Is CAPB in SLS-Free Toothpaste Any Better?

Is CAPB in SLS-Free Toothpaste Any Better?
4.94 (98.79%) 33 votes

For those with recurrent canker sores, is it better to use a toothpaste with SLS, CAPB, or no foaming agents at all?

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Sodium lauryl sulfate had already been “used as a foaming agent” in toothpastes for more than a half-century by the time this study was published, which showed tissue damage in most of those who had it smeared on their gums—but most of just ten people. The same with the study that showed a dramatic decrease in the number of canker sores when switching to an SLS-free toothpaste—just ten people. But, that’s all we had, until 1999, when a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was published: SLS versus non-SLS toothpaste in not just ten people, but 47 people with recurrent canker sores; looking at the number of days of suffering, total pain, number of ulcers, how long they lasted, how big they were. And, “no significant” differences were noted. It didn’t seem to matter whether the toothpaste had sodium lauryl sulfate or not.

But, what about the study showing the 70% decrease? Well, maybe it’s because those cases were worse. And so, the type of toothpaste only matters if you have really bad canker sores. And, that’s where the science ended, until 13 years later, when Korean researchers picked up the torch.

We had studies showing SLS-free toothpaste helps; we had other studies that found no benefit, leading “to considerable controversy.” And so, they launched the biggest study to date—90 subjects, and, same number of ulcers and ulcer episodes. But, the duration they lasted for, and average pain score was significantly less when they were using the SLS-free toothpaste. So, switching to an SLS-free toothpaste may “not reduce the number of” canker sores you get, but, it may allow them to heal faster, and make them less painful.

So, yeah, sodium lauryl sulfate can create an “impression of cleanliness,…a mouthful of foam ‘just feels cleaner.'” But, there may be a downside: potentially “reduc[ing] the protective barrier of [our mouth lining],…probably due to [the] rupture of the [bonds that hold our cells together], sometimes causing “sloughing, ulcerations, and inflammation,” drying out “the protective mucous layer lining” our mouth, making us more “vulnerable to irritants.”

But, wait; how do they explain that their study found a problem, but the last study didn’t? They suggest it could be a race issue. What? Well, they explain Koreans tend to love their spicy food; and so, maybe that makes a difference. Regardless, if you get canker sores, you may want to give an SLS-free toothpaste a try to see if it makes any difference in your case.

But, non-SLS toothpaste may just have other detergents, most commonly cocamidopropyl betaine. Is that any better? Well, what these Swiss researchers did was to take nine toothpastes—Colgate, Crest, Oral-B, Sensodyne, etc., and drip them on some human gum cells taken fresh from people who had their wisdom teeth extracted, and then use “live-dead cell staining.” Basically, you stain all the cells green, and then, you add a red dye that covers up the green—but only in dead cells, because the live cells actively pump out the red dye. So then, live cells stay green, but dead cells turn red.

Let’s see if you can guess if Colgate has SLS in it. All red, all dead. What about Crest? Mostly red, mostly dead. But, guess if Sensodyne has SLS in it. All green, all alive. And indeed, it has the SLS-free detergent CAPB instead. What about Oral-B? SLS or no? Versus this one, this one, or this one? It seems pretty clear which is which.

But that’s in a petri dish. Does that translate out into actual tissue damage in people? A double-blind crossover study: SLS-containing toothpastes versus CAPB-containing toothpastes. Forty-two desquamative reactions, meaning tissue-peeling reactions, after four days of four minutes a day of the SLS toothpaste on their gums, compared to just three with the alternate detergent. And, no such reactions at all using the exact same toothpaste, but with just no detergents at all; neither SLS nor CAPB. How does this translate out into canker sore frequency?

How about a randomized, double-blind, crossover study “to investigate the effect of toothpastes containing” SLS versus CAPB, versus no detergent at all? They found “significantly higher frequency of [canker sores]” when patients brushed with an SLS-containing toothpaste than with a non-SLS toothpaste.  So, they suggest that “SLS-free toothpastes…be recommended for patients with recurrent [canker sores].” But, they found more than just that.

Yes, SLS was the worst, but the non-foaming toothpaste—the detergent-free toothpaste—beat them both out. The non-foaming toothpaste “caused significantly fewer…ulcers” than the non-SLS alternative detergent, CAPB, which in turn “caused significantly fewer…ulcers” than the SLS toothpaste. So, the vast majority of recurring canker sore patients would benefit from switching from a regular toothpaste to a non-foaming toothpaste, but most would benefit just staying away from the SLS, regardless.

But, if your toothpaste doesn’t have sodium lauryl sulfate, will it work as well? I’m not just talking about “the impression of cleanliness,” but actual like plaque and gingivitis. Yeah, SLS may kill our cells, but it also kills bacteria cells; so, might SLS-free toothpaste not work as well? We didn’t know, until now.

And, it turns out the SLS-free toothpaste worked just as well, with regard to reducing gingivitis and plaque, and so can be “recommended for [those with] recurrent [canker sores],” since sodium lauryl sulfate may make things worse by disintegrating the protective mucous layer, and eventually penetrating into the deeper layers of the lining of our mouth, where “living tissue [function] may be compromised.”

However, folks did miss the foaminess. Though there is one additional benefit to choosing SLS-free toothpaste: SLS also penetrates into our tongue, and interferes with the inner mechanisms of our taste cells. Sodium lauryl sulfate is what’s responsible for the “orange juice effect,” that weird taste you get from citrus right after you brush. SLS is evidently what’s mucking with your taste cells.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Oliviu Stoian from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Sodium lauryl sulfate had already been “used as a foaming agent” in toothpastes for more than a half-century by the time this study was published, which showed tissue damage in most of those who had it smeared on their gums—but most of just ten people. The same with the study that showed a dramatic decrease in the number of canker sores when switching to an SLS-free toothpaste—just ten people. But, that’s all we had, until 1999, when a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was published: SLS versus non-SLS toothpaste in not just ten people, but 47 people with recurrent canker sores; looking at the number of days of suffering, total pain, number of ulcers, how long they lasted, how big they were. And, “no significant” differences were noted. It didn’t seem to matter whether the toothpaste had sodium lauryl sulfate or not.

But, what about the study showing the 70% decrease? Well, maybe it’s because those cases were worse. And so, the type of toothpaste only matters if you have really bad canker sores. And, that’s where the science ended, until 13 years later, when Korean researchers picked up the torch.

We had studies showing SLS-free toothpaste helps; we had other studies that found no benefit, leading “to considerable controversy.” And so, they launched the biggest study to date—90 subjects, and, same number of ulcers and ulcer episodes. But, the duration they lasted for, and average pain score was significantly less when they were using the SLS-free toothpaste. So, switching to an SLS-free toothpaste may “not reduce the number of” canker sores you get, but, it may allow them to heal faster, and make them less painful.

So, yeah, sodium lauryl sulfate can create an “impression of cleanliness,…a mouthful of foam ‘just feels cleaner.'” But, there may be a downside: potentially “reduc[ing] the protective barrier of [our mouth lining],…probably due to [the] rupture of the [bonds that hold our cells together], sometimes causing “sloughing, ulcerations, and inflammation,” drying out “the protective mucous layer lining” our mouth, making us more “vulnerable to irritants.”

But, wait; how do they explain that their study found a problem, but the last study didn’t? They suggest it could be a race issue. What? Well, they explain Koreans tend to love their spicy food; and so, maybe that makes a difference. Regardless, if you get canker sores, you may want to give an SLS-free toothpaste a try to see if it makes any difference in your case.

But, non-SLS toothpaste may just have other detergents, most commonly cocamidopropyl betaine. Is that any better? Well, what these Swiss researchers did was to take nine toothpastes—Colgate, Crest, Oral-B, Sensodyne, etc., and drip them on some human gum cells taken fresh from people who had their wisdom teeth extracted, and then use “live-dead cell staining.” Basically, you stain all the cells green, and then, you add a red dye that covers up the green—but only in dead cells, because the live cells actively pump out the red dye. So then, live cells stay green, but dead cells turn red.

Let’s see if you can guess if Colgate has SLS in it. All red, all dead. What about Crest? Mostly red, mostly dead. But, guess if Sensodyne has SLS in it. All green, all alive. And indeed, it has the SLS-free detergent CAPB instead. What about Oral-B? SLS or no? Versus this one, this one, or this one? It seems pretty clear which is which.

But that’s in a petri dish. Does that translate out into actual tissue damage in people? A double-blind crossover study: SLS-containing toothpastes versus CAPB-containing toothpastes. Forty-two desquamative reactions, meaning tissue-peeling reactions, after four days of four minutes a day of the SLS toothpaste on their gums, compared to just three with the alternate detergent. And, no such reactions at all using the exact same toothpaste, but with just no detergents at all; neither SLS nor CAPB. How does this translate out into canker sore frequency?

How about a randomized, double-blind, crossover study “to investigate the effect of toothpastes containing” SLS versus CAPB, versus no detergent at all? They found “significantly higher frequency of [canker sores]” when patients brushed with an SLS-containing toothpaste than with a non-SLS toothpaste.  So, they suggest that “SLS-free toothpastes…be recommended for patients with recurrent [canker sores].” But, they found more than just that.

Yes, SLS was the worst, but the non-foaming toothpaste—the detergent-free toothpaste—beat them both out. The non-foaming toothpaste “caused significantly fewer…ulcers” than the non-SLS alternative detergent, CAPB, which in turn “caused significantly fewer…ulcers” than the SLS toothpaste. So, the vast majority of recurring canker sore patients would benefit from switching from a regular toothpaste to a non-foaming toothpaste, but most would benefit just staying away from the SLS, regardless.

But, if your toothpaste doesn’t have sodium lauryl sulfate, will it work as well? I’m not just talking about “the impression of cleanliness,” but actual like plaque and gingivitis. Yeah, SLS may kill our cells, but it also kills bacteria cells; so, might SLS-free toothpaste not work as well? We didn’t know, until now.

And, it turns out the SLS-free toothpaste worked just as well, with regard to reducing gingivitis and plaque, and so can be “recommended for [those with] recurrent [canker sores],” since sodium lauryl sulfate may make things worse by disintegrating the protective mucous layer, and eventually penetrating into the deeper layers of the lining of our mouth, where “living tissue [function] may be compromised.”

However, folks did miss the foaminess. Though there is one additional benefit to choosing SLS-free toothpaste: SLS also penetrates into our tongue, and interferes with the inner mechanisms of our taste cells. Sodium lauryl sulfate is what’s responsible for the “orange juice effect,” that weird taste you get from citrus right after you brush. SLS is evidently what’s mucking with your taste cells.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Icons created by Oliviu Stoian from The Noun Project.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Sodium lauryl sulfate? Wasn’t that part of some internet hoax? Yes—I covered the background in my last video: Is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate Safe?

For more tips on oral health, see:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

73 responses to “Is CAPB in SLS-Free Toothpaste Any Better?

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  1. Unrelated but curious……Dr. Gregor, in the past four weeks since you published your
    arsenic videos, how many servings of rice have you had, and how much, roughly, is
    a serving size for you? Thanks for any insight. I’ve cut back by at least 90%.




    3
    1. Hey MP88, thanks for writing! As a Moderator, Dr. G asks us to help answer questions…but that doesn’t mean he shares his daily menu with us! I can GUESS though that he in all likelihood eats a wide variety of grains and starches, including quinoa, barley, macaroni, rices, potatoes, sweet potatoes…




      0
  2. Would the spiciness of the korean food be a good thing for the mouth tissue/rupture of bonds,
    or a bad thing? You mentioned this in the video, but maybe i am missing whether this spiciness
    is considered healthy or not for the tissue in mouth?




    0
    1. Hey mp88, thanks for writing. Dr. G does not speak of a role for spices in causing canker sores; this video is about the detergent (SLS) that is in toothpaste (and shampoo, etc) and how it causes desquamation of skin cells in the mouth. This process involves inflammation, and cooking spices typically have an ANTI-inflammatory effect, which might actually be protective.




      0
  3. hi Ignatius, I got one yesterday to try, and it has cocamidopropyl betaine, the other detergent that Dr Greger talks about in the video.
    https://www.pronamel.us/products/daily-protection-toothpaste/ The ingredient list is way down below the comments under Product Details.
    The best toothpastes I have tried were Himalayan pomegranate, and Xyliwhite https://www.amazon.com/Himalaya-Pomegranate-Flouride-free-Toothpaste/dp/B003B3OKQ8

    https://www.nowfoods.com/beauty-health/xyliwhite-refreshmint-toothpaste-gel
    But I need fluoride. It’s difficult to find sls free but with fluoride. I even used Colgate 5000 (ppm fluoride) for the past year but it is irritating.




    2
      1. Thanks Snakedog for the heads-up! I checked again today and did see a couple of Jason toothpastes sls-free, and with fluoride. They must be popular. This is the first time I have seen them on the store shelves.




        1
    1. I use Eco-Dent Daily Care toothpowder with the first ingredient baking soda. We have a genetic issue and the enamel on my teeth was all cracked. My dentist later commented the cracks were gone. I showed her the bottle and she said, ” no wonder! It has calcium!” My son has the same issue and he had some spots his dentist was watching for decay before he switched. Gone.




      2
      1. I agree, looking at the ingredients in SLS and fluoride free Eco Dent with peroxide, it may well be an effective commercial tooth powder even filling microfissures in enamel as observed by your dentist. But it is quite expensive at about $4/ oz. I use a far less expensive home made powder version. Re fluoride it may harden enamel, but it also inhibits cell mitosis or regeneration by binding to essential cell calcium, less evident in kids with faster cell divisions, but clearly undesirable in slow growing gum tissue in elderly. Bottom line, fluoride in any oral product is best avoided by all of us, even in tap water.




        0
        1. We use such a small amount per brushing that 1 bottle lasts several months. I find it quite cost effective. Homemade is undoubtedly cheaper, but we are very happy with Eco-Dent.




          1
    2. Trader Joe’s sells 2 types of toothpastes, both don’t have SLS but one has fluoride and the other one does not.

      https://www.amazon.com/Trader-Joes-Anticavity-Peppermint-Toothpaste/dp/B008MG5QPI

      I am divided between having fluoride or not, because fluoride is the only chemical that has some benefit, i.e. strengthen the enamel, while the other one is purely for marketing, i.e. SLS for foaming and giving the appearance of cleanliness. Of course we can argue that we can strengthen the enamel through diet but what about if some people needs more help? We get fluoride in our tap water anyway unless we filter it out, but I have not seen anyone around me getting sick because of it.

      For diet that helps teeth and gum then it is the usual vitamins, calcium, minerals, folic acid, etc. I know that probiotics and tea are beneficial but I just learn that coffee is too (black coffee without sugar of course).

      https://nano-b.com/blogs/news/the-30-best-food-for-healthy-teeth-and-gums




      0
  4. After these two latest videos on SLS, I’m not sure what toothpaste I should use.
    Any suggestions please?
    PS
    At the moment I’m using Neem t-paste and it does have SLS.




    2
  5. After watching the last two videos and reading through the comments, I got curious as to what ingredients were in the typical soaps that I’ve been using around the house. I like to use the foaming hand soaps with the push-down button on top that dispenses foam soap because it seems to last longer than the thick liquid ones. I couldn’t believe this one ingredient I found on the bottle:

    Methylchloroisothiazolinone …. I doubt if the soap company even knows what this ingredient does for the soap!

    I’m beginning to think these soap companies hire chemists that are so bored that they have created a contest to see who can come up with a chemical compound with the longest name ;-)




    7
    1. Ver funny, WFPB-Hal. I use a French milled liquid hand & body soap that has all of 7 ingredients, all of which are pronounceable & recognizable. They also have bar soap. It’s not cheap, but I always buy it on sale.




      3
      1. Nancy, could you share the name of the French milled soap? I Googled Methylchloroisothiazolinone and it turned out to be a preservative. Some studies have shown it does cause allergies in a few people. I think I’ll switch my soaps to something more “natural” but don’t really know which brands are the best.




        1
        1. Hal, it’s called A La Maison. It’s 100% vegetable oils, it’s SLS, paraben, & phthalate free. As well as cruelty free & some (if not most) are palm oil free (for sustainability & biodiversity). I like the rosemary mint.




          3
    2. I got curious and checked the shaving foam I use and found that it contains SLS.What is not good for the interior of the cheek and lip could not be good for the exterior of the cheek and lip.




      2
      1. Agree, and your life long habit of wet shaving aka skin scraping removes top skin layers thus aggravating SLS damage, worsened by alcohol in after shave lotions….gradually making smooth skin leather-like and making electric shaving less effective. I have always used electric shavers, now for more than 60 years!




        1
        1. That’s good to know. I use the electric shaver too, just because I am lazy and I don’t want to cut my face by accident sometimes, but not thinking that wet shaving removes the top skin layer.




          0
  6. Since you are discussing toothpastes it seems to be a great time to ask if you have plans to do some videos on fluoride.
    Thanks
    Sue




    4
      1. I’m confused. Didn’t Dr. Greger say that too much fluoride resulted in bone brittleness in his various articles on “green tea” consumption? Too much fluoride being dangerous brings into the question how much IS safe.
        8-16 cups a day of fluoridated water; does it challenge our system?




        0
      2. Dr G’s dismissal of the dangers of fluoridation may have been a bit hasty, given that he seems to have based it on a 1960 appraisal conducted by a bunch of dental students.

        A more recent (2014) analysis suggests that fluoride ingestion may have much less impact on tooth decay than initially thought, and a number of troubling adverse health effects, including dental and skeletal fluorosis, brittle teeth, hypothyroidism, cognitive impairment, and cancer.

        Passionate advocates populate both sides of the issue, but my take is there are better ways to prevent cavities than fluoridation.




        0
  7. I switched to Sensodyne after a year’s worth of pain from “geographic tongue.” But I still get it if I eat vinegar (so good in salad dressings) and lots of spices. By cutting back on the latter, I’m down to just a tiny bit of geographic tongue, so called because it makes the tongue look like it has little islands in it, sort of like a map. I only have a single line and a couple dots now, but I sure like adding chili powder and other spices to bean soups, and Mrs. Dash lemon seasoning to cooked veggies! If it gets bad, an orange or tomato is impossible toe eat but right now I’m fine.




    0
  8. Dr. Greger brought up concerns about killing nitrogen fixing bacteria that pertains to oral hygiene. He mentioned that people who kill those bacteria suffer increased blood pressure because the nitrous oxide precursors are reduced when those bacteria are no longer around to start converting nitrites to other compounds and ulimately to the artery relaxing nitrous oxide. So does SLS or fluoride kill the bacteria too? What about products like Jason’s or Tom’s with less of the “killer” compounds?




    1
  9. Since the previous article by Dr G on SLS, I went to Trader Joe and bought their SLS and chemical free toothpaste, something I tried to use years ago and had to stop because it tastes “bad”, but lo and behold it does not taste bad anymore. It looks like my taste bud have changed since I ate healthy years ago.

    Another harmful product is the antibacterial soap. Not only that it is ineffective, it also causes cancer because of the triclosan.

    I feel sorry for the nurse at my eye doctor when I saw her cleaning the equipment with antibacterial solution after each use by a patient. I don’t know how many times she has to do this everyday.

    https://www.livescience.com/48822-triclosan-exposure-caused-liver-cancer-mice.html

    I look up Trader Joe toothpaste and it does not seem to contain CAPB but its shampoo does. I don’t use shampoo or soap (which come from TJ) to wash very much these days but just use water.

    http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/product.php?prod_id=621990#.WdJtPxO3wW8




    3
  10. Just recently I noticed stringiness coming from the inside of my lips just after brushing! It must be the peeling effect. I’m going to change my toothpaste forthwith!




    1
  11. I have switched my toothpaste as well no more fluoride to Organix South, TheraNeem Naturals, Neem Toothpaste, with Mint.

    It is from India and Neem has many medicinal properties. I really like it.




    1
  12. Hi Dr. Greger,

    Interesting video as always! Thank you for all your wonderful work!

    One important thing to note about CAPD though is that it’s also an allergen for some folks, even though it often surprisingly appears on the ingredient lists of products marked “hypo-allergenic”! This ingredient is on the standard dermatologist allergy patch test (which is how I found out I’m allergic to it) so clearly I’m not the only one with this issue, and it’s not a reasonable alternative to SLS for some of us. People who are having skin or mouth irritation or rashes might want to try avoiding CAPD and all detergents (or getting a patch test of course…)

    Anyway, it’s good to hear that the detergent free toothpaste alternatives are just as effective since that’s what I’m stuck with. Have a great day and keep up the great work :)




    2
  13. The latest videos have been about toothpaste and SLS. While not exactly a nutrition question, are there any studies on tooth fillings, in particular, the long term effects of mercury? What are the alternatives?

    Thanks!




    0
  14. About 35-40 years ago I was plagued fiercely with mouth ulcers. My kindly dentist suggested I use Pepsodent and avoid SLS. It was a lifesaver. Thank you, Dr. Greger, for verifying that it wasn’t just a placebo for me. Although I never really thought it was a placebo. If I used Colgate for a couple of days, an ulcer or two would pop up again!




    0
  15. If you do not eat processed sugar (the cause of most (?) cavities, why brush at all, other than to make your mouth fresher. Then one might just use baking soda. Okay, I like to brush and floss, but I keep it brief and swish the paste between teeth before spitting it out. Somewhere in the transcripts (maybe), Dr. Greger may have pointed out that skulls from the ancient past (before processed sugar) did not have dental carries. Holes in the craniums from blows to the head—several; but no dental cavities.




    0
  16. Why toothpaste uses some of the chemicals that may be harmful:

    – SLS creates the foaming action and an “impression of cleanliness,…a mouthful of foam ‘just feels cleaner.’” (From dr G above)

    http://slsfree.net/sls-free-toothpaste/

    – Fluoride to “strengthen the enamel”

    http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/basics/fluoride/article/why-look-for-fluoride-in-toothpaste-0316

    http://fluoridealert.org/articles/50-reasons/

    – CAPB to create foaming action too but less harmful than SLS.

    http://www.tomsofmaine.com/ingredients/overlay/cocamidopropyl-betaine

    – Triclosan for “antibacterial purpose” but triclosan is a carcinogen that can cause cancer.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/07/well/live/why-your-toothpaste-has-triclosan.html

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3945593/

    Bottom line is that there is no evidence that the above chemicals can bring any kind of benefits, but to the contrary they are very harmful to your health.

    I think it’s all marketing purpose because you cannot really sell a baking soda toothpaste which does not give you a feeling of freshness after you brush your teeth.




    3
  17. I’ve been using SLS-free and fluoride free toothpaste for years and have great teeth health. SLS is the same compound the automotive and aviation industries use in engine degreasers. Why would anyone ever want to put that in their mouths or on their skin?




    1
    1. ty for posting your study Johan Woelber – it’s very interesting. Many people (including myself) who follow Dr Greger ascribe to a whole food plant based eating pattern, with no salt, oil, sugar. i think if I was to limit carbs to under 130 gm, I would starve to death. I have to check on what the carb count of thinly sliced german rye bread is (made from whole rye), but items like this can make the difference in whether a diet is sustainable or not.
      From my own experience, I think there might also be genetic/microbiome/alllergy issues that impact dental health in spite of conscientious hygiene. It’s very frustrating.




      0
    2. Any insight into the carbs they’re taking about in the study. Seems contradictory (reduce carbs and increase fiber). Hard to increase fiber without eating complex carbs




      0
      1. Mike, for healthy people then reducing carb should be a goal and not a must and it all depends on what carb to eat if they have a lot of benefits. You eliminate all simple carbs, no question about it. For complex carb then not all complex carb is desirable. For instance, sweet potato, quinoa, rye, etc. is more desirable than wild rice, oatmeal, etc. which are more desirable than bread and pasta even if they are made of whole wheat. Carb from vegetables do not count and you can eat as much as you want. You use a tool like cronometer to calculate your carb intake and you try to limit below 200 grams per day.

        So the above goal is for people with no health issue. But if I have cancer, I will cut down all of my carb sources, including beneficial carbs, and also fruits because fruit has fructose or sugar.

        There is no nutrients in carb foods that you cannot find in vegetables, and so if you have a health issue then you eliminate all carb and all fruit and substitute with healthy fats. But if you are healthy then you can eat healthy carbs, albeit keeping below 200 grams per day.

        You get the fiber from vegetables whose carb does not count.




        0
  18. What about giving up toohtpase in the first place? It´s completely worthless and full of chemicals that who knows what effect they have in our body. Toothpaste is highly abrassive and doesn’t clean your teeth at all, the brush does the job..A soft bristled brush and regular flossing is all we need, I did this two years ago and I wish I had done it before, my teeth are just fine and my gums are not red and swollen anymore..I ‘ve had gum recession and I wonder ir toothpaste had something to do with it too.




    2
      1. Hm, but Trader Joe’s has Fluoride, on the other hand Blackwood doesn’t.
        If I correctly understood, it’s better that toothpaste doesn’t have Fluoride, or am I on the wrong?




        0
  19. As one of the moderators for NF.org, I did a search on NF.org for information on fluoride and found no videos or blogs addressing the safety of fluorides as a subject. In PubMed, there are many studies of the beneficial effects of fluoride, and an earlier commenter cited this study to confirm this; https://www.oralhealthgroup.com/features/paediatrics-a-review-of-the-antibacterial-effect-of-fluoride/. The concern with fluoride in toothpaste seems to be in too much exposure in children due to the combination of fluoridated water and too much fluoridated toothpaste as this study addresses: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6590578 which concluded; ” Particular concern is warranted for the ingestion of fluoride-containing toothpastes by young children and the inappropriate use of dietary fluoride supplements in communities with sufficient fluoride already present in drinking water” As an adult you can certainly make up your own mind on the antibacterial benefits of fluoride v potential fluoride risks, but at this point there does not seem to be evidence-based research discouraging toothpaste with fluoride, as in the evidence discouraging SLS additives. Hope that helps.




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    1. Thank you Joan.
      Although I have no problem with my teeth or any part in my mouth (knock 3x), which can be a result of many other factors rather to do with the toothpaste, and although I’m trying to buy the good product as possible as I can, more and more as time passes, I’m thinking to switch to an old grandma’s recipe, put some Sodium bicarbonate on to the tooth brush, drop of water and wash my teeth….Any thoughts?




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  20. Sandra,

    there are many, such as: Jason Sea Fresh, Squigle Tooth Builder, Earthpaste Organic Toothpaste, Verve Ultra and Sensodyne Pronamel.

    Thanks for your question,

    Moderator Adam P.




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