half, and the same with vinegar. If you chug down four teaspoons of apple cider vinegar diluted in water, you get that same blunting of the spike. And, you get the additional advantage over the nuts of lowering insulin levels in the blood, something peanut butter apparently can’t do. But, presumably better than a bagel with lox, as fish causes triple the insulin response. Or red wine, which also increases insulin levels—but not as much as fish—and also shoots up triglycerides, though de-alcoholized red wine, non-alcoholic wine, doesn’t have the same problem. What about vinegar?

Not only may a tablespoon a day tend to improve cholesterol and triglycerides over time, vinegar can drop triglycerides within an hour of a meal, along with decreasing blood sugars and the insulin spike, potentially offering the best of all worlds.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Daniel Lobo via Flickr.

A double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study found that body weight and belly fat were significantly reduced by adding just a single tablespoon of vinegar to one’s daily diet. But is there any benefit to vinegar consumption if you’re not overweight? Well, their triglycerides normalized, and on the two tablespoons a day dose, there was a dip in blood pressure. But those effects may have just been because of the weight loss.

Other than taste, is there any benefit to normal weight individuals sprinkling vinegar on their salads? What about vinegar for blood sugar control?

If you feed people a half a cup of table sugar, as their blood sugars spike, their artery function can become impaired, and the higher the blood sugars spike, the more their arteries become impaired. There’s a drug, though, that can block sugar absorption, and by blunting the blood sugar spike with the drug, you can prevent the arterial dysfunction, demonstrating that it’s probably good for your heart if you don’t have big blood sugar spikes after meals. And indeed, how high your blood sugars spike after a meal is a predictor for cardiovascular mortality. So, do people who eat lots of high-glycemic foods, like sugary foods and refined grains, tend to have more heart attacks and strokes? Yes. And, they appear more likely to get diabetes. But, maybe people who eat lots of Frosted Flakes and Wonder Bread have other bad dietary habits as well.

The diets that have been put to the test in randomized controlled trials and proven to prevent diabetes are the ones focusing on cutting down on saturated fat and ramping up the consumption of fiber-rich whole plant foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, without specific regard to lower or higher glycemic loads.

The drug has been put to the test, though, and blunting one’s mealtime blood sugar spikes does seem to reduce the risk of developing diabetes, as well as reduce the risk of heart attacks and high blood pressure. So, is there any way to prevent these blood sugar spikes without taking drugs? Well, one way would be to not sit down to a half cup of sugar!

Yes, the drug can slow the progression of your atherosclerosis. Instead of the arteries going to your brain narrowing this fast, on the drug, they only narrow this fast. Wouldn’t it be better to eat a diet that actually reverses heart disease? Reverses diabetes? The healthiest diet to prevent the meal-related blood sugar and fat spikes, the oxidation and inflammation, is a diet centered around whole plant foods.

But what if you really want a bagel? Instead of spreading drugs on it, spreading on some almond butter may help blunt the blood sugar spike from refined carbs. Another option is to dip your baguette in some balsamic vinegar.

The consumption of vinegar with meals was evidently used as a home remedy for diabetes before drugs came along, but it wasn’t put to the test until 1988. After all, how much money can be made from vinegar? According to The Vinegar Institute, millions of dollars, but a single diabetes drug, like Rezulin, can pull in billions—that is, before it was pulled from the market for killing too many people by shutting down their livers. The drug company still made out like a bandit, having to pay out less than a billion to the grieving families for covering up the danger.

No liver failure from a peanut butter-schmeared bagel, though, cutting the blood sugar response in half, and the same with vinegar. If you chug down four teaspoons of apple cider vinegar diluted in water, you get that same blunting of the spike. And, you get the additional advantage over the nuts of lowering insulin levels in the blood, something peanut butter apparently can’t do. But, presumably better than a bagel with lox, as fish causes triple the insulin response. Or red wine, which also increases insulin levels—but not as much as fish—and also shoots up triglycerides, though de-alcoholized red wine, non-alcoholic wine, doesn’t have the same problem. What about vinegar?

Not only may a tablespoon a day tend to improve cholesterol and triglycerides over time, vinegar can drop triglycerides within an hour of a meal, along with decreasing blood sugars and the insulin spike, potentially offering the best of all worlds.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Daniel Lobo via Flickr.

Doctor's Note

Are these videos chock full of info or what? This is a consequence of everyone’s kind support, enabling me to hire more than a dozen researchers to help me plow through the literature. I’m embarrassed to even look at some of the videos I did years ago. They’re so one-dimensional. I’m so grateful so many of you were able to see the potential and help NutritionFacts.org become what it is today. Onward and upward!

What’s that about belly fat being reduced? You must have missed the first video in this vinegar series, Does Apple Cider Vinegar Help with Weight Loss?

I then covered Vinegar and Artery Function and will end with Optimal Vinegar Dose and Vinegar Mechanisms and Side Effects.

Did I say reverse diabetes? Reverse heart disease? See, for example, Diabetes Reversal: Is it the Calories or the Food? and Evidence-Based Medicine or Evidence-Biased?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

179 responses to “Can Vinegar Help with Blood Sugar Control?

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  1. Confused…..why would one want to be so concerned about lowering insulin in regards to blood sugar? If my blood sugar runs high, say after eating a bunch of fruit, wouldn’t I want the most availability of insulin in order to “push”/get the glucose in the blood into the cells? Isn’t that what insulin achieves? So if vinegar lowers the insulin, one might be left with elevated blood sugar levels? Anyone help explain what I might be missing here, or is my point valid?




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    1. If you think a “bunch of fruit” spikes your blood sugar, then you’ve not been paying attention. Fruit juice yes, but not _whole fruit_. Grocery-store bread* will spike your sugars worse than a banana. *processed grains with sweeteners added-almost always.

      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/if-fructose-is-bad-what-about-fruit/
      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-much-fruit-is-too-much/

      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/reversing-diabetes-with-food/




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        1. That was a really interesting one but whenever I try to show it to people they just outright don’t believe it and blame sugar and only sugar…the explanation in that video makes so much more sense.




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          1. Oh man, tell me about it! I made the mistake of feeling bad for all the apparent ignorance on the ADA forum, it was basically a huge black hole of misinfo and strictly LOW carb! I figured I’d try to update them a bit on the fat connection and you’d think I tried to kill everyone’s family or something! Holy smokes, most of the names I got called I wouldn’t even say here, but some were liar, troll, spammer, advertiser, a magician, a jerk, disillusioned, etc. Wow! I was incredulous at how I got attacked when I was just trying to help elucidate a bit, using legit links and all, after talking about my own experience with T2. I was pretty dumbfounded! Or maybe just dumb. Out of a slew of replies, there was only ONE that sounded reasonably doubtful but curious, instead of vehemently oppositional and hateful!

            After getting phone calls and getting spammed by e-mails from the American Diabetes Ass. requesting donations, (with NO link to contact them, just a convenient form to donate) and after my experience at their forum, this creepy awareness began to wash over me, and I HOPE I am just being paranoid and overboard when I admit… I get the distinct impression they are not just trolling for dollars, but are actively engaged in keeping their minions on a very selective agenda, judging by the vehement shaming, abuse and name calling that went on when I posted on their forum, and the “failure” to accept input otherwise. I realize people are resistant to new info and new ideas from outside the fold are sometimes suspect, but this wasn’t just doubt or even disagreement, they were off the wall with literal attacks! It didn’t seem like T2 patients at all, it sounded very much like the paid trolls (that they were accusing ME of being) that industries commonly use to maintain the illusions they require. But this is in relation to the health of a huge population of people, so somebody please ground me here, it was just way too loony and I just can’t interpret it in a way that makes rational sense…besides what I already said!




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            1. Raising money to find a “cure” is big business these days. There is very little to no oversight of the money raised, then methods use or how it is spent. I am not surprised but disappointed by the response you got.




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              1. File the right paperwork and vow to “cure” this or that, sell t-shirts and ribbons, host a walk/ride event and BOOM you’re in business! Sad but Capitalistic and really big money based on a great notion that perpetuates the MYTH that pHARMaceuticals will cure all.




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            2. My experience with large “charities” In Australia may also reflect the US situation.
              In essence, charities are run as large businesses. The CEOs, COOs, CAOs etc are all professional managers and paid “competitive” salaries. Additionally, many of them have performance pay which is linked to the amount of donations, grants and other funds they bring in to the organisation. Think of the heart healthy tick scheme for example. I remember reading about 5 years about the president of the Australian branch of the Save the Children Fund. A methodist minister (who just happened to be the brother of he then Australian Prime Minister), he was paid $260,000 a year for his figurehead services. The days of people providing their services for free for good causes are long gone.

              These gross financial conflicts of interest exert all sorts of strange effects on organisations. It is one reason why “charities” do not (at least in Australia) publish their accounts – at least not in a way that tells people how much of your donated dollar goes to pay the top executives and board members, or meet administration cots, or marketing costs. Only a fraction of every dollar donated goes to delivering worthwhile services or programmes. Executives ate also “incentivised” to bring in the dollars. This means you do not put your big sponsors offside – that is biting the hand that feeds you and will kill your performance pay and guarantee that your employment contract is not renewed..

              Remember the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics? With the 2010-15 US dietary guidelines , it was fully onboard with the science about saturated fat. Since 2010, the US Dairy Council has become the Academy’s national sponsor (ie single largest donor). Strangely, the Academy now no longer believes that saturated fat is a nutrient of concern. It is surely merely a coincidence that dairy products are the largest source of saturated fat in the US diet.




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              1. Similarly I got to see and observe a Director for the American Red Cross during their support of those left without power after a local disaster several years ago. He gave the appearance and aura of a small country dictator. And when someone asked “how much longer” with reference to their activities there, his reply was to the effect of, “So long as the news cameras are here”.

                The ARC was in the news every day all day long during that period. Us, the amateur radio operators who volunteered and set up complete and functional radio communications for the ARC at that event, which included over a dozen roving trucks (and subsequently rebuilt the ARC radio systems for that city as well as at least one more neighboring city) never got mentioned. We rarely are, but no major catastrophe goes without us re-establishing communications for the emergency crews, support, and finally personal contacts/inquiries.




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              2. Hi Tom I think you’re referring to Tim Costello ( World Vision) and his brother Ex Deputy Prime Minister ( because Johnny didnt keep his promise, so he didnt get to be the Big Kahuna) Peter ‘Captain Smirk’ Costello. He was demoted in 2007.
                Yeah thats a big salary, especially when these guys come with a lot of fame and therefore get favours for accommodation,travel meals etc from ingratiating companies and world governments hoping for photo ops.Their expenditure is not great. Most of that $255,000 (actually) gets banked or maybe, giving some benefit of doubt, gets re-donated.
                Believe me I’ve been there and seen a lot of government and multinational dealings, the Plebian masses would be blown away to know whats going on.Its called Corporatisation. Its happened in Govt over the last 30 odd years ( and the even years as well).
                David Williamson wrote a spot on play about the changing face of charity organisations 20 yrs ago called ‘Charitable Intent’. It concerned the tru-blu volunteer vs the Uni Business Degree suit whose job it was to maximise donations (read profits).Thus, a compassion and empathy vacuum.
                These charities are starting to look like fundamental evangelical churches with there happy clappy approach.
                I collected for charity in 1990 in Perth when the commission thing was just beginning.I got 60%.

                Sorry that this may be off topic for Dr Gregers website but these Cancer Foundations and Diabeties Foundations have people employed who are stakeholders. Its their livelihood. It becomes a belief system. They believe their own importance and believe that following pharmaceutical propaganda is where its at.
                A final hypothetical thought…If we woke up tomorrow morning and everyone was 100% healthy, free of sickness and ill health both physical and mental, would most doctors and drug companies be rejoicing?




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                1. Aah, yes, you are quite right. It was quite a while ago now that I read that article and the whole Abbot and Costello routine going on way back then must have confused me.

                  Other charity and not-for-profit smart strategies make me cynical too. For example, a number of the big charities set up separate service delivery organisations which get government grants to deliver aged care or other community services. They are not-for-profit and not averse to seeking donations either, However, the parent organisations often require that these not-for-profit make an “operating surplus” which has to be paid to the parent organisation. When is a profit not a profit? Why, when it is an operating surplus.

                  The smaller charities are not always better. How often do they outsource management, accounting or other functions to a contractor? And how often are those contracting organisations owned by the big boss of the charity concerned or a family member? And no nonsense about competitive procurement there – just a hugely over the top contract fee. The scope for using charities for personal financial and career benefit is sadly very large. And it is all perfectly legal.




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                  1. Spot on,and it is sad that it is perfectly legal. I wish people would understand that these legalities don’t just come through a wormhole from a parallel universe. They are created by the people we’re going to vote for in 10 wks, because they’ve been lobbied to, with the promise of a board position after leaving politics.

                    I believe ‘Nifty’ Nick Greiner (a smoker) got a gig with Phillip Morris after his tenure as NSW Premier and Bob ‘Gumby’ Carr (another NSW Premier) had about six or so board representations, one with Macquarie Bank for $500,000/yearr for 6 board meetings. Very Faustian…

                    On the health side, Im watching a lecture by Vandana Shiva- The Future of Food and Seed- Youtube.
                    Mostly about the dismantlement of India’s Agricultural state of affairs since the Green Revolution.
                    At the end of the day Tom, the power is in taking your own health in hand. People will notice and ask why you look good. Its a drip drip drip kinda thing and I hope we’ve got time.

                    But hey, Bruce Willis is gunna ab-sail in at the Eleventh Hour and save us all, right?
                    Anyways, Im just passing through Planet Profit~~~~~~~~~~




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                    1. Yes. No doubt the lucrative Macquarie consultancy contract was in no way a reward for the billions in public private partnership contracts doled out in NSW when Carr was premier.
                      ” Under Carr’s Labor government, and the Liberals which preceded him for that matter, Macquarie put its foot on most of the toll road concessions around Sydney. These were to become the bastions of the bank’s profit-churning powerhouse.
                      Thanks to its stapled-security trust structures, Macquarie managed to ”upfront” billions in revenues and deploy that cash to expand offshore and fund its $30 million salaries.
                      The toll road contracts, incidentally, remain a secret. There have been efforts to obtain them under freedom of information laws from time to time. The NSW Roads and Traffic Authority once tried to charge this reporter $70,000 for one set, and it was never clear what documents might have been forthcoming anyway”
                      http://www.smh.com.au/business/macquarie-on-rocky-road-as-carr-rides-off-20120308-1unbq.html

                      In fact $500,000 a year sounds like a pretty paltry reward anyway given the amounts involved.




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            3. Charzie I hope you don’t mind (and can reverse the posting) but I cut and pasted your reply above to my FB page and ranted a little beside it. Posted it “public” as well. People NEED to know. I think I got one argument there way back when I posted the Diabetes/fat video. The guy basically said “no, because my wife is a nurse”. I countered with more good information and he never replied again. NOW I know have at least one nurse (a different one) on my side. I BURNED the Diabetes (Ass.) Cookbook that I found in my possession. I have some reverence or books but some are simply hurtful (if read by the unknowing), and so it went into making heat for me and the pups. I’m sure they made a lot of them. I think part of the venom you felt was about the $.




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              1. Wade, not only don’t I mind, but thank you! I was going to do the same but everyone just avoids my FB page since all I ever use it for is to link to helpful general info, and you KNOW how that annoys sheeple. Um, people. Yep, even my own family… love them but ‘da Nile isn’t just a river in Egypt! I swear if I could afford a billboard in the center of town, I would do the same! After what I went through, I believe people have the right to KNOW the actual best current facts so they can make choices, not some corrupted version of it to suit the wallets of the suits. What people do (or don’t) with that info, again, is their choice, but I hate all the confusing and bogus BS that circulates so freely when it can so dramatically effect the one life we get! ESPECIALLY coming from some organization that purports to be supporting the population they are keeping sick!




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            4. If everybody followed a WFPB diet there would be no need for the American Diabetes Association. Of course they were angry with you, Vege-tater–you were threatening their gold mine.




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            5. I gave up posting on the UK Diabetes Forum – tbh if they don’t want to cure themselves or reduce their problems. It’s their life and they can suffer with ignorance.




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              1. I was just blown away by the volume of the hateful replies! They must sure have a big payroll from all those donations to keep it staffed like that, because I still can’t imagine your average struggling diabetic responding with such venom to somebody’s post!




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    2. Hello, the literature Dr. G presented suggests that vinegar potentiates the effects of insulin. Toward the end of the video, muscle cell glucose uptake was increased even though the amount of plasma insulin decreased in the vinegar condition. Hopefully that helps?




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      1. Yeah, but the the blood sugar would still be higher with the vinegar, as opposed to without the vinegar, and this would not be a good thing.




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        1. The muscle glucose uptake study, which was the only one presented that measured both, showed decreased plasma glucose and decreased plasma insulin in the vinegar condition.




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      2. Isn’t the whole idea of diabetes insulin resistance? Meaning if you can get away with less floating around then resistance wouldn’t build? I do wonder as well though if lower insulin means higher sugar, but perhaps what he is saying is that with sugar water you release too MUCH insulin where you end up with LOW blood sugar at the end, and something like vinegar perhaps levels that reaction out? Not sure how it would act if eating an otherwise healthy meal (i.e. not sugar water) – perhaps no difference?




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        1. Kinda like the fish comment, if it triples insulin response, then couldn’t you use that to bring sugars down? Or is the point what I was saying above that it would go too low and then you’ll bounce back up?




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          1. I agree that controlling wild oscillations in blood sugar is important as well as lowering blood sugar. However, I do not think more insulin is necessarily always better.




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          2. The insulin spike with fish is because insulin does more than just push blood sugar into the cells. Insulin also causes an increase in the uptake of lipids and amino acids by cells. So the fish increases the amount of fat and protein in the meal, which contribute to the amount of insulin released in response.




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            1. Interesting, but then wouldn’t nuts and seeds do the same thing? Why was fish singled out? If anything I’d imagine he’d mention meat.




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        2. Yes, I think that’s a reasonable idea – vinegar might reduce insulin “overshoots.” Also, sometimes the SHAPE of the insulin (or glucose) curve can change such that the peak occurs at a time that’s not being measured.




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    3. Yes, you are right, body normally produce Insulin in response to the blood sugar so that the sugar is directed to the cells and body tissues where it is used for energy. The main issue is in diabetes where body cannot produce insulin or have resistant to insulin being directed to the cells.

      So in those scenarios if taking too little or too much of the Insulin causes issue in the body. The former can result in high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, which can cause damage to the blood vessels, nerves, and organs. In a worst-case scenario, hyperglycemia can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially life-threatening condition.

      Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can result from taking too much insulin, although missing meals and exercising excessively can also bring it on. This, too, can be a life threatening. High dose of insulin can lower level of potassium which can cause muscle weakness and affect the heart as well.

      In this video talking about about vinegar. The biologically active constituent of vinegar is acetic acid, the acetic acid inhibits the activity of several enzymes for example amylase, sucrase, maltase, and lactase that break down carbohydrates. As a result, when vinegar is present in the intestines, some sugars and starches temporarily pass through without being digested, so they have less of an impact on blood sugar. That is why Dr G. is explaining that vinegar can help with stabilizing sugar in the blood with people if they prediabetic stage.




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      1. Just to confirm. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas either produces too little or no insulin, so glucose cannot enter cells for use as energy? In Type 2 diabetes, the cells cannot take up all the sugar that’s available in the bloodstream, so it stores the excess in the fat cells. It’s basically sugar overload. Vinegar inhibits metabolization of sugar and moves it out in urine, but does so without raising insulin levels? I assume you’d still have to urinate frequently which still probably isn’t a good thing. Better solution still is a lower sugar diet with plenty of dietary fiber and lower glycemic load foods?




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    4. The issue is with insulin spikes that occur with high glycemic index foods (refined carbs, etc) that essentially causes the body to “overshoot” with regard to insulin release. Yes, insulin is what gets glucose into the cells, which is important, but it is essentially a growth hormone. In addition to lowering blood sugar, insulin also decreases fat release and stimulates fat storage, and more. The benefit of lower glycemic index foods and vinegar is that it mutes the insulin response in order to prevent “overshooting” the insulin response. Hope that helps!!




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    5. Insulin is an enzyme that allows or promotes uptake of glucose. Over production of insulin means our cells are insensitive to it. So it would fair to say vinger promotes insulin sensitivity.




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    6. No, you don’t want to reduce insulin response, you want to reduce excessive and prolonged blood sugar spikes. Increased insulin response is the *result* of increased blood sugar levels, which when not controlled, over time can cause deleterious health issues, e.g., diabetes, heart disease, etc.




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    7. What happens with time is your insulin resistance is screwed, your pancreas is overworked and can’t produce it anymore. Then you’ve had it if you have other health issues. It’s all about homeostatis, regulation and the omission of spikes like this. This is what people with type 1 diabetes are born with, pancreas problems. You can acquire the same condition with diet and lifestyle choices. The example below of the 1940’s (Walter Kempner) diet doesn’t mention what foods the subject eliminated in order to stick with the rice staple? Maybe his sugar intake was far higher before cutting back for this diet… In any case, we ar all bioindividual. Type two diabetes is easily reversed with a whole food diet low on processed junk and high in living foods, including vegetable juices (green
      smoothies of mostly vegetables). When we’re younger our bodies are almost invincible, when we age, we’re a bit worn out depending on what fuel we put in. Resistance to infection, chronic health conditions can set in, we’re more frail etc… There is now too much science on the catastrophic consequences of processed sugar intake. Use palm sugar if you must, or dates, but in small quantities.




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      1. Thanks. Well said. I agree with you on the sugar-thing. As far as fruit, I am inclined to think that that too can be
        an issue for people as they get older. I just read an interesting article about how our modern day supermarket fruits are way higher in sugar than their original versions (apples, dates, etc. have been grown to have more sugar than before). Interesting.




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  2. Utilizing vinegar to blunt insulin spikes is discussed in “The Glucose Revolution”, the book that brings us a working knowledge of the glycemic index (from my earlier years of nutritional studies). This is another reason to eat pickled foods, there’s acetic acid in most of them. Watch out for fake colors though.

    opening shot comment:

    “62/43” added together is 105, and what is “D.E.”? I’ve abbreviated
    diatomacious earth that way, but somehow I don’t think it applies here.




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    1. I have to run, so can’t research this fully, but here are a couple clues. 62/43 is a type of “acid converted” corn syrup, and D.E. here stands for “dextrose equivalents.” My interest is piqued, and I hope you or another interested person will find out more and post here about it!




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  3. Dr G: re:”Are these videos chock full of info or what? This is a consequence of everyone’s kind support,
    enabling me to hire more than a dozen researchers to help me plow
    through the literature. I’m so grateful so
    many of you were able to see the potential and help NutritionFacts.org
    become what it is today. Onward and upward!”

    I like the longer videos with more information. It helps to understand what’s really going on. And it’s hard to find summarized truthful information like this elsewhere. Thanks to you and your team for such a great website. (I just made another donation :-)




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  4. I know we shouldn’t eat sugary desserts but if one was to have a dessert on a special occasion and consumed the 2 T of vinegar within an hour afterward would that help the negative effect of the dessert?




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    1. Hello, the research presented here suggests that you’d need to take the vinegar at the same time as the sugary dessert. This makes sense because processed carbs are absorbed quickly and the vinegar needs to be already on board. Hope this helps!




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      1. How about taking the vinegar right before you ate? I love the occasional ice cream sundae but somehow think dousing them with balsamic might kill the party.




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        1. LiHMoney: Not to dismiss your point, but it made me think about the super, super duper high quality balsamic vinegars – the type that are hand crafted and left to age in wooden barrels over years and year. The type that are so thick, they can barely poor out of a bottle. People actually do use those types of vinegars for dessert, including (I believe I have heard) dribbled over ice cream. ;-)

          Not that I’m saying you should find those and do that. Just sharing in case you weren’t aware of the vast world of balsamic vinegars. It’s was a new world/concept to me just a couple of years ago.




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          1. That is a good thought, the balsamic glaze is really tasty. I wonder if the vinegar concentrated down to a glaze would have the same effect?




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            1. Joan: I don’t know. I haven’t had the glaze before. I imagine it would be a similar experience. Maybe I’ll take one for the team this summer and experiment with vegan ice creams and various toppings. ;-)




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        2. I have made a kind of lemonade substitute using 1 tablespoon vinegar in a glass of ice, top up with water, stir and add stevia to taste. That would work as a dessert drink for some of us.




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  5. This is my favorite type of eduVideo–Showing how food wins hands down compared to the “Sickness Care” Industry’s medication based treatment!

    It’s hard to beat this ‘acid’ test!




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    1. Most of them seem fine to me, the real difference in price is the two type of balsamic vinegar. This is a copy/paste from wikipedia

      “The original, costly, traditional balsamic vinegar (Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale), is made from a reduction of cooked white Trebbiano grape juice, and used as a condiment. It has been produced in Modena and Reggio Emilia[2] since the Middle Ages, being mentioned in a document dated 1046. Appreciated in the House of Este during the Renaissance,[3] it is highly valued by modern chefs and gourmet food lovers.

      Balsamic Vinegar of Modena (Aceto Balsamico di Modena), an inexpensive imitation,[1] is today widely available and much better known. It bears a Protected Geographical Status label, and is the kind commonly found on restaurant tables and used in salad dressing.”

      I’ve tried several brands of the Modena type, they all tasted fine, I use it pretty often already, maybe a little more often now. The original stuff I’ve only had a few times, expensive and often intense.




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      1. Somewhere along the endless reaches of I-5 in California’s Sacramento Valley (the northern half of the Central Valley) is a small store called the Olive Pit in the little pit stop (yes, pun intended) of Corning. It’s one of those places that snags in tourists with giant billboards for miles in both directions. It carries a lovely array of olives as well as vinegars, including a delicious, thick, sweet one labeled Balsamic Vinegar Traditional Style Aged up to 18 years de Modena. It sells for about $10 a bottle the last time I bought it, less if you buy a case of 12. We love it and usually buy a few bottles whenever we drive past. I rarely eat ice cream, but I think it would be delicious on a good vanilla.




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        1. Rebecca: Olive Pit has a website and sells all sorts of balsamic vinegars and other mouth-watering goodies online. The prices are reasonable, but the shipping costs would kill me.
          Going to move to California, someday.




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          1. I should have known! Of course, everybody has a website!

            California does have its’ lures – in places. Others, not so much! I grew up there and do miss the sunshine through our Northwest winters.




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          2. $10 a bottle is pretty outrageous for vinegar, especially the Modena type. The good thing about balsamic is even the cheaper Modena type is a protected name use, so it isn’t like just anyone can make it anywhere.




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    2. My favorite is Whole Foods Market (WFM) Organic 365 brand. I’ve tried lots of different ones, from inexpensive Trader Joe’s brand to some pretty fancy imported stuff. I didn’t like TJs at all, nor most of the other forgettable ones. But the WFM one tasted as good as the most expensive ones I tried, in fact, it’s actually my favorite and the only one I buy. So, if you live near a WFM, you might give it a try.

      Mark G




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    3. May vary by location, but I’ve seen it in the cheapest grocery/dept stores. You’ll find a wonderful RANGE of options in the big upscale groceries. Always cheaper than medicine (total costs).




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  6. Completely plant based for 3 years now and have lost over 90 lbs. I recently started drinking non-alcoholic red wine because I could find little or no dietary benefit from alcohol. I very quickly lost another 8 pounds and thought it was the lower caloric content of the non-alcoholic wine. I now realize from this recent series of videos that I am now inadvertently receiving the vinegar like benefits. Anyone else have a similar experience?




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  7. I wish Dr G would always clarify if he is talking about Diabetes Type 1 or Type 2 or both. Maybe he did and I missed it.




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    1. Type 2 is a results of lifestyle choice rather than a treasonous immune system, and Dr. Greger is trying with this website to help show how lifestyle medicine, specifically a whole food plant based diet, can be very effective in preventing and reversing lifestyle diseases. So generally if he just says “diabetes” he is referring to Type 2. If the reference relates to the prevention or reversal of diabetes, it is almost certainly a reference to Type 2.




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    2. Personally, I wish they had entirely different names since they are really two entirely different illnesses with completely different etiologies! I think it’s silly, confusing, and can be dangerous to give them the same name based on an shared symptom instead of the root cause of a functioning, versus non-functioning pancreas! (Since T1 affects about 5% and T2 95%, I would always assume it applies to the latter unless otherwise specified… play it safe just in case. But it does feel kind of exclusionary when you’re that 5%!)




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  8. The nutritional supplement “Cal-Amo” by Standard Process usually works better than vinegar, is easier on the enamel of one’s teeth and is more convenient. Plus, Cal-Amo is not considered to be a universal “AVOID” for those following the blood type diet. :-)




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    1. The “Eat Right for your Blood Type” diet is a bunch of nonsense according to both my general practitioner and my cardiologist. I drink Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar and have been doing so for years. The same family company also makes some really great salad dressings and marinades with very healthy organic ingredients.




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      1. Hugo: FYI: Concerning your first sentence, NutritionFacts also covers that diet: nutritionfacts.org/video/blood-type-diet-debunked/ (Same conclusion as your doctors. Just thought you would be interested in Dr. Greger’s research.)




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      2. Hmm. I’ve been following the blood type diet since 1980 and am in excellent health with zero medications. My clients who I’ve suggested they try it have had raving reviews from their cardiologist… and ALL parameters of the blood tests are now completely in range (to everyone’s surprise but mine) after switching to the diet and adding some specific herbs for cardiac support, Several MD’s in our area are now realizing the clinical results of the blood type diet in the real world and now they are recommending it as well… better late than never. :-)




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        1. This thread is a perfect example of how we are all individuals. What’s good for the goose is not necessarily good for the gander. I think the general consensus that we should all be eating fresh whole unprocessed foods that include a large variety of plants is a good general construct to follow. When it comes to the particulars of how much of one versus another or one form of something versus another I think that’s where individuality comes into play. If someone is eating an overall healthy diet as described previously and has no health problems then I say bravo!




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          1. Agreed! Experience over time plays as important of a role in truth as does science. Many things are true that have not been proven by science, either it doesn’t have the tools, time, money or interest – or that some things are SELF evident.




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    2. Yes, what everyone said about “blood type diet”, and also as to your enamel: simply DO NOT brush until your mouth has regained a natural balance. It’s mostly when folks brush right after acidic foods/beverages that causes accelerated enamel wear. There are videos and articles supporting my assertions here.




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    3. Quackwatch is fairly scathing about Standard Process and its products …..

      “Standard Process products have been promoted with preposterous claims for more than 40 years. After the company and its founder were prosecuted for criminal misbranding, the claims gradually became less traceable to the company and now appear to come from independent sources. The products were—and still are—promoted for many conditions that are outside the legitimate scope of the practitioners (mainly chiropractors) who sell them. I advise people to avoid both the products and anyone who sells them.”
      http://www.quackwatch.org/11Ind/lee.html




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    1. If you put the pill in water and it makes acetic acid at 5% acidity, then I’d say you’re good to go. I’m betting this would not be the case and almost never find pills to be the best option for anything.




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  9. I put ACV (usually the mother, unless I run out) and olive oil on my salad every evening at dinner time. Other than that, I use it only when I eat out in restaurants with friends. Been doing this for many years, and have been lucky so far. I put a couple of teaspoons in a container of water and sip it just before the meal, and along with it. Seems to help with digestion too. I had read Dr. Jarvis’s book decades ago about ACV and I see somebody else was influenced by the same book.

    When asked how to prevent food poisoning, if possible, an asker at Yahoo got a wonderful response;

    https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20120709153715AATMopZ




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      1. That’s right — you folks over here are anti-oil of ANY kind. Not even a lousy coupla drops of organic cold pressed olive oil on a salad. Sheesh! :-(




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        1. Hey, YOU can do whatever you WANT, Dr G just reports the best current science…he doesn’t enact laws or monitor “us folks over here” or anywhere else. What you do with the info is entirely your choice. What is factual and what you choose to believe because you like something are two entirely different things!




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              1. Hi Kitsy – Maybe Vege-tator and the rest of us readers here felt chastised by you with your Sheesh!! comment about not added oil. You can add oil to your food if you want. No one here is trying to stop you. She was just warning you of the dangers and explaining the benefits of what Dr Gregor is doing in contrast to what industry and their financial interests are trying to do – get our money ad the expense of our health..




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                1. Okay, sorry people — my bad. :-( I guess I was just pissed (oops, another naughty word?) that I had offered what I intended to be some interesting advice about ACV and food poisoning, but got jumped on for the oil bit instead. So I got sort of emotional.

                  But I still agree with the Vegan RD. :-) A couple of drops of EVO on a nightly salad can’t be ALL bad!




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                  1. Thanks for the info abut the AVC for food poisoning. I have heard that before and is good to know. As far as the oil is concerned, i choose not to use it, but if you want to use it that is up to you. The problem with me, and most people as far as that goes is that a few drops turns into a few tsp that turn into a few tbls and before we know it we start using it on a regular basis. And then the problems begin.




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                    1. Yes, it takes guts to be self-disciplined. Maybe, in my case, decades of yoga/meditation/exercise, etc. helped me in the pig-out department. I admit to being a chocolate addict, but it’s the only dessert I have (with evening meal). I keep it at 2-1/2 squares of 72% or higher — the dark kind, with no milk added. And I haven’t eaten anything between meals since I was 21 or so.

                      Whatever it is I’m doing has (so far) kept me from hanging out in doctors’ offices. It’s been at least 4-5 years now since I saw one, and that was only because I figured I ought to have a blood test occasionally. Guess I should scare me up another PC, but …

                      I avoid all drugs — they’re deadly, IMO. (I’m no youngster, BTW). So one can indeed keep it at a few drops (not “teaspoons”!) of EVOO on one’s salad without going stir crazy and plopping on more. :-)




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                  2. Apologies if it seemed I was jumping on things, not my intention. However I guess keep in mind many of us are medical doctors, working with patients with inflammatory conditions, heart disease and diabetes, people who even just a couple of drops of EVO adversely effects their health, to which it is so hard to convince them, as there are so many others saying ‘everything in moderation’, or ‘a bite won’t hurt’ type responses. Sure in the grand scheme of things, we pick our poison in this world. You eating EVO in the country fresh air may be the same as me commuting in a busy city eschewing EVO in terms of mortality risk. We all make choices in life. What we aim here at nutritionfacts.org is to inform people of the best available evidence, with no bias, and allow people to make informed decisions about their own lives.




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                    1. Re: “keep in mind many of us are medical doctors, working with patients with inflammatory conditions, heart disease and diabetes, people who even just a couple of drops of EVO adversely effects their health”
                      Hats off to all the doctors who are exploring nutritional health issues especially if they have the guts to ‘take on all comers’ in a public forum….. some of the discussion around here gets a bit torrid and/or a bit tedious so credit to you for hanging around.
                      Where can I find the supportive evidence for your statement that “even a couple of drops of EVOO adversely effects health. I am familiar with Esselsteyns outstanding heart reversal studies, and protocol, but I didn’t think he had gone so far as to pinpoint risk factors food by food …. didn’t he just take a shotgun approach and exclude all oil on suspicion?
                      I think we also have to remember he was working with terminal cases and couldn’t take any prisoners whereas the protocols for prevention or maintenance might not be so strict?




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                    2. Hey rada :) Thanks for the kind words… it’s immoral in my opinion to ignore the science. Doctors are educated to practice ‘evidence-based medicine’…. So I don’t feel I can cherry-pick which evidence I do and don’t listen to!

                      I believe it started from Ray Swank’s research in the 1950s.

                      Some references here on ‘blood sludging’ from oil-
                      http://www.drcarney.com/blog/entry/animal-based-diets-turn-our-blood-fatty

                      http://www.drcarney.com/topics/item/306-heart-attack-proof-your-holidays#.VzY6CxUrLVo

                      http://www.drcarney.com/blog/entry/seeing-is-believing

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjOluDGyB-o&feature=youtu.be

                      ___________________________________________________

                      Furthermore explored is the effects of oil on endothelial cells-

                      http://nutritionfacts.org/video/extra-virgin-olive-oil/

                      http://www.drcarney.com/blog/entry/endothelial-cells-to-the-rescue

                      http://www.bethehealthyu.com/healthy-blog/cardiovascular-disease-part-ii-how-endothelial-cells-get-damaged




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                  3. I agree with you. Don’t apologise and don’t back off.
                    Dr Greger appears to have achieved cult status in a very short space of time. Some of the primary characteristics of a cult is that the members suspend critical faculties, continually answer questions by quoting their leader e.g. The Little Red book of Mao and ‘work on’ new members to bring them into line and keep them there (do you recognise any of that behaviour). I had a quick glance at some of the references given (DR Gregers and other sources) but it seems that small amounts of EVOO, when combined with a salad (and possibly vinegar?) will negate most of the negative effect on the artery walls.
                    The reason you are starting to react emotionally is because sub-consciously you suspect that their is a cultish environment developing. That is a very healthy instinct and you should pay heed. That doesn’t mean you have to leave or that Olive Oil, for example, is good for you …. what it means is that for your own health and self-development you need to get better at heeding your inner voice and better at critically analysing what others are telling you.
                    KNOWLEDGE IS POWER AND INFORMATION IS THE FOUNDATION OF KNOWLEDGE
                    for example ….. watch the Greger videos carefully, take notes, search for the studies referenced and read them carefully …. likewise for the references others link to. You will easily spot exaggerated and/or over enthusiastic claims.
                    Sometimes you will find people linking to a report to support their argument when the report does no such thin.
                    Don’t get mad, get even. Out think them and beat them at their own game (sophistry!)




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                    1. “The reason you are starting to react emotionally is because
                      sub-consciously you suspect that their is a cultish environment
                      developing.”

                      Uh-huh…I’ve felt this for quite some time. It was bold of you to sally forth with your opinion. :-)




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                    2. Gotta keep it real :-)

                      Dr Greger and his team are doing a great job …… I love the videos but they only serve to keep me on my toes and I have to do my own additional research and tweak the regime to suit moi.
                      I am less enthusiastic about the discussion board though.

                      IMO he is starting to become the victim of his own success, although he probably doesn’t realise it yet. It’s normal for businesses to have to reinvent themselves as they transit from a small entreprenurial owner-operated outfit to a staffed enterprise. I believe NF is in this phase and is facing some major issues:

                      – amongst employees there are always ambitious careerists who have their own agendas … they are relentless and can divert organisations from their mission (you can control some of the people some of the time but not all of the people all of the time);

                      – now that he has attracted bums onto the seats the marketeers are flying in to cash in on his success….. I’ve noticed he has let some in the front door already …… they have ruined every health discussion forum I have seen ….their stock in trade is spin and misinformation. As they come in the front door I usually leave by the back door;

                      – by definition private enterprise organisations are self orientated and the bigger they are the bigger the marketing budget. We know from the tobacco industry story what lengths they will go to for survival. The ways and means of the net are well known to the marketeers and it is highly like they employ people to infiltrate new groups, posting under various names, to upload positive spin for their message and negative posts to downgrade the message of the health forum. IMO a favourite tactic is to flood the boards with fake posters who generate a lot of semi-crazy off topic posts … it acts as a fog to prevent people seeing the health messages and over time puts people off enough to make them leave the forum;

                      – the Disqus board format isn’t up to the task … its a PITA




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                    3. A personal bite for … hope it helps.

                      I’m a bit of a Greger fan but shortly after I’ve dined on his fare I feel dis-satisfied and I’m still hungry.
                      The reason for that is because he’s not my type (no personal offence intended as u will see).

                      I have developed my own schemata that helps guide me through life (I call it PSYCHE TYPING) which is a form of psychological profiling; its simple but not simplistic (its derived from the Universal Wisdom):

                      – people are distinguishable by their spiritual capacity and their personality type;
                      – the spirit (soul) is either operative in the individuals life or it is not,
                      – their personality type is either ACTION PERSON, THINKING OR FEELING TYPE;
                      – overall they are hardwired for life and we all tend to act true to our type;
                      – birds of a feather flock together (in a form of divine narcissm we ‘like’ our own type);
                      – oil (spirituality) and water (secularity) don’t mix.

                      We can quickly learn to read the typology and save ourself from a lot of wasted time and trouble because by doing so we avoid disappointment based on unrealistic expectations:

                      – the metric for spirituality is altruism versus selfishness (life is dynamic and modulates between each but on average a spiritual person exhibits altruistic behaviour (sorry looking cool etc doesn’t count);
                      – the three personality types each has its own signs and symptoms …. they are tribal, especially the THINKERS and like light rays in space (red, yellow, blue) … never the twain shall meet.

                      So, I’ll have a go at your analysis (its a big guess cos I only got a few lines of email posts to work with):

                      – Dr Greger is a Spiritual Thinker …. but he’s not your type so that leaves you feeling a bit ‘left out’;
                      – you’re a spiritual type so that attracts u towards NF (in your post you could see daylight through their arguments and you were railing against injustice and they are both symptoms of spirituality);
                      – based on some very scanty info you are most likely a FEELING type … when challenged u partially retreated to ‘keep the peace’ and u probably have a body that tends towards being roundish i.e. long standing issues with body weight? If yes to the latter that is typical of FEELING types.

                      If u are a Spiritual Feeling type then u are longing for a spiritual group … a devotional group would suit but the sad news is they really don’t exist in modern culture … we only have the remnants from the old religions (some sub-groups of Buddhism and Christianity were devotional). U might have even tried some and found them wanting?

                      The odds are lower but if u are a Spiritual Action person u like projects and always have something ‘on the go’ pus u like sport or nature (like hiking or snow skiing) and ur body is lean and mean?

                      If u are a Spiritual Thinker apply for a job on NF staff :-)




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                    4. My, my…and I’ll guess that you’re the wordy type. :-) Yes, I consider myself spiritual (stopped with the organized religion stuff long ago), but I’ve always been on the slender side. Never ever had a weight problem.

                      As for Dr. G’s very interesting website, I try to absorb what resonates with me and ignore what doesn’t — and pretty much just skim over the comments. (I’m amazed that so many plant-based eaters seem to have health problems.) But I gotta confess: I don’t really belong over here anyway. Twice a week I’ll have an animal food (good grief!) –either some fish or a boiled egg (wild/organic, etc. of course). :-P




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                    5. Wordy? … that was the short version.

                      The first part was just a heads up for Dr Greger and his team … gotta do my duty…. shoulda sent it to them instead of u … sorry.
                      IMO forums etc have been devalued by marketing and lack of moderation to the point they are almost worthless today.

                      Re: occasional meat eating
                      I think it is possible that genetics may cause some people to require meat in the same way that a genetic diversion lead some to retain the capacity to digest lactose in milk while others cant.
                      I have it on my short list to dig into that subject.
                      How we are managing our health now is archaic ….. in the future individual testing and phenotyping will direct our dietary choices and medical treatment …. probably via a chip implant into a vein with data sent to an app monitoring our blood 24/7.
                      Love your honesty, openness and intelligence.
                      Cheers, gunna sign out for a while now.




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        2. Was only a suggestion! Sorry if I upset or offended you. Nutritionfacts.org just strives to educate people on the best available evidence. I’ve seen drastic changes in people’s health when they were finally pried from their bottle of organic cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil… So I mention it. But like all things on the internet… you can ignore it and make the decisions you feel best :) We aren’t anti-oil… we are pro-optimal health.




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  10. Someone is trying to tell me that conjugated linoleic acid is a necessary nutrient. I haven’t found any proof of this, and I see that there are plant based supplements but I am not sure how that is sourced. But is it really necessary for out health?




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    1. No, conjugated linoleic acid is not a necessary nutrient. Linoleic acid (omega 6) and linolenic acid (omega 3) are essential fatty acids.




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    2. There is a lot of web and YouTube hype about CLA by internet marketers. However, it is probably wiser to stay away especially if you have, or are at risk of, diabetes.
      http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-826-conjugated%20linoleic%20acid.aspx?activeingredientid=826&
      http://www.webmd.com/diet/20060310/study-cla-doesnt-keep-pounds-off

      A 2015 review of the effects of CLA supplementation also noted
      “Studies also show undesirable effects in human beings as increased levels of triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol and reduction of the HDL levels, suggesting a negative alteration in the serum lipids profile [52]. Obese individuals also presented negative alterations in the glucose metabolism with insulin resistance in some studies [53, 54]”
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4574006/




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  11. I’ve had microscopic colitis, which seems to be dependent on allergies, for 25 years, but the vegan diet with additions such as flaxseed meal and mushrooms, as suggested by Dr. Greger, has enabled me to cut back my medication from three pills a day to one. And I’m hoping to get off the medication altogether, especially as it’s causing macrocytosis. But that’s another story. Vinegar has always bothered my colitis, and I’m wondering if anyone has a way of using it that doesn’t upset the stomach. I put some balsamic vinegar on stir-fried vegetables, and I had colon discomfort afterwards.




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    1. As I mentioned above, levels of acetic acid may be higher and associated with increased symptoms in IBS. Whilst colitis is different to IBS, I wondered if it was a similar reason… though hard to tell if it’s ingestion exacerbated or high due to another cause.

      I did find one study on microscopic colitis and acetic acid (again levels only)- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23600961 suggesting lower levels of acetic acid in those with MC, which may suggesting supplementation with vinegar could be worth a trial…

      As for it not irritating the stomach… could be a dose dependent, strength, dilution or type? Could perhaps try a different kind, such as apple cider, or rice vinegar and perhaps diluted in a cup of water, and starting with small amounts and increasing to assess tolerance?




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      1. Thanks so much! That was interesting information. Rice wine vinegar doesn’t bother me as much as apple cider vinegar, and I sometimes make vegan sushi and mix the vinegar into the rice. That may be the trick, ingesting it after it’s absorbed by another food rather than taking it straight. I’ve been following Dr. McDougall’s diet for allergies and colitis, and it’s done wonders for the colitis.




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        1. And yes! Adding a starch probably also helps… I found a study suggesting bread + vinegar reduced irritation of the vinegar… but it didn’t discuss if the vinegar still had the beneficial effects!




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        2. Decades ago I took significant amounts of ACV as a supposed cure. After a while the acidic nature of the vinegar took its toll on my teeth, mouth and stomach – same for Vitamin C … over the term my body couldn’t tolerate the drip feed acid and thr anti-reactions started!
          For Vinegar try it with grains only and leave it in the fridge for a day or so … this gives the vinegar time to be neutralised by the grains (cant say if it effects any claimed health benefits of the ACV).
          I make a nice brown rice and roast cashew salad with a bit of sea salt and mixed herbs then sprinkle on some Paul Newmans Balsamic dressing – couple of days in the fridge and its not acidic anymore. tastes great. Hope it works for you.




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  12. Is there any research examining the role of vinegar, as a fermented probiotic food on the microbiome? Are gut bacteria responsible for some of these beneficial effects on insulin & triglyceride levels etc?




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    1. Hi Cathy-

      There is some discussion here-
      Stool pH and colon cancer

      and here-
      Tipping the balance of firmicutes to bacteroidetes

      I also found an interesting quote here-
      Metabolites of acetic acid…..are recently shown to have considerable antifungal and cholesterol-lowering activities and promote the formation of short chain fatty acids and mannitol, an important prebiotic capable of modifying gut microbiota.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27144019

      Although higher levels of acetic acid do not seem favourable in IBS. Hard to extrapolate if this is bacterial produced only, or would be exacerbated with vinegar ingestion…
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20414959

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19903265




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      1. I am also wondering about the effects of fermented vinegar, or fermented food in general as a healing agent (besides the acetic acid), because it sure was for me! I couldn’t touch vinegar before, when I used to have wicked IBS and gut issues, among others problems, and going plant based helped dramatically, but I still had some reactions I couldn’t seem to figure out. I was actually going to do an elimination diet before coming across some videos by Sandor Katz, (Sandorkraut) and figured it seemed worth a trial since going WFPB helped so much! Not only did it resolve the gut issues in time, but I swear it did wonders for my mood and mental performance! I am far from the only one, I know plenty of folks who say the same, but it is anecdotal and nothing scientific or “officially” proven. Not that it really matters since I know how I feel, but it would be nice to share some proof besides he-said she-said.

        I’ve even wondered if some of the opposing info on the benefits of wine consumption might have something to do with the difference between natural, traditionally fermented, vs the mass processed chemicalized stuff…I’ve never seen them differentiated and yet instinctively I feel they are two very different things. I usually get sick drinking wine, but our friend’s home fermented Portuguese wine is fine. Also, when I fermented some wild grapes and other fruit I got a happy buzz instead, quite the opposite of sick! :-P




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        1. I think I’ll chop some cabbage today. Haven’t made any natural kraut in a while. Sandor lives on the other end of this (small rural) county. I’ve not met him but have his first book and have exchanged an email or two.




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        2. Interesting anecdote :) Perhaps the pre and probiotic effects of the cabbage and bacteria could have helped rebalance your gut microbiome.. But agreed, not a lot of literature especially in humans.
          There IS however a fair bit of research on gut and psychology that would reflect your experiences with mood and mental performance too :)

          Always interesting to think about things… could be totally the case (as for many other foods no longer made in their traditional manner) or simply the same as the grass Vs grain feed meat… still meat… and perhaps you are sensitive to the preservatives or another additive instead




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  13. Does it matter which vinegar you use? (Balsamic, white, cider, malt, etc). I’ve been adding a couple of tablespoons ‘white’ to my fruit smoothie since the vinegar series began a couple of days ago as that’s what I found hiding in the cupboard.




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    1. Reading through the sources cited, there seems to be beneficial effects from a variety of rice vinegars, balsamic vinegar, apple cider vinegar, apple vinegar and white vinegar. So it would seem that it doesn’t really matter in terms of the active ingredient (acetic acid- must be at least 4g/100ml to be labelled vinegar by FDA). What seems to give varying results is hard to say if due to other say antioxidants/polyphenols (or whatever) present (such as one study comparing rice vinegar Vs forbidden rice vinegar), or that the vinegar is ‘better’.




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      1. Thanks for that Renae. As a point of interest (or not as the case may be) in the UK it would appear that they don’t need to mention acetic acid by name. I’ve managed to find three types of vinegar lurking in various dark corners. The white wine vinegar says “6% acidity”. The malt and cider vinegars both say “5% acidity”. However, if Wikipedia is accurate, then this “acidity” will be acetic acid. Calculating the percentage… could it be as simple as 4g/100ml = 4% I wonder? :-)




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        1. No problem!

          Considering most labels calculate things such as fat percentage by weight rather than by percentage of calories, it would make sense their 4% = 4g/100ml. This means though it can be 4% or higher… I’m not sure your exact question though? 4% is the acetic acid content…




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          1. Hi Renae. Sorry if I wasn’t clear, but don’t worry as despite my lack of clarity you have answered my question. :-)




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      2. Renae, was there any mention of malt vinegar (my favourite)? I use lemon juice a lot as well—perhaps this has a similar effect.




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        1. Hmmm.. not that I recall, but from what I can tell, the acetic acid is the key factor. To be called vinegar, it must contain acetic acid… so for now it seems the answer would be yes…

          The acidic component of lemon juice is not acetic acid, but citric acid and ascorbic acid. The pH of the two are similar though. So it would depend on the mechanism of action and active component…




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  14. This is a little off topic, but I was watching on YouTube Dr. Greger’s video on why some vegans have heart attacks or strokes. I just want to add something that he did not mention. If you are a vegan and doing everything perfect, taking your B12, and taking your omega 3’s, and NO OILS….no oils….etc, YOU can still have a heart attack or a stroke if you have periodontal disease (gingivitis). Back in the year 2005 scientist isolated from the plaque from patients with carotid artery disease, and coronary artery disease 2 different bacteria types that are found in the mouth. These two bacteria are the same exact bacteria that cause plaque build up around your teeth and inflame your gums. What happens is when you have bleeding gums from gingivitis or from brushing to hard, the bacteria get into the blood stream. They seem to migrate more often than not to the carotid arteries which are located very near the oral cavity (the mouth). However, they can migrate to any artery in the circulatory system. Just like they try to burrow down deep under the gum line where they are safe and secure, they also like to burrow into the bifurcation of the carotid arteries. Once they get burrowed down into the arterial wall, they start to EXUDE calcium which we call PLAQUE which is the same PLAQUE surmounting the base of your teeth. This causes inflammation. Now, here is where cholesterol kicks in. When cholesterol, triglycerides, and other fatty molecules come floating down the artery they can “stick” to this arterial wall inflammation, and this adds to the building up of the plaque ( calcification ). So, even if your cholesterol count is 70. That cholesterol can bind with the bacterial plaque building up in the wall of the artery, and over time can lead to a coronary heart attack, stroke, or obstruction of the carotid artery. You can read about from the following link a layman’s report of this 2005 discovery.
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050329134246.htm

    Statin drugs may reduce the amount of cholesterol produced by the liver, but as long as there is some degree of cholesterol and other fatty lipids floating around in the circulatory system it will eventually start to “pile up” on the inflammed exudate secreted by the bacteria in the arterial wall. So, prescribing statin drugs is just a small bandaid on the problem and does not address the cause of the problem. Eating a vegan diet is a good start in tackling the problem, because it makes your immune system stronger, and it changes the gastrointestinal flora into healthy serving bacteria which can fight against the bad bacteria. However, this can work for some vegans, but may not be a final solution for other vegans who might have a severe infection of their gums. You can have a carotid endarterectomy and the peripheral vascular surgeon can extract the plaque from the inside of the artery wall. However, there are some patients who a year down the road have the same operated on carotid artery to become plugged up again, because the root cause was never addressed: peridontol disease. The bacteria never went away, and just starts to reestablish itself in the newly “reamed out” carotid artery. Same thing can go on with stints for coronary arteries. A stint might improve your circulation for awhile, but, the bacteria was never removed, and the process starts all over again. The same thing can be said for bypass surgery, and even synthetic grafts for the femoral artery and the abdominal aorta artery. All of these modern medical miracles are only a temporary fix. The medicines, the surgeries just buy you time.

    The core problem is never really addressed by the medical establishment and that is the build up of plaque in the arteries by bacteria. So what can a vegan do? Continue the vegan diet which improves overall health and finely tunes the immune system to slowly rid the body of plaque. Reduce the inflammation with tumeric spice. Use a blood thinner like serrapeptase which also dissolves plaque. Fasting for 21 days or so under the care of a medical specialist will speed up your bodies ability to canabalize the plaque in your arteries. Linus Pauling has done research showing that large doses of ascorbic acid can kill the bacteria. Dr. Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD, cardiologists has proven over and over again that intravenous vitamin C can knock bacteria and viruses. Read his book, “Curing The Incurable” or watch him speak about it on YouTube. Dr. Levy also says that lyposomal vitamin C is just as good as intravenous vitamin C ascorbic acid.

    Of course, there are the spiritual things that people can do such as prayer, laying on of hands, and visualization techniques such as those used by Dr. Carl Simonton, who still has an operating clinic even though he died several years ago. So, in conclusion, I don’t think any ONE specific technique is going to solve this problem. I am thinking that a person needs to do ALL OF THE ABOVE. This is like World War II.




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      1. Thank you Tom for the links. These videos on oral bacteria are basically saying that a person on a vegan diet needs to rinse their mouth after eating, and also to wait 30 to 60 minutes before brushing their teeth. This is good advice….and this will help to keep the gingivitis down. Also, the videos suggest that going on a vegan diet will change the flora of your gut and this beneficial bacteria will fight off the bad bacteria that causes gingivitis. These are all appropriate steps to take to maintain our health. But, I am trying to go a little bit deeper into this issue of ridding the body of this bad bacteria to the best of our abilities, because many scientists from their research are saying that this bad bacteria is many times the root cause of cardiovascular disease, lung problems, dry eyes, diabetes, and even rheumatoid arthritis. The bacteria issue is not the only cause, but it can be the cause in many cases. So, my search is how to rid my body of this bacteria to the best of my ability, because I have 90 percent blockage in my carotid arteries from plaque build up. My surgeon wants to do surgery, but, I do not want to go under anesthesia, there are complications, people get hospital acquired infections that are resistant to antibiotics, and even if you do have a carotid endarterectomy it does not guarantee you free blood flow in your carotid arteries. Why? Because if you do not clear up the bad plaque forming bacteria in your mouth and through out your body, then your carotid arteries or grafts, or bypass veins will just become plugged up again in time.

        These bacteria that produce plaque around your teeth are the same bacteria that produce plaque in your arteries. The plaque causes inflammation. The inflammation causes white blood cells to come to the area. As cholesterol and other lipids and proteins come floating by the inflamed area they begin to stick to the wall of the inflamed artery. The point I am trying to make is that the bacteria is at the heart of this problem, and the cholesterol is secondary to the problem. So, what I am understanding is that the vegan diet not only changes your gut flora from bad bacteria but to good bacteria which are non-plaque forming. Also, the vegan diet reduces the amount of cholesterol in your blood stream. So these two aspects of the vegan diet, I think, have enabled people to reverse their coronary artery and carotid artery disease. But, it does not take place over night. From the testimonies I have read it takes about a year. Fuhlman, Ornish, Esselstyn, Pritikin, and some others have successfully treated thousands of patients with a vegan or near vegan diet and reversed their coronary artery disease. They have documented it, and the patients have admitted it, and the diagnostic evaluations have verified it.

        But, I am hoping to carry this fight up to the next level. I am connecting dots between the works of Linus Pauling and cardiologist Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD. Both of these men are champions of the use of ascorbic acid, vitamin C. they quote hundreds of scientific works that showed the benefits of using ascorbic acid to fight off a lot of bacterial and viral infections. But, not only do they quote scientific studies, but they themselves have conducted scientific studies on their patients. Dr. Levy has used vitamin C in large doses to heal thousands of people of bacterial and viral infections. You can watch him lecture on YouTube. So, I am thinking that I can bring this fight up to the next level by using large doses of lyposomal vitamin C.

        So, in conclusion, my battle strategy is to use meticulous oral hygiene care, continue in the vegan diet, and take large doses of lyposomal vitamin C. I have many other strategies which I could go into, but right now these are the basic ones to my plan.




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        1. Yes, very interesting.
          The big question in my mind, though, is whether bacteria are really the heart of the problem as you seem to think. Viruses can be another cause of cardiovascular disease for example. As can smoking nd stress. Just what proportion of CVD can be attributed to each of these particular causes (or saturated fat or trans fat or junk carbs or lack of fresh fruit, vegetables and exercise) has never really been established . Personally, I have never been convinced by “single cause” theories. Then we have to consider if we are talking about proximate or distal causes etc I just think of them as risk factors rather than “causes” which is quite an ambiguous term in may ways
          I think there is some debate about the validity of those vitamin C studies you mention. And some other people swear that vitamin D and vitamin K deficiencies are the real causes of CVD.
          However, my personal experience has been that when I supplement with vitamin C (1-2 grams daily), I just do not get influenzas or colds. When I do not, then I do experience those viral infections. Same with cold sores – at the first tingle, I supplement with Lysine and that kills it. So I do not discount the possible effectiveness of these approaches. My concern is the potential for overdosing by using an orthomolecular approach.
          Still, good luck to you.




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          1. Tom, thank for your interest and reply to my comment. I am really not worried about taking large doses of Vitamin C because Dr. Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD has treated thousands of patients with doses of up to 50,000 miligrams per day with success and never had any side effects or adverse reactions. Many of his patients were treated with intravenous vitamin C. There are a lot of people in the alternative medicine community which you can communicate with on various FaceBook pages who take anywhere from 3000 mg to 20,000 mg of vitamin C on a daily basis. In the beginning it will give you loose bowels, but after awhile your body will adjust.

            Today I went to the Long Horn Steak House for Mother’s Day dinner with all of my relatives. My wife and I were the only vegans at the “meat paradise” restaurant. We were able to order side dishes of asparagus, broccoli, baked plain potato, rice, salads, and carrots. I think we enjoyed are meals a million times more than the meat eaters.




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            1. Thanks John. Yes, I also researched the literature on vitamin c some years ago and came to the same conclusion. However, I am in the Philippines at the moment and the only vitamin C I can get is Kirklands. That contains a number of fillers including a type of sodium. I feel safer taking pure ascorbic acid on a regular basis. Consequently, I am off the daily vitamin c for now.
              Glad to hear you enjoyed your meal, though. Where I am at the moment, other than plain white rice, it is difficult to find anything vegetarian (they usually add some shrimp or pork to vegetable side dishes). Even when I do find something, the vegetarian foods have usually been cooked in oil or had oil added . I end up eating a lot of white rice when I go out.
              I




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    1. John, thank you for this good summary on how pathogenic bacteria in the mouth can harm the rest of the body. I’ve been researching periodontal disease lately and found research suggesting that both stress and lack of sleep increase risk of periodontal disease as much as smoking. There is early evidence that taking oral probiotics can help make the ecosystem in the mouth much more conducive to the growth of healthy bacteria, thus reducing the periodontal bacteria. http://us5.campaign-archive2.com/?u=62a4c9e9d011a24ea449df4f8&id=b9fce7c964&e=8b33088c3d




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      1. Julie, thank you for your link. I read the webpage article. I agree that probiotics can change your gut flora to being populated with beneficial bacteria and these good bacteria will keep the plaque forming bacteria at bay. However, I am looking for away to attack the bad bacteria directly and this has led me to research the works of Linus Pauling and Dr. Thomas e. Levy, MD, JD, and cardiologist. They have both used high doses of intravenous vitamin C to cure thousands of different viral and bacterial infections. Lyposomal vitamin C is suppose to be better than intravenous vitamin C….so I am looking at this option.




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        1. Probiotics for your mouth will do just that. These probiotics make the environment in the mouth inhospitable to periodontal bacteria. Add beneficial bacteria to the oral environment, and the level of pathogens in the mouth drops significantly. The book “Oral Probiotics” is loaded with really interesting information on this topic. http://booksta.sh/book/293079/oral-probiotics-fighting-tooth-decay-periodontal-disease-and-airway-infections-using-natures-friendly-bacteria-by-case-adams-naturopath




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  15. I was eating homemade cole slaw every day made with apple cider vinegar. I really liked it and it kept my blood sugar from going down (I have reactive hypoglycemia but I am not diabetic). Eventually I noticed that my teeth really hurt and I had to stop eating it. Lately I have tried putting the apple cider vinegar in a glass of water and drinking it with a straw so that it has less contact with my teeth. Drinking it out of a glass is pretty gross!!




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  16. In many drug ads, they say Sulfonylurea. As if sulfur and urea (nitrogen) are a treatment for many disorders. There is a supplement that has both, NAC. NAC for diabetes from Live Extension; “Human studies of NAC to improve insulin sensitivity have recently appeared, especially in a group of people typically very difficult to treat. Profound insulin resistance is seen in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), along with a variety of other metabolic disturbances. One study showed that NAC at 1,200 mg per day along with 1,600 mg of the amino acid arginine promoted a trend toward normal ovulatory cycles and substantially improved insulin sensitivity.60 A short-term study showed that 1,800 mg of NAC daily helped improve insulin sensitivity in women with PCOS.61” I am asking what plant source is the richest source of Nitrogen and Sulfur, given that both can be lost in heating? I love plants, I love learning about plants and medicine, and I love being part of this investigation.




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    1. Based on ADA recommendations, post prandial blood sugar 1-2hrs after a meal should be <180. Based on this citing . a 1 hour post meal BG of 180 is consistent with a 7% A1C level, but a 1 hour post meal BG of <140 is consistent with a 4.9-5.9% A1C.. However the latter is much more difficult to achieve.




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    1. I believe these are the final videos in this series and are coming up in the future, probably Monday & Wednesday of next week.




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  17. I am actually curious what he has to say about blood sugar spikes on a
    low fat diet. I assume most people that get blood sugar spikes in these experiments from pure
    sugar are coming from a SAD diet but I’m curious if it has the same
    effects if you’ve been low fat for an extended period of time.
    Considering they reversed diabetes on the Kempner rice diet I’d be
    curious to see more research on processed sugar’s effects on a low fat
    eater.




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  18. So, give us the take home here? Use vinegar with food as much as possible? Maybe have more of that Italian style desert: strawberries macerated in balsamic vinegar.




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    1. Someone please correct me if I am wrong –
      I don’t think citric acid would have the same effects; it seems to be the acetyl group that is doing the biochemical work.




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  19. I sure wish I could figure out how to subscribe to the newsletter and get more stuff crammed into my email in box, even though I check this site every single day. I just need more contact and reminders of all the stuff I just read a few hours ago. Gosh there must an easy way for this to happen. Wonder why there’s never any information about signing up for these things.

    [/sarcasm]

    Yes it got me again…I loaded it with expletives.




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      1. Never an issue. I’m overly sensitive to repetitive inane stuff. Especially in one of my little “trusted corners” of the interweb. There’s generally one of those same boxes on all the “new” sites I visit when following search results. Hate those too. Be super happy when the BLOCKING programs learn how to prevent those as well.




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        1. Well, it annoys us all so I don’t think you are being overly sensitive. Fortunately my ad-blocker seems to kill most but not all of them.




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  20. question for the docs: does cooking the vinegar ruin the good effects? i often add vinegar to soups, and in baking (to curdle soy milk and make ‘buttermilk” for vegan baking”




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    1. Hi Sage that’s a good question. I haven’t been able to find any studies that compare using raw vinegar to using pasteurized (cooked) vinegar but all my instincts say that it would be less beneficial if it’s cooked. (for whatever that’s worth :-)




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    2. If it’s just ordinary distilled vinegar I doubt it would matter, but naturally fermented vinegar like Braggs or other brands have live probiotics, so cooking would kill those.




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    3. I think Vege-tater’s spot on… chemically, vinegar (acetic acid) is a thermally stable weak acid and it establishes an equilibrium concentration in whatever we add it to. So, cooking/heating a vinegar won’t bother the acetic acid, but will kill any “yeasty-beasties” that were there to start.




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    1. rada: You do not *need* to eat it. We are simply learning which of the long held beliefs about vinegar have some basis in science and learning what else science has to say about the stuff. People are always asking about this food or that food and what the science has to say about it. As you can see from the comments, this is a topic that people find very helpful and interesting. But Dr. Greger is in no way saying you need to eat it. Note that vinegar is *not* on the Daily Dozen list.




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      1. I Thea,

        That was a rhetorical question intended to prompt people to think and research further into the benefits of fibre in the diet ….. more succinctly the specific benefits of varying the prebiotics to tweak the by-products. I seem to recall seeing some studies in this (in vitro I think).

        Re: “this is a topic that people find very helpful and interesting”.
        So do I.
        ACV has been a poster child of the ‘health movement’ for decades……. coolectively we are in love with it …. sounds romantic ….. naturally cured from apples … down on the farm in a wooden barn …. matured in a wooden cask … lovingly cared for by grandpa … it must be miraculous.
        I’m an NF fanboyn… its great that your digging into the pile looking for the truth. You gotta scrape the bottom of the barrel to find any basis for the medicinal benefits of ACV though!




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  21. According to folklore Vinegar is a cure for every ailment known to humankind. Common sense tells us they can’t all be true.
    Originally it was added to food for it’s mild anti-bacterial properties which is probably also why it was combined with oil to coat the food, as a barrier to the air, so it wouldn’t spoil so fast. Sweeteners and flavouring are optional extras to increase palatability.
    In the modern age of fridges, cans and vacuum sealing e.t.c it serves no purpose other than a medium to get the sugar onto the salad so most people can eat it.
    Unfortunately it is mildly acidic and damages the teeth and causes mouth and oesophagus ulcers (it’s OK when it reaches the stomach, which is acidic anyway, but the mouth and oesophagus are not designed for acid conditions).
    The fumes are also an irritant, or worse, to the eyes, skin and upper respiratory tract, at approx. 20ppm and above.
    I only use it sparingly or not at all.




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  22. Since the beginning of this year I upped my vegatarian game by cutting diary and egg consumption by 90 – 95%. Also, I don’t drink, rarely eat carbs that don’t meet the recommended 5:1 carb to fiber ratio, and only occasionally have a few bites of dessert. My favorite drinks are tea and water. I workout at least 5 times a week and in my late forties, I am made fun us as “skinny guy” which my doctor assures me is thinly veiled envy.

    All of this is to provide context with my surprise that my A1c came back at 5.6 which I understand is normal, but at the absolute upper range of normal. I’m looking at my report and it clearly states that pre-diabetes is in the range of 5.7 – 6.4. I would have thought that I would have been in the middle to lower part of the normal range.

    Any thoughts on how to interpret this?




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  23. Since the beginning of this year I upped my vegatarian game by cutting diary and egg consumption by 90 – 95%. Also, I don’t drink, rarely eat carbs that don’t meet the recommended 5:1 carb to fiber ratio, and only occasionally have a few bites of dessert. My favorite drinks are tea and water. I workout at least 5 times a week and in my late forties, I am made fun us as “skinny guy” which my doctor assures me is thinly veiled envy.

    All of this is to provide context with my surprise that my A1c came back at 5.6 which I understand is normal, but at the absolute upper range of normal. I’m looking at my report and it clearly states that pre-diabetes is in the range of 5.7 – 6.4. I would have thought that I would have been in the middle to lower part of the normal range.

    Any thoughts on how to interpret this?




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  24. Since the beginning of this year I upped my vegatarian game by cutting diary and egg consumption by 90 – 95%. Also, I don’t drink, rarely eat carbs that don’t meet the recommended 5:1 carb to fiber ratio, and only occasionally have a few bites of dessert. My favorite drinks are tea and water. I workout at least 5 times a week and in my late forties, I am made fun us as “skinny guy” which my doctor assures me is thinly veiled envy.

    All of this is to provide context with my surprise that my A1c came back at 5.6 which I understand is normal, but at the absolute upper range of normal. I’m looking at my report and it clearly states that pre-diabetes is in the range of 5.7 – 6.4. I would have thought that I would have been in the middle to lower part of the normal range.

    Any thoughts on how to interpret this?




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    1. healthy ian: Did you mean to post this three times? I’ve seen the same post a few times now…
      .
      But to your actual content: Good for you for all the changes and progress you have made! That’s really great. I’m not an expert, but I have some thoughts for you:

      When it comes to diabetes, the issue is: what percentage of your diet is fat? http://nutritionfacts.org/video/what-causes-diabetes/ You could cut out a lot of dairy and eggs and still have enough dairy and eggs and fat from other sources to be a problem. (For more detailed information about this, you could read Dr. Barnard’s book:

      You might consider using cronometer.com (a free website) to really get a sense of how much fat you are eating. Or you might just try getting rid of that last 5-10% dairy and eggs and evaluate the other foods in your diet. Are you still eating oils? Do you eat a lot of processed foods like store bought veggie burgers?

      I’m thinking these ideas may help you identify or address problems. But I have two other thoughts: People have different natural ranges for various measurements. If you could work with an expert, maybe could find out if your number is really a problem/leading into a problem or not.

      Finally, do you know what your A1c was before you changed your diet? Is it possible that your number has been going down? ie, that it started even higher before you diet change? Maybe your number will continue to go down as you move more and more toward a healthy diet. I don’t know. Just throwing that out there.

      Good luck. Let us know how it goes.




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    2. Healthy Ian Thea has given you some excellent suggestions. I would first say, if you’ve been able to cut dairy and eggs by 90-95% how much of them are you still eating? Her recommendation to cut out the last 5-10% might just do the trick for you.

      Also not all people who have insulin resistance are overweight. You may simply be over fat. You might want to see if you can find someone in your area who has the equipment to do a body composition analysis and measure your percent body fat and your lean body mass. Are you a little less lean around the middle than you are everywhere else? If so that would be a clue that you might be over fat (with the little fat you have in the wrong places).

      Finally I would see if your doctor will check your fasting insulin level. If your fasting insulin is not high or near high then it’s less likely that the A1c of 5.6 is particularly risky for you.

      As Thea said, if you don’t know what your A1c was prior to your dietary changes and you started this change at the beginning of the year then it’s very possible that it’s on it’s way down. Either way 5.6 is still a “normal” number and you are eating a healthier diet than you were before so I wouldn’t let it get me down. Pat yourself on the back and keep moving forward.




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  25. Most every mention of Diabetes has been regarding Type 2, not Type 1. I find there to be little to no research on the topic of Type 1 and plant-based nutrition. Dr. Neil Bernard has been the only one I find to touch upon the subject, but just for a small excerpt in his book. Why is Type 1 such a mystery.




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  26. I really like balsamic vinegar, and I was eating it daily with my meals. Even mixed with water. I bought a different brand and the label has a warning that the vinegar contained lead. Does all balsamic vinegar have lead? I’m now afraid to have any balsamic vinegar.




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  27. MUST READ: HOW I GET CURE OF DIABETES WITH HERBAL MEDICINE!
    I was diagnosed of Diabetes disease in 2013 and I have tried all I can to get cured but all to no avail, my life was gradually coming to an end, until i saw a post in a health forum about a herbal doctor from Africa who prepares herbal remedy to cure all kind of diseases including Diabetes disease, at first i doubted if it was real but with much pressure i decided to give it a try, when i contact this herbal doctor via his email drokosodohealingalter@gmail.com or drokosodohealingalter@outlook.com he prepared an a herbal remedy and sent it to me via courier service, when i received this herbal remedy, i called him and he gave me step by step instructions on how to apply it, After i applied it as instructed, i was cured of this deadly disease within 14days of usage, I am now free from the deadly disease, here is his email again drokosodohealingalter@gmail.com or drokosodohealingalter@outlook.com
    dr okosodo can as well cure HIV, HERPES, ALS, AUTHRUX, SCABIES, HPV, LUPOSE, and bring back your EX BACK and cast spell to make you pregnant. all thanks to Dr Okosodo \\…//




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  28. The best scientifically obtained evidence about the vinegar and blood glucose control is reported by this review. However, it is not the definitive answer. It only says vinegar caries the promise. More evidence is needed to confirm these findings. Until then if someone wants to use, use with caution.

    http://www.opastonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/diabetes-control-is-vinegar-a-promising-candidate-to-help-achieve-the-targets-ijdmd-17-019.pdf




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  29. I take Insulin (lantis) to control my A1C, and Tragenta and Glipaside to control my blood sugar levels… some people may not understand if you have type 2 that insulin is for controlling A1C, Doctor’s never tell you unless you ask.




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