How to Regenerate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Naturally

How to Regenerate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Naturally
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Chlorophyll in our bloodstream after eating greens may react with wavelengths of sunlight that penetrate through our skin to reactivate the antioxidant Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol).

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Chlorophyll is the green pigment that makes green leaves green. If one searches for chlorophyll in the medical literature, a lot of what you find is about fecal fluorescence, a way to detect the contamination of carcasses with feces in the slaughterhouse to reduce the risk of food poisoning from pathogens harbored within animal feces.

See, fecal matter gets on meat either with knife entry through the hide into the carcass, and also splash back and airborne deposition of fecal matter when they’re peeling off the skin. But if they’ve been eating grass, you can pick up the poo with a black light. Here’s a solution of chlorophyll. Under a UV light, though, chlorophyll lights up red. So, if you have a black light in a chicken slaughter plant, you can get a drop on the droppings. The problem is we don’t let chickens outside anymore. They’re no longer pecking at grass; so, there’s less fecal fluorescence. We could let them run around, or save money by just adding a chlorophyll supplement to their feed, so we can better identify areas of gut-spill contamination on the meat.

The reason I was looking up chlorophyll was to follow-up on the data I presented in my Eating Green to Prevent Cancer video, suggesting that chlorophyll may be able to block carcinogens. There were a few in vitro studies on the potential anti-inflammatory effects of chlorophyll. After all, green leaves have long been used to treat inflammation; so, anti-inflammatory properties of chlorophyll and these properties’ break-down products after digestion were put to the test. And indeed, they may represent valuable and abundantly available anti-inflammatory agents. Maybe that’s one reason why cruciferous veggies, like kale and collard greens, are associated with decreased markers of inflammation.

In a petri dish, for example, if you lay down a layer of arterial lining cells, this is how many inflammatory immune cells stick to them before, and after, you stimulate them with a toxic substance. We can bring that inflammation down, though, with the anti-inflammatory drug, aspirin, or even more by just dripping on some chlorophyll. Perhaps that’s one of the reasons kale consumers may live longer lives.

This is the study, though, that blew my mind. Sunlight is the most abundant energy source on this planet. So far, so good. However, only plants are really able to use sunlight directly, or so we thought. After eating plants, animals, too, may be able to derive energy directly from sunlight as well. What?! First of all, light can’t get through our skin, right? Wrong, as was demonstrated by century-old science—and any kid who’s ever shined a flashlight through their fingers; the red wavelengths do get through. In fact, if you step outside on a sunny day, there’s enough light going through to your brain, you could read a book in there. OK, so our internal organs are bathed in sunlight, and absorbed chlorophyll in the body does actually appear to produce cellular energy, but unless we eat so many greens we turn green ourselves, the energy produced is probably negligible.

However, light-activated chlorophyll in our body may help regenerate Coenzyme Q10. CoQ10 is an antioxidant our body basically makes from scratch using the same enzyme that our body uses to make cholesterol, the same enzyme that’s blocked by cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. So, if CoQ10 production gets caught in the crossfire, then maybe that explains why statins increase our risk of diabetes, by accidently also reducing CoQ10 levels. Maybe that’s why statins can lead to muscle breakdown. So, should statin users take CoQ10 supplements? No, they should improve their diets sufficiently to stop taking drugs that muck with their biochemistry. And by doing so, by eating more plant-based chlorophyll-rich diets, they may best maintain their levels of active CoQ10, also known as ubiquinol. However, when ubiquinol is used as an antioxidant, it is oxidized to ubiquinone. And for ubiquinol to act as an effective antioxidant again, the body must regenerate ubiquinol from ubiquinone, maybe using dietary chlorophyll metabolites and light.

They exposed some ubiquinone and chlorophyll metabolites to the kind of light that makes it into our bloodstream, and poof, CoQ10 was reborn, but without the chlorophyll, or without the light, nothing happened.  And look, we get light, we get chlorophyll if we’re eating our veggies. Maybe that’s how we maintain such high levels of CoQ10 in our bloodstream. Maybe that explains why dark green leafy vegetables are so good for us. We know sun can be good for us; we know greens can be good for us. These benefits are commonly attributed to an increase in vitamin D from sunlight exposure and all the antioxidants from green vegetables. But maybe these explanations might be incomplete.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Josch13 via Pixabay and Marie Franzen via Wikimedia Commons.

Chlorophyll is the green pigment that makes green leaves green. If one searches for chlorophyll in the medical literature, a lot of what you find is about fecal fluorescence, a way to detect the contamination of carcasses with feces in the slaughterhouse to reduce the risk of food poisoning from pathogens harbored within animal feces.

See, fecal matter gets on meat either with knife entry through the hide into the carcass, and also splash back and airborne deposition of fecal matter when they’re peeling off the skin. But if they’ve been eating grass, you can pick up the poo with a black light. Here’s a solution of chlorophyll. Under a UV light, though, chlorophyll lights up red. So, if you have a black light in a chicken slaughter plant, you can get a drop on the droppings. The problem is we don’t let chickens outside anymore. They’re no longer pecking at grass; so, there’s less fecal fluorescence. We could let them run around, or save money by just adding a chlorophyll supplement to their feed, so we can better identify areas of gut-spill contamination on the meat.

The reason I was looking up chlorophyll was to follow-up on the data I presented in my Eating Green to Prevent Cancer video, suggesting that chlorophyll may be able to block carcinogens. There were a few in vitro studies on the potential anti-inflammatory effects of chlorophyll. After all, green leaves have long been used to treat inflammation; so, anti-inflammatory properties of chlorophyll and these properties’ break-down products after digestion were put to the test. And indeed, they may represent valuable and abundantly available anti-inflammatory agents. Maybe that’s one reason why cruciferous veggies, like kale and collard greens, are associated with decreased markers of inflammation.

In a petri dish, for example, if you lay down a layer of arterial lining cells, this is how many inflammatory immune cells stick to them before, and after, you stimulate them with a toxic substance. We can bring that inflammation down, though, with the anti-inflammatory drug, aspirin, or even more by just dripping on some chlorophyll. Perhaps that’s one of the reasons kale consumers may live longer lives.

This is the study, though, that blew my mind. Sunlight is the most abundant energy source on this planet. So far, so good. However, only plants are really able to use sunlight directly, or so we thought. After eating plants, animals, too, may be able to derive energy directly from sunlight as well. What?! First of all, light can’t get through our skin, right? Wrong, as was demonstrated by century-old science—and any kid who’s ever shined a flashlight through their fingers; the red wavelengths do get through. In fact, if you step outside on a sunny day, there’s enough light going through to your brain, you could read a book in there. OK, so our internal organs are bathed in sunlight, and absorbed chlorophyll in the body does actually appear to produce cellular energy, but unless we eat so many greens we turn green ourselves, the energy produced is probably negligible.

However, light-activated chlorophyll in our body may help regenerate Coenzyme Q10. CoQ10 is an antioxidant our body basically makes from scratch using the same enzyme that our body uses to make cholesterol, the same enzyme that’s blocked by cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. So, if CoQ10 production gets caught in the crossfire, then maybe that explains why statins increase our risk of diabetes, by accidently also reducing CoQ10 levels. Maybe that’s why statins can lead to muscle breakdown. So, should statin users take CoQ10 supplements? No, they should improve their diets sufficiently to stop taking drugs that muck with their biochemistry. And by doing so, by eating more plant-based chlorophyll-rich diets, they may best maintain their levels of active CoQ10, also known as ubiquinol. However, when ubiquinol is used as an antioxidant, it is oxidized to ubiquinone. And for ubiquinol to act as an effective antioxidant again, the body must regenerate ubiquinol from ubiquinone, maybe using dietary chlorophyll metabolites and light.

They exposed some ubiquinone and chlorophyll metabolites to the kind of light that makes it into our bloodstream, and poof, CoQ10 was reborn, but without the chlorophyll, or without the light, nothing happened.  And look, we get light, we get chlorophyll if we’re eating our veggies. Maybe that’s how we maintain such high levels of CoQ10 in our bloodstream. Maybe that explains why dark green leafy vegetables are so good for us. We know sun can be good for us; we know greens can be good for us. These benefits are commonly attributed to an increase in vitamin D from sunlight exposure and all the antioxidants from green vegetables. But maybe these explanations might be incomplete.

To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. This is just an approximation of the audio contributed by Katie Schloer.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Images thanks to Josch13 via Pixabay and Marie Franzen via Wikimedia Commons.

Doctor's Note

This video has it all: a mind-blowing mechanism, practical applicability, and poop—what more could you want?

Eating Green to Prevent Cancer is the prior chlorophyll video I mentioned.

For more on the potential downsides of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, see, for example, Statin Cholesterol Drugs and Invasive Breast Cancer and The Actual Benefit of Diet vs. Drugs.

If you haven't yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

163 responses to “How to Regenerate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Naturally

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  1. Does the light penetrate clothing (how thick clothing can it penetrate?) or only bare skin? and does this apply in winter as well as in summer?

    how much chlorophyll are in different foods?




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      1. Probably does! Even when I first switched to a WFPB diet I quit burning when I went out into the sun to work. I am very fair skinned and I used to burn very quickly. As tubby as I was a year ago I probably should have sizzled when I went outside, but no. It seems that a diet based on whole plant foods changes our system enough that even when we’re still fatties we benefit.
        Just sayin’




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          1. I saw a test where UV light was applied to the participants skin before commencing a diet so they could gauge propensity for sunburn, they got the participants to consume a tablespoon of tomato paste with each meal for a couple of weeks for the lycopene thats in there and it worked for a ~15% reduction in sunburn




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        1. Well, now I know, I was wrong! Thank you for your experience. I’m not all the way there, 20 to get off yet, gives me hope.




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        2. Same here. I just don’t use sunscreen. I think it has toxic stuff in it anyway, from listening to other health shows. I now eat tons of green leafies, and I don’t get sunburned. Just a tad pink. My wife freaks out, and then I’m fine within a couple of hours. Now Kaiser is even suggesting that sunlight is important and we need to get out in it. Kaiser is a health maintenance organization. John




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            1. I’ve quite using skin care stuff too. I mix three oils (shea butter, avocado, and almond) and use that after my shower, and I’m scrubbing with rhassoul clay. I wash my hair with the clay and rinse with cider vinegar.
              I just don’t trust what is being sold to us any more. My skin and hair look great but I’m guessing it’s more from my diet than from skin care regime.




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            1. “It” being Kaiser (this comment was separated from its prompter post). And Dr. Craig McDougall is no longer with Kaiser, but with an entity called Zoom Care or Zoom+ care or some such.




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          1. Workers in manufactoring sunscreen are dressed in hazmat suits. I witnessed this first hand in doing prefire planning at FD. I had a great Captain as we would go behind the scenes not visible to the public




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        3. Same for me to. I used to burn quite easy with my fair skin, but when I stopped consuming animal produce in 2009, I noticed that I wasn’t getting burnt as easily. Over 6 years later and I’ve rarely been burnt. I’ve found coconut oil to be useful in preventing burning to some degree. Obviously I’m not talking about prolonged exposure and I’m in the UK where we rarely get very hot weather.




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        4. Thank you for sharing your story 2tsaybow, like yourself my mother is very fair skinned and cannot even walk outside without getting “sizzled” , ending up with painful , pinkish purple patches unless she covers up completely (even in a car) and only walk in the shade.
          My mother who visited us recently has become very interested in Dr.Greger’s book “How not to die” , so I will be able to tell her your story and about the additional benefits of switching to a WFPB diet.




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    1. Hi quee poi, I don’t think light would penetrate thick clothing, or at least not very much. We know that in winter, in northern latitudes there is not enough of the right kind of light (ultraviolet) to activate vitamin D in the skin. This video spoke about red light (other end of the spectrum) as penetrating the skin and also being involved, along with chlorophyll, in restoring the anti-oxidant activity of CoQ. I doubt that red light would penetrate thick clothing, also not sure if this is influenced by season. As far as amounts of chlorophyll in different foods, in my understanding, everything green has lots of chlorophyll, it is what gives the greens their green colour.




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        1. It’s a very interesting question! Cholesterol is needed in order to make vitamin d in the body, it is altered by various enzymes through several stages until vitamin d is produced. Non-vegans of course consume dietary cholesterol and also dietary vitamin d, in varying amounts and also saturated fats which promote production of cholesterol in our bodies. People with malabsorption due to various conditions of the small bowel will tend to have low vitamin d levels. Then there is sunlight…..so many variables. In practice, looking at lab tests of many people, I have not seen a clear correlation between cholesterol levels and vitamin D….Personally I suspect that the use of statin drugs to reduce cholesterol would also reduce vitamin D levels(it makes sense…) but I am not aware that this has been studied.




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            1. Hi vmh. If you don’t mind, I’ll take over the question you asked above since the previous NF volunteer you asked is now off duty. Our bodies use cholesterol to make Vitamin D, however lowering your cholesterol to a healthy level will not cause a Vit. D deficiency. Cholesterol is a non-essential nutrient – meaning we do not need to consume it from an outside source. Even with eating a low fat, WFPB diet, your liver will make all the cholesterol you need to function. Some of this cholesterol is used to make Vitamin D in the presence of adequate sunlight.

              Even without dietary change, blood cholesterol levels may be a bit lower at the end of the summer compared to the end of the winter because some of the cholesterol has been used to make Vit D in the summer. However, having high cholesterol levels does NOT translate into increased Vit D levels. Similarly, lowering cholesterol to a healthy level (LDL <70 and total <150 as is stated in multiple previous NF articles) will not negatively affect Vit D since these levels of cholesterol are your body's ideal (they only sound low by Western standards because most of our society is walking around with high cholesterol). I hope that answers your question.




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      1. just to be clear, one needs to consume chlorophyll and then go under the sun or one could expose the greens to the light and then consume them?




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        1. Hi Sam, There is no need to expose the greens to light. The cholorphyll is in the green plants already, and it is what makes them green. Bottom line is, eat your greens! This video just gives one more reason to do so. I hope that is helpful.




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          1. total anecdote here but I have quite severe CFS and had relief from muscle pain (which is generated just by household activities) when I was getting my daily maximum exercise quota by picking dark green kale from my sun bathed garden in the Aussie summer. I was juicing this kale with apple and ginger and it coincided with me not waking of a morning with sore muscles from the previous day. I was astonished but after a few weeks couldnt replicate it – this was when my own kale was eaten by moths and I was getting store bought and thus not getting the associated sun exposure. we are not too far off from the sunny months here so I will replicate this again as my kale is growing gloriously right now.




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    2. How much chlorophyll is in different foods? The consensus seems to be that the darker the green, the more chlorophyll. Thus, kale: good; iceberg lettuce: not so good.




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      1. Correct, dark green kale has much more health benefits than white (or light green) iceberg lettuce. However, other colored plant foods are also rich in chlorophyll. Yellow and orange plant foods (bell peppers, tomatoes for example) are still packed with chlorophyll, but their other pigments over power the green. So instead of concerning yourself about the specific amount of chlorophyll in each food, you’ll be fine if your diet is overall filled with deep rich colors.




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  2. How much sunlight is need to activate the chlorophyll. When I’m outside I wear a visor to keep sun off my face, so my arms are the most exposed part. Is this exposure enough. I’ve wondered the same thing about vitamin D generation from sunlight. Are some body parts better at absorption than others and how much time is required.




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      1. From your link: “…around half the time it takes for your skin to turn pink” that’s the rule of thumb from years back. In order to get that on a Northern winter’s day, either high elevation or reflection. Remember those funky foil folding face reflectors from fifties? (say that 5X fast)




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      2. Do you know of any good studies I can read to educate my natural discomfort with people who repeatedly slather globs of commercial sunscreen on their defenseless offspring who rarely even pink up in the sun? I just am very suspicious of any “innovation” like sunscreen that is so readily accepted, because it seems to always prove lethal down the road when it is foreign to our body. I’ve even read there are suspicions that it causes, instead of prevents, cancer and other issues. Used to be very fair skinned people wore hats, kept lightly covered, and stayed in the shade or under an umbrella or shelter while outside for any length of time, and if they didn’t, might have issues. We evolved here at different latitudes, so that just doesn’t apply to all of us, and yet sunscreen seems to be ubiquitous these days! If “too much sun” feels like a threat, how about limiting exposure? Seems like we often trade the good sense passed down by traditional knowledge for that urban commodity of convenience, and pay the price when we least expect it. Or maybe I’m just paranoid? lol




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        1. Hi Vege-tater. I tend to recommend, along the lines of Dr Michael Hollick, trying to get enough sun exposure to allow the activation of vitamin D in the skin, but not so much as to burn. In his book he has a table which suggests optimum durations of sun exposure as different latitudes and for different skin types and seasons. Sun burn apparently is associated with the damage that also leads to cancer. UV exposure also leads to wrinkles and using some form of protection for the face (shade, hat, sunscreen). Melanomas, associated with sun exposure, readily metastasizes and is often fatal. Squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas tend to stay more localized but can go deep, can be disfiguring when they are present and when they are removed, especially if on the face where many of them occur. It seems that later melanoma is particularly associated with sunburns in childhood, so protection from burning is important for children. I share your distaste for commercial sunscreens and wondering whether the treatment is potentially harmful. I don’t have the reference to hand, but I believe Dr Fuhrman has gone into this subject extensively and you might find more in his books or on his website. I doubt that people made the connection between sun exposure and skin cancer before modern times.




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          1. Oh sure, I agree we learn more as we go, and why I love it here, but my point is sometimes what we so readily accept as “knowledge” is only our approximation. There are gaps we aren’t aware of, pieces of the puzzle we don’t even know are missing, so we can’t always see the big picture and often make mistakes connecting the dots. I personally don’t think we can currently know, duplicate, or improve upon the natural systems we’ve evolved with over millennia, no matter how smart we *think* we are. I look around at the mess we’ve made of our beautiful planet… deforestation, extinctions, pollution, chemicals, depletions, toxic oceans, nuclear arsenals, meltdowns, wars, oppression…and try to balance that with our amazing potential, but instead of getting easier, it gets harder. Call me jaded, but it is what it is.




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          2. I remember my Oklahoma farmer grandfather, and all the men of his generation and later, always wore long sleeves and a hat. Straw hats for summer, felt hats for winter. In his older years he had a lot of moles but I don’t think he ever had skin cancer.

            People in extreme desert climates seem to always cover much of their skin.




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    1. No you cannot keep Sun off the face if you want to get the benefit and you have to expose your MIDRIFF also. Have you heard about something called Solar Plexus? Ancient Indians who practised the Sanatana Dharma(called Hinduism by Arabians and Westerners now) knew the importance of getting their daily dose of Sunlight(being brownies/dark skinned mostly). So they religiously performed “SURYA NAMASKAR” (Bowing to the Sun God) every morning before taking their essential daily bath beside river ghats. It is not just bowing with folded hands towards the Sun. It involved deep breathing and stretching exercises based on basic yoga postures and lasted for more than half an hour. Each cycle of the namaskar lasting 2~3 minutes was repeated at least 12 times. Essentially all temple priests compulsorily followed this before they started their daily duties inside the temple’s ‘Sanctum Santorum’ made out of granite or similar hard stones which blocked not only Sunlight but even the radiation/heat derived from sunlight (If you go to any big Indian temple dating back even a few hundred years, this can be verified). All Ancient Indians refrained from covering their upper bodies (only males continued doing so, after the advent of Invading Barbarians around A D 800) exposing the Solar Plexus (which derived the name from the Vedic term “SURYA CHAKRA”) which denotes the third Chakra representing power among the Seven major ‘Chakra’s that represents the sacral inner body according to Yogic principles. It is not for any other reason that the Europeans found bare bodied men and women among Javan Hindus, or among Cambodians(“Khambhoj” is the original Sanskrit name) just like the myopic Arab traveller Ibn Batuta did earlier in Sri Lanka and became a cuckoo in no time because he thought he found paradise. So after being forced to succumb to the social norms imposed by Marauding Arab, Turkish, Persian and Victorian “civic sensibility” which is ‘considered’ the most ‘modern’? most of the Indians have lost this good habit practised by previous generations till the turn of the 20th Century. So they have to learn it and validate by following Dr G’s excellent videos now…




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    1. Maybe light should be considered an essential nutrient. Our mom’s always told us it was healthy to get outside and play in the sunlight. Apparently there is more to this than just getting a suntan.




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        1. Cool!

          I am toying with the idea of buying a used tanning bed and fitting it with daylight fluorescent bulbs, to see how my body reacts to greater quantities of ordinary light. While vitamin D synthesis seems to depend on ultraviolet (UV) exposure, there is no such requirement with chlororphyll/co-q10. I am also thinking about light’s effect on depression, or Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) a it is called when the light connection is front and center. Perhaps there are other metabolic pathways that are catalyzed or triggered by light, other than the ones that have been discussed, perhaps some that science does not yet know about?




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    2. The statement about so much light entering your skull you could read a book in there caused me to spit my oatmeal all over the screen!!
      Too Funny there DrG!!
      Now where is my wheat grass….




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    1. I just started taking 200 mg/day. It’s very expensive. I hope that others will weigh in on the benefits of supplementation, if any. I live in Minnesota, where sunlight is at a premium!




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        1. I read about a Norwegian study of women on chemo for breast cancer who were given something like 90 mg of CoQ10. One woman took 400 mg instead and her tumor went away. Another of the women learned of that, increased hers to 400 mg and her tumor went away. It was a small study, and of course there is always more to learn, but it could be worth remembering should you ever have cancer treatment.




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          1. Do you have a link or title for the Norwegian study? Do you know how long it took before the tumors went away? Was there anything pointing towards the CoQ10 as the curative agent instead of the chemo?




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            1. Wilma, I’m sorry, I don’t have any details. I read this several months ago, and again read a reference to it more recently. I’m heading out the door, but I’ll try and remember where I read it and get back to you. I think the article also said you could dissolve those big gel capsules in hot water or tea, which makes them easier to take.




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      1. Dr G has a few videos on NF about the efficacy (or I should say lack of it) with supplements. I’ll put a few links below. Also of note is that a few years ago there was a lot in the news about a federal tests that showed less than half of the supplements on the market had much, if any of what was said to be included (I myself was taking a quality name brand of Vit D only to find that my D levels were dropping like a rock for this same reason). And finally, just of the supplements on the market are from China and many are synthetic. So none of that adds up to anything you’d want to spend money on. And I speak as someone who took plenty in his life and wish he’d never touched them. Some studies showed that your chances of dying were increased taking multivitamins. Here are three. There might be more. I didn’t go through the complete list of results from my search of “supplements”. The except from the last link result says “Note they say dietary intake; they’re not talking about supplements. Not only do antioxidant pills not seem to help, they seem to increase overall mortality.”. So, you probably want to be sure to watch that video. You might also search coQ10.
        http://nutritionfacts.org/video/some-dietary-supplements-may-be-more-than-a-waste-of-money/
        http://nutritionfacts.org/video/multivitamin-supplements-and-breast-cancer/
        http://nutritionfacts.org/video/food-antioxidants-and-cancer/

        Mark G




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    2. If you have a look at Mayo Clinic website, and look up coenzyme Q10, there is a monograph which discussed potential benefits, gives the level of evidence, selected references and also discusses doses, interactions and potential downsides. I think this should be a reliable source. At a glance it does not seem that there would be much benefit form taking occasionally (or much harm, except to the purse). There does not yet seem to be conclusive evidence for major benefits, at least in this particular monograph. Apparently it can lower blood pressure so care should be taken if on blood pressure lowering medications. Also it is said to ‘affect’ blood sugar, but not whether it raises or lowers. An abstract found in PubMed, “Coenzyme Q10 contents in foods and fortifications strategies” says that the average dietary intake is 3-6 mg per day, and that the richest dietary sources are meat, fish, nuts and some oils”. But our bodies already make it—though we know that statins interfere with its synthesis (you can see that on the chart in the video). I wouldn’t personally suggest using it unless the person had to take statins—although ideally one would achieve a good cholesterol level with diet, in reality it does not always happen and for some individuals statins will have a role to play.




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        1. Morry,

          It appears to still be a question mark as to the amount one should take however, there are some studies that do indicate that the absorption and functionality of the ubiquinol is higher. You might look at this study: Evans M, Baisley J, Barss S, Guthrie N. A randomized, double-blind trial on the bioavailability of two CoQ10 formulations. Journal of Functional Foods. 2009. 1: 65-73 (https://integratedhealth.com/downloads/CoQ10Study.pdf) Small but different formulations leading to higher bioavailability.

          One of the take aways is that dependant on your form of statin, dose , genetics and cellular integrity you might consider starting at a lower dose and then having your blood analysed for a scientific approach, otherwise it’s a guess.

          Dr. Alan Kadish Moderator for Dr. Greger




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        1. Here, here, jj and Dr. Maisel. Please don’t forget there are those of us who absolutely cannot lower our cholesterol numbers through diet alone. I am one of those people who has familial cholesterolimia. I have tested myself while on a vegan diet–which I am on for life–have supplemented with 1200 mg q.d. of red yeast rice, and have virtually no sources of cholesterol, and still had a total cholesterol reading of 330 mg/dl. If I could slap my liver in the face, I’d do it, but he just won’t behave. Thank you everyone for understanding that and for the information about Co-Q10 for those who need to supplement.




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  3. Very interesting. Sunlight has important implications for health other than vitamin D production.
    Dark green leafy vegetables a know to provide protection against the sun, http://mariamarlowe.com/2013/07/7-foods-that-provide-sun-protection/

    Eating green leafy vegetables and getting plenty of natural sunlight are good for you and whose benefits probably cannot be replaced with a pill. That sounds so intuitive, so pastoral, and so contrary to the lives that many of us are living.




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  4. Off topic: I got my annual test results today, all great!
    Stand out results:
    Age: 60
    Total serum cholesterol: 120; LDL 57; HDL 53.

    23andMe gene testing says I’m genetically prone to high LDL.

    Several years ago, before NF educated me, I was a vegan with health problems due to an undiagnosed bad parathyroid. In desperation, I fell for the paleo illogic and tried it for one year. My cholesterol shot up from 117 to 218 with very high LDL. I immediately went back to vegan and luckily found this site to give me factual data. My cholesterol has been steadily dropping the last 3 years and I’m finally back down to my best level, and I’m an even healthier vegan with all my new knowledge.

    Bottom line:
    1. Gene’s are not your destiny!
    2. NF is saving lives, and it’s the best nutrition education site on the net!

    Thanks, Dr Greger!
    Mark G.




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      1. If cholesterol remains high on a plant based whole food diet without added oils, and the person is not overweight, there is likely a genetic component. People with a genetic high cholesterol can have levels that are very high–300 and up (apart from familial hypercholesterolemia where cholesterol will be over 500 many times).There are single gene mutations which can be tested for (not by 23 and me, I don’t think) but I discussed this with a geneticist recently, who said, that at least half of the genetic high cholesterol is polygenic (caused by multiple genes) and most labs only test for single gene mutations. These people really do need pharmacological means to reduce the cholesterol but they should STILL eat a good diet, for all the other benefits that it will give. Decades of medical practice have really taught me that we have to be very humble, accept that we don’t know everything–and keep on learning. It seems that in a very high proportion of people, changing the diet will achieve the aim, but in life nothing is 100%!




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        1. Dr Maisel: Thanks for your reply! Interesting.

          This statement caught my eye: “These people really do need pharmacological means to reduce the
          cholesterol…” I heard a talk recently where a point was made that a person on a truly healthy diet (low fat, whole plant foods only) doesn’t need to worry about high cholesterol because the cholesterol won’t oxidize and thus would not lead to health problems. (Assuming I understood the talk correctly.) I’m not asking you to do any extra work to look this up, but I’m wondering if you are aware of any studies off the top of your head that specifically looked at people who a) have been eating a strict whole plant food diet for a good length of time, and b) who still went on to have a heart attack or stroke.

          In other words, I’m 100% on board with your point about a healthy diet not lowering cholesterol in 100% of the people–likely for a variety of reasons. But I question/wonder about whether a person with higher cholesterol under healthy conditions for a length of time really has a problem to worry about when cholesterol stays high. Do we really know?




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          1. Hi Thea, we may learn more in future on this subject but at present I as a clinician I wouldn’t gamble with leaving cholesterol very high. It wouldn’t be ethical. I am a family practitioner, not a cardiologist or lipidologist….I know in Dr Esselstyn’s study, he used diet and medication to keep cholesterol below 150….




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            1. Dr. Maisel: I’ve been mulling over your replies to me, most of which makes perfect sense. Finally it hit me what was bothering me. I remembered this study: March 2015. Statins Stimulate Atherosclerosis & Heart Failure: from Pharmacological Mechanisms Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology. Sorry that I don’t know how to cite studies. I quickly copied this info off a slide from a lecture.
              .
              I don’t know how good the study is. But the title/claim makes sense to me, and I heard about it from a source I relatively trust, Dr. Klaper. I think statins might work the same way that osteoporosis pills work = fixing a marker (bone density in osteoporosis’s case and cholesterol in statin’s cases) but having no effect on or making the actual disease worse. If true, then Dr. Esselstyn’s study worked in spite of the statins, not because of them.
              .
              I understand that you may disagree with this. But I thought you would want to be made aware of the study (if you weren’t already) for general consideration.




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              1. Just found and read this article which you can read for free. It is not a study, it is not really even a review article but a commentary on selected other studies–about 40 of them—with a lot of speculation. Reading even the descriptions of some of the studies they comment on, I am not even sure that those studies were very good. For example the Japanese study cited early in the article had a disproportionate number of people with familial hypercholesterolemia—I wouldn’t jump to conclusions. You know to actually read and understand a research paper requires a great degree of expertise, and an understanding of statistics which most of us do not have. I include myself there once things go beyond a certain level. Extrapolating from pure biochemistry to effects on whole human physiology is also fraught with problems: Dr Campbell addresses this reductionism in science, in his book Whole. These authors invoke statistics to explain why some of the results in other studies should have been interpreted differently and I have to say, that is beyond me. if faced with a patient with genetic familial hypercholesterolemia, I would certainly recommend dietary change, but knowing the natural history of the disease which drastically shortens life I would still be including the pharmacological approach and to be honest, I would refer to a cardiologist or lipidologist with special expertise. By the way I also know Dr Klaper and hope to be seeing him again soon when I visit True North this spring!




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                  1. Hi Thea, there are some remarks on this subject in the ‘ask the doctor’ section of NutritionFacts website….




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      1. Thank you. Yes, they removed the bad parathyroid and another one that looked bad but turned out to be ok. But they could not find the remaining two. My PTH and calcium levels remain questionable so they still need watching, as they think that one of the remaining two is going bad. I am tested every two months.




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        1. Do they say anything about vitamin D? The normal blood levels of vitamin d are defined by—lower limit being that which causes a rise in parathyroid hormone (because vit d helps absorb calcium form the gut, and if you don’t, then parathyroid hormone kicks in and takes it out of the bone.) I wonder if in future some one will discover a link between chronically low vitamin d levels and the development of parathyroid adenoma–this was a condition that affected some members of my family and so of particular interest to me. Good luck and keep well.




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          1. We have talked about that. Many Vit D supplements have nothing in them except oil. I found that out the hard way when I was taking 2,000 units/day of a “quality” brand and my levels dropped like a rock. I now take one drop of Blue Bonnet brand each day. Nothing in it but Vit D and it keeps me ok. The times that I have gotten low my PTH levels have gone way up and then come down when my D goes up. Recently my D started to drop by cause I wasn’t taking enough over the winter. I should have added an extra drop every few days. So I upped the D and in a couple months the D went up, but so did the PTH, but the calcium went down a little to 9.6 from 10.1. So they aren’t sure what’s happening. I’m pretty sure that I’ve got another bad PT. The problem is, how do you remove what you can’t find? :/




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        1. Hi, Pl do not speak out your value of snake oil. Trevo has Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) We give Value !!! “selling is lower value” we do not recommend.




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    1. Raw or short steaming sees to be the best way to ensure you’re getting all the chlorophyll from your greens.
      Overcooking is particularly important to avoid when it comes to chlorophyll, but with very short steaming times, the chlorophyll content of green foods is preserved, and absorption of chlorophyll from these foods may actually be increased, according to one study I found. There are steadily increasing losses of chlorophyll when the boiling time for broccoli is increased from 5 to 20 minutes. However, at cooking times less than five minutes, the research is not as clear, and some studies suggest that brief steaming of vegetables like spinach actually increases the amount of chlorophyll that can be absorbed into our body.




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  5. I have purchased a bottle of liquid chlorophyll from the health food store on a occasion over the years, and I would take a spoonful everyday. I am wondering if this processed chlorophyll was any good? But, how can you improve on nature. Probably the best source would be green leafy vegetables. But, if one did not have access to green leafy vegetables, “maybe” the chlorophyll found in the health food store would fill in the gap. What say you?




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    1. Chlorophyll in supplements is not chlorophyll but a compound called chlorophyllin made from chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is insoluble in water and unstable once isolated from its natural source, so it doesn’t lend itself well to supplements. Chlorphyllin is an ionic compound, so it’s soluble in water. There’re two major differences between chlorophyll and chlorophyllin: 1) Chlorophyll contains magnesium and chlrophylin sodium and copper. Dr. Greger has videos on overdosing copper, and people already consume too much sodium. 2) The organic portion of chlorphyllin is different from that of chlorophyll. Chlorphyllin has been around for a long time, but I don’t know if the long-term side effects of it, if any, are known. I think green leafy vegetable are a better source.




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      1. Thanks George for that insight into liquid chlorophyll that we see in health food stores. Which just makes me think, you can’t trust everything in a health food store. Those store owners are there to make a profit. They will sell you anything.




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      2. George, The statement “Chlorophyll is insoluble in water and unstable once isolated from its natural source” leads to the question: Does a “Green Smoothie”, made with a lot of leafy greens, lose it’s Chlorophyll effectiveness after being blended? Especially if some is refrigerated and used a day or so later?




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        1. Healthyvegan: In plants chlorophyll exists bound to proteins, just as heme, containing iron, exists bound to protein (hemoglobin) in red blood cells or as B12, containing cobalt, exists bound to proteins in animal tissues. I do not know if blending releases chlorophyll from protein, but it wouldn’t matter if you drink the smoothie immediately, the chlorophyll is removed from the protein in the gut anyway when hydrochloric acid denatures the protein. Since chlorophyll is insoluble in water, some kind of a carrier molecule, probably a protein like albumin, has to transport it in the body, which may also keep chlorophyll inside the body.




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      3. In 2014 we took a long trip road which had us at pretty high altitudes often. My husband has difficulty with headaches and breathing when he’s above 4,000′ or so. We spent a few days in Santa Fe, which is 7,000′. The hotel desk clerk, learning of his distress, gave him a bottle of a chlorophyll supplement called ChlorOxygen Chlorophyll Concentrate. It says on the label, “Builds red blood cells.” He took the recommended drops for the next couple of days and indeed, he began feeling better. We bought a bottle at Whole Foods, but he stopped taking it when we dropped down to lower altitudes. Then, a couple of weeks later, back headed west, he had trouble again and again the supplement helped him.

        When we got home he wanted to continue taking it but didn’t find it locally, so I ordered another brand. It did nothing for him. Then he found the ChlorOxygen locally and has been using it since. Now I wonder if he is getting too much copper. He isn’t as good about WFPB diet as I am and still eats some fish and chicken and even the occasional hamburger or pizza slice with pepperoni when he goes out. He had heart disease when we met 17 years ago and has done better since I started WFPB in recent years.




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  6. .Are chlorophyll molecules not rather large to get into the bloodstream ? And being protein not denatured by the digestive system. ?

    I was sure initially this was going to be a late April 1st post .. mainly because of a certain Gillian Mckeith “PhD” who maintained that swallowing chlorophyll would “oxygenate the body” – though in her case this was deep inside the gut away from any light source …

    I’m all for sunlight though – but this is the first year I have actively sunbathed at every opportunity – mainly on account of the vitamin D dilemma – Dr. Greger said “yes” – so I’ve been taking it daily, but several others say “no” …

    Also thanks to Dr. G I eat a full pound of microwaved kale and broccoli every night – so I’m certainly getting my chlorophyll :)




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      1. Thanks for that. :)
        I find I have free access to the whole text courtesy of my employer – but sadly I lack the necessary skills to make much use of it :(




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  7. Love this set of studies. Yet again shows how our understanding of the body’s complex functions is evolving constantly — and yet again shows that a diet of whole plant foods has a plethora of benefits beyond what might be obvious at first glance.




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  8. Hi all –

    FYI. I found this two page article on the benefits of sun exposure (“Avoiding Sun as Dangerous as Smoking” )of interest not so much for what it reports, but because it appeared recently in Medscape, the most popular online newsletter for conventional M.D.’s:

    I personally believe that although the benefits of solar exposure begin with the optimization of Vitamin D levels, that this only seems one piece of the puzzle, and that solar exposure has a number of benefits, not just one. The two reports that Dr. Greger featured in this video, from J Cell Sci. and Photochem Photobiol, begin to shed some light on how else might sunlight have beneficial effects other than making Vitamin D.

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/860805

    It begins:

    Medscape Medical News

    “Avoiding Sun as Dangerous as Smoking

    Marcia Frellick

    March 23, 2016

    Nonsmokers who stayed out of the sun had a life expectancy similar to smokers who soaked up the most rays, according to researchers who studied nearly 30,000 Swedish women over 20 years.

    This indicates that avoiding the sun “is a risk factor for death of a similar magnitude as smoking,” write the authors of the article, published March 21 in the Journal of Internal Medicine. Compared with those with the highest sun exposure, life expectancy for those who avoided sun dropped by 0.6 to 2.1 years.

    Pelle Lindqvist, MD, of Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Sweden, and colleagues found that women who seek out the sun were generally at lower risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and noncancer/non-CVD diseases such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and pulmonary diseases, than those who avoided sun exposure.

    And one of the strengths of the study was that results were dose-specific — sunshine benefits went up with amount of exposure.

    The researchers acknowledge that longer life expectancy for sunbathers seems paradoxical to the common thinking that sun exposure increases risk for skin cancer. . . . ”

    It would seem interesting to re-analyze the data to see if increased sunlight exposure and increased leafy green plant intake show a synergistic effect.




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  9. So cool to hear the actual biology behind the common sense advice mom’s have always espoused…eat your veggies and go outside and play! As our lives get more and more complicated and busy, and we’re caught up in the societal treadmill of consumerism and owning stuff, we seem to forget that we evolved with nature and can’t escape that need in our lives no matter how little time we choose to set aside for ourselves. Shortcuts of vitamins and supplements are just man’s feeble attempt to rise above our “baser” nature and make it more convenient to grab those bothersome requirements on our race to the grave…look where man’s interventions have gotten us and our planet! Stress is a killer too, and we have far too much. I think we all need to stop being gears in the machine and rebel…de-evolution… find a “cave” and forage in the sunshine! Har har.




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    1. Exactly! Mother knows best. But there are forces aligned against her. It is only to be expected that a successful species would reward itself with plenty of goodies once they solved “the food problem”. A few generations out of the jungle, modern humans are still driven by the anachronistic and formerly beneficial imperative to eat and drink high calorie fats and sugars. Couple that with a manufacturing base that can cleverly design food-like facsimiles that super-reward indulgence and BOOM… disaster.




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  10. Sunlight and a green plant diet can revert the aging process! That sounds great. Like it restores health and youth, I am exciting that we can make energy from lights. The plants are a great inheritance, thank you Dr. Greger.




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    1. Great question you put forward! I looked into the research and could not find direct answer to your question. Here is some text from the article Dr. Greger cited, “Ubiquinol is a plasma antioxidant. The mechanisms responsible for maintenance of plasma ubiquinol are poorly understood. Here, we show that metabolites of chlorophyll can be found in blood plasma of animals that are given a chlorophyll-rich diet. We also show that these metabolites catalyze the reduction of plasma ubiquinone to ubiquinol in the presence of ambient light, in vitro. We propose that dietary chlorophyll or its metabolites, together with light exposure, regulate plasma redox status through maintaining the ubiquinol pool.”




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      1. Thanks for your response. I did a quick search of PubMed and did not find anything, maybe I’m using the wrong terms. I did find info on carotenoids, but who knows if they have the same characteristics regarding absorption (at least 6 hrs to peak for lycopene).




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    1. Great question! I like this blurb from ‘Understanding Food: Principles and Preparation’ By Amy Christine Brown – “In older plants or those picked and exposed to sunlight, chlorophyll is degraded, causing underlying pigment to show. This is why leaves may turn yellow in fresh parsley or broccoli florets left too long on the produce stand. The process is similar to what happens in autumn, when the non-green colors, which have been in the leaves all along but masked by the darker green chlorophyll, are allowed to show as the chlorophyll diminishes with the changing light and cooler temperatures.”




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  11. sometimes chlorophyl rich plastids live inside other organisms. Euglena and lichens for starters. So what if Monsanto put them in our skin cells? Oh they did? Oh right…the Hulk!




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    1. It is very true that other organisms use chloroplasts, and can even produce energy with them. This is a little random, but I personally did a research project, never published, at Woods Hole (MA) in 1978, in a course I took about marine algae: showed that a certain green-colored nudibranch (shell-less snail) is able to deposit ingested algal chloroplasts into its tissue, which then actually photosynthesize light — produce measurable energy.
      This new video by Dr. Greger is just ingenious — very thought provoking for all of us. So many benefits we get from green plants!!




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      1. That would be a relationship worthy of study at Woods Hole. I envy you that experience. Once the rejection problem is solved I wonder how feasible a green mammal symbiont really is?




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      2. speaking about snails, is it true that: ”

        The lectin
        Helix pomatia
        agglutinin recognizes O-GlcNAc
        containing glycoproteins in human breast cancer.”?




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  12. Hmmm… The lasers used for low level laser therapy emit at wavelengths around 660 nm and the maximum absorption for chlorophyll a is 665 nm.




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  13. Recently a study came out and was published all over the internet about how vegan/vegetarian diets can mutate DNA and raise incidents for colorectal cancer and heart disease. I was wondering what you have to say about it and how legitimate this study is. Here’s what was published:

    Long term vegetarianism can lead to genetic mutations which raise the risk of heart disease and cancer, scientists have found.

    Populations who have had a primarily vegetarian diet for generations were found to be far more likely to carry DNA which makes them susceptible to inflammation.

    Scientists in the US believe that the mutation occured to make it easier for vegetarians to absorb essential fatty acids from plants.

    But it has the knock-on effect of boosting the production of arachidonic acid, which is linked to inflammatory disease and cancer. When coupled with a diet high in vegetable oils – such as sunflower oil – the mutated gene quickly turns fatty acids into dangerous arachidonic acid.

    The finding may help explain previous research which found vegetarian populations are nearly 40 per cent more likely to suffer colorectal cancer than meat eaters, a finding that has puzzled doctors because eating red meat is known to raise the risk.

    Researchers from Cornell University in the US compared hundreds of genomes from a primarily vegetarian population in Pune, India to traditional meat-eating people in Kansas and found there was a significant genetic difference.

    “Those whose ancestry derives from vegetarians are more likely to carry genetics that more rapidly metabolise plant fatty acids,” said Tom Brenna, Professor of Human Nutrition at Cornell.

    “In such individuals, vegetable oils will be converted to the more pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid, increasing the risk for chronic inflammation that is implicated in the development of heart disease, and exacerbates cancer.

    “The mutation appeared in the human genome long ago, and has been passed down through the human family.”

    Over many generations vegetarianism can lead to genetic changes

    Over many generations vegetarianism can lead to genetic changes CREDIT: ALAMY

    To make the problem worse, the mutation also hinders the production of beneficial Omega 3 fatty acid which is protective against heart disease. Although it may not have mattered when the mutation first developed, since the industrial revolution there has been a major shift in diets away from Omega 3 – found in fish and nuts – to less healthy Omega 6 fats – found in vegetable oils.

    “Changes in the dietary Omega 6 to Omega 3 balance may contribute to the increase in chronic disease seen in some developing countries,” added Dr Brenna.

    “The message for vegetarians is simple. Use vegetable oils that are low in omega-6 linoleic acid such as olive oil.”

    The mutation is called rs66698963 and is found in the FADS2 gene which controls the production of fatty acids in the body.

    Previous studies have shown that vegetarianism and veganism can lead to problems with fertility by lowering sperm counts.

    Separate research from Harvard University also found that a diet high in fruit and vegetables may impact fertility because men are consuming high quantities of pesticides.

    Many vegetarians also struggle to get enough iron, vitamin D, vitamin B12 and calcium which are essential for health. One study found that vegetarians had approximately five percent lower bone-mineral density (BMD) than non-vegetarians.

    However other research suggests vegetarianism lowers the risk of diabetes, stroke and obesity.

    The new research was published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.




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    1. Xen: Below are links to a whole host of excellent responses to the interpretation of the study you are talking about. Bottom line: Basically, your quote is criminally misleading “journalism”–not an understanding of the actual study.
      .
      Dr. Greger: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/plant-based-treatment-for-angina/#comment-2597611517
      Dr Katz: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/vegetarianism-nutrition-science-meets-media-nonsense-davidDr Garth Davis: https://www.facebook.com/drgarth/posts/1126374594050114?hc_location=ufi
      NF Moderator Dr. Jon: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/plant-based-diets-and-artery-function/#comment-2596819840
      NF Moderator Renae: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/almonds-for-osteoporosis/#comment-2601476959
      NF Moderator Dr. Jen: http://nutritionfacts.org/2016/03/31/dr-gregers-new-google-talk/#comment-2599942486 and http://nutritionfacts.org/2016/03/31/dr-gregers-new-google-talk/#comment-2601267177
      NF Moderator Dr. Alex: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/plant-based-treatment-for-angina/#comment-2597863794
      .
      Here’s how I put it all into perspective in my head: *Suppose* someone found out that descendants of *some* healthy people have developed an adaptation where consuming table sugar is even more
      unhealthy than it already is for everyone else. Thus, future generations might be even more sensitive to the negative health impact of eating Twinkies than we are today. Does that mean we should all eat a bunch of Twinkies today so that our ancestors aren’t worse off eating Twinkies? Of course not. That would be absurd. And that’s essentially (as I understand it) what the article you are quoting is saying in regards to eating meat. What’s more, that claim is a complete twist of what the actual study is actually saying.
      .
      Does that help?




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      1. Yes! It helps a lot and I also thought the key phrase in the study was “across generations” but it seems journalists missed it and with it the point of the whole study, ultimately misleading people! Oh well! Thanks for your response!




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      2. Thanks for the compilation work, Thea. I note in that list that there’s some confusion in communicating whether the ‘vegetarian’ genetic allele being discussed promotes long chain n-6 production or n-3 as well. Promotion of FADS-1 expression, which is the effect of the phenotype, works on both pathways.

        AA became the focus of the study and its reporting because this would seem to be most relevant result to the world at large. The downsides of excessive n-6 consumption have been explored in pretty good detail and the Indians seem to have taken a particularly hard hit from the nutritional transition, especially with respect to diabetes. Since the mechanisms explaining this statistical finding are still not settled, this research can say that it contributes by examining a possible genetic mechanism.

        If this SNP is linked more strongly with disease in the context of diets high in n-6, this would count as further evidence supporting balanced n-3/n-6 ratios. Since this is already on the radar for many on a WFPB diet, not much would change if further research confirmed this link.

        If positive selection for this SNP in historically vegetarian populations is shown, then that would count as fairly thin evidence that there may be some positive selection for this SNP in similarly vegetarian populations today. In other words, this research could reflect some downsides to a contemporary WFPB diet low in preformed long-chain PUFA, particularly one very low in fat, but direct research into contemporary vegetarians and vegans would be a much better way of showing what these potential risks are, if any. Remember that practically everyone who participates on a site like this one is going to be quite unlike historically vegetarian populations in many respects. In particular, we are subject to much less famine, and our diets thus tend to do a better job of ensuring a steady supply of the short-chain PUFA. With the substrate being more continually available, total conversion to long-chain PUFA might be higher.

        It’s hard to say how people should respond to this study, if at all. I think that more research is needed to make these results important to the WFPB diet, personally, but if you really wanted to err on the side of caution with respect to the potential issues here, it might be more prudent (than it is already) to ensure adequate long-chain PUFA during pregnancy, lactation, and maybe early childhood as well. But again, research on contemporary diets is probably going to be the best way to define adequate status for these fatty acids and how to attain it.




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        1. I think you’re making far reaching conclusions (“clearly link”) from a report that *itself* draws no firm conclusions, only suggesting further research is needed, that the studies show some indication but have severe shortcomings or parameters that need to be accounted for, and makes recommendations on how. Yes, there is some correlation, but if you thoroughly read the report, it makes no such conclusions. I agree with them that more studies are needed.




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      1. Daniel, Unless you are omnipotent, the notion that you can make a sensible rebuttal by declaring ludiocrity without providing documentation or any means of support is not a good notion. Did you read Dr. Jon’s link?




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      1. To add to that, the story of how the study attracted attention by the Adventist Review and the (tiny!) article itself are worth taking a look at:
        http://www.adventistreview.org/church-news/how-student-project-on-vegetarianism-and-sperm-went-viral
        http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282%2814%2901556-8/fulltext

        In other words, even the lead author, Emily Orzylowska, agrees that the results are extremely preliminary and have been blown far out of proportion by the media. Notably, this study did nothing to account for explanatory lifestyle variables apart from self-reported statement on degree of veganism (ovo-lacto vegetarian, vegan, or nonvegetarian), so literally anything could be the reason. B12 is a possible explanation, given that many Adventists dismiss scientific reasoning on supplementation in favor of what feels nice from their religious point of view. The idea that soy is a potential cause slipped out during an interview, according to Orzlyowska, and I’d argue that the idea about pesticides may have slipped out without too much thought during her interview for the Adventist review, where she was put on point to explain that nutritional causes other than soy may account for the observation.

        To add to the circus, let me propose one more cause which comes to my mind in the moment: the result might be due to lower consumption of preformed DHA. The reason why I’m thinking of this is because this could also connect with the research from Dr. Brenna. If lowered DHA consumption reduces sperm count and sperm motility, as may be the case, then negative effects on male fertility under other nutritional stresses may offer a very plausible mechanism for positive selection for rs66698963 in the Pune population. In particular, the reason why this polymorphism was found to be common in that population may have more to do with mildly negative effects of their diet on male fertility over countless generations, rather than factors which directly impact longevity per se.

        All this is fairly speculative, however. The fact that I was able to connect Orzylowska’s study with Brenna’s so easily is mostly just a reflection of how vague and open-ended Orzylowska’s findings were.




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        1. Yes. Zinc levels may also be a factor. Zinc affects male fertility and vegetarians have slightly lower serum zinc levels than non vegetarians. This may be exacerbated in India where a good deal of dairy food is included in the diet of vegetarians. Casein in milk has an inhibitory effect on zinc absorption. I really don’t think that this is an issue of concern even though it makes a good headline.
          http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19285597
          https://www.mja.com.au/open/2012/1/2/zinc-and-vegetarian-diets




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        2. Here’s another point that I came across while reading something else, which you might find interesting.
          “A major conclusion from the geometric experiments on flies and mice is that the balance of macronutrients in the diet has a profound impact on food and energy intake, metabolic health, lifespan, immune function, and reproduction. The diet composition that best supports longevity is not the same as that which sustains maximal reproductive output or leanness. The question arises as to whether these conclusions apply to humans. The evidence suggests that they do.”
          http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(15)00199-3

          As I understand it, diets higher in protein are beneficial for reproductive success (ie fertility) but are not conducive to healthy longevity Instead, low protein high carb diets promote healthy longevity but are less effective in promoting reproductive success This may explain why vegetarians, who generally eat low protein high carb diets, may be less fertile than non-vegetarians but have lower mortality.




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    2. Xen:
      Here is the reply that I previously posted about this issue. Bottom line is that this research study was completely misinterpreted. Dr. Greger himself also weighed in on this.

      dancer80 • 2 months ago

      Did anyone see this misleading headline and article?

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/new

      • Reply•Share ›

      Avatar

      Dr.Jon_NF Volunteer NF Moderator dancer80 • 2 months ago

      I just looked at at the article (from The Telegraph, 3/30/2016), and at the full text of the article referenced (from Molecular Biology and Evolution, published 3/29/2016). Yes, the headline is atrocious (“Long term vegetarian diet changes human DNA, raising risk of cancer and heart disease”). The scientific article is looking at the prevalence in an Indian population of a certain gene allele; this is NOT about vegetarian diet mutating human DNA, which is what the title implies. Furthermore, the crux of the article is here:

      individuals with I/I genotype having higher metabolic capacity to convert precursors to longer

      chain PUFA may be at increased risk for proinflammatory disease states as they efficiently

      convert LA to ARA. Put another way, individuals with the I/I genotype may be vulnerable to illhealth

      when adopting a diet rich in n-6 LA which severely reduce synthesis of anti-inflammatory

      n-3 LCPUFA because n-6 competes with n-3 to access the Δ-6 desaturase enzyme.

      So, all this is saying is that this “l/l genotype” — which MAY be more common among vegetarians (there is no evidence presented to support this), should avoid diets rich in n-6 LA (linoleic acid). This is what is present in corn and cottonseed and other common vegetable oils, whereas the beneficial n-3 fatty acids are present in nuts, seeds, and fish.

      • Edit• Reply•Share ›




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  14. TroyOtt/ Dallas Texas April 6 2016. Light therapy and eating your greens.. Wow Normal light is absorbed by most clothing.

    .Just a few thoughts…one of the issues is if the light is “normal” light..light that is easily scattered or if it is “focused” such as in coherent light,light in which the electromagnetic waves maintain a fixed and predictable phase relationship with each other over a period of time. Such focused light is found in therapy for pain in cold lasers. What is of interest is that this laser light can go deep past the surface of the skin into muscles,nerves,ligaments. The typical cold laser “red” light is in the 630 nm range and this is the range of which is best absorbed by blood (& water)…hence if eating green vegetables then to increase CoQ10 one may wish to use a cold laser over the wrist etc. where the blood supply is so very very close to the surface. If one has a trigger spot..tender spot, pain area, bad knee then eat greens 4-5 hours before cold laser “red” light use on troublesome area. I plan to tell everyone who uses cold lasers about this great discover. Oh, why is this important, damaged tissue, due to injury sickness, etc. tends to shut down and has a loss of energy (ATP) and hence may not be able to do everything the cell needs to do to function fully. I have seen 200-300 people use the cold laser and get great results..now I will tell them to eat their greens before turning on the cold laser light.

    Troy… Texas




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  15. Woops…post script…to get effect the cold laser light and eating greens need not be from a class IV cold laser..some of the simple low cost cold lasers that stimulate the skin should do well…lots of DC & Vets & physical therapy types have class IV cold lasers costing over $5,000…simple, safe cold lasers (class I, or II)…around $500-600 should do well tooo…for more info…see Ann Transl Med. 2015 Dec;3(22):346. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.2305-5839.2015.12.06.

    Tuning the mitochondrial rotary motor with light.




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    1. Thanks for your question!

      I could not find a study that specifically examining your question, therefore I do not have a clear answer. However, as Dr Greger suggests, eating vegetables & dark green leafy vegetables can be great for us in general.

      Hope this answer helps!




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      1. Do you think we can get some chlorophyll from drinking matcha green tea? There is no substitute for the essential dark green leafys, I was just wondering if the matcha I drink in the morning is helping to produce some co-Q10 when take in some rays as I take my dog on his morning walk.




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  16. OK, so I have been reflecting on this chlorophyll and photosynthesis subject, and something felt out of place. This is it: in green plants, chlorophyll assists in combining water and carbon dioxide, in the presence of light, to make sugar. That is the source of all the sugar (and ultimately starch…) on the planet. In our cells, sugar is broken back down to produce carbon dioxide and water, and energy (in the form of ATP). As far as I know, chlorophyll itself doesn’t produce ATP or energy, though in the transcript it says”absorbed chlorophyll can apparently produce cellular energy”. Comments from any biochemists out there?




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  17. When the light regenerates ubiquinol from ubuquinone, what happens to those nasty radicals that oxidized ubiquinol in the first place to turn it into ubiquinone? Aren’t they released back into the blood so that we’re back where we started with the original amounts of ubiquinol and radicals? Would a chemist please balance the equation?




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    1. S Noor: I think there are two pages on this site that can help you. This first one is the topic page for cholesterol. Note the end of the article lists specific foods shown to lower cholesterol. So, you may be able to tweak your diet to include these foods: http://nutritionfacts.org/topics/cholesterol/

      This next page is from Joseph, the RD who used to work at NutritionFacts. Joseph has some additional ideas that may help you: http://nutritionfacts.org/questions/what-can-i-do-to-lower-my-cholesterol-it-seems-ive-tried-everything/

      Good luck!




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  18. As I understand it, most US newspapers publish a daily 1-15+ scale of sun exposure for sensitive (‘white’) skin from EPA; it can be translated into minutes exposure at specific hours and cloud covers for 6 levels of skin darkness to avoid sunburn.
    Vitamin D is made in human skin mostly by UVB; more exposure doesn’t lead to vitD overdose, but does lead to sunburn, though UVA can damage too. Hardly any UVB goes through glass.
    UVB peaks at ~5% noonish, say 10 to 2 or 1 to 3 if banking daylight; at those hours the ozone layer’s easily shone through.
    I think a site in Norway details exposure by latitude and cloudiness. Norway can get to 5, Span, Egypt and California to 10+.
    there are of couse apps and sites for quick reference.
    Fair-skinned folks can more safely expose themselves to, say, ½-¾ their noonish time limit to make more than enough vitamin D most months.
    To renew ubiquinol, dawn and dusk are better because redder, and longer exposure is safer.
    There seem beneficial as well as decidedly harmful effects of sun exposure, and since we vary in pigment, we’ve developed that adaptation to excess or meager sunlight, so tread carefully Robyn Lucas of ANU thinks the balance favors some exposure.




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    1. http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2010/9/michael-holick-the-pioneer-of-vitamin-d-research/Page-01

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1495109/pdf/jgi_20731.pdf

      “It should be noted that this represents a very small portion of the total radiation from the sun that reaches the earth’s surface. Much is filtered out by our atmosphere. So due to the physics and wavelength of UVB rays it will only penetrate the atmosphere when the sun is above an angle of about 50° from the horizon. When the sun is lower than 50°, the ozone layer reflects the UVB-rays but let through the longer UVA-rays.
      The first step is to determine the latitude and longitude of your location. You can easily do this on Google Earth, or if you are in the U.S. you can use the TravelMath Latitude Longitude Calculator to find your latitude and longitude i. Once you have obtained that you can go to the U.S. Navy site to calculate a table to determine the times and days of the year that the
      sun is above 50 degrees from the horizon ii. Please view the video at the top of this page. The URL for the US Naval Observatory Azimuth table is http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/AltAz.php

      For a more detailed understanding of this you can visit the University of Colorado State’s page iii that discusses this in more detail. If you read the paper you will see that there are other factors, such as ozone concentration, altitude, air pollution, ground covered by snow or ice, and cloud cover that also contribute to the amount of UVB that is ultimately reaching your skin.

      Translated to the date and time of some places on the globe, it means
      for example: In my hometown of Chicago, the UVB rays are not
      potentially present until March 25, and by September 16th it is not
      possible to produce any vitamin D from the sun in Chicago. Please
      understand it is only theoretically possible to get UVB rays during
      those times. If it happens to be cloudy or raining, the clouds will also
      block the UVB rays.

      This is one of the reasons I now spend most of my winters in the
      sunshine state of Florida because in the center of the state there are
      more than two extra months of UVB as the sun doesn’t disappear for
      winter until October 23 and comes back again much earlier, around
      February.
      http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/03/26/maximizing-vitamin-d-exposure.aspx
      http://dminder.ontometrics.com/about.html

      for cloud cover, I use http://www.cleardarksky.com/




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  19. So what about sunscreens? Do they actually block the light? (I don’t use chemical sunscreens but I do use physical sunscreens (titanium dioxide, zinc oxide) on my face.




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  20. Now that was interesting and informative. To be fair, seeing as I posted negative comments on another video on this site, I have to give this one a thumbs up. Cheers. :-) (P.S. He does need to get another voice though ..)




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  21. Hello,I am looking for something that can help Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The disease is a rare form of CoQ-Cytochrome c-reductase. Only drug called idebenone has any effect at an early stage. Thank you




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  22. >>This video has it all: a mind-blowing mechanism, practical applicability, and poop—what more could you want?<<

    Before going to all the trouble of wildly speculating about possible benefits of chlorophyll in the bloodstream, howzabout a brief check as to absorption of chlorophyll from the GIT?

    Dietary chlorophyll is only slightly (~1-2%) absorbed because it is a very large molecule and not digestible to smaller fragments (in which case it'd no longer be chlorophyll anyway), and animal bodies such as ours do not consider it to be a nutrient and hence have evolved no special means to absorb it intact as we have for Vitamin B12 (which is very similar to chlorophyll in size and structure), and it is physiologically irrelevant for animal bodies, although we probably do manage to scavenge some of the magnesium which is fairly loosely bound to chlorophyll molecules.

    So the vast majority of ingested chlorophyll is efficiently eliminated in the stool, which is right and proper for large physiologically irrelevant molecules. And in keeping with the fecal theme of today's video, this is why feces have a pleasingly green tint after eating leafy green foods. What happens to the very small fraction of chlorophyll that is (accidentally) absorbed? I have never seen a study addressing this, but I think a safe guess (and in the spirit of speculation that pervades this video) would be that it is removed from the bloodstream post-haste by the liver and dumped into the bile and thence into the GIT and stool and adios down the toilet. That's the route out of the body of heme (from broken-down red blood cells), which is another molecule that is very similar to chlorophyll, size/structure-wise.




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  23. I eat WFPB so no argument there. However I also have genetic familial high cholesterol that when untreated was in the 500s on SAD diet, and after WFPB untreated is in the 300s. The video seems to imply that CoQ10 supplementation is unnecessary because if you remove statins and eat greens your body will make it, but what about people like me that can’t remove statins?




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