Benefits of Quinoa for Lowering Triglycerides

Benefits of Quinoa for Lowering Triglycerides
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How do the nutrition and health effects of quinoa compare to whole grains?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Approximately 90 percent of the world’s calories are provided by less than one percent of the quarter million known edible plants. The big three are wheat, corn, and rice, the reliance upon which may be unsustainable, given the ongoing climate crisis. This has spurned new interest in underutilized crops like quinoa, which might do better with drought and heat.

Quinoa has only been introduced into the Northern hemisphere recently, but humans have been eating quinoa for more than 7,000 years. Is there any truth to this “superfood” designation, or is it all just marketing hooey?

Quinoa is a “pseudograin,” since the plant it comes from isn’t a type of grass. Technically, it’s a seed-like fruit. It does have a lot of protein, and also lots of vitamins and minerals, but so do all whole grains. Yeah, it has more protein than other grains, but since when do we need more protein? Fiber is what we’re sorely lacking, and its fiber content is relatively modest, compared to barley or rye. Pretty strong on folate and vitamin E, and leads the pack on magnesium, iron and zinc. So, nutritious? Sure, but when I think superfood, I think some sort of special clinical benefit. So, broccoli is a superfood; strawberries are a superfood; garlic is a superfood. But what about quinoa? Consumer demand is up, thanks in part to perceived health benefits. In lab animals, it has all sorts of purported benefits, but there have been very few human studies.

The first trial was a before-and-after study of quinoa granola bars that showed drops in triglycerides and cholesterol, but with no control group, you don’t know how much of that would have happened without the quinoa. This is the kind of study I wanted to see: a randomized controlled trial. And about a cup a day of cooked quinoa for 12 weeks led to a 36 percent drop in triglycerides. That’s comparable to what one gets with triglyceride-lowering drugs or high-dose fish oil supplements.

Which is better, regular quinoa or red quinoa? Well, red does have about twice the antioxidant power, leading the investigators to conclude that red quinoa might significantly contribute to the management and/or prevention of degenerative diseases associated with free radical damage––though it’s never been put to the test. What about black quinoa? Both red and black quinoa appear equally antioxidant-rich, both beating out the more conventional white.

The only caveat I could find is to inform your doctor before your next colonoscopy, else they might mistake it for parasites. Colonoscopy revealed numerous egg-like tan-yellow ovoid objects of unclear cause, but it was just undigested quinoa.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Approximately 90 percent of the world’s calories are provided by less than one percent of the quarter million known edible plants. The big three are wheat, corn, and rice, the reliance upon which may be unsustainable, given the ongoing climate crisis. This has spurned new interest in underutilized crops like quinoa, which might do better with drought and heat.

Quinoa has only been introduced into the Northern hemisphere recently, but humans have been eating quinoa for more than 7,000 years. Is there any truth to this “superfood” designation, or is it all just marketing hooey?

Quinoa is a “pseudograin,” since the plant it comes from isn’t a type of grass. Technically, it’s a seed-like fruit. It does have a lot of protein, and also lots of vitamins and minerals, but so do all whole grains. Yeah, it has more protein than other grains, but since when do we need more protein? Fiber is what we’re sorely lacking, and its fiber content is relatively modest, compared to barley or rye. Pretty strong on folate and vitamin E, and leads the pack on magnesium, iron and zinc. So, nutritious? Sure, but when I think superfood, I think some sort of special clinical benefit. So, broccoli is a superfood; strawberries are a superfood; garlic is a superfood. But what about quinoa? Consumer demand is up, thanks in part to perceived health benefits. In lab animals, it has all sorts of purported benefits, but there have been very few human studies.

The first trial was a before-and-after study of quinoa granola bars that showed drops in triglycerides and cholesterol, but with no control group, you don’t know how much of that would have happened without the quinoa. This is the kind of study I wanted to see: a randomized controlled trial. And about a cup a day of cooked quinoa for 12 weeks led to a 36 percent drop in triglycerides. That’s comparable to what one gets with triglyceride-lowering drugs or high-dose fish oil supplements.

Which is better, regular quinoa or red quinoa? Well, red does have about twice the antioxidant power, leading the investigators to conclude that red quinoa might significantly contribute to the management and/or prevention of degenerative diseases associated with free radical damage––though it’s never been put to the test. What about black quinoa? Both red and black quinoa appear equally antioxidant-rich, both beating out the more conventional white.

The only caveat I could find is to inform your doctor before your next colonoscopy, else they might mistake it for parasites. Colonoscopy revealed numerous egg-like tan-yellow ovoid objects of unclear cause, but it was just undigested quinoa.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Video production by Glass Entertainment

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Here are the “superfood” videos I mentioned

But isn’t fish oil important to heart health? Find out in my video Is Fish Oil Just Snake Oil?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and to my audio podcast here (subscribe by clicking on your mobile device’s icon).

104 responses to “Benefits of Quinoa for Lowering Triglycerides

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  1. Quinoa several years ago, when I first became aware of it, was marketed as a complete food, with all the essential amino acids. Now it is known that eating a variety of food up to your caloric needs will deliver necessary nutrient value. Quinoa is another good food to eat.

  2. Speaking of sustainability, and increasing the variety of food we eat, there is another grain I’ve recently learned about: fonio. It’s the smallest seeded millet, and it grows in inhospitable areas, semi-arid with sandy soils, and has been grown in West Africa for thousands of years. It’s also quick maturing. It is low glycemic, has a good nutritional profile, and is of course gluten-free. I read about it a few years ago, and have finally found some to try. It’s easy to cook: bring to a boil in water, simmer for 1 minute, let it sit covered off the heat for 4 minutes, and fluff with a fork. And it’s quite tasty! I’ve tried it plain, served with a chili, and made a porridge with fresh and dried fruit and nuts for breakfast. I plan to try more recipes.

    I also like the company, Yolele Food, which is trying to introduce the crop to other countries while at the same time improve the economic situation of the small farmers who grow it. The founder is also trying to “re-introduce” it to Africans, who increasingly turn down their noses at it, preferring to eat imported white rice. The only problem with fonio is that right now, it is very labor intensive to process. But there are efforts underway to develop machinery, so that the farmers, who could grow more of it, can also process more of it. You can read more about it here: http://yolelefoods.com/. I have no ties to this company, but I like everything I read about it, and about fonio.

    Maybe we’ll discover that fonio has health benefits, too. Because it certainly has a lot of environmental ones, from growing conditions to low energy to cook.

    And the one problem I have with quinoa is that I’ve read that once it became popular, the price increased to where much of the population where it is grown could no longer afford to buy it to eat — they were priced out of their native food. The founder of Yolele foods is trying to avoid that with fonio. Another plus in it’s favor.

    1. I’m with Deb, going to order some and try it. I really like the ground into flour for preferment, going to try that too.

    2. The machine to process fonio has been developed by an African whose name escapes me now and I don’t have time to look it up. He won a Nobel prize for his work back in 2012.

      Fonio is also nowhere near as tasty or nutritious as quinoa which requires no processing at all beyond washing to taste, before cooking.

      1. John Newell,

        “Fonio’s tiny size makes it hard to process. Every step, from harvesting to threshing, winnowing, husking, and cleaning is physically exhausting. Though farmers could easily grow more fonio than they do now, they don’t have the processing capacity to keep up with larger harvests.” (https://yolelefoods.com/fonio/ So, I hope you’re right about the processing machine.

        As for cooking it, I find fonio to be easier than quinoa. I couldn’t cook quinoa successfully on the stove top, but it cooks beautifully in my Instant Pot. And I find it tasty, though on the more delicate side, but I think the same about quinoa. As for nutrition, do you have any sources you can share to support your statement? I like the idea of variety, eating different whole grains.

        1. Hi Dr. J

          There are plenty of sources of information about Quinoa nutrition on the net. I included a chapter in one of my books about it: PITCHIN’ A LOAF AN’ MAKIN’ IT WORK.

          That’s a book I spent 40+ years doing the research on to overcome chronic constipation. Just as I was about to begin the publishing process, Covid-19 came along. So I thought, since I’d already written most of the work needed for that as a chapter in PITCHIN’ A LOAF, under the title THE CURE FOR THE COMMON COLD, I decided to change focus, so I changed subject matter a bit and the title, to KILL THE CORONAVIRUS and it is being published first. The common cold and Covid-19 are the same sort of virus and their vulnerabilities are exactly the same. But since the medical community has never bothered about Nutritional Medicine and still think foods are neutral when it comes to treating illness, they are still floundering around blabbering about vaccines and drugs.

          I did put some material in that book too about quinoa and saponins because as you know, saponins are soap. And soap is what destroys the corona on a corona virus. That’s why bitter quinoa is a better idea than washed and immunologically useless.

          We’ve all heard about Trump suggesting people use cleaning solvents for killing the virus. As much criticism has he took, he was not wrong. He just doesn’t know how to apply that concept to food.

          That is not to say anyone is going to kill the virus by eating a few servings of quinoa. It’s way more complicated than that. But the process does mean that grain (and dairy) in any shape or form is not a good idea while the virus is a threat.

          KILL THE CORONAVIRUS will hopefully be published next week. I expect the proof copy this week. Once I’ve approved it, then it’s full speed ahead. I’m not going to slow down the process even if I left something out. If I did, I have a facebook page by the same name and a website ready to launch where I’ll update more information as I find it or think of it.

          One of the recommendations I made in the book was that people should be using their isolation time to be learning about the health and medicinal benefits of the foods they eat. The downtime should be spent educating about the most important thing in anyone’s life – food.

          Right now, less than .000000001% of humans know anything about food. That is part of the reason the pandemic has not yet been stopped.

          What I’ve said here and in the book is based on my own experience with corona viruses, pandemics in the tropical fish and pet industry, my experiments and marketing of health food for tropical fish. I have seen hundreds of pandemics in the fish business. It’s the cruelest industry on earth. But the mechanics of a captive fish pandemic and those of a human pandemic are nearly identical.

          You can read more about that on my Facebook page: KILL THE CORONAVIRUS.

    3. I have read that the traditional eaters of quinoa have been priced out as well. I use it a lot and I love it but the way the world works to get these great foods to our privileged plates is so unfair. I am sure it happens with many foods.

    4. Besides the fact that I don’t have a palate for quinoa, you are right…the astronomical price of this staple is ridiculous…

  3. I just wish it didn’t taste so bad. My trigs are bad still, even after 2 years WFPB eating. To me, quinoa tastes like dirt. Seasoning it makes it taste like seasoned dirt. :(

      1. Kathy,

        That’s what I was going to suggest: Rinsing it. Quinoa contains saponins, bitter tasting compounds that can be rinsed away. I rinse mine, then soak it for about 15 min covered with water, then rinse it again before cooking them. They cook up fabulously in my Instant Pot (I had difficulty cooking them on the stovetop — and once I set the program and push the Start button on my IP, I can walk away till they’re done).

        1. Saponins are the most important part of quinoa and indeed any plant based foods. Saponin is one of the most important reasons for eating a plant based diet. It’s the saponins that protect plants from insects. It’s the saponins that protect our circulatory systems and indeed, is the only substance that removes plaque properly from veins, arteries and capillaries. Do not be so quick to dismiss saponins. Think this way: bitter is good, sweet is not good in terms of health restoration.

        2. PS to my comment above: Perhaps it is not necessary to thoroughly rinse quinoa to remove the saponins:

          “ Quinoa contains bitter tasting compounds called saponins that keep insects away without the need of pesticides. They are especially concentrated in the outer coating of quinoa.

          Manufacturers can easily remove saponins by rinsing quinoa with water before consumption.

          Although producers of most packaged quinoa have already removed most of the saponins, people may wish to give it an extra rinse before consuming it.” https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/274745#diet

          The level of saponins in the seeds also apparently vary among “sweeter” and “bitterer” varieties, and depend upon the growing conditions of the plants.

    1. I came to the same conclusion as Micajah. I dislike the taste, texture and expense of quinoa. I have not tried sorghum though and wondered if it cooked up similarly to quinoa. It isn’t cheap either.

      The only way I have success in lowering triglycerides is to severely limit starchy veg, eliminate flour products, and lower overall calories to weight reduction mode. Same with ldl cholesterol.

      1. Laughing.

        I bought some a while back, but it is on my emergency prep shelves.

        I intentionally have been buying grains and I still don’t know if I will figure out how to make any of them at all and have me like them.

        I still decided to buy them.

        Try them comes after find recipes.

        This is going to take a while.

        So, what goes with dirt, hmmm?

        1. I was feeling a little bad about wasting money and not even starting to use them yet, but there is “learning the health benefits fatigue- which Dr. Greger is helping with by being entertaining” But there is still “shopping decision fatigue” and “recipe decision fatigue” and “organizing decision fatigue” and “which things should I grow fatigue” and “what do I cook things in fatigue” and “how do I get over the internal emotionally not wanting to try things fatigue” and there are probably 10 more fatigues I can find.

          I do understand why people like Instant Pots. If mine had worked it would be I have 1 pot and don’t have to make decisions. The ones I tried never worked for starches making me mentally tell the pun “Not starch solution” when I see it in my closet.

          1. One thing I learned is that when it comes to organizing, people will either try to send you in the direction of the “joy, joy” lady or the Swedish death process, but I needed an organized prepper.

            I have to simplify from what the preppers do and from what the gardening people do.

            I am only going to garden kale and broccoli sprouts or microgreens. I had to make a decision and commit to that and knock it off of my decision-making process.

            What I see is that people end up following the coupon people and buying everything cheap, then eventually circling around the joy, joy lady and throwing everything out.

            My brain gets so confused by these processes, but eventually, I think I will get it.

            It just is going to take years.

        2. Stop worrying about the dirt. That was posted by someone unfamiliar with how to prepare quinoa. Quinoa tastes like pasta, not dirt. Rinse it in a pot, pour most of the water off, cook it until fluffy and eat it. Add seasonings exactly as you would for pasta. The end difference is that quinoa is fantastic nutritionally and pasta is not.

        3. So, what goes with dirt, hmmm?
          —————————————————-
          Heh, well in Louisiana they have a dish called dirty rice ‘-)… but in re: quinoa, I like to do a (dry) cup and keep it in the fridge to add in equal parts to Quaker oats. I also add almond milk to the bowl.

          I also add the cooked quinoa to a soup or stew.

          The subject of this video has me considering adding some quinoa to some “no sugar added” ice cream, the next time I cook up a batch of the quinoa.

          Reminds me… the video says quinoa is a seed rather than a grain. Does anyone know anything about Canary seed as a dietary supplement? I have some that has been ground to a powder but that stuff REALLY tastes awful.

          1. “Does anyone know anything about Canary seed as a dietary supplement?”
            – – – – – –

            Nope, but I do eat organic whole millet (don’t birds like millet seed?) as part of my cooked breakfast cereal. Another 1/8 cup might be either: kasha (buckwheat groats); steel cut organic oats; organic rice; barley; and of course quinoa. One forth cup per morning. The taste of quinoa is fine with me; dunno why some people are not fond of it.

            Of course all the extras piled on/mixed in with this clever concoction would help make anything taste good. I’d start itemizing, but the list would take too long. :-)

            1. The taste of quinoa is fine with me; dunno why some people are not fond of it.
              ——————————————————————————————————
              Same here. And I did try some on ice cream (+ wild blueberries)… it gave the dish a nuttiness that was welcome.

              Also layered some on top of a Rye Crispbread shingle covered with chicken salad made from rotisserie chicken parts. Again, very tasty. ‘-)

          2. Lonie,
            “So what goes with dirt?”

            Most foodstuffs are grown in dirt, unless grown hydroponically or possibly in moist air (sprouting).
            Dirt remains on some food that is eaten. We probably all eat dirt every day.
            Dirt is where we used to get our B-12. Now we wither with neurological degeneration if we don’t take a pill.
            I’ve seen on TV a community in Africa that eats dirt patties when drought cuts them short.
            Um, let me see, where can we find dirt? Oh yeah, it’s every where.
            If we processed nutritive dirt for consumption, it would cost money but there would be an endless supply.
            Dirt farming could be done at the point of consumption (patio, backyard).
            Little water and chemicals are needed. Few pests.
            World hunger be gone.

            1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_6YOGkjmAM

              DIRT eating: WARNING: 1. It costs nothing. 2. People live on it. 3. They are healthy. 4. It could be a solution to world hunger. 5. Food manufacturers could probably make it into delectible tasting foods.

              Enter “dirt eating” into your YouTube search box and watch videos of people eating dirt, for years, and not only being healthy but solving their health problems.

              1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbG6XSkBb_s

                Dirt recipies. WARNING: Dirt eating could save you from dying of fast food. AND, whatever you do, don’t ship any gormet dirt into food deserts. People might get something nutritious to eat. AND, whatever you do, don’t promote dirt eating because it might ease global warming, AND it might give hungry people something to eat :-0

            2. Um, let me see, where can we find dirt? Oh yeah, it’s every where.
              ———————————————————————————————
              Heh, preachin’ to the choir Dan.

              I practically grew up on dirt as a condiment. As a kid I drove a tractor (we didn’t have cabs in those days) in a dusty field that if the wind was from a direction behind or ahead of the way your rows were running, you were alternately plowing inside a cloud of dust or breathing pure, clean air.

              At night when you went to the house, you blew snot clods from your nose, wiped dirty mucous from around your eyes, and coughed up as much dirt from your mouth as possible and just swallowed the rest.

              And during the 7 year drought of the 1950s, if you raised a window in your bedroom to let the heat out and the cooler night air in, you would probably be sleeping in a bed seeded with gritty sand.

              Yeah, I was young then… ~ 10 years old. But still continued eating smaller amounts of dirt over the years due to my location/vocation.

              Of course dust and dirt, though related, are two different types of soil. It has been said that a child who plays at making mud pies will grow up healthier than a child wrapped in anti-biotic “bubble wrap”.

              I probably could have been raised in a more health-efficient manner, but overall, to your point, once you get used to it and get past thinking that dirt is, well, dirty… dirt ain’t so bad. ‘-)

              1. Lonie,
                I’ve done cabless farm tractor work also, Farmall-H & Ford. I don’t think I got as much dust as you did. I’m not sure I would eat todays dirt unless it is organic.

                1. I’m not sure I would eat todays dirt…
                  —————————————————
                  Getting to the point it is hard to find anything to eat.

                  For those dealing with Celiac disease, here’s your problems.

                  https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-05/nlh-cdl050620.php

                  I think I remember a chemical company tag line “Live better through chemicals.”

                  My one great hope is that CoVid-19 will result in consumer backlash against all the old chemicals let loose from Pandora’s Box. I think Europe does a better job of banning these health destroyers.

                  Maybe we should study their actions and follow up on what, if anything, replaces the bad chemicals that may be important in what they do. By doing away with those legacy chemicals we force the chemical companies to do new research for a replacement.

                  As long as the old chemicals keep selling, there is no incentive to do research.

    2. Micajah, Quinoa does not taste like dirt if it is washed properly. However the dirt taste is not dirt. Unwashed quinoa tastes bitter because of the saponin in is coated with that protects in from being eaten by insects, birds and rodents.

      Saponin is the vegetable form of soap. Saponin is in fact, the most important element in or on quinoa but Dr. Greger somehow did not discover that. I’ve been eating quinoa for many years.

      I’ve had and have Fonio too. But Fonio as a grain is so fine that in the mouth, it’s nowhere near as much fun to eat as quinoa.

      Texture is another thing overlooked in this video. It beats the hell out of rice for this reason in my opinion and is a natural dietary equal to Wild Rice for texture.

      Quinoa is indeed a super food if any food can be said to be super. I’d say quinoa is the most important food under-consumed on earth.

      As Dr. Greger also pointed out, quinoa is not a grain. It contains no glue (the English word for gluten) and does not readily ferment while digesting. That is an important consideration because grain does readily and quickly ferment. For that fact alone, quinoa outperforms any grain where health restoration is a consideration, is way more digestible since it’s water-soluble where glue/gluten is not. What that means is that grain, whole or refined causes constipation and other blockages in most people on a cumulative basis where quinoa is completely digestible.

      My wife has made muffins from quinoa and they were delightful in taste and texture.

      We just talked about what could be done with quinoa flour. We don’t know but Vitamix has a new machine out that can apparently render quinoa into flour. So, something new to look forward to that has zero negative health impacts.

    3. Hello Prompt-1eba42aecc357996fe5e3111f5df8a92,

      Try mixing your quinoa with Brown Rice. Makes it less gritty.

      Blessings, Good Health & Longevity,

      Skip Stein Health, Wellness & Longevity Consultant Whole Foods 4 Healthy Living https://www.wholefoods4healthyliving.com https://mewe.com/join/restoringamericashealth

      Email: SkipStein@WholeFoods4HealthyLiving.com

      Cell: 407-683-6816 Office: 1.407.680.3914

      “You can’t keep one disease and heal two others – when the body heals it heals everything.” -Charlotte Gerson

      The information contained in this communication is confidential and may be legally privileged. It is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking any action in reliance of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. I am neither liable for the proper/complete transmission of the information contained in this communication nor for any delay in its receipt.

    4. Two considerations,
      Buy pre-rinsed quinoa, Costco’s Kirkland brand is pre-rinsed. Also, do not follow the instructions where water is concerned. Quinoa should be cooked at a 1:1 (1:1 1/4) ratio dependent on where you live and your stove top. Otherwise you end up with a bowl of mush. Google Fluffy Quinoa recipes for more info…

  4. Other than in salads , what are some other creative ways I can use quinoa? I struggle with ways to use it, and I’d really love to share some ways that my viewers on my nutrition blog can Use it

    1. Dineo,

      I don’t think my uses of quinoa would count as “creative,” but I use it instead of rice: as a side dish, often cooked with other veggies; served under bean dishes: in soups, stews, chilis; etc. I probably eat it several times a month. Same with rice; I probably eat it several times a month.

      1. Our kids love a simple soup with veggie broth, quinoa, green peas and maybe carrots and chickpeas. It’s our go to when we need a quick nutritious dinner

  5. I used to eat quinoa daily, until suffering a kidney stone recently. Lo and behold, quinoa is really high in oxalates, a no go for anyone with a tendency to form calcium oxalate kidney stones. I switched to farro and spelt, which have lower oxalate levels, and are also reasonably nutritious. Anyone have any other grains/ seed type cereals that are low ox? Thank you.

    1. Hi, Martin Nussbaum! There are many factors that influence kidney stone formation beyond just the oxalate content of food. Oxalate may be present in soluble and insoluble forms, with the insoluble forms much less likely to be absorbed. Vitamin C enhances oxalate absorption, while calcium inhibits it, so it matters what you eat with higher oxalate foods. Gut flora also play a role in oxalate absorption, and there are even intestinal bacteria that use oxalates as their primary source of energy, breaking them down so that they are not excreted in urine. I mention this because amaranth has a higher oxalate content, but also a higher calcium content, and much of the oxalate in amaranth is insoluble. This might be a pseudograin for you to try. I hope that helps!

  6. I make black bean burgers that have quinoa in them. The recipe makes 10-12 burgers that I freeze and now have no need for processed vegan burgers. I also use quinoa instead of rice for a bed for my dinner because it cooks so much more quickly than rice. In fact, I now rarely use rice because of the red of cooking quinoa. I didn’t realize the red was healthier than the white, but I have been mixing them to create a look similar to tricolor, since the crockpot is more expensive. There are plenty of uses for quinoa!

  7. Thanks Dr.J

    I make quinoa and chia seed bread, it’s very healthy and tasty. I add fresh herbs , it makes the bread aromatic . No baking powder or yeast. All clean ingredients . Sometimes I add pumpkin too. Thanks for sharing

  8. Vartika please can you share with me how to make the bread that you write about, it sounds delicious.
    It will be the first time I try and make bread so I hope it’s easy to do for a beginner!

  9. I think Dr. Greger left something out in his presentation…there was no mention of what the control group was eating instead of quinoa. So if they were eating no whole grain, don’t you have to compare the quinoa to eating other whole grains? I will have to check the oxalate issue, it could be something to watch at 1 cup per day.

    1. Roy,

      There were 3 groups. Sounds like the control group didn’t get quinoa. They didn’t mention whether they were allowed other grains or not, but there was a dose-response between the test groups, so it seems like the benefits are legitimate. Yes, it isn’t going to tell you whether other grains are better or worse. Just that quinoa has benefits.

      This was a dose-response randomized, controlled, single-blind trial with a parallel design (1 control and 2 treatment groups) that compared the effect of 25 and 50 g quinoa/d in 50 overweight and obese participants over a 12-wk intervention period.

    2. IMHO you don’t need to know. It does not matter what grain you eat, not all of it is digestible. I don’t mean the fibre. I mean the water-insoluble glue that is part of all grains. As such, grain always ferments inside you. If you are aware, you can feel it and taste it.

      This assumes that you started with a clean digestive system. If your digestive system is contaminated with grain or dairy to start with you cannot taste the difference because the taste of fermentation is part of your normal, but not natural state.

      Quinoa is fully digestible and therefore no fermentation. If your system is clean and your bowel movements regular, the quinoa fibre does not stick around long enough to ferment. That therefore means, you now do not fart or have bad breath and you have no snot, both features of fermentation and processed food consumption that no one and nothing on earth evolved to metabolize.

  10. Every day now, I am being offered deals on all sorts of silver-infused sheet sets, bath towels, etc.

    The ad said something like: Your sheets get dirty. Ours don’t.

    Future topic: I am wondering how much they mess up the skin microbiome.

    I say it because, yes, I bought the gloves and face masks for COVID-19, but I tend to sleep under just a sheet during the summer and when I go on vacations, which probably won’t happen soon and hasn’t happened, but I tend to not trust the bedding. When I traveled in Europe, we brought sheet sacks and Hammacher Schlemmer has an over-sized antibacterial, antimicrobial sheet sack.

    Yes, now, I wonder about the gut microbiome and the effect on the environment and health in general. If that ever shows up in a study, I would be interested.

    These things are big business right now because of the pandemic. Hospitals and nursing homes use them in pillows and obviously it isn’t preventing deaths there. Do they use silver-infused sheets and towels?

  11. The children being affected by COVID they think might be related to the strains on the east coast, south and Midwest.

    I think they said the U.K.too.

    https://discoveries.childrenshospital.org/covid-19-inflammatory-syndrome-children/

    This is going to be devastating.

    We are having children start dying right when society is starting to open.

    I was listening to the cases in my state and immediately this disease is killing children after they seem almost through with it.

    That changed everything for me.

    How many parents tried to have their children exposed because of hers immunity concepts.

    1. Deb,
      An Oklahoma news report this morning showed a wife warning of COVID-19. Her husband (not old) was the first here to die of it. He looked young and healthy. Several in their church became ill, including a 22 year old.

  12. It has mutated in such a scary way.

    If this is indeed COVID.

    It comes at the end even when there were no symptoms during.

    So unfair for parents to lose 5 year olds that way.

  13. Doe having children die after they have antibodies means Germany and the WHO were right to say it doesn’t look promising for hers immunity?

    Unless it mutates to become less virulent?

    1. It is dietary. That’s why doctors have never managed to defeat a corona virus. They are never looking in the right direction.

      The key to vulnerability is diet. It’s the common denominator right around the world. What does nearly everyone eat that they did not evolve to eat? Grain.

      And what does grain have in it? Gluten. And what is the real English word for gluten? GLUE.

      Then think about what protects the virus. A corona of fat right? Well if your diet includes domestic meat, it includes a boat load of fat. That fat lines our respiratory and digestive tracts. So the virus in insulated from our immune systems by the indigestible fat we eat that is a solid at body temperature.

      We have made ourselves the perfect host for a virus that could not possibly survive if we only ate what we evolved to eat.

      1. John,

        We shall see if they look at the diets of the children and what they find.

        You would go in the grain direction but I would look at the Whole Food Plant-Based community as eating a lot of grains.

        You will cause me to look for the states and countries and communities that eat the most grains to see if there is any obvious correlation but there are at least 14 mutations of this so far and I live in one of the states with the kids getting sick.

        Arizona had a nice mutation as if this might end soon.

        But I know that it took almost 500 days for Swine flu to kill this amount of people.

        Possibly.

        It is hard because the numbers changed but, either way, it took almost 500 days and we are going to get there in months.

      2. Okay, John, the Blue Zones are filled with grain-eaters.

        So I had to look to see if any of them would have been close to a COVID-19 hot spot.

        Nicoya, Costa Rica 26% of their calories are from whole grains.

        Sardinia, Italy 47% of their calories are from whole grains.

        There are a lot of COVID-19 cases in Italy but Sardinia is in the bottom 4 regions in Italy in cases and is considered one of the “best case” results.

        And, Costa Rica has one of the best COVID-19 studies in the Americas (More Costa Ricans have died in the USA than have died in Costa Rica itself)

        Anyway, it doesn’t tell me anything because they are both places that make pretty good decisions during pandemics.

        1. Blue Zoners don’t eat much in the way of grains. They are way fitter than Americans the same age. I wrote a chapter about their lifestyles in my book PITCHIN’ A LOAF AN’ MAKIN’ IT WORK. What you read about them on the net is not really representative.

          I did the research on them specifically because of the points you make.

          Stop trying to pick holes in the theory and start looking at why what I say works instead and you will be better off. Not eating grains is not the big deal you think it is. The human body without grain, dairy, sugar and domestic meat in it is far fitter and healthier if an appropriate amount of exercise is done as well.

          I’m living proof of my assertions and I’ve been doing the experiments for four decades. Do I eat grain occasionally? Yes, I do, but grain consumption is always paid for after the fact with snoring, snot, fermentation, farts and other stuff.

          If I eat a single slice of bread my wife can tell.

          Snoring, snot and farts are not normal. They do not exist in a clean human body. With nothing to ferment, there are no fermentation products. So no plugged sinuses, colds, sleep apnea and on and on.

          The benefits from avoiding grain far outweigh the benefits from eating grain unless you have no other choice. At that point, eating grain is better than starving.

          Surely, understanding that no mammal besides rodents eats grain should tell you something, especially when you consider that they have excrete it, then eat their excrement in order to benefit should connect some dots for you? Do you do that? Your digestive system is much less able to metabolize grain than a rat. So are you doing something a rat cannot?

          Again, Dr Greger makes some great points in his blogs and videos but in the end he is still a doctor carrying some of the same learned-it-by-rote baggage other doctors trudge along with.

          Don’t take what he says as gospel. Don’t forget, most of the time he is expounding theories, not answers.

          There is plenty of financial motivation for keeping people eating glue laden grains. Maybe you should do your own research and find out what happens instead of blindly believing I can’t be right.

          Don’t forget this either. Neither he or his minions have showed up here to tell me I’m wrong. They can’t because even a very limited test done honestly produces benefits that prove me right.

          In my opinion, grain consumption is a slow form of intentional degeneration.

  14. Watched a video about thiamine on Youtube. Allithiamine is derived from garlic. This version of thiamine is lipid soluble and heat stable. Search for ‘allithiamine japan’ and if you scroll down through the first few hits you’ll find a pdf about how it is made. Crushed garlic, thiamine solution, alkaline, heated at 60 degrees for 30 minutes. Corn is a good source of thiamine. Nixtamalisation involves using an alkali and heat in the process. It might work. Lipid soluble form would be better for people with diabetes and kidney failure.

  15. We do eat a lot of Quinoa, but I prefer it mixed in with brown rice. Since my triglycerides hover around 38, yes that is 38 NOT 380, I don’t really have to eat it for that. It just adds a nice nutty flavor, packed with protein and goodness. Comes in different colors too and that is cool. I love it when the medical staff look at my numbers; see their eyes bulge and then look at my age. 74 and still kickin! Plant Based for over 11 years!

  16. I use quinoa flour to replace a quarter of the white flour in Italian Biscotti recipes: can therefore leave out eggs as well and still have a dunkable result.

  17. I have been vegan for nearly a year. But after a recent diagnosis of sitosterolemia, and high cholesterol levels,especially lipoproteins, I am being directed to go back to eating animal products as a source of fat and protein. And avoid all vegan fats because of the plant sterols. Quinoa is actually classified as a seeD so that is off my list. I cannot find any literature for my condition that would allow me to stay vegan. So far NIH, NORD and the Sitosterolemia Society all recommend avoidance of plant fats period. Are they right? Would you have any information? Was there any research on patients with this rare gene mutation that could steer clear of animal products? Eating meat doesn’t ethically sit well for me, but I am allergic to soybeans so I feel I am in quite a quandary. The VA nutritionist recommended using animal products as a source of fat. I’ve read countless scientific journals on the internet about this condition and yet the only thing they recommend is Zetia and low plant sterol diet. What is the truth out there? I cant lose weight on a vegan diet at all. Oh and having MS doesn’t help either.
    Your thoughts on this are greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    1. You have left vital information out of your note. How are you overweight on a vegetarian diet? Are you still eating grain? If so, that could be part of the problem.

      You weren’t specific about what plant based fats you consume.

      So far none of what you said makes any sense to me. You are not telling us something.

    2. Hello Uliana,

      Given your high cholesterol, I am not sure why you would be recommended to eat animal fats, as they are well known to increase cholesterol levels. As for sitosterolemia, it may be pertinent to lower plant fats as well, but that doesn’t mean a low-fat plant-based diet is out of the question. Please discuss these options with your doctor as that seems to be the best option for reducing your cholesterol levels, improving MS, and helping with your sitosterolemia.

      I hope this helps,
      Dr. Matt

      https://nutritionfacts.org/2014/07/22/how-to-treat-multiple-sclerosis-with-diet/

  18. Sound good, but careful if you have diverticulitis, folks. Quinoa sounds like it could pose a problem if it remains in your gut undigested like it shows in this video.

  19. Skip the on-screen presentations. Your pitch and animated hand movements were so distracting, I had to on another tab. No offense, but the medium should not override the message. Thanks for all your great work and for changing my personal diet.

  20. I’m confused; what exactly do you mean by “current climate crisis,” sir? I quit following when the same so-called scientist proposed melting the polar caps by dropping soot on them a few decades ago. Could you educate the ignorant here…before the world presumably ends in the next, say, 10 years after polar bears start dropping from the skies?

    1. Some people go through their entire lives in a state of confusion that can only be relieved by an injection of common sense. Since there is no such thing Terp, you are doomed.

        1. Ahhh, yes—more name calling. Your mom must be proud. You troll the comments spamming what seems like hundreds of posts. I’ll drop out, as clearly NF allows your type of disrespect and ad hominem attacks. I wish you well, kid.

      1. What do you do when you can’t follow the science in detail? This applies to all sciences not just climate but I’ll focus on climate science.

        Do we “believe” one group or another? No, belief is for religion not science. Do we go with whatever the majority of scientists say? No, consensus is for politics not science.

        So what do we follow? Predictions! The scientific method requires them. If you are not making predictions that can be tested you are NOT doing science. See this 1 minute clip for an explanation:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7YcimsISUk

        Get PREDICTIONS with DATES and temperatures attached to them from both the natural cycles and CO2 groups. Then check up to see if their predictions happen. It is easy for anyone to do and kind of fun. Always copy the URL so you can check the wayback machine if they “clean up” their mistakes.

        As far as global warming goes, we are at a great juncture, a true fork in the road. The IPCC projects 0.5-1.0 C increase and the natural cycles scientists predict 0.25-1.0 C decrease over the next 20 years. They can’t both be correct but they both could be wrong.

        I will make only one prediction. CO2 will continue to increase by 1-2 PPM yearly over the next 20 years. China and India have said so and that is where it is determined.

        1. I like the way you think. Such clarity of thought is a rare commodity.

          The Larsen B ice shelf was a great example of what you just said. In 1998, scientists in Antarctica predicted the Larsen B ice shelf would hold for another thousand years.

          When I saw that on the news, I spent some time watching ice melt in my rum and ginger ale. My observations showed that ice cubes in a warmer environment (my drink) maintained shape and appearance for a substantial length of time, yet the ice disappeared very quickly (a couple of minutes) every time. So this was a repeatable experiment. It never failed.

          So my response to the claims made by scientists was derision. Sure enough, the ice shelf collapsed into the drink about four years later. Science is a useful tool but not if common sense is not part of the equation. And TRM as you say, a prediction and the record to go with it is so vindicating when they match.

  21. Well let’s do an experiment. Do this:

    Eliminate all dairy, all fat and all grain from your diet. No sugar either. What you have left is vegetables and fruit. Eat most of the raw. Stick to berries for your fruit. Eat meat at least once a week or take a B-12 supplement. You can take extra Zinc if you like. Get plenty of sunshine and exercise outdoors.

    Do that for a couple of weeks without cheating and see what happens. If you don’t cheat, all of you will see notable health improvements without doing anything else. You will notice that your need for water will decrease as well, yet you won’t be dehydrated. That’s because when you eat enough living plant material, the water in the plant tissues and LIVE fibre instead of dead fibre you get with grain, retains enough of its water as is goes through your intestinal tract to keep you hydrated even with a modest amount of water. You know this is right because not one of our ancestors were carrying around bottles of water – especially in desert conditions. This diet will help you have your 3 dumps per day minimum. Those of you who are overweight and therefore systemically constipated will not only start to see a decline in your weight, your physical and mental energy level will improve. Some aches and pains will disappear. No side effects beyond improved health.

    If you don’t see health improvements, that will because you are already doing this and know it works or you are terminal and beyond help.

    So, this is nothing buy you eating foods all of our ancestors ate. The most powerful nutrition on the planet. Remember, Quinoa is not grain so it’s allowed and encouraged. Don’t wash the saponins off. If you can buy quinoa that is so bitter you can barely eat it, you have a find. That level of saponin is what you need to KILL THE CORONAVIRUS, which is the name of my new book that will be released shortly. No I can’t give it away for free. I’m a church mouse. I can’t live on fresh air. But eventually, you will see Dr. Greger start to pick up on my ideas. You will note that since my tirades about grain, he and his minions have had nothing to say about it. These things do take time to confirm, but in the meantime, there is nothing stopping you eating the same or similar menu our ancestors ate.

    Keep in mind that while our ancestors did eat some grain, it was not wheat or similar, so much less glue. Therefore their digestive and respiratory environments were alkaline with zero fermentation going on. The meat they ate was not fat saturated. The red meat and even poultry we eat today is sodden with fat. Fat that once ingested, coats our inner surfaces and protects Covid-19 from our immune systems when it infects us.

    That’s why Americans more so than any other people, are more susceptible to Covid-19 IMHO. Those countries that have adopted American foods and styles of food prep are all countries struggling with Covid-19. Including Bolivia and other south American countries that grow quinoa who have switched to gringo style of eating along with fast food restaurants. You can follow the virus and the diet around the world. And don’t think rice escapes this phenomenon. It doesn’t.

    Eating pasta, pizza, cereal and the like is not you being a vegetarian. It’s you fooling yourself and gambling that you won’t encounter the virus. Good luck.

    I am no saint myself when it comes to food. Let’s be clear on that. I lived my life on junk food. I was nearly destroyed as a direct result. Junk food is a hard addiction to break. Who doesn’t enjoy toast and jam, noodles, pancakes, cheesecake, doughnuts, cheese and on and on. Covid-19 does not have the capacity to care about your addiction or your cockeyed food beliefs. It cares about hook-up. As in hook up to a cell.

    Don’t think for a moment it has to hook up in your body to one of your body cells that is part of you. If you are eating grain, dairy, meat and sugar, your body is awash in bacteria that works as a host. Covid-19 does not need its source to actually be you, it just needs a cell that is compatible with you. That is good enough. So in that sense you are the perfect welcoming host even if you normally eat as I’ve suggested and you only just had your one and only Western Diet meal for this entire calendar year. Your last meal is good enough to disturb what should be a saponin influenced and saturated mucosal layer from head to toe.

    Remember, saponin is soap. EVERYONE agrees soap kills the virus. Like I said on the book cover, It ain’t rocket science. On the other hand given the glacial pace at which medical minds work it might be 20 years or never before the current crop of constipated scientists finally convince themselves that real food actually does protect us the same way it did our ancestors.

    My impression of the people on this site is that most of you read the information, think about it then forget it. It’s hard to comprehend how so many of you can read the stuff on this site and seem to learn so little. Hopefully these quinoa posts prompt you to actually pry yourselves from the chairs your asses are form fitted to and actually put some of this material into action.

    I’m well aware that those of you with long noses and a degree don’t think much of a person with no degree giving you advice. Well get over it and use your heads. Don’t take my word for any of this, just eat properly and pay attention to the results. Don’t think because your shit finally flows properly that you have diarrhea. Chances are many of you are so backed up you need a library to pass the time waiting for the next log. Normal is 14 seconds from the time your ass hits the seat until you need to wipe. Keep that firmly in mind before you start thinking I’m a quack. Normal means no snot, no farts, no snoring, no sleep apnea, no constipation, no sinus infections, no ear infections, no colds, healthy hair and finger nails, no high blood pressure. Normal and processed foods are oxymorons. Don’t you BE a moron.

      1. You said it better than I did. Thank you. I wonder how many of the armchair scientists on this site will allow that beautiful sentence to penetrate deeper than the epithelium where it may spark some sentience…

    1. Although the sources cited for this video certainly show the benefits of quinoa for lowering triglycerides, I searched Medline Plus and was unable to find a study comparing quinoa to whole oat groats on this effect. There were studies showing quinoa beat corn flakes in triglyceride-lowering (no surprise there!) and other studies comparing quinoa to whole wheat, but these studies did not show a direct improvement for the quinoa, although the discussion pointed out possible methodological reasons for that and also cited several other studies that showed inconsistent results for cardiovascular benefits for quinoa v whole grains.
      AT this point, although your question is a good one, I think we can only say that both oat groats and quinoa have shown positive effects in lowering triglycerides, but neither has yet been shown to be the clear winner. Enjoy both or stick with the one you prefer and either way you’ll improve your cardiovascular risk.

      1. The best comparison would be between hemp hearts and whole wheat.

        That comparison should include hydration effects, constipation as well as glue (gluten) Impact on mucus viscosity.

  22. You weaken your arguments for something when you link it to global warming. Plants grow better and are more drought resistant in higher CO2 environments. Just focus on the positives of a food.

    As to quinoa it does have 18 amino acids but it does have a high glycemic load. Just something to keep in mind. I like it mixed with hemp seed personally. That is a nice balance of carbs, protein and fat.

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