How to Prevent Alzheimer’s with Diet

How to Prevent Alzheimer’s with Diet
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What evidence is there that our meat-sweet diets play a cause-and-effect role in dementia?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What is behind the dramatic increase in dementia in Japan over recent decades? Maybe it’s rising obesity rates or the “increases in cholesterol, saturated fat, and iron from increases in [meat and other] animal products.” Overall, calories went up just about 10% in Japan, whereas animal fat and meat consumption rose 500%, about 10 times the rise in sugary junk. Now, during this timespan, rice consumption went down, but the thinking is that rather than white rice somehow being protective, maybe they were eating something worse instead. It’s like when you find fish consumption is correlated with less disease, you wonder if it’s because they’re eating that rather than some worse meat.

If you look across multiple countries, you see a similar pattern, with “[t]he most important dietary link to [Alzheimer’s appearing] to be meat consumption, with eggs and high-fat dairy also [maybe] contributing.” There appears to be a really tight correlation between Alzheimer’s and per capita meat supply. And, then, studies within countries uncover similar findings, with Alzheimer’s and cognitive decline associated with meaty, sweety, fatty diets, whereas most plant foods are associated with risk reduction.

This could be for a variety of reasons. Animal products tend to have more copper, mercury, lead, and cadmium, and no folate but contain saturated fat and cholesterol, and pro-inflammatory advanced glycation end products, so many mechanisms that dietary modification may be our best bet for reducing risk of Alzheimer’s disease. But, how do we know it’s cause and effect? The evidence that meat consumption is causally linked to Alzheimer’s disease, well, there’s the strength of the association, the consistency across different types of studies, the fact that the dietary changes preceded the risk of dementia, the dose response—more meat linked to more risk—a bunch of plausible mechanisms. We know that “[m]eat is…a risk factor for other chronic diseases,” but there’s never been randomized controlled trials to put it to the test.

When you read reviews of the damaging effects of high-fat diets to the brain and cognition, “a number of factors are proposed to [account for the] high-fat diet-induced damage to the brain…[—] oxidative stress, insulin resistance, inflammation, and changes to [blood vessels and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier].” But, these are based mostly on studies of rodents. Yes, high fat diets can cause energy dysfunction in the brain, based on fancy MRI techniques, but if you’re looking at that and thinking that’s a weird looking brain, that’s because those are rat brains.

But, let me show you two sets of human cerebral arteries, the arteries deep inside your skull. These are the brain arteries on autopsy of non-demented elderly individuals. Here are the arteries from Alzheimer’s patients, clogged nearly completely shut with atherosclerotic plaque packed with fat and cholesterol. With CT scans, you can follow this “intracranial artery stenosis”—this brain-artery clogging—over time, and follow the “progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease.” Those who only had low-grade stenosis were pretty stable over time in terms of their cognitive function and ability to dress themselves and other activities of daily living, whereas those with more clogging started slipping over the years, and those who started out with the most brain atherosclerosis rapidly went downhill, and were twice as likely to progress to full-blown Alzheimer’s.

“Chronic consumption of standard Western diets [rich in saturated fat] and cholesterol [may] compromise [our] cerebrovascular integrity” and compromise the blood vessels in our brain. So, of course, drugs are recommended—“pharmacological modulation” of diet-induced dysfunction—but why not just try to eat healthier in the first place?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Caio Resende via Pexels. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What is behind the dramatic increase in dementia in Japan over recent decades? Maybe it’s rising obesity rates or the “increases in cholesterol, saturated fat, and iron from increases in [meat and other] animal products.” Overall, calories went up just about 10% in Japan, whereas animal fat and meat consumption rose 500%, about 10 times the rise in sugary junk. Now, during this timespan, rice consumption went down, but the thinking is that rather than white rice somehow being protective, maybe they were eating something worse instead. It’s like when you find fish consumption is correlated with less disease, you wonder if it’s because they’re eating that rather than some worse meat.

If you look across multiple countries, you see a similar pattern, with “[t]he most important dietary link to [Alzheimer’s appearing] to be meat consumption, with eggs and high-fat dairy also [maybe] contributing.” There appears to be a really tight correlation between Alzheimer’s and per capita meat supply. And, then, studies within countries uncover similar findings, with Alzheimer’s and cognitive decline associated with meaty, sweety, fatty diets, whereas most plant foods are associated with risk reduction.

This could be for a variety of reasons. Animal products tend to have more copper, mercury, lead, and cadmium, and no folate but contain saturated fat and cholesterol, and pro-inflammatory advanced glycation end products, so many mechanisms that dietary modification may be our best bet for reducing risk of Alzheimer’s disease. But, how do we know it’s cause and effect? The evidence that meat consumption is causally linked to Alzheimer’s disease, well, there’s the strength of the association, the consistency across different types of studies, the fact that the dietary changes preceded the risk of dementia, the dose response—more meat linked to more risk—a bunch of plausible mechanisms. We know that “[m]eat is…a risk factor for other chronic diseases,” but there’s never been randomized controlled trials to put it to the test.

When you read reviews of the damaging effects of high-fat diets to the brain and cognition, “a number of factors are proposed to [account for the] high-fat diet-induced damage to the brain…[—] oxidative stress, insulin resistance, inflammation, and changes to [blood vessels and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier].” But, these are based mostly on studies of rodents. Yes, high fat diets can cause energy dysfunction in the brain, based on fancy MRI techniques, but if you’re looking at that and thinking that’s a weird looking brain, that’s because those are rat brains.

But, let me show you two sets of human cerebral arteries, the arteries deep inside your skull. These are the brain arteries on autopsy of non-demented elderly individuals. Here are the arteries from Alzheimer’s patients, clogged nearly completely shut with atherosclerotic plaque packed with fat and cholesterol. With CT scans, you can follow this “intracranial artery stenosis”—this brain-artery clogging—over time, and follow the “progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease.” Those who only had low-grade stenosis were pretty stable over time in terms of their cognitive function and ability to dress themselves and other activities of daily living, whereas those with more clogging started slipping over the years, and those who started out with the most brain atherosclerosis rapidly went downhill, and were twice as likely to progress to full-blown Alzheimer’s.

“Chronic consumption of standard Western diets [rich in saturated fat] and cholesterol [may] compromise [our] cerebrovascular integrity” and compromise the blood vessels in our brain. So, of course, drugs are recommended—“pharmacological modulation” of diet-induced dysfunction—but why not just try to eat healthier in the first place?

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Caio Resende via Pexels. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video.

Doctor's Note

For those familiar with the scientific record, this all comes as no surprise. In fact, I’ve covered similar studies in the past:

In fact, I was even debating whether or not to make this video. It’s like when a new broccoli-is-good-for-you study comes out. Been there; done that. But so many people seem confused about the role of diet and lifestyle in dementia that I figured I’d just cover the latest, even though there’s not much new ground broken.

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

230 responses to “How to Prevent Alzheimer’s with Diet

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    1. Older people tend to be sicker than younger people. Also, on average, unemployed people tend to be sicker than employed people.

      Various diseases and traumas cause cholesterol to decline. These include Alzheimer’s, alcoholism, certain liver diseases and cancers, infectious diseases, heart attacks and traumas like surgery. Malnutrition alxo causes cholesterol to decline. Hence the association between low cholesterol (often caused by illness and trauma) and increased mortality risk eg

      “…. results of a recent meta-analysis10 of cause-specific mortality (including unpublished data on noncardiovascular causes of death) from 10 large cohort studies and 2 international studies that concluded that reduced serum cholesterol is not related to excess mortality among cohorts of employed individuals, whereas population-based studies did show a relationship. The investigators proposed that the discrepancy in results was probably due to a higher frequency of risk factors associated with low cholesterol, eg, alcohol abuse and ill health, in population-based study samples compared with employed cohorts.”
      http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/92/9/2365.full




      31
      1. But still from the third citation:

        “Participants with low serum total cholesterol seem to have a lower survival rate than participants with an elevated cholesterol level, irrespective of concomitant diseases or health status.”




        2
        1. Yes but that is because in some long latency chronic diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’s, unplanned declines in cholesterol (and weight) – ie declines which are not the result of dietary changes or increased exercise or statins (drugs) – are actually preclinical symptoms of disease. That is, unplanned or otherwise inexplicable declines in cholesterol and weight can precede a formal diagnosis of disease. Often by many years eg

          “Results Cholesterol levels in men with dementia and, in particular, those with Alzheimer disease had declined at least 15 years before the diagnosis and remained lower than cholesterol levels in men without dementia throughout that period. The difference in slopes was robust to adjustment for potential confounding factors, including vascular risk factors, weight change, alcohol intake, and use of lipid-lowering agents.

          Conclusion A decline in serum total cholesterol levels may be associated with early stages in the development of dementia.”
          https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/793179

          and

          “To minimize the impact of preclinical malignancy on serum cholesterol concentrations in our study, we conducted a lag analysis that excluded cases diagnosed within the first 9 years of follow-up, which showed the inverse association substantially attenuated and no longer statistically significant (RR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.87-1.06). Progressive attenuation was observed with the exclusion of the first 3, 9, 12, and 15 years of follow-up (Table 2).”
          http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/18/11/2814.long

          “”This finding supports the idea that the low serum cholesterol levels that we detected as a possible risk factor may actually have been the result of undiagnosed cancers,” he added. “In addition, we observed a greater decline in total serum cholesterol from baseline to 3 years, specifically among the cases that were diagnosed in the early half of the observation, as opposed to the latter portion.”
          https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/711853#vp_2




          18
      2. Consumed in the absence of refined sugar, plant lipids have no deleterious effect on human health. Animal fats don’t either if they are derived from animals raised without pharmaceuticals and tainted feed.

        ALL CELLS have the ability to make fat, elsewise their organelles would dissolve into the watery cytoplasm.




        4
        1. “Consumed in the absence of refined sugar, plant lipids have no deleterious effect on human health. Animal fats don’t either if they are derived from animals raised without pharmaceuticals and tainted feed.”

          And your evidence for these stunning statements is what precisely? If you can substantiate this amazing claim, I reckon you’ll be up for a Nobel Prize.

          If not, it’ll be a tinfoil hat.




          17
        2. Well, I have been watching the music version of Cells and have learned quite a bit and at least know the words cytoplasm and organelles and know that the things, which don’t go into the Krebs Cycle may go to make adipose.

          I haven’t put it all together yet, but I just started yesterday and so far, I did these music videos and some of the notes and quizzes, but if I listened well enough to a different lecture on Krebs Cycle, if you don’t exercise, you can’t cause the Krebs cycle to be activated…. or something like that….

          https://www.sciencemusicvideos.com/the-cell-song-3/

          https://www.sciencemusicvideos.com/enzymes/

          https://www.sciencemusicvideos.com/glycolysis-rap-version/

          https://www.sciencemusicvideos.com/krebs/

          Here is my vote to have Dr. Greger work with someone like this in the future and do some musical videos.

          A musical year in review? LOL!




          3
          1. Is it my imagination or are these latest videos and blog comments just like the double Krebs cycle coming after glycolysis?

            And I think I have experienced all of it here.




            1
    2. Anna,

      There is a lot of noise out there an what diets are right . To be perfectly honest I was a Paleo purist for years . I ate grass fed meats an veggies very little
      Fruit an I was told that this diet is the best diet for just about every disease out there. Well I didn’t see any improvement in my health. Before I went with the Paleo diet I was a vegan an I felt amazing I had high energy I was in good spirits an I ate an abundance of fresh fruits. Fresh juices an also cooked food as well.
      An I’m happy to say I’m am back on it agin for almost a year now An I won’t go back to eating high fat low carbs diet again. I did the keto genie diet an that was a nightmare for me. An actually put on weight An I had terrible sleep. An my cholesterol levels kept rising so that diet is not good for averyone. If you want to ward off Alzheimer’s like I do my mom had an it was just horrible horrible disease an I’m also doing my best to prevent it. I eat plant based with lots of fruit an veggies grains potatoes all high carbs an like I said I feel great. If you follow Dr. Greger he wants you to eat these foods . Pick up his book. Don’t get caught up in those low carb diets it’s just a big trend . If you have the APOE GENE FOR Alzheimer’s the last thing you want to do is put fat into your diet that gene already makes it so you need to go in the other direction.. I hope this helps you or someone else that’s confused about all of the drama out there, for me personally I had to stop listening to the people An doctors that promoting the low carb high fat diet. It was driving me insane . Eat your veggies an fruits an your body will do what it needs to do.




      30
      1. Thank you for giving your experience, I’m actually on WFPB already for 3 years, I just want to make everything clear to myself so that I’m able to promote this diet to other people. I have one issue though, I think my hair has thinned a lot, I guess I need to eat more protein, but it’s hard for me to eat enough protein rich plant food without going beyond my caloric needs…




        1
        1. Protein is a necessity especially study shows as one ages. It is thought the elderly may require more protein to do things like maintain muscle mass by some study.

          But on hair thinning Tom has provided on another thread links to the issue. Perhaps he will read this and repeat Some theorize hair thinning to be related to insufficient iodine in ones diet. Not to say all hair thinning is caused by that especially in elderly as other factors may be causal.
          However vegans do not tend to eat a lot of iodized salt nor fish or similar things. It is iodized for a reason as many historically did not have it in standard American diets. So like supplementing vit D in milk they have taken to iodize salt.

          A easy cheap thing to take to supplement iodine in diet is kelp. Other sea plants may have contaminants and must be avoided. But kelp especially of the northern atlantic variety seems to not be so contaminated.
          It can be bought and crumbled a little bit of it a teaspoon or so into things we may eat. Or for about 5 USD tablets(60 or so in a bottle) of compressed kelp may be purchased. I don’t like the taste and as it is so easy will take a tablet every couple of days or so.
          So if vegan one may consider that. Of course if you are using table salt or eating fish that would not apply and other cause may be present. Some considering themselves to be WFPB do consume such things.

          Protein supplements such as pea protein are available but it seems many protein supplements of all kinds regardless of type are contaminated as well.
          So if considered I would take care the company sources organic and tests for contamination, usually heavy metals, lead or arsenic being most commonly found. They do usually have few calories.




          5
          1. Iodine is present naturally in some veggies but a typical serving provides usually less then 10% of RDA.
            So unless one eats a bunch despite that there may be a deficiency.




            2
          2. Ron, in New Mexico. Our one ocean is entirely radiated from Fukushima = poisoned, contaminated, radiated water from Fukushima, still flowing into our one ocean. If you look at a map, you will see what I mean by one ocean. Although some people say the kelp on North Atlantic is okay, I eat nothing from the ocean since Fukushima – 7 years and counting.

            I am an organic vegan and my hair is thinning.

            I was and still am hoping to find a solution here that I can use.

            Thanks




            1
            1. I consume Dulse seaweed for my daily iodine by including some on my daily salad. Maine Seacoast Vegetables does extensive annual testing including radiological testing which has consistently found very low levels similar to the low background levels encountered. You can learn more about that at Maine Coast Sea Vegetables.




              4
              1. I like your comment, quickdraw, because I LOVE Dulse! I eat it as a substitute for potato chips — I think I have a salt tooth I’m trying to defang. I eat just a small serving a few times a week. It’s good!




                2
              2. I use Maine Coast dulse too. It has a manageable amount of iodine whereas kelp has a very high amount of iodine and you have to be pretty careful how much you take of it (kelp). Too much iodine is not good.




                1
            2. Ok…show me a study or something verifying north atlantic kelp contamination by radioactive elements?
              The entire world is subject to some radioactive element pollution in the form of plutonium to my dim recollection as cause of fifties and sixties nuclear testings.
              I think we will be hard pressed to find totally uncontaminated foods from any source in the present world. The question is always how much is bad for us.




              7
              1. Referencing this..
                The 2000 Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation to the General Assembly states that:
                The main man-made contribution to the exposure of the world’s population [to radiation] has come from the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, from 1945 to 1980. Each nuclear test resulted in unrestrained release into the environment of substantial quantities of radioactive materials, which were widely dispersed in the atmosphere and deposited everywhere on the Earth’s surface.”
                Airborn it presents everywhere. Thus in trace forms in anything grown in soil. It is however in such small amount as to be basically untestable using normal testing procedures.

                Yes there is probably some minute amounts of radioactive elements present in any sea veggies found in the north atlantic. Accidents with nuclear submarines have occurred as well.
                The question is how much is harmful. Some veggies are very harmful to health to consume due to contaminants. Others seem not.
                We presently live in a contaminated world. Fish are the most common purveyor of contaminants to humans as fish filter through their breathing water and retain them in their tissues such as cows and such due with eating grains. Contaminants found in grass or grains pass on through into the meat.
                Sea veggies some contain specific contaminants such as arsenic lead and others.This is usually dependent upon site specific causality, where it is harvested subject to agricultural run off industrial pollution and the like. Kelp I feel safe with personally if grown in the north atlantic.

                But to each their own. Would I a vegan chance iodine deficiency which may present as hair loss and other problems on the remote chance a supplement tested for purity from the north atlantic may contain some minute radioactive element which is present in soils and oceans throughout the world..no.
                But each to their own. I personally think it is always a issue of management of risk. Risk always exists in our polluted world presently.




                5
            3. I’ve been on a WFPB diet for over twenty years and over that time my hair has thinned considerably. Last year I started drinking two cups of soy milk a day and saw the rate of hair loss slow down. Then I ran another marathon and my hair started falling out again. I didn’t know what to do. I saw my doctor, and a dermatologist–no luck. I then made it a point to make sure that I ate complete proteins and didn’t skip foods like grains and only eat beans, for example, in my daily diet. I added some pea protein powder to my diet, too. It has dramatically slowed my hair loss and I have new sprouts all over the place in the front where I hadn’t been growing hair for years. There’s still a small section that hasn’t grown back and it’s the thinnest area on my head, but maybe over time this will improve. I don’t know if it’s really the protein, or something else, but it’s the only thing I can think of that I’ve changed. I already get plenty of iodine in my diet. I do worry that consuming more protein although plant based might be leaching out too much calcium from my bones, however.




              4
              1. Han I am just another blogger expressing opinion here with no particular qualification.
                I do however have familiarity with endurance sports. To my dim recollection there is some connection with the increase in blood volumes and lower iron levels in tested endurance athletes.
                AS to that causing hair loss…I just don’t know.
                But I would have my iron levels tested. Not a bad thing to have tested in any event as a endurance athlete.
                I tested low personally when I did such though seemingly having adequate intake.




                1
                1. To add..don’t have a dog in this fight.
                  Shaved head. Do have a beard though it is only about 3 or so inches long ;)




                  0
                2. Thanks, Ron! I get my iron levels tested every year. They are always on the low side of normal. I do make sure I eat iron rich foods and even, once or twice a week take an iron supplement during marathon training months. I also wanted to say, hair loss does not run in my family. Everyone else, males included, have very thick heads of hair. None of them eat vegan and none are runners. I still believe this is the healthiest most humane way to eat, and all the important numbers: cholesterol, BP, heart rate etc. are fantastic.




                  0
                3. So I got my blood work done the other day. My iron is very low, it’s 5.3 μmol / l (the lowest from the normal range is 10.7), I also checked ferritin, it’s 25 μg / l. Ferritin is within the normal range but below 40 is considered low. My hemoglobin is rather high, 151g/l. I track my iron on Cronometer and nearly always get all my iron to 100%, so I don’t know why I have the deficit.




                  0
              2. Did you have extensive fall out, individual hair thinning or both? It’s because I don’t loose hair, it’s not rarer, it’s just thinner and less healthy




                1
            4. I am very sad to hear of the hair loss issue some of you are dealing with. Strangely, I have experienced the opposite, I am 53 and my hair now is extremely thick, so thick I have to get it thinned out every time I get my hair cut and it grows right back!

              I’m a long time vegetarian than a vegan for the past 15 years, but not always eating in an ideal way. When I cleaned up my diet further to eat along the lines of what is taught here, my hair changed. I added green veggies every day in most meals, broccoli, beans and flaxseed daily. I also dramatically increased the amount of green tea I drank every day (not by design, just a habit). During this time, my hair got WAY thicker. And it has stayed that way, probably since I continue to eat in this manner.

              I’ve heard the “your hair needs protein to grow” argument. But I don’t buy that. During this time when my hair has been in turbo mode, I cut down on higher protein vegan foods, simply because I moved to New Zealand where its harder to find.

              I am not sure if this is of help at all to anyone experiencing hair loss, but wanted to throw it out there, simply because its been a dramatic change for me. Also, I did spend one year of that time doing very expensive liquid chinese herbs to try to reverse this one resistant health condition I was battling. At that time my hair grew even faster, it was almost comical! So maybe chinese medicine is an avenue to check out as well if the hair loss continues, as an option. Or maybe green tea helps? Just some thoughts.




              0
            1. Anna, you are very well-spoken for an 18 year old. Good for you that you are researching for your health!

              I laugh, because my family was junk food and fast food and processed food. TV dinners, changed to Microwave dinners, eaten in front of a television.

              Genuinely, good for you!

              Feels like you need an internal list of questions:

              Do you dye your hair or pull at your hair?
              Do you know that your hormones are okay?
              Do you eat enough nutrition and calories?
              Do you have stress?
              Do you get sleep?
              Do you take any drugs of any types?
              Do you wear braids?
              Do you chemically treat your hair in any way?
              Do you have thyroid problems? (Do you get enough Iodine, Selenium, B12, D3)
              Have you had bloodwork recently where you know you aren’t low in any particular nutrition?
              Do you have anemia?




              1
          1. I don’t loose hair, it’s just that each individual hair is not as thick as it used to be when consumed animal foods. I am going to eat a pinch of kelp powder each day then. Also I consume legumes every day. I need to do blood work, I guess




            1
            1. Regarding iodine, you might want to take a standardized dose at the RDA of 150 mcg to know what you are getting, a least as long as you are doing an experiment. You can do this with kelp tabs or potassium iodide tabs.




              1
        2. I would look for other reasons for hair loss other than protein. Protein is not an issue if you’re eating a balanced WFPB diet. More likely causes: heredity, stress, hypothyroid, iron deficiency (unlikely on WFPB), Lupus, polycystic ovary, scalp condition, etc. I would see your doctor about the root cause,




          5
        3. Anna,

          Eat leafy greens an avocados for you hair . The great thing about being plant based is you really don’t need to count calories because there no junk food involved. Eat until you feel satisfied not stuffed. I don’t count calories or weigh food that just makes your stress out more over every little thing An it
          Adds more stress to you life That’s why I love this diet. I don’t even look at like its a diet it’s just a healthy lifestyle. An I haven’t put in any weight if your looking to lose weight that just cut back a little on grains. An make sure you stick to low fat .




          1
          1. So I got my blood work done the other day. My iron is very low, it’s 5.3 μmol / l (the lowest from the normal range is 10.7), I also checked ferritin, it’s 25 μg / l. Ferritin is within the normal range but below 40 is considered low. My hemoglobin is rather high, 151g/l. I track my iron on Cronometer and nearly always get all my iron to 100%, so I don’t know why I have the deficit.




            0
        4. How can you not eat enough protein on a WFPB diet? I specifically try to eat a low protein diet. Every day I have tracked my diet with cronometer.com, it says I have consumed over 100 grams of protein. I don’t see how this is possible.




          7
          1. Well, I also track my foods on Cronometer and I genuinely don’t understand how do you get so much protein. I am small and consume 1300 calories per day, I eat oatmeal, a smoothie with flax seeds and almond fortified milk and a fruit salad for breakfast, a meal of grains and legumes for dinner, a huge bowl of greens or vegetables for dinner. I hardly ever get over 35 g of protein per day and I can’t fit any more in that 1300 calorie limit.




            0
            1. Well, if you’re small and only consume 1300 calories a day, why would you think that 35 grams isn’t a lot of protein? Why would you need more protein than that? You don’t want to make yourself sick and overload your kidneys. Sounds like you might not be getting enough carbs.




              2
          2. We’ll seems to depend. From NASM site but I think it reflects the current issue as per vegan athletes. More and more athletes are trending vegan and WFPB as a auxiliary to muscle recovery. A 2018 sundance film attests to that.
            A quote from nasm..
            How much protein is really needed?
            Well, that depends. There is no research that a vegetarian or vegan athlete has higher protein needs than someone consuming a mixed diet. However, consuming the variety of foods, complementary proteins, and essential amino acids must be taken into account for an overall balanced intake. According to the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA), the average person needs 0.8 grams/kilogram a day of protein.
            An active individual has increased protein needs. Exercising or training five or more days per week requires 1.2-1.7 g/kg per day. With higher intensity exercise there is increased protein utilization for protein development and tissue repair. This roughly equates to 82-116 grams of protein per day for a 150-pound person.

            So it seems to depend a bit on lifestyle/exercise amount and weight.




            5
          1. So I got my blood work done the other day. My iron is very low, it’s 5.3 μmol / l (the lowest from the normal range is 10.7), I also checked ferritin, it’s 25 μg / l. Ferritin is within the normal range but below 40 is considered low. My hemoglobin is rather high, 151g/l. I track my iron on Cronometer and nearly always get all my iron to 100%, so I don’t know why I have the deficit.




            0
            1. Hi Anna Because some people don’t absorb iron as well as others. There are a few things you can try.

              •Always have meals that are high in iron with vitamin C •don’t eat meals high in iron which are also high in calcium •do you run? We are exactly sure of exact mechanism but runners-particularly woman runners-tend to run low. •take a veggie iron supplement like Gaia.
              •there are a couple videos on just this topic if you look above under iron. The comment section should be helpful.

              I know a lot of people have issues with supplements but as a female runner it has always been as issue

              Either way if it is your issue with fatigue etc things should improve within a few weeks.




              0
                1. HiAnna Sorry. Thinning hair is another sign of low iron. I wrote original comment so long ago I had to review why I thought iron. Good luck.




                  0
                  1. Thank you for your help. I am concerned about my absorption. I always eat at least raw vegetables with my meals, so there is plenty of vitamin C with iron rich foods. What if I don’t absorb the iron from the supplements too? What do you think about Garden of life RAW iron? I have seen people recommended it in the comment section. Daia is pricey.




                    0
        5. I would say eat Quinoa & Tofu ( Which ever you prefer either soft/Med/Firm) & all kinds of beans without increasing caloric math.




          1
      2. “To be perfectly honest I was a Paleo purist for years . I ate grass fed meats an veggies very little
        Fruit an I was told that this diet is the best diet for just about every disease out there. Well I didn’t see any improvement in my health. Before I went with the Paleo diet I was a vegan an I felt amazing I had high energy I was in good spirits an I ate an abundance of fresh fruits. Fresh juices an also cooked food as well.
        An I’m happy to say I’m am back on it agin for almost a year now An I won’t go back to eating high fat low carbs diet again. I did the keto genie diet an that was a nightmare for me. An actually put on weight An I had terrible sleep. An my cholesterol levels kept rising so that diet is not good for averyone.”

        Margaret Sims, thank you very much for that information. Very helpful. The Paleo diet is so popular now……very good to know your experiences with it




        3
        1. ” Before I went with the Paleo diet I was a vegan an I felt amazing I had high energy I was in good spirits an I ate an abundance of fresh fruits.”

          I’m curious to know what made you drop the vegan diet in the first place. How long had you been on it (the first time) before you went Paleo?




          1
          1. Robert ,

            I switched because I was brain washed by all of the information out there. An at the time my holistic doctor of two years insisted that I would
            Not do well with a high carb diet because I have an under active thyroid. So if you ever research the diet for hypothyroidism all you see is them promoting the paloe diet an bone broths. I had tons of all of it an my thyroid is still under active , so I decided to change it An I no longer see
            That doctor. An I have to say when you have a under active thyroid you literal don’t have any energy An this doctor just put me in a bunch of
            Supplements that he was making him a lot of money to give me some energy . An in reality it’s actually fruits that give you energy An are very healing to the body an they do not cause diabetes like they want you to believe. There’s a lot of conflicting information at there. I’m hoping to found a doctor that will not tell me that I need to eat meat to be well. I just not buying that story. I wish that dr. Gregor would do a video on a vegan diet an hypothyroidism everyone says it can’t be done an that you need animal products . Been there done that it didn’t work for me. I hope that answer your question
            That it can’t be done.




            5
            1. “‘ I wish that dr. Gregor would do a video on a vegan diet an hypothyroidism everyone says it can’t be done an that you need animal products ‘”

              Same here! I have similar experience with under active thyroid and everyone is recommending paleo diet. I am really looking forward to Dr. Greger’s video on this topic.




              0
    3. Quoting from your first citation:

      “Mortality decreased with the increases in both TC and LDL-C concentrations . . . These findings suggest that low TC and low LDL-C may be independent predictors of high mortality in the very elderly.”

      And from the second:

      “There was a significant negative association of serum HDL cholesterol with mortality. Mortality was highest (53.3%) in men with serum HDL cholesterol less than 0.80 mmol/l. Mortality was low (16.5%) in women with serum HDL cholesterol greater than 1.8 mmol/l.”

      And finally, from the third:

      “Participants with low serum total cholesterol seem to have a lower survival rate than participants with an elevated cholesterol level, irrespective of concomitant diseases or health status.”

      Other studies document the positive relationship between consumption of lipids and brain health (see Dr. David Perlmutter’s work, for example.”

      So if you have trouble convincing “Captcha” that you are not a robot, consider increasing your intake of plant fats (“phyto-lipids”.)




      2
      1. Ah, yes, the wonderfully entrepeneurial Dr Perlmutter

        “As Perlmutter’s megaphone has grown, so, too, has his brand empire — he has sold everything from “Empowering Coconut Oil” to supplement blends tailored for specific demographics, like the $90 “Scholar’s Advantage Pack” for “young adults seeking to optimize cognitive function,” and the $160 “Senior Empowerment Pack,” a “combination of formulas designed to help keep you cognitively sharp as you age.” One book pointed readers to an $8,500 brain detoxification retreat run by Perlmutter, which included shamanic healing ceremonies. (He even has his own organic foaming hand soap.)”
        https://www.thecut.com/2015/06/problem-with-the-grain-brain-doctor.html

        Why on Earth do you believe all this snake oil about fats and grass fed baloney or whatever it is that all the fad dieters are eating this year?




        6
    4. I a suspecting that some of the “J” shaped, might be because not all vegans supplement B12 and Omega 3.

      I say that based on the London study.

      Vegans who don’t take care of their B12, Omega 3 and D3 have higher brain problems.




      4
    5. The one with elderly and cholesterol in the elderly gives some thoughts on it.

      “Cholesterol levels seem to decrease with age [5,7,15]. Low S-TC in the elderly has often been seen as a marker of frailty [12]. The inverse association between S-TC and mortality has also been interpreted to be due to confounding by chronic diseases such as dementia or malnutrition [16,17].”

      For those of us who have tried to keep elderly people eating enough calories or food at all, that makes sense.




      3
    1. I just read this study. Uh-oh…..this raises so issue, years? Hopefully dR. G. addresses this study.

      What kind of foods do you eat, not eat? Thanks.




      0
    2. The study data are fine. It is the interpretation of them which is the problem. A cynic might even say that the interpretation placed on the data by the authors is delibetately deceptiive.

      Peope in wealthy Westernised countries with advanced health systems (usually offering excellent universal care) tend to eat diets relatively rich in animal foods and fats. People in poor countries with little or no health care tend to eat diets of poverty high in carbohydates and low in meat and animal fat. It’s not surprising that people in rich countries tend to live longer than people in poor countries.

      See or example this Harvard article “PURE study makes headlines, but the conclusions are misleading”
      https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2017/09/08/pure-study-makes-headlines-but-the-conclusions-are-misleading/

      It is probably just a coincidence that the leaf authors of the article you link to are at McMaster University which receives funding from the Canadian and US dairy industries. Dairy foods are apparently the main source of saturated fat in North American diets.




      18
      1. Tom, that is a great article.

        Yes, they group the good carbs and refined carbs together and leave out trans fats and separate the other fats.

        And aren’t taking into account poverty diets, and things like access to medical care in the first place.

        It is so easy to groups things together to get whatever results you want.

        I am genuinely pondering nuts.

        Today, I had one of my keto friends take her husband to the hospital. He is having so much pain that they don’t know what to do.

        I got her to say that she would try WFPB, but it would seem like that is a case, where nuts would have to be limited, because they have been filling up their arteries so much over the past year.

        Do you have any insight on that?

        The Vegan doctors – some leave nuts out and some don’t.

        I want to genuinely help these people.

        They are so far away from WFPB that at least being able to have nuts would be easier than not having nuts, but they both have Diabetes and have had heart issues (one had a heart attack) and have pain to the point of not being able to walk far, but they have rejected WFPB until today.

        Because I texted back to a group today about it, I am going to have a group of 10 people who are not started on this way of life at all do a vegan cooking class and I still have so much to learn myself.




        2
        1. Deb

          For people who already have heart disease, I would suggest the Esselstyn approach. His view is that “As nuts are a rich source of saturated fats, my preference is no nuts for heart disease patients. That also eliminates peanuts and peanut butter even though peanuts are officially a legume. For those with established heart disease to add more saturated fat that is in nuts is inappropriate”
          http://www.dresselstyn.com/site/nuts-what-about-nuts-i-hear-so-many-different-opinions/

          and this
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWOwZTo6GBE

          You might want to suggest that they watch some of the YouTube videos of Dr Esselstyn’s presentations eg
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYTf0z_zVs0

          That one is an hour long though but this is much shorter
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sl97IvbfUNQ




          2
          1. Tom,

            Thank you so much! I will be watching them!

            The hard part is that leaving things like nuts out makes a hard dietary transition harder.

            Need to find things they can eat, which they like.

            I have been using powdered peanut butter. Wondering if the 95% less fat changes the equation.




            1
      1. Bahaha! Favorite quote here “So, unless you are prepared to believe that eating only white rice is the reason you are likely to be gored by a bull and bleed to death- this study doesn’t mean what the headlines say it means!”




        4
      2. Dr. Greger, I thought the photos of the brain arteries…….first the clean, unclogged arteries…….then the clogged ones, blocked with plaque…….those were very powerful photos. Made a big impact on me. I won’t forget those photos, those images. Much more powerful than words. Thanks very much.




        9
        1. Robert, I felt the same way.

          They are like art to my eyes.

          I want to blow them up, frame them and not tell anyone what they are until they ask.




          2
      3. I am humbled every time your face shows up in our midst.

        I do not have words for how much your dedication to this cause has already blessed me and helped me.

        You have made it easy for me to toss a web-site link or a book and save lives.

        Thank you!




        1
    3. Anna,

      Dr. Greger has already pointed to the benefits of limiting carbs.

      That being said, people who go high carb whole food plant based are not having the bad side of the mortality equation.

      White flour and sugar may be the answer.

      Meat + sugar is a bad combination.

      People who went Keto had their arteries clogged up by 51% in a year.

      People who go vegan have the absolute best mortality, but the vegans need to supplement B12 and Omega 3 or they lose their advantage.




      4
      1. Dr. Barnard reversed Diabetes by lowering saturated fats, white flour and sugar and that is where the Alzheimer’s research is going.

        No matter what, lowering fats lowers caloric intake and fights obesity and there is not a disadvantage going Whole Food Plant Based.

        The longest living populations are vegans who supplement.




        2
      2. “People who go vegan have the absolute best mortality, but the vegans need to supplement B12 and Omega 3 or they lose their advantage.”

        Can you name some specific Omega 3 supplements that you have in mind?

        thanks




        0
          1. Steven Litrov:
            “Dr. Greger lists his supplementation recommendations here, although does not recommend any particular brand. He generally just recommends the cheapest you can find.”

            Algae based Omega 3 fatty acid supplements are not nearly as commonly found as typical vitamin and mineral supplements, so it would be nice to have some specific brand recommendations.

            In the reference you gave, Dr. Greger states: • “250 mg daily of pollutant free (yeast- or algae-derived) long-chain omega-3’s (EPA/DHA)”

            A couple of specific product recommendations would help. Again, they are not so common as simple vitamin or mineral supplements.

            thanks




            0
        1. Can’t speak for Deb but thinking you may be like me and just read a thing and say I may like to try that and do a look see on Amazon…..
          I use Spectrum EPA DHA vegan with vit D added to it.
          per two caps…. (a bit expensive though).
          550 Omega 3 fatty acids
          330 mg DHA
          165 mg EPA
          1000 IU vit D
          I tend not to trust off brands with supplements.




          1
      3. I have been wfpb (i do eat wholegrain bread as well) for 3 years now, and just had blood tests showing yet again low iron levels. I am usually in the 12 to 15 range. I can’t afford supplements, especially omega 3. Fish oil can be cheapest, but still… Is the 1 tbsp ground flax per day enough ? The low iron levels have shown up for years now, always below 15. Any suggestions ?




        0
        1. Dr Greger doesn’trecommend this but a good quality “vegan” multi vitamin/mineral may be worth considering.

          The Garden of Life women’s one-a-day works out at about 38c a day (it’s currently dicounted at the online store I use).. it provides 30% of the daily iron RDA

          But spinach, broccoli etc are all high in iron too. So are watercress, curly kale, beans, peas lentils etc




          1
          1. Thank you WFPLisa, John and TG for your suggestions! I will apply them all… I was looking at the iron values for nuts and seeds, and thought it should be easy to add an ounce of pumpkin seeds to my spinach salads. A multivitamin might work well – definitly worth a try. Thanks all




            1
  1. what about low mercury sushi? Is it just the cooked meat/animal products, how about raw? Are
    they exempt for this possible specific harm today highlighted today by you?




    0
  2. And could be a an issue when the diet includes both lots of sugar alongside a meat, but
    not a bad issue with meat if no sugar/junk food is in the diet at the same time?
    Did any of these studies address that? Seems important. These Japanese, when they ramped
    up there meat intake back in the day, they had access to lots of sugar junk, the trend has continued,
    as if you have access to the meat and it is affordable, you also have access to the the junk food on
    the shelves too. They eat both together, everyday. How about if one was left out? Would the other
    be way less harmful as far as dementia? Maybe one of the (the junk food) puts the meat into a more
    toxic environment, allowing it to cause harm that otherwise might have not been so bad to the brain
    had the junk been left out of the diet? Same goes for meat, what if left out of diet completely, but the
    junk food was still eaten? Maybe the junk would be less harmful then?




    0
    1. Both junk food and meat consumption have been linked to various chronic diseases like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and Alzheimers.

      There’s no evidence that one without the other results in little or no chronic disease.

      Similar speculations are put about by low carbers and saturated fat and cholesterol sceptics to justify their dietary practices.

      As far as Japan is concerned, as I am aware, higher total fat and meat intake is in fact associated with lower carbohydrate intake
      http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/26/5/837.pdf
      .




      6
  3. https://www.foodnavigator.com/Article/2014/02/25/AGE-related-dementia-Cooked-foods-and-meats-linked-to-Alzheimer-s-risk

    So it’s the cooked meat/junk food AGE’s side effect maybe? Same with the junk food?

    There are lots of carbs with low AGE’s, and these would seem harmless, but add in the AGE’s version of the these foods/carbs
    and harm then occurs? Same with meat, animal products?

    Or does the saturated fat/cholesterol become toxic as far as harm/dementia, regardless of AGE’s?

    This blood brain barrier issue seems interesting. Please look at that in further videos/studies.




    0
    1. Hi, Yev.. There are several factors involved, and AGEs are among them. Animal products are abundant sources of AGEs, and cooking increases them. Plant-derived foods generally have far fewer AGEs, unless they are browned in oil. Cholesterol and saturated fat are, in and of themselves factors in the development of many diseases, including Alzheimer’s. While cholesterol cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, oxidized cholesterol can. The brain is able to oxidize excess cholesterol as a way of getting rid of it, but that can go both ways. If there is a lot of oxidized cholesterol in the bloodstream, it can enter the brain and cause havoc. Saturated fat can cause elevated blood cholesterol levels. I hope that helps!




      1
  4. The chart (1:20) listed vegetables, fruit, nuts, legumes, whole grains as protective against Alzheimers, but 6 out of the 7 studies also listed fish as protective. Why?




    3
    1. Glad you’re following NF.org carefully to ask such a good question. I think you’ll find answers in Dr, Gregers note under the video; https://nutritionfacts.org/video/fish-brain-food-older-adults/ which recognizes the benefits of the omega-3s in fish (and presumably why they were cited in the study as brain-protective), but also explains why fish may not be the best sources for those omega-3s :
      “Consumption of long-chain omega-3s (EPA and DHA) may be useful for forming and maintaining brain health, though (video series forthcoming), there’s the struggle between Mercury vs. Omega-3s for Brain Development when coming from fish or fish oil, thanks to how polluted our oceans have become (even in “distilled” fish oil, see Fish Oil in Troubled Waters).
      (https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/omega-3-fatty-acids/)/
      Check out those other videos for more clarification. Hope that helps clear up the seeming confusion.




      2
    2. I watched a PBS special tonight where a man ate fish for a whole year. Sometimes 3 times per day.

      He read all of the amazing things about fish and Omega 3 and did his year of eating it and did his lab tests at the end of the year, thinking he was going to see an improvement over his hamburger days, but his lab tests had no change at all.

      He ended the year by getting a hamburger and preached a secular sermon about balance.

      Wondering if someone could challenge him to try WFPB next and see if that helps.




      1
  5. Plaques and tangles seem to get the most attention for Alz, both directly damaging nerve function. I’d like to see the connection between them and occluded brain arteries. Any research or theories?




    1
    1. Yes, read Dr. Bredesen’s book entitled the End of Alzheimer’s.

      It appears the plaques are the brain’s protective mechanism gone into overdrive stimulated in part by diet.




      3
  6. Please, I think your information is credible and I’m very interested in your topics, but the way you speak is so affected and so off-putting.

    You might think more about your delivery and just talk to us like a normal person.




    2
    1. Barbara, try to listen to what he says and not how he says it. Dr. Greger’s message is too important and valuable to be distracted by his voice. I love his voice (and see huge improvement throughout the time :). Dr. Greger – never give up.




      15
    2. I once felt something somewhat similar to what you report. I have since come to realize that Dr. Greger’s message is so pure and unaffected that he could be speaking with a Donald Duck voice and I would still listen. If there is concern that there might be an air of arrogance in his voice, you will quickly learn that Dr. Gregor is not at all arrogant. He may get frustrated with the powerful entities that promote bad science and wrongful conclusions, but that’s clearly because he cares passionately about the health of individuals. He sells no food or supplement products and his efforts are completely non-profit. That includes the products (books, CDs, etc.) that he does sell. His website nutritionfacts.org is totally free and is free of any advertising. How many other nutrition “gurus” for the masses can one say the same about? Some say he cherry picks data that supports a WFPB diet and avoids those that do not. This criticism doesn’t stand up. Dr. Greger fairly often does speak of data that do not support a WFPB diet. Besides that, could we accurately say that those who report only studies in support of not smoking cigarettes are cherry picking to support a non-smoking bias? Yes, I have made some assumptions in legitimizing the cigarette smoking analogy, but I carefully look at the evidence as objectively as I know how and I continue to believe strongly in the WFPB way. The evidence is growing that it is the anti-WFPB factions (i.e., Dr. Greger’s critics) that are much more likely to cherry pick. Many of them are swept up by something called the tomato effect. Besides that, there is solid evidence that the pools of available data themselves are frequently manipulated and tainted by the powerful meat, dairy and egg industries. These powers may hire polished PR firms to deliver their messages to the public, but no matter how soothing the voices, the messages are usually misleading at best. Dr. Greger’s voice is now soothing to me. That has much more to do with what he is saying than how he is saying it, but my sense that the messages are coming from a quite normal person is also reassuring.




      13
      1. Or Barbra could watch the videos with closed captioning (CC) and the sound turned off? I am so pleased that CC is available, since I often send links to my brother who was born profoundly deaf. I’m hoping that he shares them further with the Deaf. (He does now eat a wfpb diet, though he calls it vegan.)

        I find Dr. Greger amusing and entertaining. My husband and I love to spout: “Until now!” “They put it to the test!” Please don’t change your delivery style.




        5
    3. Barbara, By the tone of your review, I’m thinking that you’re something of a newcomer to NutritionFacts.org. You’ll get use to the good doctor’s delivery, in time, and benefit from all the great information he offers. If you had been around years ago, you’d have heard him giving the presentations in Dr. G, hip-hop style, rappin’ the stats and, from time to time, break dancing.

      You got here, at just the right time.




      0
    4. I watched “Eating You Alive” the other day and what struck me was that there are different vegan doctors who appeal to different types of people. Dr. Greger is entertainment oriented and he might eventually change America, because so many people want entertainment. I genuinely see it as for us to change as a country in this area or to have a voice that gets listened to by mainstream media or by the world, it will likely be because someone has an entertaining voice.

      I look at the political candidates and the entertainment industry and sports industry and Dr. Greger is so much less affected than any of them and he doesn’t come across as arrogant at all. Playful, in a good way.

      I am thinking it is like when you listen to commercials or radio announcers, they tend to enunciate in strange ways, and it sounds “off” at first, but if you replace them with someone who just reads the words, it is not at all interesting.

      I feel like you will soften if you come to see how much he cares about the message and how effective and genuinely funny he is..

      I remember that I judged a local leader once for something, years ago, but after I got to know him, that very thing, which I hated the first day, became exactly what I loved the most. Funny, how the heart does that.

      Dr. Greger, you have the best comic timing of all of them, and, you are so passionate and genuinely entertain us. I know that you won’t be everybody’s taste, but I feel like, WFPB needs about 1000 of you to even get the message out and I feel like it will only be people who are charismatic and entertaining enough who will reach America and the world, because THAT is what people have been feeding on the most over the past 50 years..

      By the way, Colin on WNPR had someone who mentioned not eating meat as the healthiest way to live. He is doing $35 local farm raised chickens is what he said and THAT $35 chicken would be enough to drive me to Morning Star Farms.




      0
      1. LOL!

        Am I the only one who heard Dr. Greger’s voice and timing when he told his grandmother story and came right over here?

        Dr. Greger, you are what you are and have the speaking engagements you have and get asked on Kelly and Ryan, because you have such an interesting voice and such a playful, vibrant countenance AND because you read the studies so we don’t have to.

        I genuinely know that your being entertaining and charismatic is what will save the most lives and that matters more than any of us.




        0
        1. Dr. Greger, I am absolutely positive that there are days that you hate the sound of all of our voices, too, but I appreciate that you still try to read our snarky comments.




          0
          1. Can I just say, I hate that Dr. Greger is going to come on here and have everybody saying to turn down their speakers?

            This man gives his books and speaking engagement money to charity and he has been working tirelessly to save people’s lives and I hate how many times he has to come here and see all the comments railing against the truth he is trying to bring.

            I am not upset with anybody at all on this site, it is just a strange internet phenomenon of not valuing and honoring and thanking the people who work so hard for us.

            I want him to read at least one voice of sincere thank you and I genuinely love your voice and I love, love, love how hard you work to entertain us.




            0
  7. So the arteries are clogged with fat, the video leads us to believe that an abundance of fat in the diet caused the fat to deposited in the arteries. Could not another mechanism, say the way our bodies respond to sugar, our desire for processed foods, or lack of other important nutrients cause our body to mishandle the fat. Every client that I have encountered has been consistently lacking in at least 4 nutrients. At his point you are not on a healthy path. Should we demonized fat? Or should we get back to a base line of healthy nutrition levels before we point the finger of causation?




    2
    1. Many thing influence the creation of dietary plaque. Things that cause a inflammatory state are some of which you mention sugar nutritional lack and to add, cigarette smoking and such.
      And inflammation is a part of plaque formation. All the inflammation in the world will generally not cause arterial plaque without the addition of the dietary fat consumption componant. A little fat is good for us and necessary, excess coupled with inflammation spells trouble.
      No one is demonizing fat. Type of fat and amount is the focus.




      2
      1. I am not a believer in high fat diets, and I agree with you in that inflammation is driving this issue. For me inflammation is the bigger problem because if you remove the fat you still have a major life threatening problem, inflammation. Just mix in a little sugar wait several and health crisis. Me bigger point is that these studies show correlation and not causation.




        0
    2. Scientific studies are not “demonising” anything. Saturated fat apologists regularly attempt to dismiss the voluminous evidence on this issue by simply terming it demonising and quickly moving on. They are unable to refute the evidence and this is how they rationalise ignoring it.

      The AHA last year released an assessment by a panel of experts of the evidence about dietary fats and heart disease. It is long and technical but well reading.
      http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2017/06/15/CIR.0000000000000510




      7
      1. TG, regarding: “The AHA last year released an assessment by a panel of experts of the evidence about dietary fats and heart disease. It is long and technical but well reading.”

        I was expecting the AHA to come out in favor of lower fat in the diet, but I was surprised that they said:

        “we conclude strongly that lowering intake of saturated fat and replacing it with unsaturated fats, especially polyunsaturated fats, will lower the incidence of CVD.”

        But that’s not the message we get from the people whose dietary advice I personally follow, Dr. Greger, Dr. John McDougall, Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, T.C. Campbell, etc….

        Your comments please

        thanks




        2
        1. They are simply going on what the evidence shows. Evidence that meets the high standards, they set that is.

          From a hard-headed evidence-based science point of view, they have to ignore Esselstyn’s results because there was no control group, there was no randomisation and it was a small trial that has not been replicated by other resarchers. They also have to ignore Ornish’s finding because he used multiple interventions along with diet to achieve the results he did.

          Note that the report specifically states (page e8)

          “Finally, we note that a trial has never been conducted to test the effect on CHD outcomes of a low-fat diet that increases intake of healthful nutrient-dense carbohydrates and fiber-rich foods such as whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and legumes that are now recommended in dietary guidelines.”

          This is basically a WFPB diet. I suppose the point I am trying to make is that they (the AHA expert panel which wrote this report) can only derive conclusions and make recommendations on the available evidence (that meets the specified standards).

          People like Greger, Campbell etc draw their conclusions from a much wider web of evidence that goes beyond RCTs. It includes observational studies and identified mechanisms of action (eg the effects of fats and oils on endothelial function). I personally find their arguments convincing and believe that they are in fact broadly consistent with the AHA report.




          1
      2. I do not disagree with you. My point is that we are looking at correlation in these studies and not causation. The body is made up of many complex chemical processes if all of the pieces do not work you will experience health problems. For example in these studies they do not list how much fiber the participants are getting, what is the make up of their gut microbiodome, how much choline is in their diet. Choline helps us make bile, very important in fat digestion. Also, others have mentioned exercise, what was their activity level, did they over consume alcohol, lifestyle is a factor in our health picture. Did anyone analyze their DNA?
        There some people out their that genetically can not handle fat. At the end of the day these people were unhealthy but just consuming fat was not their only issue.




        0
        1. “At the end of the day these people were unhealthy but just consuming fat was not their only issue.”

          That may be so but it doesn’t follow that fat is consequently not an issue.

          There is sufficient evidence out there to show that trans fats and saturated fats are unhealthy, and that high total fat consumption leads to weight gain and the associated increased risks for T2D, heart disease and cancer.

          The evidence has been strong enough to convince expert scientific panels commissioned by eg the World Health Organization national health authorities and professional medical associations.




          2
          1. I agree with your first statement. Also, trans fats are toxic. I am not a fan of high fat diets, but a higher fat diet can be beneficial to an athlete without any unhealthy repercussions. Take a look at the person that is presenting their “diet”, could that person run 3 miles, could that person survive a high intensity workout? Our health is based on the whole picture of you not just one single facet. I think the WHO still advocates a high carb diet which I think is more dangerous than a high fat diet.

            It seems to me that we are trying to come up a diet that will keep us healthy as we do very little exercise.




            0
            1. A high carb diet that is based on refined carbohydrates is defeinitely unhealthy. However, that is not what the WHO or anybody else is recommending. They recommend diets high in vegetables, fruits and whole gains because the evidence shows that this eating pattern is associated with lower morbidity and mortality.

              Low carb diets on the other hand are associated with higher mortality.

              You wrote “a higher fat diet can be beneficial to an athlete without any unhealthy repercussions”. Do you have any evidence for this?

              You also wrote “Take a look at the person that is presenting their “diet”, could that person run 3 miles, could that person survive a high intensity workout? Our health is based on the whole picture of you not just one single facet.” I agree with your last sentence but the first one isn’t entirely relevant I’d say

              For example, I am pretty sure that Jim Fixx could run three miles and survive a high inten sity workout. But he clearly wasn’t healthy since he dropped dead of a heart attack at a comparatively young age.

              There’s been planty of studies done of exercise and mortality. None of them to my knowledge show you need to be able to run three miles or survive a high intensity workout to be healthy – daily exercise/activity yes but not those specific examples you quote. And diet may be significantly more important overall
              https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-much-should-you-exercise/




              0
      1. Hi jj, Everyone is a little different, the most common ones are magnesium, calcium, choline, and folate. If they are vegetarians I often see B12.
        With the exception of the vegetarian B12 issue, everything can be fixed through a whole foods diet.




        1
        1. hi John Mac, how do you fix iron deficiency on a 1450 cal or less wfpb diet ala Esselstyn style (ie only 1 tbsp flax allowed, 1 walnut/ day) ? ty




          0
            1. hi John Mac, yes , I am vegan, and apart from whole grain bread, I am wfpb for some years now. I dislike taking iron supplements immensely, which is why I ask. The highest iron level I have had in past years was after months of consuming molasses squirrely bread . ( fattening !) where it reached 22. I am back to 12 now. All other blood tests are good. Thank you !




              0
              1. I see, do you consider cacao a whole food. If so 2 tbsp are over 8mg of iron at only 130 calories. How do you handle the B12 issue?




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                1. Wow, ty John Mac, I did not think of cacao for iron! I will definitly give it a go, and if my levels are up at next testing, i will refer people to this page. I dont think it is all that rare, but thats just my guess from hearing others mention it.
                  I do take an inexpensive liquid B12 supplement, and currently , rightly or wrongly, thats the only supplement I take at the moment.

                  Thank you so much for the suggestion.. I really appreciate it.




                  0
                  1. You are welcome. Veganism requires some planning because meat does bring a lot of minerals and other nutrients to the table. The software that I use is cronometer.com, it is free and will allow you to track all of your nutrition via your diet. Good luck.




                    2
    3. I agree with everyone else, that none of us want to demonize fat.

      That being said, the doctors who are reversing disease, put the people with heart problems and Diabetes and Alzheimer’s and with impotence, etc. on low fat WFPB diets and “it works” is all I am going to say.

      The people in the study where they as a group were moving toward vegan and 10 jumped to keto, that group had a 51% increase in blockage of the arteries in one year.

      I feel like the WFPB points to getting rid of animal products, sugar and refined flours.

      At that point, there is some disagreement about oils and things like nuts, but they mostly all come together about when people have seriously blocked arteries, because of diet, they have them watch their oils, nuts and seeds and avocado, too.

      Dr. Greger is pro a handful of nuts and just switched avocado to green light, but I feel like his next book will be what gives the details of whether he has a different answer for obese and ill people.

      Dr. McDougall and Furhman both had two versions of their diet advice, depending on whether you are trying to lose weight or not.




      0
      1. I am not disagreeing with anyone. But if you are unhealthy and you move to a 100% WFPB diet you have changed a lot of things. Which thing was it that improved your health the most, more nutrients, more fiber, less sugar, less fat, no meat? Also, a WFPB diet has a few inherent problems, omega 3s and B12. You can get omega 3s from seeds and some plants but they are in the ALA version, our brain needs DHA and DEA. Most vegans will claim that we convert the ALA to DHA and DEA but that is not necessarily true. We tend to use ALA for energy and if any is leftover we may convert some of it.
        DHA is so important to the body that once consumed the body will not use it as fuel and will send it to the brain where it is needed the most. Also we know that the omega 6 to omega 3 ratio should be no more than 4:1, anything higher then that can cause inflammation. Also, you still have the B12 issue, where does that come from in a WFPB diet.




        0
    1. Greg, Dr Greger already addressed your questions in previous videos (use the search feature or the topic search to find related videos for your questions) in these videos https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-coconut-oil-cure-alzheimers/ and here, https://nutritionfacts.org/video/olive-oil-and-artery-function/ We see from today’s video that vascular health has everything to do with dementia. There are many more videos about coconut and olive oil for the searching.




      5
  8. My mom was diagnosed with vascular dementia at 78 which progressed to AD. I feared the same would happen to me, that is until I learned that eating a whole food plant based diet with a daily dose of turmeric helps us live longer and healthier.

    Thank you Dr. Greger. My son arrives tomorrow in Buenos Aires with my copy of How Not To Die Cookbook for my 70th birthday!!!!!!




    9
  9. This video explains why eating high omega 3 diet is time ticking bomb for Alzheimers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ub8Z-E7xJqk

    Humans who ate fish in the past did not live long and they could not experience the oxidation of Omega3s. Now people live longer but are not aware that omega 3s oxidize like browning an onion. It is physics. The best long term strategy is to have a low level in your diet.




    0
  10. Let’s see…

    I do NOT eat:

    High Fat Dairy, in fact I haven’t eaten any dairy since 1980;

    Sweets, In fact for most of my life I’ve avoided any food with any form of sugar added, but much more rigorously since about 1990;

    Processed meats, In fact I do not eat any meat fed with corn, wheat or soy beans;

    Fried Potatoes, In fact I do not eat any potatoes, corn or rice

    White bread, In fact all grains I eat are 100% whole grain – mostly rolled oats and rye

    But I DO EAT four to eight ounces of 100% grass fed beef/lamb per day and four eggs per day.

    When I got out of a nursing home I was assessed for a program. The results:

    On the “Short Blessed Test”, where Normal is 0 – 4 and and 10 or more is consistent with cognitive impairment, I got 0.

    I am 76yo. In spite of eating 4 – 8 oz of 100% grass fed cooked at low temperature beef per day and four eggs per day I GOT THE BEST POSSIBLE SCORE!




    4
    1. Well good. The person who was the record holder for age length French woman ate a bar of chocolate each day and smoked a cigarette each day until a few years before her death and she also was totally awake alert and with it..




      5
    2. Pretty much the same as my own dietary choices, except I substitute herring filets + kalamara olives for your meats (not criticizing, just commenting.)

      The one thing I would suggest you adding is dark chocolate or raw cacao powder (as hot chocolate.) Maybe doing that we could get that 0 down to a minus 1? ‘-)




      3
  11. Some have mentioned cholesterol being a neutral in some study.
    Thought I may mention just a personal observation. Yes I have worked and visited regularly assisted care facilities and homes for the elderly.
    Prior to the time a person may need complete care they may indeed loose weight. They start to forget to eat meals.
    So even if one was fat and is still fat the weight comes off. With loss of weight normally comes decreased cholesterol levels regardless of diet content.

    Something to consider in study of cholesterol levels and alzheimers. Of course when in a fully assisted living stage this is not the situation as meals are given with regularity and on schedule. But if study is reflective of a before that status, this may have implication.
    It is a personal observation however for your consideration.




    3
    1. Point being….. to my opinion a study on strictly cholesterol levels and presence of alzheimers and progression in midstage may have confounding elements unless strict control is endeavored.
      Similar to studies of improved cholesterol levels on those using diets such as ketogenic to loose weight. The tell is on the loss of weight not the dietary influence on cholesterol. Weight loss may influence cholesterol levels. Not to say that all who loose weight may have healthy cholesterol levels however, nor that thin peoples necessarily have low cholesterol levels. Existant cholesterol levels trend down with loss of weight.




      2
    2. Ron in NM,
      The goal is to avoid the “fully assisted living stage” thru a combination of a superior WFPB diet and regular exercise, both aerobic and strength training. With this program we can have expectations of being independent and active into our 90s.




      2
      1. My personal goal B is to remain fully functional and optimally functional, which means in the upper 95% of physical function measurables for my age.
        Thinking other things allow in the main for how long one lives beyond personal control.
        Thinking Steve McQueen…. who on a flight from Mexico where he was being treated for lung cancer(experimental latril treatment not legal in the US at the time though popular back then) a consequence of his being a mariner in his youth and thus exposed to asbestos, died of a heart attack on that flight.
        My thinking being when you are going to go you are going to go.
        Don’t care to reach any age really just want to live till the end. Thinking also I am not alone in that.




        2
  12. About Beef Fat

    The fat of 100% grass fed beef looks different, tastes different, cooks differently, and ESPECIALLY is chemically different than the fat of standard corm/wheat/soy bean fed cows.

    So it is entirely inappropriate to conflate standard and 100% grass fed beef.

    NONE of the studies quoted here were done using 100% grass fed beef (if they had been there would have said so)

    People seem always to be rushing to blame beef for everything. If I am an example, researchers ought be looking at other parts of the diet..




    1
    1. Sydney Once again you make assertions but where is th supporting evidence? Can you show us any?

      After all the fat may be somewhat different but what about the heme irron, IGF1, Neu5Gc etc?




      7
    2. When Campbell did his studies for “The China Study,” the people there were not eating food out of big CAFOs. Even so, the people eating more animal food proved to be sicker than those on a more WFPB diet. That is why I ignore all the “Oh, what about grass fed, etc.” noise….




      2
    3. 1 tobacco made in the Himalayas is safe.

      2 all studies have been done with cheaper tropical tobacco and don’t count

      3 “So it is entirely inappropriate to conflate standard and 100% Himalayan tobacco”




      2
      1. You make a good case Panchito!

        All you need now is a source of Himalayan tobacco and a website, and you will be very rich very quickly.




        2
    4. Sidney, here’s why you may want to add nuts to your diet as your protein source.

      https://www.newsmax.com/health/health-news/nuts-seeds-heart-health/2018/04/06/id/852959/?ns_mail_uid=100354791&ns_mail_job=1787515_04092018&s=al&dkt_nbr=010102it67n3

      The team looked at five different dietary patterns and sources of protein, including meat, nuts and seeds, grains, processed foods, and legumes, fruits and vegetables, and their effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD).

      After following participants for an average of 9.4 years, the team found that participants who had a high intake of meat protein showed a 60-percent increased risk of CVD, while those who consumed large amounts of protein from nuts and seeds experienced a 40-percent reduction in CVD.

      No association was found between CVD risk and grains, processed foods, or legumes, fruits and vegetables, suggesting that the association found could not be ascribed to any other source of nutrients included in the study.




      2
  13. This video has helped me explain something I read only recently.

    That is, the piece dealt with blood vessel clogging saying that by eating the right kind of fish (to get omega 3s) one could prevent (ameliorate?… Can’t remember for sure) the clogging of blood vessels. They also said that omega 3s from plant sources (they used flax seed in their testing) were inferior to the omega 3s from fish in their testing.

    For me anyway, that explains eating oily fish being beneficial to the brain that we’ve been taught for a number of years appears to now be validated by the evidence of clogged brain vessels contributing to dementia.

    Sorry, cannot find the link to what I read.

    ADDITIONAL: This could be something that is helped by drinking beet root juice as it helps to dilate blood vessels via Nitric Oxide, allowing more oxygen to reperfuse brain cells.




    3
    1. Lonnie…I though flax oil required the production of a body enzyme to reduce it to usable forms of EPA DHA.
      This enzyme it is thought reduces with age.
      My vegan source of EPA DHA then is algae derived. I think that is all I find locally. Fish oil provides the same nutritional profile in this regard as that derived from algae. In vegan circles they describe it as…this is after all where the fish get it.

      Could look it up but perhaps you may care to look into it.




      1
      1. source of EPA DHA then is algae derived. I think that is all I find locally. Fish oil provides the same nutritional profile in this regard as that derived from algae. In vegan circles they describe it as…this is after all where the fish get it.

        Ron, Agree on the algae. I also see krill oil as a good source… an even better source than fish oil capsules. I take one of those before bedtime to help protect my vascular system over night.

        I think this is especially important timing as it has been noted that most heart attacks occur in the A.M. And while I think my vasculature is in good shape, you never know if there is a spot in the more important vessels that has been damaged and therefore accumulated plaque.

        So it’s krill oil at night and beet root juice in the morning for me.




        1
        1. Fish oil is now tested pretty thoroughly for contaminate levels considered hazardous to human health due to a study of sorts done in Ireland and published in media in the prior decade . At that time they were not and found some had hazardous levels.
          Now they all are pretty well tested and contaminates still exist just at much lower levels rarely being totally contaminate free.

          AS it is a manageable risk I tend against fish oil on a health basis. However I do hold bias being vegan. I can see why meat eaters would supplement with fish oil however.




          2
  14. I thought the cause of Alzheimer’s was still a mystery. Amyloid plaques are suspected, but not always consistent with the disease. Now, here, for the first time, I am told that clogged brain arteries seem to be the cause… what to make of this?




    0
    1. Personal OPINION here Magnus.

      There are many contributors to Alzheimer’s and this is probably one of them due to sub-optimal amounts of oxygen reaching throughout the brain.

      Another one that is a probable contributor is that naturally produced aBeta and Tau are not properly removed from the brain as waste when their levels are built up above normal.

      Another contributor I treat equally as dangerous is inflammation.

      Another could be genetics but I’m less concerned with the genetic component as I believe that if the three above are addressed and controlled, the genetics are nullified.




      3
    2. Nobody really knows what causes Alzheimers but the majority view appears to be that the risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also risk factors for Alzheimer’s.
      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-alzheimers-vascular-risk/risk-factors-for-heart-disease-and-stroke-also-tied-to-alzheimers-idUSKBN17D1Y3
      http://time.com/3387589/alzheimers-disease-heart-health/

      Note also that vascular dementia is the most common dementia after Alzheimer’s dementia and a significant number of demented people have several dementias at the same time.
      “50 percent of those whose brains met pathological criteria for Alzheimer’s had pathologic evidence of one or more coexisting dementias.”
      https://www.alz.org/dementia/mixed-dementia-symptoms.asp




      1
  15. Great video! This reminds me of a documentary on cannibalism. It came to the conclusion that people got “mad cow disease”. Similar to most species that eat it’s own. So I wonder, As we ingest more food that resembles our own body, do those cells sneak past our defenses. Like eating brains of other animals is a reative Nono does some of the cells of that animal to sneak past the blood brain barrier and cause problems? And could meat of an animal be similar to cannibalism, but happens at a Les sever and slower pace?




    2
    1. Interesting theory.

      We did, after all, treat human problems with the organs of animals… like treating like as I remember it being called. My mother had thyroid problems and before Synthroid, she was treated with a medicine made from a cow’s thyroid gland.




      2
    2. Consumption of dairy at a very early age some study suggests recommends that general theory. .. So we , some of us, generate diabetes as result of a bodily confusion due to similiarilies found between whey protein found in milk and some things found in our body related to insulin production or utilization.
      Dr Greger has a video on this linkage.




      0
    3. food-for-fleeting-thought… ‘ US Meat Safety and Mad Cow Disease Facts 05/08/2012 by: Beth Levine …a cow in California has recently been identified as having mad cow disease…leading once again to the question of meat safety in the U.S.
      Of course, the solitary infected cow was removed from the food supply and destroyed, posing no threat itself to meat safety. But how many other cows are potentially carrying mad cow disease (otherwise known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE)? According to the USDA’s mad cow disease facts, we are very safe. In their estimation, only one in a million cattle in the U.S. are infected with BSE. And apparently, that was the one that was just discovered. But in reality, it’s hard to imagine how they can even determine any type of figure. The agency only tests approximately 40,000 of the 35 million cattle that are slaughtered annually to be sold as beef products.
      And when you extrapolate out the math, it gets a little more unnerving. For the moment, let’s assume that one in a million number proposed by the USDA is correct. Since there are 35 million cattle slaughtered annually, that would mean, since the USDA has only pulled one cow from the food supply in the last five years, that some 174 infected cattle made it into the food supply. And since each 1200 lb beef animal produces about 500 lbs of meat, that means there were potentially some 174,000 infected half pound meals served in the US in the last five years alone — based on USDA estimates — and double that if you think of a serving as a quarter pounder with cheese. Those are not reassuring numbers… The vast majority of cattle raised for consumption in the U.S. are slaughtered before they are two, and evidence of the presence of BSE is not clear for an average of five years after the initial infection. BSE is actually a massing of prions, which are abnormal proteins, within the brain. The symptoms do not develop for anywhere from two to eight years post-infection. And the testing is not able to detect the disease until just before the animal becomes symptomatic. So a two-year-old cow could have a BSE infection for over a year but would likely be completely asymptomatic as it goes to slaughter. Therefore the disease would go undetected even if it was present and this was one of those few cattle selected for testing…Just as it takes several years for BSE to develop in a cow, the human version of the disease — Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, acquired by eating tainted meat — also takes years before symptoms show up…’ https://jonbarron.org/article/mad-cow-found-united-states




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      1. Dar, Interesting stuff there. mad cow disease might be the a tiny bit of the issue. But My post is about the fact we know when species eat its own they get brain disease. So how far out do we have to go to keep that from happening. Would just our species do that, if we ate apes and monkeys would it cause it too. Would all meat cause it at a slower pace? Why it happens is my next question. Is it some other cell absorption? Why does cannibalism kill the brain? Just putting a thought out there. I understand lack of oxygen for Dementia. When people get in environments with low oxygen they lose metal clarity, lose motor function, and maybe even hallucinate.




        2
        1. Again just speaking off the top of my head from dim recollections on the subject… , they had found one specific tribe in Africa I think it was that were the last existant tribe of cannabilistic peoples.
          To my dim recollection there was a viral agent that caused death amongst these peoples from the practice. Would that be present in like primates?. Monkeys kill and eat other monkeys in their natural environment(different species of monkeys) At certain times of year when natural food is not present they engage in that practice to amount to at least 10 percent of their dietary caloric intake. So monkey being monkeys they would probably not exclude eating any certain part. . That said it would appear this virus is not found in other primates, or they have a natural immunity to it.
          So eating of brains as a exclusion for omnivores or carnivores would seem a human problem. Lions also eat the young of other prides. I think the eating of dead bodies of a same specie is not uncommon at all in certain specie that scavage or are opportunistic feeders.
          Animals, carnivores scavangers, tend to eat whatever they can get in a find not excluding certain parts. Some of the higher forms like wolves and monkeys of the same specie, respect their dead but that I would guess is a exception.
          Wolves do eat dogs which really are of the same related type and coyotes do as well kill and eat dogs. Coyotes to my experience will eat about all of a thing they kill eventually excepting very large prey such as deer.

          Had a coyote try to get my little dog two days ago ;(




          0
          1. Ron, you make good points. But cows eating cows = brain disease. People eating people brain disease. Have no idea about monkeys. It seems people who were cannibals lived a long time before they displayed signs of the disease. But you maybe right that some didn’t get sick and it was a virus or something else. Not sure how you would know if a monkey or lion had a psychosis? The soccer team that ate a few dead people didn’t have too many problems, but they didn’t make a lifelong habit of it.




            1
            1. Relatively recent study has shown that to be a normal behavior amongst monkeys in the wild. It was once thought wrongly they were vegetarian. But they actually hunt other specie of monkey with pack behavior during two select months when normal foods are not so available August I think is one of the months.
              Lions it may be a selection evolutionary process. The male lions eat the offspring of lions that are not theirs. So their offspring tends to survive and reproduce. In theory the one doing the eating is the stronger lion so is the one who furthers his genes through this behavior. The weaker offspring then do not survive to reproduce and compete for food supply .
              It is not aberrant behavior.
              Came across the chimp thing in a anthropological study. Think Jane Goodal may have a hand in the observational part of it but am not certain.

              I was researching if human were naturally omnivores or not.
              The book is still out on that by my read though most assume our late history the last 200K or so to be our evolutionary proof of meat eating discounting the prior several million as a distinct specie. I tend to thinking most of our evolutionary history abstract from recent speaks against meat eating as normal behavior for human. Nutritional needs such as inability to generate vit c and some other things speak against that as primary in our diet at one time. We die if we do not eat veggies. Most omnivores do not.Carnivores certainly not.




              1
              1. The musculature of monkeys speak of carnivorous behavior as do the teeth. We should have known better but we hold biases which interfere with our observational capacities at times. Especially as it concerns humans to my opinion.
                Poor people who keep chimps as pets find that out unfortunately quite dramatically. They are killing machines if they want to be. Evolutionarily that would not present unless killing for food was a part of it. They live in trees so protection from predation is not so much a problem and they generally will not kill their own specie for mating and such.
                Our musculature and teeth tell a opposite tale. We function for endurance. The strong amongst us Neanderthal types died out probably due to inability to provide caloric needs to sustain such bodies. Though we did mate with Neanderthals many other similar strong types we did not and they completely died out.




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              2. I agree with that, but I would add that we could not have thrived as a species with out meat. It may not be in our best interest to eat it. It may not be our best food source, but people can’t just eat 5 months out of a year. I live pretty far south, but growing season is May through September. I would hate not to eat from October to May. Now it may be possibly for awhile but if populations continue to rise we may be back to being locked into eating what we grow.




                0
              3. Sorry to be pedantic here but chimps aren’t monkeys. They are apes (as are we). Apes are usually bigger and don’t have tails (usually).

                However, some monkeys apparently do eat small lizards, birds eggs, insects etc.




                1
  16. Off Topic, but triggered by comments below: Our search here did not reveal any videos nor any blogs by Dr. Greger on dietary effects on thinning hair. Since this problem is common in men and common enough in women with aging, how can we distinguish between the inevitable and the preventable? Can anyone provide reliable and current sources on the matter? Thanks.




    2
  17. Is it possible, when fat is already deposited in brain arteries, to completely reverse the issue
    with a vegan diet? If so, how long would it take?




    1
    1. Quick reversal within months(the process may start even much earlier) is possible for coronary artery disease research shows. Plaque formation and calcification is the process of the occlusion of the arteries in coronary artery disease. What is described here is the same basic occlusion occurring with brain blood supply. So reversal is possible on a whole food plant based vegan diet. That is proven. A junk food vegan diet no.

      Will that translate to improved cognitive function through remediation in a similar fashion……I would guess it might, but I think it would in the main act to stop the progression. Brains were once thought to be static…. when injury occurs that is It,done, they never recover. Current science suggests that is not the case, they do recover in part, in a limited extend and brain cells themselves may regrow.
      Which by my personal read would mean dependent upon extend of progression of the disease.

      Others more informed on the current science may elaborate. I am to qualify just another blogger expressing opinion.




      1
      1. Without checking the science to my dim recollection significant reduction was first noted in a six month time frame with conclusion of basically functionally normal arterial function for most with coronary arterial heart disease in a years time. But subsequent study also to my dim recollection shows the process of reversal of the occlusion, the start, is in a very short time frame. It takes a bit for the body to remove the plaque.

        One stops adding to the occlusion immediately and with more time removes it. Brain are still brains not hearts, so damage to a brain to my opinion is more confounding in the attempts of the body to heal itself.




        0
      2. If you have a study showing reversal of Alzheimers , please post it. I Have yet to read that or see Dr G put out a video saying as much.




        0
          1. Hey Lonnie, that’s a cool study, but doesn’t sound Vegan to me, haha. That could open a lot of questions. People paying for umbilical cords might be the next market multi million $ market.




            0
            1. Hey Lonnie, that’s a cool study, but doesn’t sound Vegan to me, haha.

              Heh, heh… yeah, it’s sort of a Sophie’s Choice, or more to the point a Hobson’s Choice:

              A situation where one may choose the thing that is offered or else take nothing at all. After Thomas Hobson (1544-1631), an English mail carrier who rented horses and, to avoid overtiring his animals, told his customers that they could take the horse nearest the stable door or no horse at all.

              People paying for umbilical cords might be the next market multi million $ market.

              I’ve checked in on the price of umbilical cord blood plasma. Too rich for my blood (literally and figuratively ‘-). However, the TIMP2 could be an inexpensive alternative.




              1
              1. The retention of umbilical cords after birth is a relatively common practice in certain parts and income groups in China in anticipation of future medical application.One company blood cord I think is the name, is traded as stock on one of our exchanges.
                I did once own some of their stock which was doing quite well.
                Assume they are still around but it was quite a few years prior I last looked into it.
                amazing stuff.




                1
                1. Checked still around…. China Blood Core corporation traded as CO on NYSE. Changed their name to Global blood core corporation however. And are a bit expanding their scope of operations seemingly. Years ago I think it was only storage in frozen state now they seem to be into applications.
                  And I guess going global.




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        1. That wasn’t the question original though.

          The question was about reversal of plaque in (brain) arteries.

          Two different – but related – things.




          1
          1. Tom from what I’ve read and seen on this site it’s not reversible. The fact wfpd can reverse heart disease is an inclination that it could help the altzheimers, but havent seen anything to say that it has cured it. If I’m not mistaken dr G has said it’s not curable as of now. Is that wrong?

            End




            0
            1. No.

              No but he is suggesting that we might be able to prevent Alzheimer’s with diet. And even to prevent or moderate disease progression and symptoms. Which are highly desirable goals in themselves.

              Part of the problem is that the vascular problems cause brain damage that can’t be reversed. Nonetheless, preventing further damage is highly desirable.

              However there is some evidence that vascular dementia (not Alzheimer’s) can be reversed (at least in the earlier stages) eg
              https://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/news/20010518/high-blood-pressure-dementia-elderly#1

              Vascular dementia is the second most common dementia and many people have mixed dementias eg both Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia.




              1
              1. Thank you Tom, that’s exactly right. It’s probably possible to stop deterioration, at some point. And maybe not at some other point. I was just trying to keep honesty in his text. But as dr G says, we have to put it to the test. I imagine at some point in dementia, it would not be possible to manipulate the diet just due to the lack of understanding of the patient. I wish it could be reversed. I’m highly concerned for myself in long term outcome I’m here for my family and of course my well being.




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    2. I think the thoughtful comments you received from Ron, one of our frequent knowledgeable commenters addressed your question well. Perhaps with more research we will find hope that fat reversal in brain arteries is possible,as occurs in the heart, but for now focusing on not having progression is the approach that makes the most sense and is better supported by science.
      Although Alzheimers is not fully understood we can also focus efforts on other approaches that have been shown to minimize risk. Check out what Dr. Greger has to say on Alzheimers and all the videos he has prepared.




      2
      1. Who gave you the impression these things weren’t reversible?

        Good diet, as Dr. Greger suggests appears to protect. And good diet also appears to reverse the problem, over time. There are lots of reports of good results in this area, even if the vaunted research is lacking. There is no down-side to giving it a try.

        There is preliminary research showing that Vitamin C is a big player in this area. Though NIH and others have a history of denying funds for further research there. The RDA for Vitamin C is absurdly low.

        Most of the animals on Earth make their own Vitamin C internally. Humans did too, until a genetic mutation occurred long ago. We still have the broken genes to show for it.

        Other animals our size make huge amounts of Vitamin C daily. And they hardly get sick. Extrapolating, if we hadn’t lost our ability to synthesize Vitamin C a 150 lb. human would likely make more than ten grams of C daily. And much more should they become sick.

        Vitamin C is an important part of keeping our arteries in good repair. When there’s not enough the body goes to plan B. It patches your arteries with Cholesterol. The longer the damage persists the more Cholesterol needs to be applied, until the passageway gets smaller and smaller. Plan B is not the best, but it does keep you alive longer.

        We all need more Vitamin C. Some need a lot more. It’s an amazingly important substance.

        Thanks! Best of health to everyone!




        1
        1. Alzheimers is a specific disease with specific processes. Dementia is another disableing cognitive disorder which may present as alzheimers but may have multiple causes. CTE for instance found amongst football players is likely not reversible and results in dementia symptoms. .

          I have not found study that presents advanced stage alzheimers as reversible. Could be possible I would guess in intermediate stage but that would generally have to be accessed if what was presenting was alzheimers upon autopsy. A conclusive definitive diagnosis of alzheimers may be presumed by symptoms genetic tendency and such but is not a known, until autopsy.
          AS far as I know alzheimers has not a study to support that. Dementia can be reversible at times but it may have varying cause.

          If you know of such a published valid scientific study to that result please provide it. As stated I am not speaking from a position of qualification.
          It appears we can stop coronary artery disease dead in its tracks and reverse. Has that been a proven scientifically by study with alzheimers…..I have not seen it but perhaps you have and may provide it.




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          1. Ron

            There is something in what Richard says although trials of vitamin C in AD patients have shown no effects on disease progression.

            However, higher plasma levels of vitamin C are associated with better cognitive status and lower risk of cognitive impairment. Of course, plasma ascorbic acid levels may just be a marker for healthy diets high in plant foods rather than directly causal. We don’t know.

            The OSU’s Linus Pauling Institute summary of the evidence on vitamin C and Alzheimer’s may be worth a read.
            http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/vitamin-C




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  18. Eat properly prepared Miso soup. Made with Wakame seaweed and good shittake mushroom. This will help reduce the radiation in your body. Check on line…




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  19. I have been vegan 4 months now and it has been great for my health. However, what I have found while researching is that our bodies do not produce (and we cannot get from plants): CLA and Carnosine… can someone clear this up? Does this need to be supplemented or should we be eating small amounts of meat or dairy occasionally to get these?




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    1. Hi, Amanda. You do not need to eat any meat or dairy in order to be healthy. Carnosine does not need to come from the diet, as the human body is able to make it. CLA is not an essential nutrient either. It is touted as having health benefits as an anti-inflammatory agent, mainly by those who are selling it. Whole food, plant-based diets are anti-inflammatory, so additional sources of CLA are not necessary. You might be interested the following quote from the authors of this study: “Plant phenolics appear to have both preventative and treatment potential in combating cancer and warrant further, in-depth research. It is interesting that these effects of plant phenolics on cancer inhibition resemble effects reported for specific fatty acids (omega-3 PUFA, conjugated linoleic acids).” The researchers are looking for compound to isolate from plants to make drugs, supplements or so-called “functional foods,” for which the researchers admit the data on humans is not clear, but you can have the benefits by simply eating the plants. I hope that helps!




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  20. From skinny vegan….
    ” Upon digestion, carnosine is broken down in the gastrointestinal tract into its constituents. Yes, some intact carnosine does escape the GI tract freely but that small amount is quickly broken down in the blood by the enzyme carnosinase. Carnosinase hydrolyzes carnosine and other dipeptides containing histidine into their constituent amino acids. In other words, after consuming meat, all of the carnosine that was ingested is converted to beta-alanine and histidine. Then, oddly enough, the amino acids are converted back to carnosine in the muscles and used or transported where needed. The entire process of carnosine synthesis is not entirely understood, but it’s worth noting that consuming carnosine from meat is unnecessary, as it will be converted into beta-alanine and histidine anyway, both of which are available in many raw whole foods.”

    CLA also has a ability to be converted from base materials which a healthy individual consumes in a plant based diet through bacterial processes in our intestines.

    So if one has some problems with their intestines or some other specific problems mentioned it may be necessary to supplement. Normally in healthy peoples it appears not.
    B-12 vitamin D and as one ages Omega 3 fatty acids EPA DHA one may be advised to consume. B-12 is now found in many vegan processed foods.
    Vitamin D is added to milk in its processing commonly and B-12 is added to feed during processing of cattle in feedlots as part of the fattening process before slaughter. So if one does not consume those things one may consider supplementation. Vit D as we can process it from the sun but few spend enough time unclothed exposed to sun to make enough.




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  21. Thanks for this video. I blamed the metformin for my dad’s decline when i should have acknowledged the diet. I haven’t considered the buildup of damage over time from the diet, and that a wfpb diet isn’t likely to make much difference now. Is it possible to dramatically improve the speed of artery repair? Caldwell, leafy greens and nox to improve artery walls, but takes a long time. What if high dose curcumin, aged garlic extract, and collagen or glycine were supplemented?




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    1. I forgot to mention that when i give high dose curcumin supplements to my dad, over time, his stomach and nearby organs get inflamed. It’s most likely his gallbladder. Maybe taurine supplementation would be helpful too.




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      1. Hi Arthur,
        I’m sorry to hear about your dad’s decline. I assume from your post that your dad has Alzheimer’s disease. I agree with you that you need to be cautious giving him supplements, particularly if not done under the supervision of a physician. Care of patients with Alzheimer’s generally benefits most from a multi-disciplinary approach.

        It seems that you are interested in seeing what other options are available for treatment and you might want to have a look at the following article. From a medical point of view, the evidence presented is extremely weak and the data is limited. There are no RCT to support it’s efficacy. The company promoting this therapeutic approach also has a financial interest (not me!) It’s nevertheless interesting, but reader beware…

        Bredesen DE, Amos EC, Canick J, Ackerley M, Raji C, Fiala M, et al. Reversal of cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. Aging (Albany NY) 2016 Jun;8(6):1250–1258. http://www.aging-us.com/article/100981/text

        The paper only describes 10 case studies, so the evidence here is obviously limited.

        The therapeutic intervention was labelled the MEND protocol (metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration). The protocol covers nutrition, supplements (if needed), sleep, lifestyle factors and blood tests/medical care. Emphasis was placed on individualising treatment under medical care.

        Here is a summary of what looks like the MEND protocol (since the protocol itself is not in the article). https://drmariamaricich.com/clients/959/documents/MEND.pdf

        Hope this helps




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        1. Thank you for the links. I’m aware of the Bredesen protocol. I can’t find a naturopath or lifestyle medicine practitioner in Melbourne, Australia, that can help. I’m concerned about spending too much money on a treatment plan that ultimately won’t work and/or cause harm. I would like to do some gene testing to see if there are any metabolism problems and to check the apoe type he has, within reason. I don’t want to spend too much.




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  22. Dietary modifications related to vascular risk factors are probably more relevant to vascular dementia rather than Alzheimer’s disease.

    The role of lipid metabolism in the brain is interesting. Ketogenic diets were originally studied in refractory epilepsy in children and found to be effective.
    Lefevre F, Aronson N. Ketogenic diet for the treatment of refractory epilepsy in children: a systematic review of efficacy. Pediatrics.2000;105:e46.

    “Beside its efficacy in the treatment of refractory epilepsy, the ketogenic diet has been suggested to be useful in the therapy of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases including AD, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and mitochondrial disorders.”

    This is an interesting review on some of the studies done looking at ketogenic diets and Alzheimer’s disease.

    Lange KW, Lange KM, Makulska-Gertruda E, Nakamura Y, Reissmann A, Kanaya S, Hauser J (2017) Ketogenic diets and Alzheimer’s disease. Food Sci Hum Wellness 6:1–9
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213453016301355

    The following is a RCT looking at the effect of a ketogenic agent on mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.

    Henderson ST, Vogel JL, Barr LJ, Garvin F, Jones JJ, Costantini LC. Study of the ketogenic agent AC-1202 in mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Nutrition & Metabolism. 2009;6:31. doi:10.1186/1743-7075-6-31.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2731764/

    Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by early and region-specific declines in cerebral glucose metabolism. Ketone bodies are produced by the body during glucose deprivation and are metabolized by the brain. An oral ketogenic compound, AC-1202, was tested in subjects with probable AD to examine if ketosis could improve cognitive performance.

    Conclusion: AC-1202 rapidly elevated serum ketone bodies in AD patients and resulted in significant differences in ADAS-Cog scores compared to the Placebo. Effects were most notable in APOE4(-) subjects who were dosage compliant.




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    1. Ketogenic diets are very difficult to follow and very easy to mess up. I doubt my GP will organise gene testing to find out what Apoe type my Dad is. I think it just isn’t common practice yet. More research needed to prove efficacy i guess, and price of testing probably has to go down too.




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    2. This all seems a bit weak.

      The ketogenic diet/Alzheimers review link you posted concluded “At present there is only limited evidence of the usefulness of ketogenic diets in AD.”

      While the RCT found few if any changes in MMSE or other cognitive tests. Furthermore this was a trial of a specific supplement not of ketogenic diets. It may be worth noting that this trial was funded by the manufacturers of the supplement concerned and was conducted by researchers who were employees of the company or stock/option holders.

      As for trials in paediatric epilepsy, they have found benefits in about 30% of the patients. However some studies and reviews have noted adverse effects including heart abnormalities and even deaths. Keto diets are not without risk.




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      1. Tom,
        I agree with your points – I am not advocating using a ketogenic diet in AD since evidence is limited. I’m only making an observation that dis-regulated glucose metabolism plays an important role in inflammatory brain disorders and that some individuals may benefit from a ketogenic diet. I generally do not recommend ketogenic diets other than in the context of certain medical conditions under strict physician supervision.

        Of course ketogenic diets do have risks. That’s why it should not be for mainstream consumption. But a 30% improvement in refractory epilepsy in children with a ketogenic diet is an outstanding response. Vedolizumab only has a 6% response rate for mucosal healing in refractory Crohn’s disease, but this outcome is considered to be encouraging given the population studied.




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  23. The issue of dietary interventions in vascular dementia are similar in cardiovascular disease. The role of saturated fat is cardiovascular disease is not straight forward. I posted some of these comments in the video https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-saturated-fat-studies-set-up-to-fail/, but some of the issues are the same so I’ll post a few relevant studies.

    A PROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY
    Praagman J, Beulens JW, Alssema M, Zock PL, Wanders AJ, Sluijs I, et al. The association between dietary saturated fatty acids and ischemic heart disease depends on the type and source of fatty acid in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103(2):356–65.
    https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/103/2/356/4564754

    Conclusion: In this Dutch population, higher SFA intake was not associated with higher IHD risks….

    A COUPLE OF META-ANALYSES

    Chowdhury R Warnakula S Kunutsor S Crowe F Ward HA Johnson L Franco OH Butterworth AS Forouhi NG Thompson SG Khaw KT Mozaffarian D Danesh J Di Angelantonio E . Association of dietary, circulating, and supplement fatty acids with coronary risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Ann Intern Med 2014;160:398–406.
    http://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/1846638/association-dietary-circulating-supplement-fatty-acids-coronary-risk-systematic-review

    Study Selection: Prospective, observational studies and randomized, controlled trials.

    Limitation: Potential biases from preferential publication and selective reporting.

    Conclusion: Current evidence does not clearly support cardiovascular guidelines that encourage high consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low consumption of total saturated fats.

    Primary Funding Source: British Heart Foundation, Medical Research Council, Cambridge National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, and Gates Cambridge.

    Harcombe Z, Baker JS, DiNicolantonio JJ, et al. Evidence from randomised controlled trials does not support current dietary fat guidelines: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Open Heart 2016;3:e000409
    http://openheart.bmj.com/content/3/2/e000409

    CONCLUSIONS: The current available evidence found no significant difference in all-cause mortality or CHD mortality, resulting from the dietary fat interventions. RCT evidence currently available does not support the current dietary fat guidelines. The evidence per se lacks generalisability for population-wide guidelines.

    AND A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Veum V, Laupsa-Borge J, Eng Ø, Rostrup E, Larsen T, Nordrehaug J, et al. Visceral adiposity and metabolic syndrome after very high-fat and low-fat isocaloric diets: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017;105(1):85–99.
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/311279409_Visceral_adiposity_and_metabolic_syndrome_after_very_high-fat_and_low-fat_isocaloric_diets_a_randomized_controlled_trial_12

    Conclusions: Consuming energy primarily as carbohydrate or fat for 3 mo did not differentially influence visceral fat and metabolic syndrome in a low-processed, lower-glycemic dietary context. Our data do not support the idea that dietary fat per se promotes ectopic adiposity and cardiometabolic syndrome in humans.




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    1. That stuff is all highly tendentious and the Chowdhury and Harcombe studies in particular have been thoroughly discredited.

      Last year’s AHA advisory statement on dietary fats and hearts disease by a panel of experts summaried the evidence to date eg

      ” In summary, randomized controlled trials that
      lowered intake of dietary saturated fat and replaced it with polyunsaturated
      vegetable oil reduced CVD by ≈30%, similar to the reduction achieved by
      statin treatment. Prospective observational studies in many populations
      showed that lower intake of saturated fat coupled with higher intake of
      polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat is associated with lower rates
      of CVD and of other major causes of death and all-cause mortality”

      The panel also concluded

      ” Taking into consideration the totality of the scientific evidence,
      satisfying rigorous criteria for causality, we conclude strongly that lowering
      intake of saturated fat and replacing it with unsaturated fats, especially
      polyunsaturated fats, will lower the incidence of CVD.”
      http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2017/06/15/CIR.0000000000000510

      These conslusions are consistent with those reached by other health authorities around the world. Saturated fat plays a causal role in cardiovascular disease.




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      1. Hi Tom,

        Thanks for taking the time to reply. The AHA advisory statement on dietary fats and heart disease is a well considered position. I agree that consumption of polyunsaturated fats should be increased and is cardio-protective. The issue is what should the polyunsaturated fats replace – saturated fat or complex carbohydrates – or both?

        I am concerned about advice to follow a very low fat diet (standard advice dietary fat </=30% total calories, very low fat <15% total calories).

        – Randomized trials show that weight loss is not sustained with very low fat diets.
        -In extreme cases, very low fat diets may lead to nutritional inadequacies for essential fatty acids.
        – Very low fat diets are often associated with the use of processed low fat foods that are calorie dense.

        So what actually happens when dietary saturated fat is substituted by polyunsaturated fats, monounsaturated fats and complex carbohydrates?

        Let’s look at a meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies.
        Clarke Robert, Frost Chris, Collins Rory, Appleby Paul, Peto Richard. Dietary lipids and blood cholesterol: quantitative meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies BMJ 1997; 314 :112

        Metabolic ward studies are the gold standard for measuring the outcomes of dietary intervention. The only limitation from this meta-analysis in 1997 is that the measured outcomes mostly looked at total cholesterol, with only just over half of the studies measuring LDL and HDL cholesterol. Unfortunately, non-HDL-C, TC/HDL, LDL particle size or number were not looked at – and these markers are much more accurate indicators of CVD risk.

        Here is a screenshot of the multivariate analyses of dietary interventions on LDL and HDL: https://prnt.sc/j3ptgc

        Look what happens when you substitute total fat by complex carbohydrates (10% of calories). A drop in total cholesterol of -0.20mmol/l (-7.7mg/dl), drop in LDL by -0.12 mmol/l (4.6 mg/dl) and drop in HDL by -0.10 mmol/L (-3.9 mg/dl).

        What happened when saturated fat was replaced by complex carbohydrates?

        Total cholesterol was reduced by -0.52 mmo/l (-20.1 mg/dl). LDL cholesterol reduced by -0.36 mmol/l (-13.9 mg/dl) and HDL cholesterol reduced by -0.13 mmol/l (-5.0 mg/dl).

        These data are not so straightforward to interpret since they don’t include non-HDL-C or TC/HDL measurements – I’m not sure if other metabolic ward studies measured these parameters.

        The effect of dietary intervention depends on the what each person’s starting cholesterol was. Let’s look at one possible scenario. Patient with TC = 200 mg/dl and HDL = 40 mg/dl. So TC/HDL = 5.0. Keep in mind that TC/HDL was not directly measured and that makes the data interpretation difficult (for me anyway).

        Replacing total fat by complex carbohydrates slightly worsens the TC/HDL from 5.0 to 5.32.

        Replacing saturated fat by complex carbohydrates also slightly worsens the TC/HDL ratio from 5.0 to 5.14

        So, replacing total fat or saturated fat by complex carbohydrates is not necessarily beneficial.

        Substituting complex carbohydrate by polyunsaturated fats, on the other hand, decreased LDL and elevated HDL – consistent with the demonstrated efficacy of polyunsaturated fats in reducing CVD risk.

        MY THOUGHTS

        1. Increased consumption of polyunsaturated fat leads to a beneficial lipid profile and is likely cardio-protective. Replacing saturated fat and complex carbohydrates by polyunsaturated fats can be cardio-protective.

        2. Refined added sugars should be eliminated as much as possible.

        3. The issue of saturated fat intake is more complex. It likely depends on genetic factors. Saturated fat per se may not be the issue. Rather, saturated fat in the context of an inflammatory state such as metabolic syndrome is likely the issue. I’m sure that’s why observation meta-analyses are conflicting because of the inter-individual responses to saturated fat.

        The rise of cardiovascular disease in the developed world is predominantly driven by metabolic disease – and hence treatment of underlying metabolic disease needs to be addressed as the primary treatment goal. This is best done in the context of a low carbohydrate diet together with intermittent or more prolonged fasting. Since fat has relatively little effect on insulin secretion, fat is probably less involved in the underlying mechanism of metabolic disease. Of course, elevated saturated fat consumption in the presence of inadequately treated metabolic disease is a ticking time bomb.

        Lean, physically active individuals without insulin resistance can afford to consume a significantly higher proportion of complex carbohydrates. Individuals with metabolic syndrome need to follow a carbohydrate restricted diet. Since protein consumption also needs to be moderated, this generally requires a higher fat consumption.

        TYPE OF FAT

        Of course we are talking about whole foods, and dietary fat comes with differing levels of saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and the polyunsaturated fats omega-3 and omega-6. https://prnt.sc/j328b3

        I think the beneficial effect of the polyunsaturated fat will be enhanced when there is a higher omega 3:6 ratio. Look at the incredible fat profile of flaxseed oil!

        The source of the fat is also a significant factor. Grass fed versus grain fed animal make a big difference in lipid profile. Animals are generally fattened with grains – so it would appear that grains have a similar effect in both animals and humans! Look at the difference in lipid profile between wild caught versus farmed salmon. http://prntscr.com/j3s31k

        Similar significant differences in lipid profile is also seen in grass versus grain fed beef and pastured versus caged chicken eggs.

        Vegetable oils tend to be much higher in monounsaturated oil, which are more likely have a neutral benefit regarding lipid profile. In addition, the omega 6:3 ratio is relatively which may be pro-inflammatory. There are also concerns regarding the processing of vegetable oils as well. Vegetable oils are also susceptible to oxidation, as opposed to the relative stability of saturated fats. Lipid oxidation can lead to the loss of micronutrients, as well as the formation of potentially toxic oxidation products. Vegetable oils can turn rancid even at room temperature, however lipid oxidation is more rapid at higher temperatures, and may not be ideal to use for cooking.

        SUMMARY

        For cardiovascular risk management, individualise dietary interventions. For patients with metabolic syndrome, focus on treating insulin resistance with carbohydrate restriction and intermittent or prolonged fasting. Eliminate refined added sugars. Replace carbohydrates with fats which contain the best lipid profile. Oily fish such as wild caught salmon, avocados, nuts and nut butters such as walnuts, almonds and macadamia nuts, oils like flaxseed and avocado, and small quantities of grass fed beef or pastured eggs if desired. Carbohydrate intake should be limited and sourced from fruit, vegetables and legumes due to the higher fibre content and nutritional profile, rather than grains.

        The AHA advisory statement should be modified: “We conclude strongly that lowering intake of refined added sugars and replacing it with unsaturated fats, especially omega 3 fats, will lower the incidence of CVD. Consideration should also be given to lowering intake of complex carbohydrates and replacing it with fats high in omega 3, particularly in the context of metabolic syndrome.”!!




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          1. By all means – eat the krill. All of the wild caught oily fish are fantastic and should be consumed while rather than the oil where possible.

            I use oil to dress salads – mostly flaxseed oil and sometimes EVOO. Nut butters and tahini are other good choices. Eating fat wih vegetables is important to help with absorbing the fat soluble vitamins.

            I also use oil to cook – avocado oil is a good choice since it is relatively stable to oxidation by heat and has a good lipid profile. I use oil to sauté vegetables to enhance absorption of the vegetable’s fat soluble vitamins. A sprinkle of mustard powder with sautéed cruciferous vegetables is also great.




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            1. Alex, my understanding Is flax oil has about 2day shelf life. Is there any truth to that? I’m eating Krill for iodine and what ever else we get from fish (oils), and seem to be some of the least contaminated. As a people, we have such a problem with getting what we need from a whole food. We go to fish oil. I’m not sure popping a fish oil tab after eating a steak or burger would be healthy.




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              1. Flaxseed oil, like fish and krill oil, are highly polyunsaturated and susceptible to oxidation. So you would never use flaxseed oil to cook food. Even at room temperature these oils will become oxidized and lead to rancidity.

                Exposure to oxygen, light and heat must be minimized. Most people would store flaxseed (whole, ground or oil), in an opaque airtight container in the fridge. Whole flaxseed can last for 12 months, but ground or oil probably under 6 months.

                “Fresh flaxseed has a mild, nutty flavor, whereas rancid flaxseed is marked by bitterness and a sharp, unpleasant aftertaste. Because it’s possible to grow accustomed to the off flavor of oxidized fats, however, you also should smell flaxseed to assess its freshness. Spoiled flaxseed — whether whole, ground or in the form of oil — is typically described as smelling like oil paint or a box of crayons. Any flaxseed products tinged with such odors are past their prime and should be discarded, notes the book” “Wellness Foods A to Z: An Indispensable Guide for Health-Conscious Food Lovers.”

                Also, regarding fish oil, I completely agree that popping a fish oil tab does not do much in the context of an unhealthy diet. Likewise you probably don’t need a fish oil supplement if you consume 2 servings of wild caught fish per week. Krill oil or cod liver oil might be useful supplements if you don’t eat fish. Alternatively, algae oils would be good to consider if you are vegetarian or if you are concerned about potential contamination.




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        1. Thanks for taking the time and trouble to respond in such detail. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to respond in equal detail.

          However, I do not think that your statements are consistent with the evidence. That’s not just my assessment. This is a clear implication from the fact that your opinions are not shared by the expert panels responsible for the WHO guidance on healthy eating nor by the AHA paneel which drew up the evidence summary regarding dietary fats and heart diease.

          As for dietary polyunsaturated fats vs complex carbohydrates, I am not sure that we have definitive evidence on this. However your 1997 review of metabolic ward studies was about the effects on biomarkers as found in studies averaging one moyhth in length. What do we know about the effects on long term hard endpoints? This 2016 Harvard study suggests it may be much better to replace high saturated fat (dairy) foods with complex carbohydrates like whole grains (than to replace them with polyunstaurated fats)

          “When dairy fat was replaced with the same number of calories from vegetable fat or polyunsaturated fat, the risk of cardiovascular disease dropped by 10% and 24%, respectively. Furthermore, replacing the same number of calories from dairy fat with healthful carbohydrates from whole grains was associated with a 28% lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

          Replacing dairy fat with other types of animal fat, such as from red meat, predicted a modest 6% higher risk of cardiovascular disease.”
          https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2016/10/25/dairy-fat-cardiovascular-disease-risk/

          Sorry but I find all these low carb/fat apologia type arguments seriously flawed and deeply unconvincing – but thank you for taking the time the post the references you are basing your comments on.




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          1. Tom,

            The article you mentioned is referring to a study by Harvard Chan School researchers published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

            Mu Chen, Yanping Li, Qi Sun, An Pan, JoAnn E Manson, Kathryn M Rexrode, Walter C Willett, Eric B Rimm, Frank B Hu; Dairy fat and risk of cardiovascular disease in 3 cohorts of US adults, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 104, Issue 5, 1 November 2016, Pages 1209–1217

            The data on fat substitution is interesting, but also note in the results:

            Results: In multivariate analyses, compared with an equivalent amount of energy from carbohydrates (excluding fruit and vegetables), dairy fat intake was not significantly related to risk of total CVD (for a 5% increase in energy from dairy fat, the RR was 1.02; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.05), coronary heart disease (RR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.09), or stroke (RR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.93, 1.05) (P > 0.05 for all).

            We did not observe a significant benefit of replacing dairy fat with the same energy intake from refined starch and added sugar (P > 0.05 for CVD, CHD, and stroke) (Figure 1), but the substitution of 5% of energy from dairy fat by carbohydrates from whole grains was associated with a significantly lower risk of CVD (RR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.75), CHD (RR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.62, 0.70), and stroke (RR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.91)

            Your comment that my statements are not consistent with the evidence or with other expert panels is not true. There is a difference between general population recommendations, as opposed to advice given to populations with specific medical conditions.

            I agree that general population advice should include significant consumption of carbohydrates(50-60% total calories), from fruit and vegetables, legumes and whole grains (if tolerated). This should include a lot of resistant starches. Added sugar and flour on the other hand, should be minimised. The problem with the original advice about following a low fat diet is that the fat was often replaced by sugar and refined starch – which probably led to even worse metabolic disease.

            So, I certainly do not advocate low carbohydrate diets on a general population basis. Rather, it should be reserved for certain medical conditions such as metabolic syndrome and possibly neurodegenerative or autoimmune conditions. Metabolic syndrome is associated with insulin resistance and is likely caused by excessive added sugar and refined starches, driven also by caloric excess. Consumption of complex carbohydrates do not cause diabetes. Nevertheless, individuals with diabetes do not have normal insulin responses, and in this context a lower carbohydrate diet together with intermittent fasting has been demonstrated to have a superior effect on reducing insulin secretion.

            All of the hype about low carb diets can be off putting. But so too can all of the dogma on low fat diets. The adverse effects of fat, including saturated fat, has been significantly simplified and over stated. Saturated fats absolutely add fuel to the fire of metabolic disease. But the match that starts the metabolic disease is probably sugar and flour. And once that fire is raging it is very difficult to put out!




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  24. This is from Dr Mirkin’s latest newsletter. Combining a healthy WFPB diet and regular exercise would seem to be an excellent formula for reducing our risk of Alzheimer’s

    “A study of 1,462 women, ages 38 to 60, followed for 44 years, showed that those who exercised regularly were one tenth as likely to suffer dementia with aging as those who did not exercise (Neurology, March 14, 2018). In another study, 6500 older people wore exercise trackers. After three years, those who exercised regularly had a 36 percent lower risk of memory loss as well as better memory and executive function (Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, January 2017;49(1):47–53).

    A third study of 81 older adults used VO2 max, a test of maximal ability to take in and use oxygen, to give a dependable measure of fitness. Those who were less fit had an increased rate of dementia and of losing the white matter in their brains that helps them to retain memory and make wise decisions (Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, Dec 19, 2017;61(2):729-739). An earlier review of hundreds of articles showed that older people who exercise have far less loss of brain function with aging, less brain blood vessel damage, larger hippocampal brain size for better memory, less loss of brain tissue with aging, better spatial memory, better communication between brain nerves and improved ability to learn new facts (Mayo Clin Proc, 2011 Sep; 86(9): 876–884).

    My Recommendations
    If you don’t already engage in a regular exercise program, check with your doctor and then try to start one as soon as possible. See How to Start an Exercise Program”




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  25. Thank you, Dr. Gregor, for making this video. I know you thought twice about it, but I have recently decided to print the sources I get from these videos. I have aging parents and they are extremely healthy, but they still eat eggs, meat, and dairy. My father’s father had dementia and my mother’s mother had Alzheimer’s. I will be printing all the sources for this video and sharing with them. It can be difficult to share with people what you’re learning when you don’t have the evidence in front of you. Again, thank you for making this video. It summarizes a lot of what you have shared in previous videos into one neat and tidy package.




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  26. Mediterranean Diet and Age-Related Cognitive Decline A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extravirgin olive oil (1 L/wk), a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts (30 g/d), or a control diet (advice to reduce dietary fat).

    Conclusions and Relevance In an older population, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with olive oil or nuts is associated with improved cognitive function.




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  27. Q: If we have eaten a high animal fat diet from a previous lifestyle, can we reduce or even eliminate that inevitable atherosclerotic plaque buildup in our veins and arteries including within our brains, through a whole plant food diet?

    I’ve been on this lifestyle for 6 years now ever since the fall of 2011, when I first viewed FOK. After the radiation for pc in 2014, my oncologist said he’d never seen a man at my age recover so quickly from the light eternal. I told him that these were lifestyle diseases. He said he was beginning to see that. Evolving . . .




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  28. Yes. Dr. Ornish and Dr. Esselstyn have both published well founded scientific studies demonstrating reversal of atherosclerosis with an unprocessed whole food plant based diet.

    Dr Ben




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