Oil Pulling for Teeth Whitening & Bad Breath Tested

Oil Pulling for Teeth Whitening & Bad Breath Tested
4.71 (94.19%) 31 votes

When oil pulling was put to the test for teeth whitening, halitosis, and dental enamel erosion, the results were no better than rinsing with water—or worse.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

A review of the effects of oil pulling concluded that the ancient practice “may [indeed] have beneficial effects on [oral and] dental health.” I have talked about the benefits for dental health, but oral health too?

Oil pulling was also tested against “oral malodor,” also known as halitosis, or, simply, bad breath. It’s believed a quarter of the world’s population suffers from it. So, they decided to put oil pulling versus chlorhexidine to the test.

How do you test for bad breath, though? There’s all sorts of really fancy methods—”gas chromatography electronic nose[s], diamond probes, dark field microscopy,” but these are really “expensive” or “not very reliable.” So, they decided to go with the “gold standard.” Study subjects were just told to breathe in the researcher’s face.

And then, they wanted to know what the study subjects thought about their own breath. So, they asked them to lick their own wrist and sniff it, then give it a score from zero to extremely foul. And though the subjects themselves thought their licked wrists smelled better after two weeks of oil puling, the researchers disagreed that their breath smelled any better.

But, after three weeks, there was a significant and comparable improvement in breath odor in the oil pulling and chlorhexidine groups. I was excited about this study, because they used an actual placebo—colored water—to presumably match the look of chlorhexidine, and swishing for the same duration. Aha! So, we can finally answer that nagging question about whether oil pulling cuts down on plaque and gingivitis because of the oil, or just because you’re swishing anything in your mouth that long. And, the water worked just as well—the same drop swishing with oil, or just swishing with water, suggesting that the plaque is just disrupted by the extended rinsing action. Yes, oil may be five or six times cheaper than chlorhexidine, and safer, but cheaper and safer than just plain water?

Yeah, but can water whiten teeth? “Numerous websites” offer testimonials of oil pulling whitening teeth, but there were no studies published in the medical literature. And so, most doctors would just give up there. But these two dental professors in Detroit decided to put it to the test. “Teeth were selected from [their} stored collection of human extracted teeth [sounds a little horror movie-ish].” Then, they put them in tubes with coconut oil, sesame oil, and sunflower oil, along with some fake saliva, and vigorously shake them every day for two weeks and found…”no evidence to suggest” that oil pulling has any effect on teeth whitening.

That’s like when another internet darling was put to the test—strawberries and baking soda, which was evidently featured on Dr. Oz. Over-the-counter whitening strips worked; a home whitening system works, where the dentist sends you home with custom trays; and in-office tooth whitening works. But the DIY strawberry-baking soda mixture failed—as bad as just plain water, used as a control.

What about dental erosion? In my video on plant-based diets and dental health, I talked about how those eating healthier may have healthier gums. But, because they tend to eat more acidic foods, like citrus, and tomatoes, and fruity teas, they may be at more risk for eroding off some of their enamel, which is why we should rinse our mouth with water after eating or drinking anything acidic (anything sour).

But what about rinsing with oil every morning? The way our body protects our teeth from erosion is by forming a “pellicle” over our teeth—a protective layer, of mostly proteins from our saliva, but some fat, too. So, hey, might oil pulling help “prevent erosive damage” to our tooth surfaces by kind of buttressing this protective layer? You don’t know, until you put it to the test.

Now, they wanted to put the teeth under a microscope afterwards, and that’s hard to do when they’re still in people’s heads. So, they put “slabs” of cattle teeth in their mouth, let them sit there until that protective layer developed, and then, oil pulled around the teeth—or not, in the control group, and then took them out, and exposed them to acid.

If you expose the teeth to acid without putting them in your mouth, within two minutes—120 seconds—significant demineralization takes place. Calcium is dissolved out of the teeth by the acid. But, just let those same teeth roll around in your mouth for a few minutes, and then expose them to acid, there’s less erosion.

Okay, but then, what happens if you put them in your mouth and do some oil pulling? Is there even less erosion? No, there’s more. It’s as if the oil pulling undermined the protective layer. And, that’s exactly what they saw under the microscope. Here’s what that protective layer looks like before the oil pulling, and then after. They suspect the oil may actually be depleting the protective layer of some of its protection.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Vladimir Belochkin, Mello and Gan Khoon Lay from The Noun Project

Image credit: Marissa Anderson. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

A review of the effects of oil pulling concluded that the ancient practice “may [indeed] have beneficial effects on [oral and] dental health.” I have talked about the benefits for dental health, but oral health too?

Oil pulling was also tested against “oral malodor,” also known as halitosis, or, simply, bad breath. It’s believed a quarter of the world’s population suffers from it. So, they decided to put oil pulling versus chlorhexidine to the test.

How do you test for bad breath, though? There’s all sorts of really fancy methods—”gas chromatography electronic nose[s], diamond probes, dark field microscopy,” but these are really “expensive” or “not very reliable.” So, they decided to go with the “gold standard.” Study subjects were just told to breathe in the researcher’s face.

And then, they wanted to know what the study subjects thought about their own breath. So, they asked them to lick their own wrist and sniff it, then give it a score from zero to extremely foul. And though the subjects themselves thought their licked wrists smelled better after two weeks of oil puling, the researchers disagreed that their breath smelled any better.

But, after three weeks, there was a significant and comparable improvement in breath odor in the oil pulling and chlorhexidine groups. I was excited about this study, because they used an actual placebo—colored water—to presumably match the look of chlorhexidine, and swishing for the same duration. Aha! So, we can finally answer that nagging question about whether oil pulling cuts down on plaque and gingivitis because of the oil, or just because you’re swishing anything in your mouth that long. And, the water worked just as well—the same drop swishing with oil, or just swishing with water, suggesting that the plaque is just disrupted by the extended rinsing action. Yes, oil may be five or six times cheaper than chlorhexidine, and safer, but cheaper and safer than just plain water?

Yeah, but can water whiten teeth? “Numerous websites” offer testimonials of oil pulling whitening teeth, but there were no studies published in the medical literature. And so, most doctors would just give up there. But these two dental professors in Detroit decided to put it to the test. “Teeth were selected from [their} stored collection of human extracted teeth [sounds a little horror movie-ish].” Then, they put them in tubes with coconut oil, sesame oil, and sunflower oil, along with some fake saliva, and vigorously shake them every day for two weeks and found…”no evidence to suggest” that oil pulling has any effect on teeth whitening.

That’s like when another internet darling was put to the test—strawberries and baking soda, which was evidently featured on Dr. Oz. Over-the-counter whitening strips worked; a home whitening system works, where the dentist sends you home with custom trays; and in-office tooth whitening works. But the DIY strawberry-baking soda mixture failed—as bad as just plain water, used as a control.

What about dental erosion? In my video on plant-based diets and dental health, I talked about how those eating healthier may have healthier gums. But, because they tend to eat more acidic foods, like citrus, and tomatoes, and fruity teas, they may be at more risk for eroding off some of their enamel, which is why we should rinse our mouth with water after eating or drinking anything acidic (anything sour).

But what about rinsing with oil every morning? The way our body protects our teeth from erosion is by forming a “pellicle” over our teeth—a protective layer, of mostly proteins from our saliva, but some fat, too. So, hey, might oil pulling help “prevent erosive damage” to our tooth surfaces by kind of buttressing this protective layer? You don’t know, until you put it to the test.

Now, they wanted to put the teeth under a microscope afterwards, and that’s hard to do when they’re still in people’s heads. So, they put “slabs” of cattle teeth in their mouth, let them sit there until that protective layer developed, and then, oil pulled around the teeth—or not, in the control group, and then took them out, and exposed them to acid.

If you expose the teeth to acid without putting them in your mouth, within two minutes—120 seconds—significant demineralization takes place. Calcium is dissolved out of the teeth by the acid. But, just let those same teeth roll around in your mouth for a few minutes, and then expose them to acid, there’s less erosion.

Okay, but then, what happens if you put them in your mouth and do some oil pulling? Is there even less erosion? No, there’s more. It’s as if the oil pulling undermined the protective layer. And, that’s exactly what they saw under the microscope. Here’s what that protective layer looks like before the oil pulling, and then after. They suspect the oil may actually be depleting the protective layer of some of its protection.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Vladimir Belochkin, Mello and Gan Khoon Lay from The Noun Project

Image credit: Marissa Anderson. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is the third in a four-part series on oil pulling. If you missed the first two, watch them here:

The final nail in the coffin of oil pulling is in the last video of this series: The Risks of Oil Pulling.

How can we protect our enamel? See:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

98 responses to “Oil Pulling for Teeth Whitening & Bad Breath Tested

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      1. Can I be honest? I don’t consider that “bad breath”… As a WFPB person myself, I think smelling garlic on someone’s breath is actually sexy… Call me weird? There’s a difference between that and the “real” bad breath of someone who either doesn’t brush their teeth, or is “sick” and you call smell it on their breath. I don’t know if this makes any sense. Just my opinion.




        7
        1. It’s not weird at all. I do love garlic and onion’s smell.
          I’m from Catalonia and I’m telling you that we eat a lot of garlic
          and onions and, well, a way too much, and there’s nothing more
          sexy that ‘that’ body perfume.




          1
          1. I agree! It’s appealing, healthy… and it’s much better than the artificial perfumes that people wear (which are overwhelming and full of toxic crap)




            1
    1. Lin, I had a similar problem with onions when I ate meat & dairy. I especially ate a lot of dairy. I couldn’t eat onions at all. They would repeat on me for 3 days and, of course, they made my breath smell like onions.

      A few years after permanently eliminating meat & dairy from my diet, I was pleasantly surprised that find out that I could eat onions (even raw) again without any digestive problems. I also found that if ate them on a daily basis, the less my breath would smell from them. The same was try for garlic.

      What I’m assuming is that I didn’t have the right gut flora to digest them. Now I do, so the digestive & breath problems have noticeably diminished.




      6
      1. Thank you Nancy, that’s good to read, although I’ve been high carb, low fat vegan for 17 years, and haven’t eaten meat, including chicken or fish for 29 years. I did eat onion daily for years too.

        A study on the effect of sulphurous veg on breath odour would be interesting.

        Obviously, they are part of Dr.Greger’s Daily Dozen, which is a nuisance when they can have such an unpleasant side-effect for some people.




        1
      2. Oh I like your theory, Nancy! That could explain why I used to get a sick stomach from raw garlic and now I can literally chew it and eat it if I want to with now problems.




        1
    2. I personally don’t experience this from onions, broccoli or garlic. I haven’t noticed it from broccoli lovers who are close to me either. Maybe the effect will go away over time? If you’re ever concerned but don’t want to sacrifice the sulphuriphane, perhaps broccoli sprouts won’t have the same effect on you.
      Also maybe parsley along with your meals may help.




      1
          1. I also once babysat for a girl who put onion sprouts on peanut butter sandwiches lol, at first I thought it seemed like a gross idea but I had to try it and it was actually good. You don’t taste the sprouts through the peanut butter but there’s a niche crunch. I even did this with spinach once and liked it, I couldn’t actually taste the spinach.




            1
  1. Same question for me please… cabbage-moputh-smell for several days… my wife doesn’t want to kiss me anymore after cabbage… so my love for cabbage is challenged…. :(




    1
  2. I use baking soda, I brush with baking soda and also put a teaspoon of baking soda in a glass of water and use it to rinse my mouth after eating, anyone else using baking soda? Do you find it good?




    8
    1. Irene, I was wondering the same thing about bicarbonate of soda, are there any tests Dr? I use bicarbonate of soda and Turmeric mix for my teeth and bicarbonate of soda and Vinegar to wash my body and hair with, I started using it as a test on myself (its the only option I have), as far as the smelling test goes no complaints (3 years now) and I live in a hot part of the world with people who would tell me ;) My hair is very soft and I’ve found that I can go longer without a full wash than when using shop bought products, unless I have been doing some heavy or dirty work of course.




      2
    2. I use baking soda as a toothpaste occasionally. It works well and is probably a better choice than many toothpastes if this website below is to be trusted
      https://www.sheltondentistry.com/patient-information/toothpaste-abrasivity/

      However, when it comes to travelling, a tube of toothpaste is more convenient.

      Dr Greger did a video on mouthwashes a while ago that you might find interesting. However, it doesn’t compare green tea and baking soda mouthwashes.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/whats-the-best-mouthwash/




      1
    3. I once used baking soda as a toothpaste for a while. I’d spray the toothbrush with 3% peroxide…dip the brush in baking soda and brush. Doesn’t have the typical sweet taste of most toothpastes…more or less salty tasting

      Did seem to seriously whiten my teeth though. Stopped because of tooth enamel concerns…don’t know if this was justified though.




      1
    4. Although baking soda is not abrasive (neither is oil) it is harsh enough to remove the pellicle layer. Just putting a pinch of baking soda in ones mouth can cause a burning sensation–that may be a good hint.




      1
  3. Is there any evidence suggesting pulling can ameliorate or even eliminate infection in a tooth? Underneath a crown, I apparently have a crack with a “low grade” infection, according to my dentist. There does seem to be a correlation that, when I swish with coconut oil, the throbbing of infection subsides for a while. However, it does return possibly because I am not pulling/swishing every day. Could pulling daily resolve a low-grade infection?




    1
      1. Might check out whether swishing with hydrogen peroxide has downside. For example, will it kill helpful oral bacteria, such as are important to nitrogen processing? Suggest you look into this. There are videos discussing.




        5
    1. Per my post further down, you might try this for the pain. As for the low grade infection that I interpret to be linked to inflammation, white willow bark may be helpful. It should also work as pain relief, as would corydalis.

      Before going anywhere I will be face to face, I put a few drops of cloves in my mouth and swish it around before spitting it out. I also do the same if I have any pain in my mouth from a sore tooth or gums. The cloves take away the pain.




      3
      1. My mother, who was born in 1915, always chewed on a few whole cloves if she thought her breath might be smelly. After chewing them (not chewing them up, just biting into them a bit) she would spit them out.

        I’m pretty sure oil of cloves was used in the old days for toothaches. I would be afraid it would burn my mouth, but maybe they diluted it.




        2
        1. Linda, thanks for the links… I didn’t read them because I’m currently in a case study of the long term use of these products for many, many, many, many years and do not want to cloud my judgement of the results. ‘-)




          1
    2. There is no evidence of this. If you do have an infected nerve, and/or cracked tooth, then this should be addressed by your dentist as it could abscess which can be very uncomfortable to say the least. Hydrogen peroxide is not a potent antiseptic and there is evidence of carcinogenicity on mucous membranes like those in the mouth. Why not use what your own white cells use to kill bacteria that they have engulfed? Your own white cells make bleach believe it or not. Its not a carcinogen and it is a potent antiseptic. There are actually several clinical studies showing efficacy in reducing gingivitis. You can mix one teaspoon in a cup of water, swish for one minute, then spit.

      Dr. Ben




      3
      1. Definitely interesting but no way would I ever put bleach in my mouth lol. I’d prefer dental work. That just does not sound like it would be healthy, though I’m going on my own instincts and basic knowledge of bleach, not undermining your research.




        0
    3. Peggy, you could always just give it a try for a little while then go back in and see if the infection is gone. I would do it in the evening personally due to the protective layer concern. I haven’t seen his other video on the risks of oil pulling yet so I’d watch the whole series before deciding.
      You could also try swishing with a couple drops of oregano oil since it’s so good at killing infections including STAPH or so it’s said.

      Good luck!




      0
      1. You could also try swishing with a couple drops of oregano oil since it’s so good at killing infections including STAPH or so it’s said.

        That’s a good idea… I generally just add some oregano water to my tea, but I think I’ll try swishing it.

        S!… YOU DA MA’AM!! ‘-)




        0
  4. First, does the oil take more of the protective layer off than brushing? Next, I’ve seen it on my own teeth remove coffee and wine and chlorhexidine stains, along with regular brushing. So perhaps the design of that test isn’t so great,and perhaps it’s scrubbing off the enamel.

    Thanks for the video, it’s certainly gives my more to think about.




    5
    1. But have you tried swishing the same period of time with water? Could just be rinsing off the stains or perhaps the oil has a soap-like effect along the lines of brushing and therefore brushing might accomplish the same thing.
      I brush with bentonite clay and I notice that it keeps my teeth stain free even compared to another toothpaste I use on occasion, but it doesn’t mean that bentonite clay is whitening, it just means that it cleans well.




      0
  5. Does oil pulling actually work at the other end though? Wouldn’t having oil in your mouth stimulate the excretion of lingual lipase and in turn signal the liver to start producing bile and the pancreas to contract; thereby stimulating the body to excrete cholesterol? Given that oil pulling finds its origins in India and their historical diet was so high in fiber wouldn’t this practice have contributed to their good health? Along with spices and teas of course, and perhaps other Aruvedic practices?

    I’m speaking historically, I know India now suffers from the same diseases as the SAD situation in West.




    3
      1. I think because he puts things on his show promising people benefits (or seemingly promising) without proper evidence to back it up. I think his intentions aren’t set out to mislead but he definitely doesn’t do proper research on things before promoting them. Anyone remember the raspberry ketone craze?




        6
        1. I’ve recently ordered some ketones, both liquid and capsules. Just had labs and a Dr. appointment and my ketones showed to be 20 of whatever the measurement is. Figured that was too low. My A1c numbers have improved over the past six months but are still high, while my fasting glucose levels are also still high, but improved.

          My doctors still are puzzled how those numbers can remain above normal and yet my other lab work shows results that most people would kill for.

          But one of my doctors, the junior of the two, revealed to me a herbal that might help lower those numbers. He told of an experience he had when doing volunteer work in the jungles of Venezuela.

          The natives offered him a cup of guava leaf tea which, not being fluent in the language he understood to be drank for the taste. Instead, he relates, it lowered his blood sugar to dangerously low levels and he felt he could have died if he had not gotten some sugar in his system to counter-act the condition.

          And yes, I’ve ordered some guava leaf tea. I’ll have to remain vigilant to ensure there is no problems with either the ketone and/or the guava leaf consumption. I generally start new things especially, slow and low.




          2
        1. One spokesman said that Oz was peddling ‘snake oil’ to consumers on his show. What a scammer..

          And you base the “scammer” label on the word of a “spokesman”? I say that makes you an easy mark for real scammers.

          Does Dr Oz get it right all the time? Does Dr Greger? No on both counts.

          I think we are very fortunate that so gifted a Dr as Dr Oz isn’t afraid to be something other than an AMA pharmaceutical Dr and offer alternative methods to achieving good health. i commend and respect him and read his findings often. I don’t necessarily follow all of them but I don’t follow many of Dr Greger’s findings either.




          1
          1. Lonie, no, he was reprimanded for selling things that had no evidence of effectiveness. To me, he isn’t a doctor.. The senators criticized him for endorsing certain chemicals for quick weightloss. His claims were not true ie unscrupulous. pfft!




            6
            1. Still, there are millions who think Dr Oz is the Wizard, just as there are many (probably not Oz numbers) who swear by Dr Greger.

              And a Congressional investigation, some may think, is bought with campaign donations by ??? (Big Pharma and Big Medicine would probably gain the most by discrediting the Wizard.)

              Dr Greger is wise to avoid suggesting that supplements are better than medicine. Hard for the powers-that-be to attack food. ‘-)




              2
              1. Lonnie, more like hard for the powers that be to attack scientific data. There is no comparison here; it sounds ridiculous to try to compare them.




                3
          2. “Does Dr Oz get it right all the time? Does Dr Greger? No on both counts.”
            Actually yes, Dr. Greger does get things right because he critically looks at the evidence and presents to the public the best available EVIDENCE whereas Dr. Oz makes blatant claims about things with little research involved. To me that is very irresponsible since he advices a large public audience.
            That’s like comparing Mozart to The Monkeys imo.
            I don’t see the good in alternative methods when the alternative methods aren’t properly researched and may be ineffective or worse, possibly harmful. I like that Dr. Greger shows us what the evidence says so we know which alternative methods actually work and which are a waste of money/time or are even harmful.

            I think Dr. Oz could do a lot more good if he were evidence-based but I don’t think he’d have a successful tv show if he were. He has to stay somewhat in line for sponsors as well as attract and keep an audience. The channel may change when people stop hearing what they want to.




            6
            1. “Does Dr Oz get it right all the time? Does Dr Greger? No on both counts.”

              Actually yes, Dr. Greger does get things right because he critically looks at the evidence and presents to the public the best available EVIDENCE whereas Dr. Oz makes blatant claims about things with little research involved. To me that is very irresponsible since he advices a large public audience.

              S, I think you (et al) put too much faith in Dr Greger’s researchers and not enough blame for Dr Oz’s researchers. Yes they BOTH have researchers who compile scripts for them to read from… Oz using a teleprompter, Greger reading from a prepared text. Of course they approve them and may have a hand in the writing, but first found and pitched by the researchers I’m guessing.

              And yes, either group could run out of things to post/talk about but that would mean stopping, so either of them may put out research that on the outside plays as plausible, but when you break it down and compare it to other research on the same subject, it may not stand up as the last word.

              Both Oz and Greger are gifted presenters. We shouldn’t allow preference for the style of one over the other to equate to being right vs wrong.

              That’s like comparing Mozart to The Monkeys imo.

              Well, by today’s standards I think the Monkeys probably had more hits than Mozart, who probably had hundreds of works but only a few that are remembered… come to think of it, I can’t remember even one of the songs the Monkeys put out… I concede that point to your column. ‘-)

              I don’t see the good in alternative methods when the alternative methods aren’t properly researched and may be ineffective or worse, possibly harmful. I like that Dr. Greger shows us what the evidence says so we know which alternative methods actually work and which are a waste of money/time or are even harmful.

              Again, I think you are giving too much credence to Dr Greger’s research… usually he quotes just one or two studies that give us a surprise result.

              I don’t recall him using Meta Analysis of a subject as the theme of his videos. Meta Analysis can correct for poorly constructed studies.

              I think Dr. Oz could do a lot more good if he were evidence-based but I don’t think he’d have a successful tv show if he were. He has to stay somewhat in line for sponsors as well as attract and keep an audience. The channel may change when people stop hearing what they want to.

              I won’t say you are incorrect in your take on Dr Oz, but Dr Greger, probably subconciously, plays to the audience here on NF.o.

              And to further my point that Dr Oz has more followers than Dr Greger, NF.o’s spell checker does not draw a red line under Oz, but continually doesn’t recognize Greger as a real word. ‘-)




              1
              1. Lonie, Dr. Greger actually LOOKS at the research, Oz does not. Greger presents the RESEACH, not the claim. I don’t need to have faith in Greger and he doesn’t suggest people have faith in him, he presents scientific data, not statements which require faith. He even has taught people how to look through evidence with a critical eye. So I cannot elaborate enough how ridiculous it is to compare Dr. Greger to let’s face it, a tv show host.




                3
                1. Lonie, Dr. Greger actually LOOKS at the research, Oz does not. Greger presents the RESEACH, not the claim. I don’t need to have faith in Greger and he doesn’t suggest people have faith in him, he presents scientific data, not statements which require faith.

                  You state that Greger looks at research and Oz does not, as fact. Not sure how you know that but will take you at your word. As for faith, I think one does need to have faith in the intentions of either Dr to present their best advice.

                  So I cannot elaborate enough how ridiculous it is to compare Dr. Greger to let’s face it, a tv show host.

                  Since you use the term “tv show host” in a frowny-face way, let me repair Dr Oz’s reputation by referring to him as a media content creator. Maybe this will help you see him in a different light. That is, see him as a brilliant cardiothoracic surgeon and Columbia University professor with the power to reach millions of people.

                  And whose to say he hasn’t had more good health results than say Dr Greger? That is, Oz reaches people who are more apt to make the changes he reports than they would be to undertake the Spartan-like changes (in the mind of John/Jonetta Q Public) preached here on NF.o.

                  Let’s be honest about the two audiences… Dr Greger is more or less preaching to the choir assembled here because we are here due to the need to find like-minded thinkers.

                  For me personally, this is the first time I have felt the camaraderie with people concerned with a high degree of health pursuit. There’s certainly no one in my family nor among any of my friends. This is the one place I can be who I am and discuss what I believe… and yes, argue points with people like you that are (I hope) friendly adversaries when on the opposite side of a position.

                  And Oz, as I have stated, reaches a completely different co-hort.




                  0
              2. It’s not a matter of preference, Lonie, it’s a matter of science VS. entertainment.

                “Well, by today’s standards I think the Monkeys probably had more hits than Mozart” Lol, thank you for helping to further my point… quality over quantity. Greger is real science, Oz is a show putting out what will attract and keep an audience. The truth isn’t popular or readily embraced.

                Honestly it seems you’ll argue anything sometimes even if the argument you’re trying to make refutes ITSELF. I’m not trying to be rude but from dairy benefits to Oz and Greger being remotely on the same level, I’m just saying…

                I was never trying to argue that Greger has more followers, the masses are generally ignorant on these subjects (in part thanks to people like Dr. Oz) and they tend to follow the mainstream and the mainstream media is often a very misleading thing. Good thing I don’t judge people based on spellcheck ;)

                Have you read Dr. Greger’s book “How Not To Die”? All proceeds go to charity, yet another example of the ongoing list of the differences between the two. Anyways, I highly suggest reading it if you haven’t. If nothing else, it will give you some insight into Dr. Greger as a person and a physician.




                3
                1. Honestly it seems you’ll argue anything sometimes even if the argument you’re trying to make refutes ITSELF. I’m not trying to be rude but from dairy benefits to Oz and Greger being remotely on the same level, I’m just saying…

                  Well, my Dad did often get exasperated with me as a teen-ager and claim “You would argue with a fence post!” so I have a history of arguing and also, a small problem with authority, now that I think about it.

                  I was never trying to argue that Greger has more followers, the masses are generally ignorant on these subjects (in part thanks to people like Dr. Oz) and they tend to follow the mainstream and the mainstream media is often a very misleading thing. Good thing I don’t judge people based on spellcheck ;)

                  No, I wasn’t suggesting you argued the follower numbers, and I get what you are saying that the masses are ignorant (in how to take care of their health) and by and large trust their medical doctor to give them advice on staying healthy.

                  That is why Dr Oz is important… he doles out the small measures of better health methods that people who rely on a medical doctor for advice will listen to and implement.

                  I submit that he may have extended many people’s lives through his show.




                  1
                  1. Haha (about the fence post). Perhaps Dr. Oz has helped people through bits and pieces of helpful information, but he also misleads people and is not evidence-based. Imagine how much he could help if he were… Again though, I don’t think he’d have a tv show of that were the case. I do find many of his statements to be very irresponsible especially since so many trust him.
                    I agree to disagree.




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                2. I know that for the following reasons…

                  1) Dr. Greger has explained this about himself in videos and in his book.

                  2) Basic observation: he goes through and explains the studies to his public in great detail… would be pretty hard to do without actually reading the research… C’mon Lonie..

                  3) Dr. Oz gives out false information so if he’s looking through research, he sure as hell isnt doing a good job.

                  You do not need faith in one’s intentions when one’s actions speak for one’s intentions.

                  Exactly… he has the power to reach millions, yet misleads people with misinformation. Moreover, I see it as a catch 22, he reaches millions through his fame but I do not believe he’d have this same fame if he were not first and foremost an entertainer (in regards to his show, not professional background).

                  Hmm, I’d say that’s definitely your own perspective… eating plants isn’t really a challenge. The world has been lied to for so long. There are many Dr. Oz types out there but very few Dr. Greger types who for what seems like the first time in history is making the scientific facts about human health and nutrition and the real unadulterated best available science readily available to the public without pre-deciding what they can “handle.” In both the short and long term I have zero doubt that Greger has and will positively impact the lives of more people.
                  If I were going on my own observations, I’d tell you about the people I know who watch Dr. Oz… they’re not very healthy. I used to watch Dr. Oz until I started learning about nutrition and realized he was gimmicky. Back then I thought I ate healthy (on and off) but had no idea what I was doing and after going WFPB the difference in my health was profound. It wasn’t until finding Dr. Greger that I truly knew what the healthiest diet was. Now THAT is important considering through all the years (generations for that matter) of agenda-based information and blatant propaganda we literally need to relearn how to feed ourselves and our children.

                  Thanks for the insight (I feel like that came across as sarcastic but it was not lol). Yes, no worries, friendly adversary here as well.




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                  1. Dr. Oz gives out false information so if he’s looking through research, he sure as hell isn’t doing a good job.

                    To be honest, I doubt he pores over the research his staff does for him. With all the responsibilities he has, how could he devote the required time? Wouldn’t surprise me to learn Dr Greger is in the same boat. But yes, Oz’s information is researched… and just because that research is turned into a media event doesn’t make it wrong simply because you think differently.

                    And the reference earlier to the Congressional Inquiry of Oz, how many on Capitol Hill do you think are WFPB eaters?… and I’m including staffers in that question. My guess is that they are proponents of eating the Western Diet and probably don’t take supplements as evidenced by them trying time after time to have the govt regulate supplements. Dr Oz is a champion of alternative medicine even though he is knee deep in the Big Medical culture. The Congressional Inquiry and his standing up to them reinforced him in my mind as a Hero of the State.

                    There was a time in the past when a Senator from my state came out in favor of regulating supplements. I was so angry I quickly formed a scenario in my mind where Vitamin C was available by prescription only, so people were willing to trade a kilo of coke on the black market for a small amount of Vitamin C. The notion of regulation died so I didn’t write the satirical piece, but may have to again if Congress gets enough nannies elected.

                    eating plants isn’t really a challenge. The world has been lied to for so long. There are many Dr. Oz types out there but very few Dr. Greger types who for what seems like the first time in history is making the scientific facts about human health and nutrition and the real unadulterated best available science readily available to the public without pre-deciding what they can “handle.”

                    Agreed, eating plants isn’t really a challenge. But where anyone will get challenged and forcefully so is when they tell a meat eater, a milk drinker, a wild game hunter and eater… even suggesting these types change will either get a “turn and walk away” or an in-your-face diatribe on the strong belief in what they eat.

                    Dr Oz can gently turn these trucks around while Dr Greger’s pitch to the same people will get you run over by the truck.

                    If I were going on my own observations, I’d tell you about the people I know who watch Dr. Oz… they’re not very healthy. I used to watch Dr. Oz until I started learning about nutrition and realized he was gimmicky. Back then I thought I ate healthy (on and off) but had no idea what I was doing and after going WFPB the difference in my health was profound. It wasn’t until finding Dr. Greger that I truly knew what the healthiest diet was. Now THAT is important considering through all the years (generations for that matter) of agenda-based information and blatant propaganda we literally need to relearn how to feed ourselves and our children.

                    No disagreement with anything you said in this paragraph. But that is you and most of the people who visit this website. We just have to hope Oz can pre-condition many more to become like us. ‘-)




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                    1. When it comes to scientific evedince Lonie, there is in fact true or false information and Dr. Oz has given out blatantly false information. What makes it wrong is the science… it’s not a matter of perspective.
                      I’ve said this I think 3 times at least but you don’t seem to want to acknowledge the obvious which is that Dr. Greger’s videos are evidence-based and Dr. Oz’s show is not. Technically one could read through googled blogs and call their findings “researched” but it doesn’t mean it’s well researched.

                      Again, if you read Dr. Greger’s book and/or learn a bit more about him you’ll learn that he does spend a lot of his time researching. I remember him saying something about people presenting things to him and he talked about how he had looked into it to see if there was anything to it.

                      Yes there are people who will also eat potato chips and cotton candy for dinner (so to speak) does that mean the science should be watered down for them? Of course not! Enough with the nonsense (speaking about the world, not to you). No one is forcing anyone to do anything, what Dr. Greger does is provide them the all too rare opportunity to learn the TRUTH and from there have the CHOICE of what they want to do with it. At least their decision won’t be out of being misled! (That passion is my attitude towards the world, not directed at you.)

                      On another note, apart from the subject of nutrition, people do have a right to eat what they want, but not who they want. And there is no “game” or “big game,” that is sickening hunting industry propaganda, they are sentient beings in their home, not someone’s “game.”
                      And one’s life’s worth does not depend on another one’s belief. If someone wishes to apply that thinking to others then they must also apply it to their own life or be doomed as hypocrites.

                      Back to the subject… if truth and facts make someone hide their head between their legs, that is their choice and issue. It’s irresponsible at best to leave out, misinform, or dilute the science in an attempt to potentially cater to these individuals and that thinking is why the world has been so misinformed all along so I have to disagree with you.

                      I can see your point in regards to different approaches reaching different people but my problem lies in the truth being skewed or altogether sacrificed to do so and that just leads to more confusion on the subject and is unfair to the general public.

                      If Oz simply showed the evidence of plant based eating, for example, and maybe taught people about meat interfering with blood sugar, etc. and less time on weight loss supplement ideas, he’d have helped a lot more people. That’s just one example out of many.
                      I don’t think it’s fair to an audience to decide what they should and shouldn’t know. But that wouldn’t go over well with network sponsors for one thing.

                      I’m not.saying Oz is the devil by any means but our take on him is very different and there is no comparison with him and Dr. Greger.




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                    2. On another note, apart from the subject of nutrition, people do have a right to eat what they want, but not who they want.

                      I’m assuming the above is just some snarky remark ‘-) aimed at cannibals etc. to which I answer that they can eat who they want as long as there is mutual consent between adults. ‘-)

                      Again, if you read Dr. Greger’s book and/or learn a bit more about him you’ll learn that he does spend a lot of his time researching. I remember him saying something about people presenting things to him and he talked about how he had looked into it to see if there was anything to it.

                      S, I don’t read books… I’ll wait for the movie. ‘-) But I accept your paraphrasing of that point of the book as accurate. But for all I know, Dr Oz is just as meticulous.

                      And there is no “game” or “big game,” that is sickening hunting industry propaganda, they are sentient beings in their home, not someone’s “game.”

                      I’m not sure the hunting industry invented the term regarding hunting for game, as a game between animal and man as you suggest. I think they are just using a term that has been around for years and that people recognize. I agree with you that “Big Game Hunters” don’t square with the aim of most hunters. That is, they hunt for the meat and many of them believe that someday something could happen that could require survival skills to feed themselves and their family.

                      That is what I’ve come to believe is the intent of my nearest neighbors. The husband, wife, 8 or 9 YO daughter and year or two younger son… they all hunt. And I saw on their facebook page where both the girl and the boy got a nice deer each this year. I think the girl got two… a doe and a buck as she had legal tags for.

                      You probably see her as this bloodthirsty little monster when in fact she is the sweetest thing you’ll ever hope to meet. She eats deer meat often and seems healthy.

                      She finally talked her Dad into letting her have one of my momma cat’s kittens. The little girl’s mother emailed me a day or so ago that “Snowball” is spoiled rotten.

                      And one’s life’s worth does not depend on another one’s belief. If someone wishes to apply that thinking to others then they must also apply it to their own life or be doomed as hypocrites.

                      I have been a hunter for a portion of my life. Still am actually, but now I hunt with a camera. When I did hunt, the best ones were the ones where I returned home with all my shells unspent. There was just something good about being in the great outdoors, alone.

                      My neighbors know I’m not a hunter but do not hold that against me. And even if I were to strongly protest that they hunt, I still do not think they would disavow me. So it would probably be upon my shoulders to shun them if I took a strong position.

                      I certainly don’t want to do that even if I were so inclined, especially because that little girl is such a good friend of mine and I wouldn’t want to risk the family connection.

                      And when they come to visit, she doesn’t rush to tell me how she shot this great buck… but she can’t wait to tell me the things that Snowball does. ‘-)

                      I take hypocrisy seriously, and I don’t think I am guilty in this instance.




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        1. wow Joss Levy, though this does not surprise me. I see him as the jerry springer of the medical profession – it’s just (unappealing) entertainment.




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  6. Wow, very good to know!! Thanks for putting this info out there! Depleting the protective layer would be reason enough for me to avoid it even if it had the benefits. Luckily I won’t actually be missing out on anything. Better for our drains, too!
    Though it would be nice if there were a proven natural whitening method. I find brushing with bentonite clay helps whiten but I’m sure that’s just due to cleaning off surface stains.

    Oh, what about natural methods to assist with remineralizing? Is there anything to the whole swishing with calcium citrate thing?




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  7. Dr. Gregor,

    You provide a much-needed voice of reason in health care and I have been following you for a couple of years.

    This particular video on oil-pulling troubled me. Most of the quoted studies establishing effectiveness were done on dead teeth. When a tooth is in the body and alive it is an independent organ with circulation via blood supply and a pervious tubules dentin structure. Fluid moves in and out thru the dentin to the pulp and the blood. Teeth that are extracted cannot provide a good basis for testing because they lack all these features and are dead. It’s like saying MSM won’t improve a liver that is in a jar. How can it – all the functions have ceased since the liver has been dismembered from the body and is dead.

    Please see Nadine Artemis here:
    If you want strong teeth… WATCH THIS! (PART ONE)

    If you want strong teeth… WATCH THIS! (PART ONE)
    For more info, please visit: http://www.longevitywarehouse.com Nadine Artemis filmed LIVE at the Longevity Now® …

    You are still my hero and I support your organization 100%+ Thank you for all your effort and love for your fellow humans.




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    1. The point about live vs. dead teeth is interesting.

      I also wonder about David’s point, above, asking “What do we know about how, say, merely brushing (or, for that matter, eating fatty or acidic food) damages the pellicle?”

      The protective protein-fat pellicle on teeth that Dr. Greger worries oil-pulling erodes forms quickly enough that, in the experiment with bovine teeth cited, researchers felt they could establish “initial pellicle formation” by immersion of bovine teeth in human subjects’ mouths for just one minute (04:33 in the video).

      Then after the oil-pulling, the bovine teeth remained in the mouth for a further 19 minutes.

      So how long does it take for a protective-enough pellicle to re-form? Maybe 19 minutes isn’t enough … but maybe a half-hour is? And how pellicle-disrupting are other things we subject teeth to (acidic fruit, fatty food, brushing)? Is regenerating the pellicle ever healthy? (I mean, there’s a similar protective layer on skin, but soap and water once in a while, albeit probably less often than Westerners use it, isn’t necessarily bad.)

      Without more information, I’m going to happily continue oil-pulling for the advantages noted here, for the boost in oral hygiene I think it’s provided me (fewer cavities), and for how wonderfully clean it makes the mouth feel, without disrupting healthy oral flora the way antiseptics do.




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      1. I like all the points you’ve listed George Willowki. This video series has really helped me reassess my daily oil pulling. I’ve taken a 3 day break from it and boy does my mouth feel dirty!! Yes I would love to know what else hurts the pellicle layer–I know that acid, baking soda, bleaching strips and other harsh things remove the layer. What about brushing teeth? eating food? drinking water?




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  8. Before going anywhere I will be face to face, I put a few drops of cloves in my mouth and swish it around before spitting it out. I also do the same if I have any pain in my mouth from a sore tooth or gums. The cloves take away the pain.

    Burst my bubble if you choose Dr Greger, but I know what works and will not refrain from doing this. ‘-)




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    1. Why so confrontational Lonie?

      Do you mean to say that even if evidence was presented that showed it increased cancer risk, you would still keep using it? I

      t has been shown to be toxic to insects for example. And in large amounts it can be toxic to humans
      https://www.drugs.com/mtm/clove.html

      Cloves are an ancient remedy for toothache and there is some scientific evidence that they are effective. However, it can be dangerous to use this remedy on babies and small children.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16530911
      https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-251-clove.aspx?activeingredientid=251&activeingredientname=clove

      However, frequent use may sometimes cause problems
      “Clove oil or cream containing clove flower is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the skin. However, frequent and repeated application of clove oil in the mouth or on the gums can sometimes cause damage to the gums, tooth pulp, skin, and mucous membranes.”




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      1. Let me say this one more time…

        Burst my bubble if you choose Dr Greger, but I know what works and will not refrain from doing this. ‘-)

        *And besides Tom, I seldom use this remedy and use clove extract rather than clove oil.*




        1
        1. OK Lonie.

          It is just that your post seemed to imply that whatever the evidence might say, you ‘know’ that cloves, clove oil and clove extract are safe and effective.

          They might well be and I have used cove extract for toothache myself (many years ago). it worked well. There is even some evidence that clove extract has anti cancer properties.
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4132639/

          On the other hand, so do bleach, beer, camel urine and human blood.

          However, I suppose that my point was to express surprise that you say that whatever the evidence might show now or in the future, you are not going to change your beliefs/opinions on this matter. You are not alone in this attitude I suppose – many people refuse to let the facts get in the way of their opinions. It doesn’t seem the most productive attitude to me though. Just sayin’…….




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          1. I think it’s because the “evidence” that cloves cause cancer is very slim. Anything that is overused can cause health problems. And dish soap kills insects, but we can bathe in it.

            Science is linear but reality is not. That’s why science is wrong so much of the time, and can lose the trust of so many. It almost seems as if one can get a study to say whatever one likes. And it is almost impossible to control for every factor and influence, that’s what makes us human.

            The 20 Greatest Blunders Of Science http://discovermagazine.com/2000/oct/featblunders

            And in Ayurveda and Chinese medicine they give different medicine for different body types with the same disease. One medicine can make one person sick and another well. That’s how they see it. They have a more sophisticated science of health in many ways.

            With that said, Turmeric made into a paste with a little water and brushed on the teeth whitens them beautifully. Turmeric stains everything, but whitens teeth. Sure hope it isn’t taking off enamel. We could use some science on that question.

            Keep up the good work ya’ll




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            1. I wasn’t suggesting that cloves cause cancer – that was just a hypthetical example to ask Lonie if there was no possibility that his/her opinions could be swayed even if evidence of harm did emerge.

              In any case, there is some evidence that clove extracts actually fight cancer nt promote it (see my earlier post).




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            2. I’m amazed to hear you say turmeric whitens teeth, but pleased since I eat it so regularity. I’ll have to try that sometime, though I’m a little nervous because it even stains skin! I’ve done the turmeric facial thing and it takes at least two washes to get rid of the orange tint.
              Would be awesome if Dr. Greger looked into turmeric used topically on skin as it’s said to be effectivive for hyperpigmentation.
              I’d actually like to see more science on topical skin care in general. There is a lot of harmful stuff out there in the beauty industry that no doubt causes damage or is ineffective.




              2
          2. However, I suppose that my point was to express surprise that you say that whatever the evidence might show now or in the future, you are not going to change your beliefs/opinions on this matter. You are not alone in this attitude I suppose – many people refuse to let the facts get in the way of their opinions. It doesn’t seem the most productive attitude to me though. Just sayin’…….

            Heh, Obviously the Internet is not a good place for lighthearted comments, as my ‘-) was meant to convey.

            I think it’s because the “evidence” that cloves cause cancer is very slim. Anything that is overused can cause health problems. And dish soap kills insects, but we can bathe in it.

            Ginko says: Science is linear but reality is not. That’s why science is wrong so much of the time, and can lose the trust of so many. It almost seems as if one can get a study to say whatever one likes. And it is almost impossible to control for every factor and influence, that’s what makes us human.

            ^ THIS! ^




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      2. TG, thoughts on cloves in the whole spice form? Is there a certain amount we shouldn’t exceed when eating the whole food? I know essential oils are extremely concentrated but I make it a point to regularly add the spice to my diet due to antioxidant content.




        1
        1. This is an important point… that clove is a spice. I have a small jar on my cabinet that I use often as well. It is judicial to show research that supports the use of a product along with the usual dissenters warnings for using a product. Then let the user be aware… or wary.




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        2. Hi S

          I am not aware of any studies on overconsumption of cloves (or clove powder).

          There are unlikely to be any adverse effects from regularly consuming cloves in normal amounts in food (unless you are on anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy, or are hypoglycaemic) but there are no studies on this. However, I have seen some warnings that long term regular consumption might increase risk of seizures and even epilepsy. However, this appears to be an extrapolation from reports of adverse effects resulting from clove oil ingestion.

          Cloves are high in polyphenols – apparently, gram for gram, they have more polyphenols than any other food – and they favourably affect lipids (at least in type 2 diabetics).
          http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/20/5/A990-b




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    2. Clove oil contains eugenol which is used in dentistry. It, like phenol, has localized anesthetic/sedative properties. It does dull toothache pain. It does not provide benefit in the treatment of periodontitis or tooth decay, which are painless and deadly infections. Keep in mind that slow chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, dental decay and high blood pressure do not hurt….until it’s too late. In the case of clove oil, sure it will make the acute phase of an infection less painful, but it’s like taking morphine for heart attack pain: it just covers up the pain.

      Dr. Ben




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  9. Love your NutritionFacts website, Dr. Gregor!

    I just have a question about time: how long should one swish for in order to remove plaque, and should it be done daily?

    The evidence points to water as being as effective as the other solutions, so that’s my choice.

    Look forward to your response.




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    1. I can’t imagine that swishing alone would remove plaque. It would be interesting to do your own trial and error with this, seeing for yourself whether your teeth feel clean or not.




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  10. The best whitener I have found is peppermint oil. One drop on my toothpaste 2-3 times a week keeps my teeth a healthy look white. I consume red wine and coffee and my teeth are several shades whiter from using peppermint oil. However, don’t over do it.




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