NutritionFacts.org

iron

Since the human body has no mechanism to excrete excess iron, it is probably best to refrain from consuming blood-based (heme) iron and taking iron supplements unless prescribed (for example, for pregnant women who are demonstrably anemic). This is because iron pills have been linked to birth complications such as preterm birth and maternal hypertension. Presumably because of iron’s pro-oxidant qualities, it can be a double-edged sword; lowering the iron level of cancer patients has been associated with dropping death rates. The absorption of plant-based (non-heme) iron can be regulated by the body, though, making dark green leafy veggies and legumes such as lentils preferable sources, especially since food is a package deal.

Topic summary contributed by a volunteer
To help out on the site, email volunteer@nutritionfacts.org

Watch videos about iron

  • Alzheimer’s Disease: Grain Brain or Meathead?
    Alzheimer’s Disease: Grain Brain or Meathead?
    Grain consumption appears strongly protective against Alzheimer’s disease, whereas animal fat intake has been linked to dementia risk.
  • Phytates for the Prevention of Cancer
    Phytates for the Prevention of Cancer
    Phytic acid (phytate), concentrated in food such as beans, whole grains, and nuts, may help explain lower cancer rates among plant-based populations.
  • Bacon, Eggs, and Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy
    Bacon, Eggs, and Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy
    Eating meat or eggs before pregnancy may increase the risk of gestational diabetes.
  • Greens vs. Glaucoma
    Greens vs. Glaucoma
    Kale and collard greens contain vision-protecting plant nutrients such as zeaxanthin that may significantly lower the risk of glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness.
  • Phosphate Additives in Meat Purge and Cola
    Phosphate Additives in Meat Purge and Cola
    The consumption of phosphorus preservatives in junk food and injected into meat may damage blood vessels, accelerate the aging process, and contribute to osteoporosis.
  • Canned Beans or Cooked Beans?
    Canned Beans or Cooked Beans?
    Canned beans are convenient, but are they as nutritious as home cooked? And if we do used canned, should we drain them or not?
  • Nutrient-Dense Approach to Weight Management
    Nutrient-Dense Approach to Weight Management
    Americans eating meat-free diets average higher intakes of nearly every nutrient, while maintaining a lower body weight, perhaps due in part to their higher resting metabolic rates.
  • Eggs and Choline: Something Fishy
    Eggs and Choline: Something Fishy
    Too much choline, a compound concentrated in eggs and other animal products, can make bodily secretions smell like rotting fish and may increase the risk of heart disease due to conversion in the gut...
Page 1 of 3123