How to Treat Periodontitis with Diet

How to Treat Periodontitis with Diet
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Plant-based diets are put to the test in the treatment of periodontal disease.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What is the effect of nutrition on periodontal disease? “Periodontal disease is a bacterial infection that results in inflammatory destruction of the connective tissue and bone that support the teeth,” and is therefore “one of the leading causes of” our teeth falling out. Like most infections, though, how our body responds may play a critical role. Yes, “the presence of bacteria is the primary [cause, but] a susceptible host is also necessary for disease initiation.”

The standard explanation of periodontal disease is the plaque theory: the buildup of plaque leads to gingivitis—gum inflammation—which leads to the periodontitis, inflammation lower down beneath the gums. But in some forms of periodontal disease, plaque doesn’t appear to play a critical role. Therefore, in the last few years, there has been more interest in the importance of systemic health, our body’s response. “In this respect, nutrition may be of great importance, since it has been implicated in a number of [other] inflammatory diseases”—all of which carry elevated periodontal disease risk.

Traditionally, when we think of the effects of nutrition on dental diseases, we’re only thinking about cavities. However, there’s been less research on the role of diet in periodontal disease. Well, but if it’s about inflammation, one would expect “saturated fat-rich diets” to make things worse—increasing oxidative stress as well inflammation. So, we may want to cut down on saturated fat. But let’s not just speculate. I mean, is there an association between cholesterol levels and periodontitis? If not, it would be hard to implicate saturated fat. But no, there does appear to be a link. Those with high cholesterol do appear to have up to double the risk.

What about periodontal conditions in vegetarians? A hundred vegetarians versus non-vegetarians were studied, and those eating vegetarian did have “better periodontal conditions (less inflammation signs, less periodontal damage, and better dental home care).” However, it should be considered that vegetarians may not just be avoiding meat, but are healthier in other ways, like better dental home care.

But do people who eat more saturated fat get more periodontitis? Yes, about double the risk at the highest levels of intake. And this study was in Japan, where they eat less than half the meat and dairy compared to the U.S. The only way to know for sure, though, is to do an interventional trial, where you change people’s diets and see what happens. In other words, you have to put it to the test. And, bone loss was indeed magnified by a diet high in saturated fat and cholesterol. But if you’re thinking hmm…that’s a weird-looking jaw, that’s because it was a study done on rats.

This is what I was looking for, though the title kind of ruins the suspense. “A high-fiber, low-fat diet improves periodontal disease markers” in terms of probing depth, clinical attachment loss, and bleeding on probing—all the standard measures. And, of course, eating a healthier diet, body weight, blood sugar control, and systemic inflammation improved as well. Ah, but that complicates things. Maybe their mouths got better just because they lost so much weight. You can improve periodontal disease with just bariatric surgery, like stomach stapling. Well, after eight weeks on the diet, they went back on their regular diet, and so gained most of that weight back. But the periodontal disease improvements persisted, suggesting that it was more than just the weight loss that lead to the improvements. They’re thinking maybe the high-fiber diet altered their good gut flora, or maybe their oral flora? What exactly was going on?

Well, German researchers took 20 women with mild-to-moderate chronic periodontitis, and for a year, tried to transition their diets towards more wholesome nutrition—meaning more plant foods, more whole foods, more fresh foods, trying to center their diets around vegetables, and fruit, whole grains, potatoes, and legumes—beans, split peas, chickpeas and lentils. And….after 12 months, the patients “showed a significant reduction of probing pocket depth, gingival inflammation and, [measured for the first time,] decreased concentrations of inflammatory” chemicals inside the crevice between the tooth and gums, which are thought responsible for “the tissue destruction in periodontal disease”—a decrease by as much as 75 percent. And, all the while, their “oral hygiene status did not change,” suggesting it was the diet that did it. But what was missing here? A control group. But there’s never been any randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of diet for periodontal disease …until now, which we’ll cover next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Wikimedia via Wikimedia commons. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

What is the effect of nutrition on periodontal disease? “Periodontal disease is a bacterial infection that results in inflammatory destruction of the connective tissue and bone that support the teeth,” and is therefore “one of the leading causes of” our teeth falling out. Like most infections, though, how our body responds may play a critical role. Yes, “the presence of bacteria is the primary [cause, but] a susceptible host is also necessary for disease initiation.”

The standard explanation of periodontal disease is the plaque theory: the buildup of plaque leads to gingivitis—gum inflammation—which leads to the periodontitis, inflammation lower down beneath the gums. But in some forms of periodontal disease, plaque doesn’t appear to play a critical role. Therefore, in the last few years, there has been more interest in the importance of systemic health, our body’s response. “In this respect, nutrition may be of great importance, since it has been implicated in a number of [other] inflammatory diseases”—all of which carry elevated periodontal disease risk.

Traditionally, when we think of the effects of nutrition on dental diseases, we’re only thinking about cavities. However, there’s been less research on the role of diet in periodontal disease. Well, but if it’s about inflammation, one would expect “saturated fat-rich diets” to make things worse—increasing oxidative stress as well inflammation. So, we may want to cut down on saturated fat. But let’s not just speculate. I mean, is there an association between cholesterol levels and periodontitis? If not, it would be hard to implicate saturated fat. But no, there does appear to be a link. Those with high cholesterol do appear to have up to double the risk.

What about periodontal conditions in vegetarians? A hundred vegetarians versus non-vegetarians were studied, and those eating vegetarian did have “better periodontal conditions (less inflammation signs, less periodontal damage, and better dental home care).” However, it should be considered that vegetarians may not just be avoiding meat, but are healthier in other ways, like better dental home care.

But do people who eat more saturated fat get more periodontitis? Yes, about double the risk at the highest levels of intake. And this study was in Japan, where they eat less than half the meat and dairy compared to the U.S. The only way to know for sure, though, is to do an interventional trial, where you change people’s diets and see what happens. In other words, you have to put it to the test. And, bone loss was indeed magnified by a diet high in saturated fat and cholesterol. But if you’re thinking hmm…that’s a weird-looking jaw, that’s because it was a study done on rats.

This is what I was looking for, though the title kind of ruins the suspense. “A high-fiber, low-fat diet improves periodontal disease markers” in terms of probing depth, clinical attachment loss, and bleeding on probing—all the standard measures. And, of course, eating a healthier diet, body weight, blood sugar control, and systemic inflammation improved as well. Ah, but that complicates things. Maybe their mouths got better just because they lost so much weight. You can improve periodontal disease with just bariatric surgery, like stomach stapling. Well, after eight weeks on the diet, they went back on their regular diet, and so gained most of that weight back. But the periodontal disease improvements persisted, suggesting that it was more than just the weight loss that lead to the improvements. They’re thinking maybe the high-fiber diet altered their good gut flora, or maybe their oral flora? What exactly was going on?

Well, German researchers took 20 women with mild-to-moderate chronic periodontitis, and for a year, tried to transition their diets towards more wholesome nutrition—meaning more plant foods, more whole foods, more fresh foods, trying to center their diets around vegetables, and fruit, whole grains, potatoes, and legumes—beans, split peas, chickpeas and lentils. And….after 12 months, the patients “showed a significant reduction of probing pocket depth, gingival inflammation and, [measured for the first time,] decreased concentrations of inflammatory” chemicals inside the crevice between the tooth and gums, which are thought responsible for “the tissue destruction in periodontal disease”—a decrease by as much as 75 percent. And, all the while, their “oral hygiene status did not change,” suggesting it was the diet that did it. But what was missing here? A control group. But there’s never been any randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of diet for periodontal disease …until now, which we’ll cover next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Wikimedia via Wikimedia commons. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

104 responses to “How to Treat Periodontitis with Diet

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  1. I lost a tooth to periodontal disease last year even though I eat mostly WFPB diet… I brushed and flossed but that wasn’t enough.. Doc said I needed to rinse my mouth out with chlorhexidine. I checked it out and it’s a mild carcinogen…… I then found out that calendula leaves, a medicinal herb does the same thing as the chlorhexidine.. It’s used in Ayurvedic medicine to heal wounds. I made a tincture extracting it with 190 proof alcohol. Brushed and flossed with it along with using neem powder, another Ayurvedic herb.. No periodontal disease reported by the periodontist…
    Not condoning or denying it’s effectiveness, it just worked for me.. YMMV.
    mitch

    1. Sorry to hear about your tooth Mitch. That sucks. One of my recurring nightmares is losing teeth and loose teeth. You might also be interested to know that Dr. Greger has a video talking about randomized control trial studies where green tea mixed with amla powder (Indian gooseberry) was just as effective/more effective than chlorhexidine. Dr. G recommends decaf if you’re doing it before bed though haha.

    2. I have been adding calendula flowers (including both leaves and pedals) in both green and black tea, primarily for the lutein and zeaxanthin. Good to know it’s helping guard against periodontal disease as well.

    3. Mitch,

      I was pondering Dr Greger’s teeth and mouth videos and they have already said the green tea and Amla.

      I add rinse, but don’t brush after citrus and other acidic food and drinks

      watch out for Stevia and any other artificial sweetner because they wreck the mouth microbiome.

      Honey didn’t wreck the mouth microbiome in the study where they acted primitive.

      Also,I am going to say the word, “oatmeal” though that was not a Dr Greger video. I think it was a reversing cavities study I looked at a few years ago. I can’t guarantee it was, but I think I found that when my cousin suddenly had 10 cavities with his Diabetes.

  2. I have been battling gum disease for over 25 years. I have also been WFPB for at least that long. I am 66 years old, 5’4” tall, 103 pounds, take no medications, run 3 miles 3 times a week, lift weights 3 times a week, practice yoga 3 times a week and play singles tennis once a week. I am the picture of health. I have had gum surgery twice and my periodontist says I can’t have more surgery. Yet my pockets are still deep and I have go 4 times a year for cleaning. My dentist and periodontist say my home cleaning is immaculate. I have asked about taking antibiotics but he says it won’t help, that my condition is stable. Sure hope part 2 of this video has some help for me!

    1. Thanks Rebecca. I have not used “regular “ toothpaste in years. I started using Tom’s and some time later switched to Jason to avoid sodium lauryl sulfate. I had not tried baking soda but will now. Thank you for the suggestion!

      1. Trena,

        I started having problems after I switched to Toms and other natural tooth pastes.

        I don’t understand why, but I had never had problems before and suddenly I was having teeth problems.

        I just switched off of them. We shall see if it helps.

        1. I have a collagen defect and one of the many issues is tissue fragility. My gums have bled all my memory and at age 10 the dentist had me swabbing my gums with mercurachrome, err “mercury”. As a mother of three, I read that CoQ10 could help bleeding gums. It works for me!!! All the enamel was cracked, too. I have had many broken teeth. I switched to EcoDent tooth powder and my whole mouth is much better.

    2. Have you had a bone density test done? If you have osteopenia or osteoporosis bone loss will happen that can affect many people in the mouth and is irrelevant to brushing habits. The mouth is but a symptom if that is the case.

    3. I am a dentist with 30 years experience. There is a very strong genetic component to periodontal disease. If one or both of your parents lost their teeth relatively young, say in their 40’s, then that is a definite red flag. The current theory is that these people have an exaggerated immunological response to the bacterial presence. Thus a Dr. Golub promotes Periostat which is low dose Doxycycline which he recommends to take twice a day for 9 months. According to him it is not acting as an antibiotic but it decreases the inflammation by binding to the MMP’s(matrix metallo proteinases) in the bacteria and your body’s immune cells. Strangely, many dentists haven’t even heard of this. I just noticed he did a 1 1/2 hr interview which is now on you tube.

        1. Trena, Is there some way I can email you privately?
          I want to explain why I’m guessing that you are in better periodontal health than you think. And perhaps discuss antibiotics.

  3. Dear Trena, I, too, have a good plant-based diet but still had been struggling with gum issues until I quit using commercial toothpastes. By using simple baking soda and water for the past two years, my gums have remained healthy and my dental pain has gone away. I do hope this could help you, too, if you haven’t already tried it. Best of luck!

    1. Rebecca, that’s what I often use to brush my teeth. It’s so effective for so many things, including cleaning bathrooms & the kitchen. I also use it in the laundry and to remove tea stains from cups. I’ve even used it as an underarm deodorant. And as a substance, as far as I know, it’s not harmful to the environment.

  4. Before I went on a WFPB diet I had good home dental care but still had gum disease and lost 2 teeth. Since I’ve been on a WFPB diet these last 9 years, my gum disease has disappeared! My gums do not bleed, and the deep pockets are back to normal. I haven’t changed my home dental care but do juice 6 times a week with veggies, not fruit juice and swish before swallowing. My dentist says my excellent dental health is attributed to good home dental care and has nothing to do with my diet, but I have never had such good dental visits since I started the WFBP diet, so I know it must be my diet and juicing. I think my dentist is very much like my doctor when it comes to knowing what a WFPB diet can do for your health, nothing!

  5. I had tooth problems all my life. Was vegan for 15 years and continued to have tooth problems. Switched to WFPB diet, no oil, no sugar, and my tooth problems all vanished. I have no plaque and no stains despite eating blueberries, cranberries and coffee. I no longer go to the dentist or get my teeth cleaned. No need.

    1. Exactly Blair.
      Thanks for distinguishing Vegan and WFPB.

      Not saying the others with continued gum issues aren’t strict WFPB, but it is possible they are still consuming too much white sugar (for example).

      1. Casper,

        I didn’t start having teeth problems until a year into mostly WFPB, but it didn’t start until I changed to natural tooth pastes. I don’t use oil and I am not eating much sugar. Holidays and birthdays.

        Also, they started staining like crazy and it looked like enamel was wearing away and I haven’t been eating citrus except in dishes.

        Anyway, I don’t get it, but I do suspect either missing nutrition or that I stopped eating oatmeal or something.

        1. Something had to wreck my mouth microbiome.

          I also have gotten sick twice after years of not getting sick.

          Not sleeping probably wrecked my antioxidants in 2 hours and it takes 3 days to rebuild that, plus I am hanging around with an 8 year old, but it still sucks to go years without getting sick and then get sick twice close together.

          My dog has messed up my microbiome????

          1. Trying to remember if I tried Oil of Oergano or Olive Leaf extract on myself before using it on my dog. I did try essential oils at a few make and takes, can those mess up the mouth microbiome?

  6. Hello Mitch,

    Can you be more specific about your Ayurvedic treatment? I too struggle with periodontal disease, even though it improved a lot since I started water flossing after my regular flossing at night. I can’t water floss during the day because I work full-time but strongly recommend it.

    1. Wow, YR, that is a fabulous addition!

      Amazing that something which people don’t even keep in their mouths could even possibly contribute to Diabetes.

      Makes me wonder how many biological mechanisms occur from a 30 second swish.

  7. To those experiencing gum problems while eating WFPB: the video states that the risks of periodontal disease decrease — but it did not say that the risks go to zero.

    That is true for all lifestyle conditions or diseases, as I understand these videos: the risks of developing any of them go down, but not to zero, on a WFPB diet. There are no guarantees.

    1. Olive oil has a very powerful antimicrobial effect (as well as antiviral). This power is identified by its bitter and pungent taste (burns the throat). This happens when the olives are young (very green). Ripe olives (black) don’t have this – mild flavor. Pickled olives are not bitter or pungent and therefore lack this element.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3002804/

      5.5. Antimicrobial effect

      Oleuropein has been shown to have strong antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria [57–59] as well as mycoplasma [60]. Phenolic structures similar to oleuropein seem to produce its antibacterial effect by damaging the bacterial membrane and/or disrupting cell peptidoglycans. Different authors have used biophysical assays to study the interaction between oleuropein and membrane lipids [61]; however, the exact mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of oleuropein is still not completely established, although some authors have proposed that it is due to the presence of the ortho-diphenolic system (catechol) [57]. In 2001, Saija and Uccella [62] proposed that the glycoside group modifies the ability to penetrate the cell membrane and get to the target site. Effective interference with the production procedures of certain amino acids necessary for the growth of specific microorganisms has also been suggested. Another mechanism proposed is the direct stimulation of phagocytosis as a response of the immune system to microbes of all types.

      Oleuropein and hydrolysis products are able to inhibit the development and production of enterotoxin B by Staphylococcus aureus, the development of Salmonella enteritidis and the germination and consequent development of spores of Bacillus cereus [57–67]. Oleuropein and other phenolic compounds (p-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic and p-coumaric acids) completely inhibit the development of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and B. cereus [58].”

      1. Interesting but won’t the antimicrobial effect result in damage to our gut /mouth/throat etc bacteria, both beneficial and harmful?

      2. I know that you are a great advocate of olive oil consumption, Panchito. However, studies seem to suggest that while its consumption is significantly less harmful than animal and saturated fats, it actually promotes arterial disease relatve to consumption of polyunsaturated fats.

        The Pritikin website has an interesting article on this point:
        https://www.pritikin.com/your-health/healthy-living/eating-right/1103-whats-wrong-with-olive-oil.html

        The scientific panel convened by the AHA to look at dietary fats and cardiovascular disease also concluded:

        ‘We judge the evidence to favor recommending n-6 polyunsaturated fat, that is, linoleic acid, stronger than monounsaturated fat to replace saturated fat because of the positive results of randomized clinical trials that used polyunsaturated fat compared with the paucity of trials that used monounsaturated fat10; the greater relative risk reduction for polyunsaturated fats in observational studies12,17,18; the greater reduction in LDL cholesterol with polyunsaturated fat4; and the regression of atherosclerosis in nonhuman primates by polyunsaturated but not monounsaturated fat.’
        https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000510

        Dr Greger also has some relevant videos and blog posts on this matter eg
        https://nutritionfacts.org/2017/10/17/what-about-extra-virgin-olive-oil/
        https://nutritionfacts.org/video/olive-oil-and-artery-function/

        1. PS I think it is far better to consume whole plant foods instead of either hard fats (butter, cheese, lard etc) or oils. However as the AHA scientific panel observed

          ‘Finally, we note that a trial has never been conducted to test the effect on CHD outcomes of a low-fat diet that increases intake of healthful nutrient-dense carbohydrates and fiber-rich foods such as whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and legumes that are now recommended in dietary guidelines.’
          https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000510

          The Esselstyn studies were not considered because they were not randomised and there was no control group. The Ornish sttudies were not considered because those used multiple interventions not just dietary changes.

          1. What you are saying is about a different topic. And none of what you said disproves what I said. The good news is that different choices can be made. If your choices take you to good health then you did well and everybody is happy, except when your choice is judge wrong by others. With so many different people around, it is easy to be judged wrong. That is the social price that comes with the choice.

            1. I agree, Panchito. After several decades of living in the same ol’ body, one gets to know what’s good for it and what isn’t. And (apropos of nothing), “when the pupil is ready, the teacher appears.” I too like a few drips of EVOO every day.

              I’ve also been told I have beautiful skin. I mean, you know, for my age ‘n everything. :-)

            2. Panchito

              Since your post was about the effects on health of consuming olive oil, my own seemed broadly relevant. It wasn’t intended as a social judgement but a simple statement about other evidence concerning olive oil consumption’s health effects.

              However, you’ve made quite a number of posts over the last year praising the benefits of olive oil. is there any particular reason?

              1. The reason is the good effects of olive oil on my health. Other people may have a different experience. By sharing my experience I may help somebody.

                  1. YR

                    By that standard, drinking your own urine will benefit your health too.
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdi0N6IO2Kw

                    People selling/promoting alternative ‘cures’ and beliefs (or anything else for that matter) rely on testimonials. They can always find somebody to testify to their benefits. If an infection or apparent health problem clears up (often of its own accord), people are prone to attribute the resolution of the problem to the prescription medicine, supplement, food, or Argyle socks that they happened to be taking/eating/wearing at the time – even when these things might have had no beneficial effect on the outcome anyway. Many medicines just suppress the symptoms of a disease in any case. I always remember when growing up, that the local newspaper often contained classified notices from people giving thanks to some Roman Catholic Saint or other for a disease clearing up, or finding a lost ring, or whatever. They are not the proof of the pudding – methodologically rigorous trials are, multiple mutually confirming lines of evidence are.

                    As the saying has it, association in time is not proof of causation. it’s that sort of thinking perhaps that kept things like human and animal sacrifice going for so long.

                    Then there’s the placebo effect……………

                    Those are some of the reasons why health authorities place much more reliance on the results of rigorous scientific trials than on personal testimonials. As I understand it, this site is about what the latest scientific evidence shows rather than a platform for personal advocacy that turns a Nelsonian blind eye to inconvenient evidence or simply dismisses it because it is contrary to strongly-held personal beliefs.

                    1. “As I understand it, this site is about what the latest scientific evidence shows rather than a platform for personal advocacy”
                      – – – – –

                      Look around you. Many of those commenting here are talking about what personally helped them. For instance, one said that EcoDent helped her problems. And so forth.

                      Deb is convinced that a little oil makes her gain weight. But was it really the oil?

    2. Thanks Panchito.

      I respect that. I just can’t have oil. I had gained weight back and I thought it was 7 pounds, but it was closer to 10 and just finding out that there was oil in my plant milk, I already lost 4 of it back.

      I lost zero pounds in almost 2 years to the point where I thought I had to have a bad thyroid because I had given up junk food and fast food and restaurant food and thing after thing, but fats are what I had to give up.

      Disconcerting to gain weight back as a vegan, but hidden oils is going to be the reason.

        1. Panchito, from the article you quoted: “We investigated the effects of energy-restricted diet containing EVOO on body composition and metabolic disruptions related to obesity….[the research subjects were] 41 adult women with excess body fat (mean ± SD 27.0 ± 0.9 year old, 46.8 ± 0.6% of total body fat) [who] received daily high-fat breakfasts containing 25 mL of soybean oil (control group, n = 20) or EVOO (EVOO group, n = 21) during nine consecutive weeks. Breakfasts were part of an energy-restricted normal-fat diets (-2090 kJ, ~32%E from fat).”

          So these research subjects were overweight, eating “an energy-restricted normal fat diets.” Presumably, they were eating a typical SAD (though energy restricted), but I can’t tell from the abstract alone. But the question is whether these results can be extrapolated to plant based whole foods eaters. Add to that normal energy intakes, and perhaps healthy weights. I personally doubt it.

          The information in the videos on this website suggests that limiting all added oils (as well as sugars and salt) is a better option compared to simply switching from one plant oil to another. In addition to eating plant based whole foods.

          I also wonder who funded this study; do you know?

        2. Panchito,

          Some people can succeed even doing Keto. I interacted with a man and told him how I throw up eating coconut oil and he said that the feeling nauseous caused him to lose weight and Dr Greger did an audio podcast about that. They got nauseous before they ate a lot of calories.

          I gain weight when I do any oils. I start losing again when I go no oil, low saturated fats.

          There are people whose stretch receptors pick up on the oil and they eat fewer calories. It doesn’t work for me. Plus, there is such a strong likelihood that I was Diabetic. I didn’t get checked out, but I had things like neuropathy and horizontal nail ridges and eye problems and brain problemd, plus other things and I went low fat, no oil to get rid of all the symptoms. I got rid of everything except some of the brain issues, but those have improved with the no oil, low saturated fat approach.

          Each way of eating has its own rules and all I know is that I ended up gaining 10 pounds back when I accidentally added in oils and I have lost 4 pounds back going back off of it.

          My Keto friends eat oil and won’t eat grains or starches and I do eat those. My elderly relatives succeeded with moderation, but my generation didn’t succeed at moderation. The stretch receptors / calorie density logic is the one which finally worked, but it took me getting rid of oil.

          1. For 2 years before I came here, I kept cutting thing after thing out, but I was so frustrated that no matter how much I cut out, I didn’t lose a pound and I am post-menopausal, but still, I gave up icecrean and candy and every junk food and I even gave up most carbs. I was doing salads with cheese and oil and vinegar. I was afraid of Diabetes so I gave up all sweets and soda and breads and potatoes and pasta and on and on, but I didn’t lose anything at all. Nothing. It wasn’t until a few months after I csme here that I got rid of dairy and oil that I started losing and did well at it. After that I added back in rice and potatoes and Ezekiel bread, etc and still kept it off. The hidden oils are when I suddenly went up.

            1. It is not keto. They used less than 2 TS of evoo per day. The ratios were

              carbohydrate: 49.0 ± 2.8% E
              fat: 31.8 ± 2.85% E
              protein: 19.1 ± 2.4% E

              but do what works for you

            2. BE WARNED.

              Someone blocked my ip adrees and deleted my comment. The WFPB police don’t want you to know the science. Think about that.
              They are cooking the dialog and only allow ‘favorable’ science.

              1. Interesting, Panchito — I wouldn’t doubt it. That’s why we must continue to think for ourselves and not be influenced by the sheeples.

                “I am the master of my fate:
                I am the captain of my soul.”

                William Ernest Henley

                1. “I am the master of my fate:
                  William Ernest Henley
                  ——————————————–
                  Any body know what this guy’s fate was?

                  1. Here y’go, Lonie:

                    “Henley died of tuberculosis in 1903 at the age of 53 at his home in Woking.”

                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Ernest_Henley

                    Pundits who claim to know say that before we incarnate, we DO know when we’re going to check out this time around. But of course we don’t remember this, nor should we. He was probably more than ready to leave this wild and crazy world.

                    1. He was probably more than ready to leave this wild and crazy world.
                      ——————————————————————————————
                      Yeah, musta been… seein’ as how he was (presumably, practiced what he preached) Master of his own fate.

                1. Dear Stephen, Thank you for your reply and explanation. However it’s not clear to me that you have it straightened out yet. It was a particularly egregious mistake as far as I’m concerned because I very much wanted that message to reach Dr. Greger for him to evaluate the possibility of a new, important video production.

                  The reason I’m afraid you don’t have it straight yet is that this reply you sent to me, Larry Burnett, DDS actually starts with Hi Panchito. I’m pasting the message which I thought Dr. Greger would want to see below this message. If you will be sure Dr. Greger gets a look at the note I’m posting below I will consider the mistake completely corrected. Thanks again for getting back to me.
                  Larry Burnett The note I post below was written in response to another writer who wrote that he would like to see Dr. Greger do a video on tooth remineralization.

                  I agree that a video on dental enamel remineralization could be a tremendous help for those who suffer from tooth decay and the high costs of repair. I offer the following evidence based reasons for the need for Dr. Greger to consider bringing this new dental information fo our attention.
                  1. The most important dental discovery over the past 100 years is remineralization.
                  2. We now know that tooth decay is a process of chronic loss of minerals from the outer enamel layer of the tooth as a result from local acid conditions produced by overgrowth of acid producing microorganisms.

                  2. We now know that the process of demineralization and remineralization is a constant process that goes both ways just like in the bones of our bodies. The word carries comes from the process of demineralization of our bones.

                  3. We now have discovered how to influence the demineralization/remineralization cycle toward more remineralization and less demineralization. This means that early decay when first discovered can be remineralized by simple lifestyle changes and TOPICAL fluoride application. The result is disappearance of the early decay with replacement of enamel which I s stronger than the original.

                  4. The early decay must be discovered and reversed before the decay advances to a hole in the outer enamel (an actual cavity). This means The early decay should be diagnosed and treated non-surgically starting when the first teeth begin erupting into the mouth. (Age 1 year). But the treatment still works on early decay(before cavitation) of mature teeth also.

                  5. Like most medical discoveries there has been a long delay before the profession recognizes and implements the newly discovered science. This information was proven and recognized at the turn of the century around the year 2000.

                  6. The knowledgeable dentist and hygienist now is faced with the choice of treatment of early decay. Either teach the patient how to remineralize the lesion or drill and fill the defect. Unfortunately most dentists are much like the proverbial carpenter whose only tool is a hammer. To him every problem looks like a nail. The Dentist’s main tool is a drill resulting in … The fact is that once that first filling is placed, the result is a lifetime of breakdown and repair. This leads to ever larger fillings, crowns, root canal treatments averaging about $3000 in present dollars over a lifetime of the tooth.

                  7. The fact that this “cure” for tooth decay is almost unrecognized is similar to the problem of the medical problem wherein the profession doesn’t know or understand nutrition being the cure for our chronic diseases. So like cardiovascular disease, the cure of childhood tooth decay remains muted because of financial incentives and poor education of the profession.

                  The “cure” has been discovered. Dr. Greger could now bring this discovery to the public. The randomized clinical trials proving this are abundant and can be easily accessed by Dr. Greger and his staff. I have most of the literature in my library.

                  In short, early tooth decay is a medical problem with medical solutions. The elimination of early decay should be shifted to the pediatric medical clinics for optimal elimination of childhood decay. The patient will then grow up with the knowledge for eliminating decay in the permanent teeth.

                  I have been studying, advocating, and teaching this for about 20 years. I would be honored to volunteer my help for Dr. Greger in preparing this new information for publication.

                2. Steven, did you receive the message I sent you with reference to tooth remineralization which I asked you to share with Dr. Greger? Please respond so I’ll know if I have to find out how to send it directly to him.

    1. Yes Lonie, and the major bleed from the bank account too. Dentists, veterinarians, lawyers … pretty much from the same stock… except I have known lawyers to do charity work.

      1. and the major bleed from the bank account too. Dentists, veterinarians, lawyers … pretty much from the same stock… except I have known lawyers to do charity work.
        ————————————————————————————————
        I quite agree.

        Living in the country I am not bothered by busy bodies trying to tell me how to live. That is, my four cat friends (sometimes 5 ’cause a neighbor’s cat prefers what I serve instead of what he has to eat at home) have never been to a vet and are never sick.

        I read a comment posted under one of Dr. Gregers videos from a woman suggesting that Brewer’s Yeast fed to her cats prevented fleas. Since then I’ve been adding that to my cats’ food and they haven’t had any fleas… but I can’t confirm that is the reason why.

        But I’ve had the time to tend to most of the services needs from the professionals you mentioned. Still, I guess they fill a need by others who are too busy to take care of things on their own.

        Some futurists are suggesting that Blockchain technology will make us less dependent on lawyers and in time we will be able to get a diagnosis from an AI that is better than a human diagnosis, and will be able to construct our own medicines to remedy our illness.

        Pretty far-out but if true, younger generations will not have the same dependencies on professional services as we do.

        1. Lonie,

          I like learning about future science and technology.

          I watch the commercial where the tattoo artist sketches it into his device and a robot does the tattooing and know that the future will be fascinating.

          3-D laser printed organs or stem cells being implanted or immunotherapy or water fasting or PEMF all in a race for their spot in the future. Which one will win? Well, I suspect it is likely to be that each thing will fill different niches.

          They had some cool grow your own clothing versus laser print your outfit for tonight TED Talks.

          I also watch what is already out there. People steal bikes with drones and lift them high in the air.

          There are towns where the groceries are all delivered by robots, which know how to avoid traffic and which talk politely to the people who block its path. That already exists.

          Not in my town, but there are towns which have it.

          There have been cool fashion designers who have made transforming outfits for homeless people, which turn into a sleeping bag and a tent and back into to supercool outfits.

          Life really could get fascinating, and the money is the main downside.

          Immunotherapy originally costing $5000 and now the best one is $500,000 for one dose is the part of the future, which scares me.

          But if I ever became homeless, I would be writing that lady who made the outfits which transform into a tent.

          1. Good stuff Deb… you really are well read.

            But some of what I’m reading says money will not be the problem in re: many of the soon to come health remedies. Reason they give is that AI will make discovery really cheap and so it will be available cheaply.

            But as you suggest, at the present cheap isn’t accepted as a real word by some of these companies.

            Still, an example of how this is working is where some Japanese researchers found a way to correlate natural plants to medicines. Through some sort of method they found that Naringinen can clear out plaque from the brain at night and another research unit discovered that this cleaning process works better when we sleep on our side. Pretty hard to prevent Alzheimer’s any cheaper than that.

            And another Research group found how to determine algorithmically if plant to medicine can be linked and discovered that Ashwagandha (and other plants) can perform as Metformin or even Rapamycin.

            We live in Good Times… and Better Times may be coming!

          2. I watch the commercial where the tattoo artist sketches it into his device and a robot does the tattooing and know that the future will be fascinating.
            ———————————————————————————————————–
            Yeah, that’s the only part of that commercial I remember ’cause the first thing that flashed in my mind was a screaming SKIN SIN!

    2. Lonie, your knee-slapper reminds me of a submission by a reader for the Life in These United States page. (Yeah, from that same Reader’s Digest issue of June 2018; I haven’t returned it to the lobby yet.)

      “Feeling down about my thinning hair, I told a friend, ‘Soon I’ll never need to go back to the beauty salon. Whenever I vacuum, all I pick up is my hair.’

      “A glass-half full kind of gal, she responded, “Well, then you won’t need to vacuum either.”

      (Agnes Scharenbroch, Manitowoc, WIsconsin)

        1. Laughing.

          My grandmother always read me Readers Digest jokes.

          My grade school best friends father always read me Playboy humor. He was just a little bit inappropriate. His wife eventually moved as far away from him as possible.

  8. I really like how Dr. Greger is covering the issue of dental health. I read Weston A. Price’s book Nutrition and Physical Degeneration that investigated tribes in the 30 that had straight and healthy jaws that could accomodate wisdom teeth. The kind of foods he said these tribes ate to get their nutrition were animal foods, though. I refuse to eat butter, cheese and organ meat since there is no proof that eating those foods would stop or reverse heart disease or cancer. I’d love to know if there is any research showing how to develop better jaw bones to accomodate wisdom teeth through nutritional intervention.

    1. Matt K, what Weston found in those foods that aided bone develpment is now called vitamin K2. Because of current farming methods, it’s not in any of those foods anyway. You aren’t missing anything by skipping them. You can get the K2 by eating natto, or by taking it in supplement form. It also, according to the studies, prevents calcium buildup in the arteries, while adding it to the bones where it belongs. Of course, vitamin D is also important for building bone. As is getting enough calcium and magnesium in diet.
      I try to get about 100grams of greens (3 ounces) a day, mainly kale, chard and spinach, plus lots of other fruits and vegetables. Try for 1/2 cooked, 1/2 raw. The dentist always remarks on how good my dental health is. Maybe all that chewing? :)

  9. For good dental care guidance, Google “Jay W. Friedman, DDS, MPH”

    He helped me in deciding not to remove my two young daughters wisdom teeth. Teeth are still in at ages 27 and 29 years old. Dr. Friedman said that 2/3rd of removals are scams. Get his book, too

  10. How to build up jaw bone after some loss showing in xrays despite no gum disease and dentist happy with home cleaning. Dentist said no use trying other general bone health efforts as won’t help jaw bones. But try anyway? Aside from prunes and almonds (already ate almonds and can’t tolerate many prunes), chewing hard foods a lot, is that all that can be done? The benefits of high impact or weight bearing exercise for bone health is uncertain?

    1. WFPB enthusiast,

      Look up regenerative medicine.

      MicroPulse ICES was originally used for helping bone and it really does regrow bone.

      I think cold laser might, too.

      I know that a side effect of PEMF has been that people have had their teeth regrow.

      The thing is that it is all experimental devices used by self-hackers.

      I used it to bring injury pain down to zero. I got rid of foot and ankle pain, rotator cuff pain and lower back pain, but alef believes it can harm the blood brain barrier if used too close to the brain.

      Hard to say if the jaw is far enough away from the brain. Could be because the top of the body is often too far away with most PEMF.

      They are using pulsed magnet with psych and people get a lot of healing and it does regrow bone and can regrow things like meniscus.

      If you look at the photos on Micropulse ICES site, they show the bone regrowth and probably tell how long it took. That was missing chunks of bone. You are doing a more subtle process.

      I don’t know that it is safe. But it is only the blood brain barrier that I worry about.

      They are doing studies and I just got to be in one, and what I know is that if you ever get a severed spinal cord, buy one or if you get injured, but you have to make your own decisions about risk for new technologies.

      1. I used it to stimulate my vagal nerve to break my emotional repulsion of things like turmeric and blueberries, based on a study I saw on PubMed. It really did seem to help, but so did Dr Greger videos and it may have been extreme placebo effect, but I eat a lot of the thibgs regularly now.

        (I used to hate broccoli and any spices and blueberries and all the rest of the berries and I used to be addicted to dairy and the emotional attachment broke off really quickly.

        Blueberries took so long that I really do know it could just be my faith in PubMed studies.

        I just had a gadget and tried to figure out how many things I could use it for.

        1. They used the Micropulse ICES to heal people after brain injury and it did help that.

          I just don’t understand the whole blood brain barrier thing.

          1. What is the blood brain barrier? I understand the function and that there is one, but I don’t understand what it is made of.

            It would be somethknb I would like to understand better.

  11. 1 cup of brazil nuts has 10g of fiber. Also, as shown on a previous video by Dr. Greger, they help lower cholesterol. However given their high selenium content, eating too many leads to selenium toxicity, and selenium toxicity can lead to tooth decay. How many brazils nuts are safe to eat for the cholesterol benefit, and yet avoid any periodontal risk?

    1. On the Brazil Nuts – 2 Nuts per day for 4 days per month, for cholesterol control. Keep the rest in the freezer for the next month. Check out p 27 in “How Not To Die.”

    2. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Nutrient Database, a 1-ounce serving of dried, unblanched Brazil nuts, which is approximately six to eight whole nuts, contains 544 micrograms of selenium. The Food and Nutrition Board recommends 55 micrograms of selenium daily for both adult men and women. The Food and Nutrition Board has set the tolerable upper limit, or UL, of selenium at 400 micrograms for men and women over age 19. The UL is considered the maximum amount of a nutrient that can be consumed daily without causing potentially harmful side effects. A one ounce serving is already over that amount. An entire cup would be 4052 micrograms of selenium. Consuming too much selenium may cause fatigue, hair loss, digestive problems, mood changes and nerve damage. If you have been eating Brazil nuts and experience these side effects, stop eating the nuts and contact your doctor.

    3. Scott,

      Thanks for saying that.

      Once I open Brazil nuts, I end up eating them as snacks. Maybe 4 a day. I used to think that I didn’t like them, but it turns out I do. I just finished a container.

  12. Your teeth are not all you should worry about?

    “Now, a new paper published in the journal Science Advances shows that Alzheimer’s may come from a completely unexpected source.

    Scientists took samples of saliva, spinal fluid, and brain tissue from dead and living people. All the subjects had been either diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or were suspected of having it.

    The researchers found that the patients’ brains had the bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. It is involved in gum disease.

    And the scientists also found that the bacteria travel from the mouth to the brain, secreting a toxic protein that destroys brain cells.

    What’s more, these gum disease germs increase production of beta-amyloid. It’s a protein believed to cause Alzheimer’s.”

      1. The unfortunately named Dr Mirkin has an interesting article on gut bacteria and Alzheimer’s risk too.

        He recommends

        ‘Since recent studies show that dementia may be influenced to a large degree by the types of bacteria living in your colon, I recommend eating the foods that encourage growth of healthful bacteria and discourage the harmful types. Harmful colon bacteria can cause inflammation that can increase your risk for dementia as well as for heart attacks, strokes and certain cancers. You can reduce inflammation by:
        • eating a plant-based diet with a wide variety of vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts and fruits’
        http://www.drmirkin.com/morehealth/dementia-risk-increased-by-harmful-bacteria-in-your-colon.html

    1. Don’t forget that it also affects the heart. Your gums are very vascular, meaning they’re full of blood vessels. And, your mouth is full of bacteria. If you disrupt the gum layer even a little bit, you’re going to get bacteria in your bloodstream, which can go anywhere and trigger inflammation throughout the body. Studies show that the bacteria found in periodontal disease — including Streptococcus sanguis, which plays a role in strokes– spreads to the heart. The two appear to go hand-in-hand, in the absence of gum disease, there is significantly less of these bacteria in the heart.

      BRUSH AND FLOSS PEOPLE, it is as important as your diet when it comes to your health.

  13. I am a devoted WFPB diet devotee and I thank all the teachers here for saving my life and preserving my health. Most of my dental career has involved teaching dentists and hygienists diagnosis and treatment of periodontal(gum diseases. This discussion gives me a chance to contribute useful evidence based information for those periodontal concerns. This is in addition to the accurate information provided by Dr. Greger and staff. I will post a link to an article I wrote for dental professionals years ago.

    Indeed periodontitis is a bacterial infection with consequences accurately described in the periodontal video presentation. But here are additional facts for those who continue to have periodontal problems even after professional treatment. This article is meant only for persons with a high degree of interest in the problem. It is a bit long but I tried to write it in a way that was understandable to the general public. I hope this will be extremely useful to anyone suffering refractory(difficult or impossible to cure) periodontitis. This is my attempt at payback for all those who have helped me here

    LB, DDS
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/rteirlcpb1u5sfw/Pocket%20Monsters.pdf?dl=0

    Periodo

    1. Thanks for the article.

      A few years ago, my house contractor had a knee replacement go bad and they said that if they couldn’t heal the infection, he would have to get a peg leg and when I looked it up, they talked about biofilm and I found Serrapeptase, which helps with calcifications and biofilm and one of the things people said was that it caused them to not need dental cleaning.

      I wonder if they have tested how enzymes affect the oral and gut microbiome?

      Honey is another thing which I wonder about because I think when I looked it up it had good bacteria. I looked it up because it hadn’t harmed the gums in the study where they let them eat honey and didn’t let them brush their teeth.

    2. Another thanks. I’ll pass this on to my wonderful dentist who may not be aware of this (though she graduated at the top of her class through undergrad and grad school so she may be following this practice already). I’m nearing the end of a 3-year journey of dental reconstruction that, in the end, will total more than $32,000 so I’m anxious to maintain what I’ve gained. Looking back, I think my primary mistake was thinking that I couldn’t afford procedures like, for example, osseous flap surgery that was recommended about 25 years ago. I’d like to go back to tell my 43-year-old self, “It’s pay this amount now or almost 7 times this amount later.” But who listens to anything when you’re young… (she says, hoping that there are a lot of young people on this site who will set her straight).

  14. Can Dr. Gregor cover remineralizing teeth enamel? My front teeth are somewhat clear at the tips and am wondering what can be done to give the teeth all the nutrition they need to be back at 100%. Was hoping for information other than typical acid erosion dialogue I get from the dentist…. I am WFPB.

      1. STEVEN, Have you received my request to share my info. With Dr. Greger. I have not received a reply from my note concerning correcting your mistake.

        If nothing else, please send me a route by which I can give Dr. Greger the opportunity to receive this new dental science.
        Larry Burnett DDS

    1. I agree that a video on dental enamel remineralization could be a tremendous help for those who suffer from tooth decay and the high costs of repair. I offer the following evidence based reasons for the need for Dr. Greger to consider bringing this new dental information fo our attention.
      1. The most important dental discovery over the past 100 years is remineralization.
      2. We now know that tooth decay is a process of chronic loss of minerals from the outer enamel layer of the tooth as a result from local acid conditions produced by overgrowth of acid producing microorganisms.

      2. We now know that the process of demineralization and remineralization is a constant process that goes both ways just like in the bones of our bodies. The word carries comes from the process of demineralization of our bones.

      3. We now have discovered how to influence the demineralization/remineralization cycle toward more remineralization and less demineralization. This means that early decay when first discovered can be remineralized by simple lifestyle changes and TOPICAL fluoride application. The result is disappearance of the early decay with replacement of enamel which I s stronger than the original.
      4. The early decay must be discovered and reversed before the decay advances to a hole in the outer enamel (an actual cavity). This means The early decay should be diagnosed and treated non-surgically starting when the first teeth begin erupting into the mouth. (Age 1 year). But the treatment still works on early decay(before cavitation) of mature teeth.
      5. Like most medical discoveries there has been a long delay before the profession recognizes and implements the newly discovered science. This information was proven and recognized at the turn of the century around the year 2000.

      6. The knowledgeable dentist and hygienist now is faced with the choice of treatment of early decay. Either teach the patient how to remineralize the lesion or drill and fill the defect. Unfortunately most dentists are much like the proverbial carpenter whose only tool is a hammer. To him every problem looks like a nail. The Dentist’s main tool is a drill resulting in … The fact is that once that first filling is placed, the result is a lifetime of breakdown

      7. The fact that this “cure” for tooth decay is almost unrecognized is similar to the problem of the medical problem wherein the profession doesn’t know or understand nutrition being the cure for our chronic diseases. That is a combination of financial incentives and education of the profession.

      The “cure” has been discovered. Dr. Greger could now bring this discovery to the public. The randomized clinical trials proving this are abundant and can be easily accessed by Dr. Greger and his staff.

      In short, early tooth decay is a medical problem with medical solutions. The elimination of early decay should be shifted to the pediatric medical clinics for optimal elimination of childhood decay. The patient will then grow up with the knowledge of eliminating decay in the permanent teeth.

      I have been studying, advocating, teaching and this for about 20 years. I would be honored to volunteer my help for Dr. Greger in preparing this new information for publication.

      Larry Burnett, DDS

  15. I attended your lecture in St. Louis,MO on October 4th.
    I’ve been following a plant based diet for 3 months now. In the past 5 weeks I’ve had 2 outbreaks with cold sores on my lower lip. My husband did some research and studies indicated that some vegans react to nuts in their diet. It was recommended to take 500 mg. of L Lysine twice a day. What are your thoughts? Thank you for any advise you may have as I feel wonderful, have lost 13 pounds and hope to lower my cholesterol which was at 155. I am 64 years old.

  16. Do you know anything about a tooth powder by primal life organically which is made with different types of clay? The founder claims that the product will remineralize your enamel. Your thoughts? Is there any scientific evidence of this that you know of?

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