The Worst Food for Tooth Decay

The Worst Food for Tooth Decay
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One of the worst breakfast cereals will surprise you.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Nearly a half century ago at a Senate hearing on nutrition, a Dr. Nizel from Tufts suggested that sugary breakfast cereals “should be banned in the best interest for all concerned, particularly children”—perhaps not surprisingly, since he was a professor of dental medicine.

A dozen different foods and beverages were ranked for their “cariogenic potential”—their cavity-causing potential—by implanting electrodes in the mouths of study subjects to measure the amount of acid produced in the plaque between their teeth after eating a variety of different things. And, the two breakfast cereals they tested topped the charts.

If you drink some sugar water, the pH on your teeth plunges within minutes into the acidic danger zone, and stays there for an hour, eating away at your teeth. Caramel is worse. It sticks to your teeth, so stays longer, down deeper in the acid zone. But, check out the breakfast cereals: goes down and stays down, even two hours later.

We’ve known about the cavity-causing “potential of presweetened breakfast cereals” for decades. A dozen such cereals were put to the test to measure the level of tooth-dissolving acid produced by the strain of bacteria that causes cavities. As one might expect, “the [cavity-generating] potential was found to be related directly to the sugar content of each cereal”—though Frosted Mini-Wheats was an exception. Despite having 40 percent less sugar than cereals like Froot Loops or Frosted Flakes, Frosted Mini-Wheats caused the greatest calcium demineralization—ranking second only to the now defunct “Powdered Donutz” in cavity-causing potential. A study of twenty-eight different cereals concluded that “Unquestionably, the sugar concentrations in these twenty-eight cereals are sufficiently high to qualify them as dentally dangerous.”

Wanting to be good corporate citizens, General Mills took their Super Sugar Crisp, which was 44 percent sugar, and reduced the sugar…font size. Then, caring about children’s health so much, they removed sugar altogether…from, the name….

Kellogg’s cares, too. Though Sugar Smacks is, apparently, where “space energy comes from,” it doesn’t sound as wholesome as Honey Smacks; same cereal, healthier name. They did remove sugar from Corn Pops and Frosted Flakes; I mean, well, from the front of the boxes.

And Cookie Crisp? I think the fact that it’s made by a dog food company says it all.

But, General Mills protests: a study they did in which teens were randomized to receive free cereal delivered to their homes—or not—didn’t seem to get any more cavities, proving breakfast cereal is harmless for your teeth. Anyone care to take a guess at the study’s fatal flaw? The kids in the control group were free to just have their parents buy their sugary cereals from the store, and so both the experimental and control groups may have been eating the same cereal, “with the only difference being that the experimental group received its cereal free, and the control group” had to pay for it.

What did the General Mills researchers have to say for themselves? “Dietary controls so rigid as to exclude the ingestion of cereals by children would be difficult, if not impossible.” But then, that’s not a control group!

That’s like this Kellogg’s-funded paper saying yeah, if we didn’t feed kids sugar, then we could virtually eliminate cavities, but “this ideal is impractical.” So, let’s take the middle ground and come up with, oh, Froot Loops with marshmallows. But hey, at least they’re fruit shaped, or at least “fruity shaped.”

Observational studies have also failed to link breakfast cereal consumption with cavity prevalence though, or incidence. This is presumed to be because eating it with milk helps clear food particles from the mouth. Though Frosted Mini-Wheats did lead to the same sugar retention in the saliva ten minutes after intake, with or without milk, the other cereals were cleared out faster. “[S]ugared cereals are often eaten as snacks [by kids, though] without milk.”

And, ten minutes after the ingestion of dry sugary cereals, you’re left with nearly 50 times the sugar residue in your mouth, compared to swishing the sugar down in liquid form. “[I]t is inconceivable,” concluded the researchers, “to contest the fact that frequent between-meal ingestion of [foods like high-sugar cereal] is dentally hazardous. Whether or not meal-time eating of sugared cereals induce [cavities] is not the point…because [kids snack on them] between meals, they have a marked potential for dental danger.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credits: Ajrieger via wikia, Wokandapix via pixabay, and Jason Liebig. Images have been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Nearly a half century ago at a Senate hearing on nutrition, a Dr. Nizel from Tufts suggested that sugary breakfast cereals “should be banned in the best interest for all concerned, particularly children”—perhaps not surprisingly, since he was a professor of dental medicine.

A dozen different foods and beverages were ranked for their “cariogenic potential”—their cavity-causing potential—by implanting electrodes in the mouths of study subjects to measure the amount of acid produced in the plaque between their teeth after eating a variety of different things. And, the two breakfast cereals they tested topped the charts.

If you drink some sugar water, the pH on your teeth plunges within minutes into the acidic danger zone, and stays there for an hour, eating away at your teeth. Caramel is worse. It sticks to your teeth, so stays longer, down deeper in the acid zone. But, check out the breakfast cereals: goes down and stays down, even two hours later.

We’ve known about the cavity-causing “potential of presweetened breakfast cereals” for decades. A dozen such cereals were put to the test to measure the level of tooth-dissolving acid produced by the strain of bacteria that causes cavities. As one might expect, “the [cavity-generating] potential was found to be related directly to the sugar content of each cereal”—though Frosted Mini-Wheats was an exception. Despite having 40 percent less sugar than cereals like Froot Loops or Frosted Flakes, Frosted Mini-Wheats caused the greatest calcium demineralization—ranking second only to the now defunct “Powdered Donutz” in cavity-causing potential. A study of twenty-eight different cereals concluded that “Unquestionably, the sugar concentrations in these twenty-eight cereals are sufficiently high to qualify them as dentally dangerous.”

Wanting to be good corporate citizens, General Mills took their Super Sugar Crisp, which was 44 percent sugar, and reduced the sugar…font size. Then, caring about children’s health so much, they removed sugar altogether…from, the name….

Kellogg’s cares, too. Though Sugar Smacks is, apparently, where “space energy comes from,” it doesn’t sound as wholesome as Honey Smacks; same cereal, healthier name. They did remove sugar from Corn Pops and Frosted Flakes; I mean, well, from the front of the boxes.

And Cookie Crisp? I think the fact that it’s made by a dog food company says it all.

But, General Mills protests: a study they did in which teens were randomized to receive free cereal delivered to their homes—or not—didn’t seem to get any more cavities, proving breakfast cereal is harmless for your teeth. Anyone care to take a guess at the study’s fatal flaw? The kids in the control group were free to just have their parents buy their sugary cereals from the store, and so both the experimental and control groups may have been eating the same cereal, “with the only difference being that the experimental group received its cereal free, and the control group” had to pay for it.

What did the General Mills researchers have to say for themselves? “Dietary controls so rigid as to exclude the ingestion of cereals by children would be difficult, if not impossible.” But then, that’s not a control group!

That’s like this Kellogg’s-funded paper saying yeah, if we didn’t feed kids sugar, then we could virtually eliminate cavities, but “this ideal is impractical.” So, let’s take the middle ground and come up with, oh, Froot Loops with marshmallows. But hey, at least they’re fruit shaped, or at least “fruity shaped.”

Observational studies have also failed to link breakfast cereal consumption with cavity prevalence though, or incidence. This is presumed to be because eating it with milk helps clear food particles from the mouth. Though Frosted Mini-Wheats did lead to the same sugar retention in the saliva ten minutes after intake, with or without milk, the other cereals were cleared out faster. “[S]ugared cereals are often eaten as snacks [by kids, though] without milk.”

And, ten minutes after the ingestion of dry sugary cereals, you’re left with nearly 50 times the sugar residue in your mouth, compared to swishing the sugar down in liquid form. “[I]t is inconceivable,” concluded the researchers, “to contest the fact that frequent between-meal ingestion of [foods like high-sugar cereal] is dentally hazardous. Whether or not meal-time eating of sugared cereals induce [cavities] is not the point…because [kids snack on them] between meals, they have a marked potential for dental danger.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credits: Ajrieger via wikia, Wokandapix via pixabay, and Jason Liebig. Images have been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Which Is a Better Breakfast – Cereal or Oatmeal? Stay tuned for the video coming out in a few weeks. And, check out this older video for how to make A Better Breakfast.

Studies like the one from General Mills are the reason it’s so important to look beyond the headlines, and it’s why I dedicate so much time to pointing out research flaws and red flags. The lesson is: always check the primary source—or, just let me do it for you!

My popular sugar videos are:

Citrus can also have an acidifying effect on teeth, so always rinse after consuming citrus: Plant-Based Diets: Dental Health. When it comes to caring for your teeth, Don’t Use Antiseptic Mouthwash. Instead, watch What’s the Best Mouthwash? for a better option. And Should You Floss Before or After Your Brush?

And, what about toothpaste? See:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and to my audio podcast here (subscribe by clicking on your mobile device’s icon).

61 responses to “The Worst Food for Tooth Decay

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  1. I would be interested to hear about the cariogenic potential of no added sugar Cheerios and Shredded Wheat cereals. I doubt there are studies one way or the other though.

    1. Ryan, I’m a dentist and saw many childrens’ teeth damaged by snacking on cheerios, little orange fish crackers, pretzels, anything made of finely ground flour that can form a paste on the teeth. That’s why popcorn is a great snack for kids and pretzels a terrible one. Sunflower seeds at their ballgames are great; cheese puffs are not. Ritz crackers are a nightmare. the beauty is that we can actually do the research inour own mouths; if the snack is made of flour and/or sufar and leaves a film on the teeth…avoid it! There is something delicious that is a whole food and a better choice… and often cheaper too. Best snacks are always fresh fruit and nuts.

      1. I once joked with a dental hygienist that was going to clean my teeth that “I got ready by eating a bag of oreos on the way here!” She did not find it funny but was upset. I told her it was a gross joke and apologized and then she laughed. Apparently she had been the victim of having to clean a kids teeth and the parents fed the kid cheetos in the waiting room right before they knew the kids were getting their teeth cleaned. To this day I can not eat anything like a cheeto. Thank you mad lady.

      2. I am a dentist also and have a special interest in decay prevention. The video was superb and accurate in every way. But the conclusions drawn from the evidence don’t provide us with this best ideas for prevention.

        It is not just sugar but most refined carbs that let acidogenic microorganisms produce the acid that causes local demineralization. But the demineralization only occurs when the ph is below 5.5. As soon as the drink or food is finished the body is bringing the ph back toward normal. This process usually takes about 30 minutes to an hour if no new acidogenic food is put in the mouth. As the area gets back to neutral the demineralization ceases and remineralization replaces the minerals that were lost during the acid attack. But if during the remineralization time you take another acid enabling snack the remaining bacteria convert this new product into more acid, remineralition ceases and demineralization resumes and eventually a cavity is produced as this frequent snacking persists.

        The proper conclusion is that the problem is not so much which acidogenic product you ingest But is FREQUENCY of ingestion.

        If this is effecting you or your children here is how you stop it. Cease frequency of refined carbohydrate snacks. If that is not the answer for you, then consider putting baking soda on your toothbrush which will immediately neutralize the acid that has formed from the snack by applying immediately after snack ingestion of food or drink by brushing with it.

        Toothbrushing alone is not the answer. The toothbrush is the delivery system to deliver the medicinal cure. The only defense we have is locally delivered fluoride in toothpaste (not through drinking water), and acid neutralization with baking soda which has been working safely for many years.

        So the big takeaway is this. The problem is not so much which harmful product you snack on, but the frequency of snacking which causes the tooth decay to occur. There is no real evidence showing plain brushing and flossing reduces tooth decay. Tooth decay is another lifestyle disease like cardiovascular disease and cancer. That’s why we have no simple medicinal cure.

        Any accurate description of decay risk says frequency of snacking rather than snacking.is a high risk activity.
        Larry. DDS

    2. I think that all of Dr Gregors videos are chock-full of relevant and proven information. I simply wish that he would take some courses in speech therapy, because he is virtually impossible to understand. (I am English mother tongue).
      Better still, pay someone who speaks normally to cover his videos
      Extremely frustrating trying to match his dialogue with the pictorial presentations, but I suppose better than nothing…

      1. Personally, I like his style, especially “let’s put it to the test,” but as an opera singer and professional voiceover artist, I’d be happy to oblige.

      2. I think Dr. G is a great entertainer and because of that many many more people than otherwise become aware of the vital information that he is teaching.

        1. I agree David Walker! I enjoy Dr Greger’s presentation so much – he really has a gift in being able to translate scientific material into funny, inciteful, practical advice. He, himself, is the drawing card for many (if not most!) of us consistently throughout the years. Thank you Dr Greger.

          1. Dr. G’s lack of glossy media polish adds to his credibility, in my opinion. Yes, sometimes he talks too fast or slurs words, but if it becomes a significant problem the transcripts are there. In fact I sometimes skip the video and just read transcript.

      3. Ich bin Deutscher und habe in meinem Beruf als Fluglotse nur Englisch gesprochen. Dr Gregers Art zu sprechen ist unmöglich, er sollte einen Kurs belegen oder jemanden sprechen lassen, der das kann. Sein Buch ist in viele Sprachen übersetzt worden, er hat Wichtiges zu sagen und die Welt will ihn verstehen, aber so klappt das nicht. Die Texte möchte ich verfolgen, aber in seiner Geschwindigkeit geht das auch nicht. Reinhard Knull

      4. I am an English teacher (U.S. English mother tongue). I find him very easy to understand—and very entertaining as well. Maybe it’s because we’re both from the east coast. Maybe it’s because I also have a science background. Granted he has trouble with the word “similarly,” but that is an acceptable flaw (and even endearing) considering he has changed my life for the better with his videos.

    1. Julot,

      “…although raisins are like 70% pure sugar, they caused less acid to be produced; so, although they’re sweet, they don’t appear to adhere to our teeth. But don’t raisins stick to your teeth? 21 foods were put to the test, and there was actually no relationship between food retention and how sticky the foods appeared to be. Bits of cookies, crackers, and potato chips actually stuck to the teeth the longest, whereas things you’d think would stick, like caramel and raisins, disappeared within minutes, though fresh fruit like apples and bananas disappeared from the mouth almost immediately.

      Phytonutrients in grapes appear to actually prevent the adherence of bacteria and prevent plaque formation…” (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-raisins-cause-cavities/) The whole video is worth watching.

      You can do a search of this site “dried fruit cavities” to find this and other related videos.

      1. My son’s dentist observed my son had deep pits in his teeth…just a natural variation in tooth morphology. She asked if he ate raisins, dried fruit and idenitified that as the likely cause of his cavities, as the raisins got stuck in them. So for some, raisins can definitely cause problems.

        1. Mims,

          Your dentist’s comments remind me about the theory — passed off as “fact” — as to what causes or exacerbated diverticulitis: nuts, seeds, or pieces of corn or popcorn stuck in those diverticula, or pockets. And patients were told to avoid these kinds of foods. Why? Because these were seen in diverticular pouches, and so correlation was assumed to be causation. But, as Dr. Greger has pointed out, in fact, patients who eat a lot of whole foods have less diverticulitis: “According to a landmark new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, not only fiction, but those with diverticulosis eating nuts and popcorn had lower rates of inflammation.” (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/diverticulosis-nuts/)

          So your dentist may not be correct. And the other foods mentioned, “Bits of cookies, crackers, and potato chips” may lodge in your son’s deep pits and cause even worse problems. I wonder what the evidence was that the dried fruit was a problem, but that other foods weren’t?

      2. Yeah i know this video but what about very sticky dried fruits like some very dry dates and dry figs/bananas seems to be extremely sticky and stay between the teeth, we can actually feel it quickly after eating it, every dehydrated foods rich in carbs is terrible for teeth because sticky so it makes sense, water rich foods doesnt leave residues in the mouth that saliva cant clean.

  2. I would love Dr. Greger to do a segment commenting on the idea that vegans cannot
    have good dental health. I’ve been a vegan for 35 years (vegetarian when I’m not at home),
    and hear warnings that the phytic acid in legumes and nuts (a large part of my diet) blocks
    the absorption of nutrients necessary for dental health.
    I now soak my nuts overnight and then dry them in an oven set at 150 degrees. Advice,
    please?

    1. I think the primary reason some vegans have a reputation for poor dental health is because some eat too many acidic fruits and beverages, which erode enamel. Yes, it would be interesting to hear from Dr. Greger about phytates and dental health. We do know that the phytates in beans, grains and nuts are definitely protective against cancer.
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/phytates-for-the-treatment-of-cancer/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/phytates-for-rehabilitating-cancer-cells/
      https://nutritionfacts.org/video/phytates-for-the-prevention-of-cancer/

    2. Hibiscus tea is very healthy for your entire body. However, it is highly recommended that you drink a glass of water immediately afterwards as the tea will strip the enamel off your teeth over time, probably quicker than sugary cereal. Protecting Teeth from Hibiscus Tea
      Michael Greger M.D. FACLM October 13th, 2014 Volume 21 Brushing your teeth after eating certain foods would go along way to reducing these problems for those who choose to ignore the Doctor’s priority advice.

      1. Agreed, and you should drink hibiscus tea through a straw. My experience is that hibiscus drastically affects the sensitivity of teeth. It seems much worse for teeth than sugar.

      1. Thank you!

        (How much $ does Gundry spend on advertising?
        Every time I try to play a youtube video on topics unrelated to health–like opera–there he is!)

    3. It appears you’ve heard some misinformation. I’d encourage you to continue eating your healthy diet and be concerned about sugar as other commenters have advised.Please watch the NFO videos as recommended. As far as phytic acid here is an article you may find reassuring based on research on starches
      Effects of Starch on Oral Health: Systematic Review to Inform WHO Guideline.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30074866/
      “ no association between total starch intake and caries risk but that RDS (rapidly digested starches) intake may significantly increase caries risk…Very low-quality data relating to periodontitis suggested a protective effect of whole grain starches (SDS). The best available evidence suggests that only RDS adversely affects oral health.”
      This next article provides an explanation why people initially were wary about phytic acid and caries, and why that concern seems less worrisome now. I did indeed check to see what research has been done looking at the potential negative dental consequences of grains and cavities and no studies have been done in the last several decades, as author indicated. Hope this is helpful

      Can Cavities Be Healed with Diet?
      https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-cavities-be-healed-with-diet/ “But you don’t need to cut out grains, nuts, and beans in order to remineralize your teeth…”.
      That idea dates back to some research done in the 20s and 30s,

      ,

  3. Great vid (however not so surprised sugary cereals are the worst breakfast ;) )

    I have stunned my dentist when I for the first time reversed a cavity since becoming HFPB!

      1. I think Martin probably meant to type WFPB, ie whole food, plant-based diet which is what Dr Greger espouses in his videos, articles and books.

  4. The graphs are what will stick with me the most from this video.

    A powerful visual.

    Cereal being that much worse than caramel seems very counter-intuitive.

    Wonder why the Frosted Mini-Wheats is in its own category?

    Did they have a hypothesis about what made it so different?

    That would have been the cereal my family moved to when we were trying to be better.

  5. I have always said that food manufacturers are worse than drug dealers. Drug dealers do not pretend their products are healthful but I wonder how much more dangerous they are than cereals and other refined “food” products in the long run. Certainly their drugs are not as addictive cereals and other mass produced foods considering the obesity rate is around 40%, much higher than drug addiction. Not that I am condoning all drugs either, but the countries with the lowest addiction rates have legalized drugs, Portugal is number one, but their obesity rates and cavities are far greater than drug addiction despite all drugs being readily available.

  6. Not going to lie… Frosted shredded wheat was my favorite cereal as a kid. Haven’t had it in over 20 years. But boy did I love it back in the day.

  7. I’ll never forget this TV jingle from when I was a kid in the 60’s:

    “Kellogg’s Sugar Corn Pops. Sugar Pops are tops.
    Oh the Pops are sweeter and the taste is new. They’re shot with sugar through and through.”

  8. As a child, my favorite breakfast cereal was Kellogg’s Sugar Corn Pops, the ideal (I believed) in good eating– clearly, I was unaware of any hazard. After all, with such a sweet taste, what could go wrong?

    Yet, after decades of bad news about sugar, today’s parents still shop the grocery aisles as if nothing has changed. They run a gauntlet of child-abusive appeals to children’s fascination with colors, shapes, promises of “prizes” and, yes, loads of sugar.

    The case can be made for sugar as a genuine toxin, and as Dr. Greger points out, even congressmen knew of the hazard. But vote out sugared cereals from the American diet? (cue national anthem) That’s simply beyond the realm of possibility.

    1. LOL, yes, Sugar Pops was a fav, with Sugar Crisp and Alphabits next. “Can’t get enough of that Sugar Crisp! Sugar Crisp! Sugar Crisp!” Shreddies was health food by comparison. It’s a wonder we survived.

        1. Laughing, we would get the variety package of little boxes. I think I liked them all.

          Cartoons is where they pumped to kids.

          They really are the ones who get kids wanting them.

          Even thinking back on every junk food, the ads and jingles and packaging is what worked and the companies selling it know exactly what works to over-stimulations child’s mind.

          Their current campaign of adding unicorns to Lucky Charms is brilliant marketing toward young girls.

          Parents have to raise their kids with DVRs and limited exposure to advertising to break the cycle off our country.

          It is worse than ever because kids are raised on every overstimulating thing there is and their brains want more.

          Dark chocolate breaks chocolate overstimulation.

          Dates are sweet like candy, but it is easy to eat just one.

          I feel sorry for the people who are starting now. My coworker almost threw up today because his daughters college loans changed and even with both he and his wife working he might not be able to afford to have her finish. That is happening everywhere and kids are trying to comfort their own brains out of fear of the future.

          I didn’t have that at the same level.

      1. And we just HAD to put even more granulated sugar on our already sugary cereal until the bottom had a layer of sugar sand. Wow. And yuck.

  9. We try to generally avoid sugar. Now my family loves to eat medjool dates stuffed with sunflower seed butter. Would love to know the effects of this sticky but natural sweet treat.

    1. It’s good that your family has found a food solution that is consistent with your nutrition goals AND sustainable! (Dropping the other shoe) Be wary however that “natural” does not mean low sugar – all dates are over 70% sugar – here’s one external nutrition list that I found: https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/nutrition-medjool-dates-5371.html. I became aware of the date/sugar issue when I mistakenly switched, thinking it was relatively low calorie, which it is not.

      Dr. Greger has a video on the subject: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/are-dates-good-for-you/ . He cites one study on the effects of date consumption done by Israeli scientists.
      Usually when Dr. G highlights a study in this way he will critique the methodology and also look for possible conflict of interest, in this case, disappointingly, he did neither. A quick online check revealed that Israel produces only about 40 tons of the total 8 million tons of dates annually, which would hopefully mean the chances of conflict of interest are low. I’m not qualified to even *find* the study let alone comment on methodology

      1. M,

        That was a video, which I hadn’t seen before.

        You are right that he usually does mention conflicts of interest.

        It was also lacking some of the detail that my favorite videos have.

        However, I think the fact that they were measuring blood sugar and triglycerides makes conflicts of interests less important, unless they were lying about the numbers.

        If they were saying that dates are better than candy bars, then it would have been a sign of conflict of interest.

        The whole “ideal food” part didn’t build enough evidence for me. Ideal? Like blueberries and broccoli and kale and walnuts and garlic and turmeric, etc? It is one of the superfoods and does it retain that benefit as a syrup?

        He didn’t post the charts and that makes it harder to evaluate.

        When I started WFPB, I ate one date per day and it prevented any sweet tooth.

        Dr Greger, if you hadn’t limited yourself to 12, would dates be added to your daily list or is it more like carrots and tomatoes?

        Also, it sounds like they were looking at dates versus date sugar or date syrup.

    2. Rae, Dr. Greger talks about dates quite a bit and reccomends dates or date sugar (which is just dried whole dates) as a sweetener. He himself eats dates (was mentioned in one of his live Q&A’s).

      Dates are a whole fruit, sugar from fruit is entirely different than refined sugars. There’s lots of stuff on this site which shows that, but in particular I would suggest watching his video “How Much Fruit Is Too Much?” And search the site for “dates” for videos specific to them.

      Dr. Greger has also reccomended more calorie-dense foods for kids on plant based diets (dried fruit was specifically mentioned) because they don’t have the stomach capacity for huge amounts of raw veggies and such. Under that advice, dates and sunflower butter would be a great snack for kids specifically.

  10. Ok, I don’t care how addicted to sugary crap anyone is, marshmallows in fruit loops is just disgusting… even for a bad idea, that was a horrible idea. Gross.

    1. Laughing, i didn’t know that Fruit Loops had tried to go head-to-head against Lucky Charms.

      I stopped eating breakfast during high school or college and never went back to cereal all that often and never to the kid’s cereals.

  11. I have been talking about my gadget and I just had the same thing happen which happened after I used it back when I got it.

    Immediate almost miraculous results and then at the end of a week or so, it went from heavenly to over-stimulating to overstimuling in a negative way where I had to shut it off, but I still slept like a baby last night after a short use of it. It is almost like my body is saying that I am charged up enough by it and that I can stop soon.

    I had to turn the power down to 1 to use it at all last night.

    This is what happened when I used it on my ankle, back, shoulder and when I used it on my Bangalore nerve to change my emotional attachment to food, and both times, I used it for a week, then, I had to stop, but the I never had pain again at the injury site or with my rotator cuff and I really did change my emotional response to foods and this time I really did sleep at night for the first time in a decade.

    I won’t be talking about it anymore but I wanted to say the negative

    If I go back to insomnia, I will let you know, but if sleeping sticks after a week of using it, I will use it for a week at a time when something comes up. My brain feels improved so I am contemplating whether to do another week of a shorter length of time and less power, but I still love the device. It has changed my life a few times and I don’t think I would have succeeded at WFPB without it because of how many food aversions I had.

    I just don’t want to over-represent it. This is the 3rd or 4rh time I used it for a week then could feel my own blood circulation increase so much that I no longer ever have cold fingers. I don’t have to wear gloves anymore in the Winter, but I can’t keep using it for long periods of time.

    1. Today, I found which nerve to stimulate in case I have sleep apnea, so I am going back to the drawing board with my gadget.

      I am switching from gamma to theta or delta this weekend and leaving it on the lowest setting.

      I watched videos on what happens to the brain while I sleep and sleep seems to be my best strategy and I read testimonials of people who were healed from sleep apnea using PEMF.

      I haven’t had a sleep study, I just had a man talking about it today and I am going to heal my brain.

      I feel like I have made the food choices and now I am solving for sleep.

      By Christmas, I am going to have a new brain. I really believe it.

      1. I just watched a documentary on Hedy Lamarr and cried my eyes out that the navy didn’t recognize her patent and used it and never compensated her.

        She invented something which changed the world and if someone had listened she could have done so much more.

        I fell in love with WFPB for the same reason I fell in love with the Micropulse ICES.

        There is such beauty in how they work and in what they can do.

        Hedy Lamarr was able to accomplish that type of invention, plus raised hundreds of millions in wars bonds.

        God only knows how many lives were saved by that money and that invention.

        I might cry again that people don’t know how to love people once they judge them.

    1. I’ve pondered your question and am sorry to say that, as it stands, I cannot figure out what you are talking about. Perhaps if you could be a bit more specific about the part of “this video” that you mean? Comparing the entire video to eating a banana makes no sense to me! Are you maybe asking how much bananas promote tooth decay?

      1. Dr. λ, Creator of Variables, Binder of Variables, Applicator of Terms, Checker of Types, β-Reducer of β-Redexes Dr. λ, Creator of Variables, Binder of Variables, Applicator of Terms, Checker of Types, β-Reducer of β-Redexes says:

        His question as it is asked is nonsensical. However I suspect that he had the same question as me in his mind which is:
        Can you explain the difference in effect on dental health between the food mentioned in this video and fruits (e.g. bananas)?

        Although I wonder about the short term effect that eating fruit has on dental health, I think that fruit is good for one’s dental health in he long term. Many of the fruits are one of the few things that can make the body more alkaline. This in turn makes the saliva more alkaline which enables the body to neutralize the acid in the mouth that would otherwise cause cavities.

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