NutritionFacts.org

kale

Kale is a dark leafy green, cruciferous vegetable and an excellent choice for one of our nine a day servings of fruits and vegetables. It is a good source of antioxidants, calcium, lignans, nitrates, skin-enhancing carotenoids and other phytonutrients, including lutein and zeaxanthin (which may protective against glaucoma). Kale may even reduce cholesterol. Unfortunately, kale is not common in the American diet. One can overdo the consumption of raw kale. Cooked kale may improve immune function, though ideally should be chopped 45 minutes before cooking to maximize the production of the anti-cancer phytonutrient sulforophane.

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