The Risks of Oil Pulling

The Risks of Oil Pulling
4.22 (84.38%) 32 votes

Oil pulling may help with tooth sensitivity, but the risk of inducing lipoid pneumonia outweighs the benefits.

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Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

So far, we learned that oil pulling may be no more effective than swishing with water for plaque and gingivitis, doesn’t whiten your teeth, and may even make dental erosion worse.

What about oil pulling as a treatment for tooth sensitivity? About a quarter of people have sensitive teeth—like experiencing aching sensations when drinking ice water. So, researchers split people up into three groups: oil pulling vs. a desensitizing toothpaste vs. placebo (just rinsing with salt water), and then they blasted people’s teeth with cold air. The placebo didn’t help much; the before-and-after sensitivity scores were the same for nine out of the ten in the placebo group. But, the desensitizing toothpaste seemed to help in most of the patients, and so did the oil pulling. Okay, so, there is some benefit to oil pulling. If you have sensitive teeth, why not give it a try? Unless, of course, there’s some downside—some risks associated with oil pulling.

Typically, the only concerns you see expressed are for clogging your sink drain or something. But, the reason it’s warned against in young children is fear of “aspiration”—that you might accidentally choke on it, and some oil may go down the wrong pipe into your lungs. And, this could potentially happen at any age. But, is that just a theoretical concern? No, there are cases of “lipoid pneumonia [attributed to] oil pulling”—which is when you get an oily substance stuck down in your lungs.

First described back in 1925, when it was customary to use like mentholated Vaseline in the nostrils of kids—until they died of pneumonia. And, on autopsy, areas of their lungs were clogged with oily fluid. Glad we don’t use mentholated Vaseline any more. But we do—that’s what Vicks VapoRub® is. And, if you stick it in your nostrils, you can end up filling up part of your lung with it. That’s why you should never put Vaseline in your nose before bedtime; it “lique[fies] at body temperature,” and creeps down into your lungs as you sleep. And so, people “need to be aware.” I did my part by posting a video about it ages ago, but it’s not just Vaseline—anything oily or greasy can do it. You can give your kid pneumonia with “intranasal butter application”—evidently a folk remedy for a stuffy nose, which can end you up with a stuffy lung.

Same thing with olive oil. Or, this poor woman, who thought it was a good idea to put baby oil in her nose, because her nostrils were dry. Not a good idea. Less common causes include inhaling too much “vaporized” candle wax, because you “spen[d] most of [your] time in a shrine [surrounded by] burning candles.” Lipoid pneumonia isn’t nicknamed “fire-eater’s lung” for nothing, as performers place themselves at risk for aspirating that tiki torch oil in their act.

A thankfully really uncommon cause is self-injection with oil. Why would anyone do that? “[T]o increase the size of [their] genitals,” of course—until they accidentally hit a vein, and squirt oil into their bloodstream.

But, this is what concerns me more. Cases like this poor woman: four admissions to the hospital with pneumonia within just six months. During her fourth admission, her doctors “meticulously inquired about every possible cause of her recurrent pneumonia, and she revealed that she had [started] oil pulling 2 weeks [before] her first admission.” And then, when she was discharged from the hospital, she did it even more to try to “detoxify” from all the drugs they had given her, which led to three more hospital admissions. They told her to stop the oil pulling. And, no more pneumonia.

That’s one of the reasons the American Dental Association recommends against the practice. In fact, remember that tooth-whitening experiment? There’s a reason they used extracted teeth, instead of just having people do it. They didn’t think it would be ethical “to conduct a human trial” of oil pulling “with the knowledge that there was a chance of inducing lipoid pneumonia in study volunteers.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

So far, we learned that oil pulling may be no more effective than swishing with water for plaque and gingivitis, doesn’t whiten your teeth, and may even make dental erosion worse.

What about oil pulling as a treatment for tooth sensitivity? About a quarter of people have sensitive teeth—like experiencing aching sensations when drinking ice water. So, researchers split people up into three groups: oil pulling vs. a desensitizing toothpaste vs. placebo (just rinsing with salt water), and then they blasted people’s teeth with cold air. The placebo didn’t help much; the before-and-after sensitivity scores were the same for nine out of the ten in the placebo group. But, the desensitizing toothpaste seemed to help in most of the patients, and so did the oil pulling. Okay, so, there is some benefit to oil pulling. If you have sensitive teeth, why not give it a try? Unless, of course, there’s some downside—some risks associated with oil pulling.

Typically, the only concerns you see expressed are for clogging your sink drain or something. But, the reason it’s warned against in young children is fear of “aspiration”—that you might accidentally choke on it, and some oil may go down the wrong pipe into your lungs. And, this could potentially happen at any age. But, is that just a theoretical concern? No, there are cases of “lipoid pneumonia [attributed to] oil pulling”—which is when you get an oily substance stuck down in your lungs.

First described back in 1925, when it was customary to use like mentholated Vaseline in the nostrils of kids—until they died of pneumonia. And, on autopsy, areas of their lungs were clogged with oily fluid. Glad we don’t use mentholated Vaseline any more. But we do—that’s what Vicks VapoRub® is. And, if you stick it in your nostrils, you can end up filling up part of your lung with it. That’s why you should never put Vaseline in your nose before bedtime; it “lique[fies] at body temperature,” and creeps down into your lungs as you sleep. And so, people “need to be aware.” I did my part by posting a video about it ages ago, but it’s not just Vaseline—anything oily or greasy can do it. You can give your kid pneumonia with “intranasal butter application”—evidently a folk remedy for a stuffy nose, which can end you up with a stuffy lung.

Same thing with olive oil. Or, this poor woman, who thought it was a good idea to put baby oil in her nose, because her nostrils were dry. Not a good idea. Less common causes include inhaling too much “vaporized” candle wax, because you “spen[d] most of [your] time in a shrine [surrounded by] burning candles.” Lipoid pneumonia isn’t nicknamed “fire-eater’s lung” for nothing, as performers place themselves at risk for aspirating that tiki torch oil in their act.

A thankfully really uncommon cause is self-injection with oil. Why would anyone do that? “[T]o increase the size of [their] genitals,” of course—until they accidentally hit a vein, and squirt oil into their bloodstream.

But, this is what concerns me more. Cases like this poor woman: four admissions to the hospital with pneumonia within just six months. During her fourth admission, her doctors “meticulously inquired about every possible cause of her recurrent pneumonia, and she revealed that she had [started] oil pulling 2 weeks [before] her first admission.” And then, when she was discharged from the hospital, she did it even more to try to “detoxify” from all the drugs they had given her, which led to three more hospital admissions. They told her to stop the oil pulling. And, no more pneumonia.

That’s one of the reasons the American Dental Association recommends against the practice. In fact, remember that tooth-whitening experiment? There’s a reason they used extracted teeth, instead of just having people do it. They didn’t think it would be ethical “to conduct a human trial” of oil pulling “with the knowledge that there was a chance of inducing lipoid pneumonia in study volunteers.”

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified.

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

This is the final video in this series on oil pulling. Watch the first three here:

Speaking of toothpaste, ever wondered about that ingredient SLS? Check out my recent videos Is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate Safe? and Is CABP in SLS-Free Toothpaste Any Better?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

77 responses to “The Risks of Oil Pulling

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  1. So do we always unknowingly inhale oil when oil pulling, or does it just happen to those who oil pull a certain way?
    Interesting that oil pulling reduced tooth sensitivity because you’d think that since oil pulling reduces the protective pellicle layer it would INCREASE sensitivity.




    6
    1. I have never seen anyone make the case for stopping fluoride toothpaste because if ingested, in more than a pea size amount, it is toxic. How do you get your children to not ingest it? What is the long term effects of multiple ingestions? There can be negative effects from any practice if done improperly. Were tests done on the anti-bacterial or anti-viral effects of coconut oil used in oil pulling? What effect does it have on the pathogen responsible for gingivitis and cavities? What is the whole picture? What about the harm being done by nano cleaning particles, contained in some toothpastes, wedged under gum lines? What do you use Dr. Greger?




      14
      1. Oil pulling has eliminated my tooth sensitivity. In order to get oil in the lungs it needs to be inhaled. Oil pulling is the same as rinsing your mouth with water or other mouth wash. The process is just longer. I find it astounding that research needs to be completed in order to advise people not to inhale oil. Is there no common sense?




        9
    1. Search causes, only way to reverse something, maybe try eating way less or no starchy foods, it doesnt seems to help peoples with sinus/nose problems, can replace by fruits carbs, hope you dont eat dairy, thats the worst of the worst for these problems~




      2
    2. If in fact you do decide to avoid the olive oil, you might want to try carrying a little squirt bottle of pure water (if they’ll let you) to squirt up your nose during flight.

      I suggest this because unlike your case, at times during a night if my nose is a little stuffy and I wake up being a mouth breather, I spray my nose-face with some distilled water I keep in a glass bottle and my nose opens right up and I become a nose breather again.




      4
    3. I’m betting the solution may reside in the dose. As with so many things the difference between medicine and poison is the dose. I’m certainly not an expert, but maybe a cotton swab with a drop or two would be different than squirting oil or putting globs in your nose.




      3
    4. Nasal irrigation with a properly formulated (i.e., isotonic) saline solution works for me. You can mix your own, but I like the convenience of using pre-mixed packets in distilled water. For airplane travel, I take a few little ampoules of pre-mixed solution made by the NeilMed company. They are under 100 ml so you can put them in your carry-on liquids bag.




      1
    5. The issue is applying oil inside the nares before bed (laying supine, inducing post-nasal drip/drainage into the lungs). I wouldn’t suspect this being a concern when remaining upright, as you would be on an airplane.




      0
  2. As I was looking into this research I did see some references to using large amounts of oil. Evidently some people use so much oil, and they even gargle with it. Could that be the cause of sucking oil down the wind pipe.

    So I can see not giving it to young children. Not using large amounts. I think a teaspoon seems to work fine. And I see why Dr. Greger has said he doesn’t recommend it. Who would want to take credit for getting people to self induce pneumonia. So, certainly need to be caution.

    Thanks again for the insight.




    3
  3. Thank you Dr. Greger for this report. It confirms a suspicion I have had for many years. Lerrry Yoong the founder of Yoonger Existing Essential OILS encourages all of his devotees to buy his aroma therapy heaters. What the uneducated devotees do is put some of his essential oils in this heating bowl and then the oils evaporate in the air for people to breathe into their lungs. This aroma therapy scam is probably causing great harm to millions of people as they breathe in the vaporized oils into their lungs. Lerrry Yoong is making billions of dollars selling his essential oils and vaporizers. He even has a mouth wash called Leaves which is nothing but various oils and he urges his devotees to swish with it for oral care and I have heard from some people that some people in his huge organization actually encourage people to swallow these oils. The best plan is to eat a whole plant food diet, and if need be use distilled water, or sterile water to spray into your nose or into your dry eyes if that is the problem. But, why spend hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of dollars on so-called essential oils that have great potential to harm you when all you really need for good health is a Whole Plant Food Diet, exercise, clean purified water, and a positive attitude.




    5
    1. John: I’m not writing to defend Lerrry Yoong the founder of Yoonger Existing Essential Oils. I’d never heard of the individual nor of his company. I’m writing just to point out a fact. Essential oils and oils like coconut oil are different substances. When a dried plant material, like leaves or roots, is subjected to a procedure called steam distillation, the resultant liquid is called an essential oil. (Essential oils are insoluble in water, hence the word oil.) An essential oil is a mixture of two related classes of compounds called terpenes and terpenoids. Terpenes and terpenoids have relatively low boiling points, which is why essential oils have strong smells. If one breaths in an essential oil, they don’t last long in the respiratory system; they evaporate and leave the body with exhaled air. In contrast, oils like coconut oil, which are a mixtures of triacylglycerides, which have high boiling points. (In fact, they burn before they evaporate.) Consequently,, if an oil like coconut oil gets into the lungs, it’d linger, and, according to this video, can cause trouble.




      9
    1. So Kathy, have you felt that oil pulling has been useful? Do you notice good things? How has your dental health been? If yes to all of these, why would you allow an internet discussion to dissuade you from continuing? The proof is in the pudding, so it’s said. Michael Doll Sent from ProtonMail mobile ——– Original Message




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      1. “Internet discussion”? That is an odd way to describe the demonstrated risk of serious harm and lack of substantial benefit shown by the scientific evidence.




        14
        1. MAnytimes, Scientific standards or only standards for the people whom they agree with. Standards put forth by the pharmaceutical ind. Say that vaccines are fine for everyone. Not the case. Monsanto’s science says that Glyphosate is good for us Not the case…For years, the sugar industry was scientifically saying that sugar had no problems for a balanced diet. Not the case…they were cooking the books from the beginning. While science is necessary, when it is used by moneyed interests to back up a for profit paradigm the #1 perspective to have is “follow the money”. I could count on two hands an altruistic business model where people are 1st before profit.
          And yes, this is a discussion. How do you know if the information you are reading is accurate and without bias? It is just electrons on a screen…check for yourself…I would trust a thousands of years old medical paradigm before I would admit to ultimate truth based on the oil induced pneumonia diagnosis published in one article.




          5
          1. Exactly. One extremely extremely isolated case of oil pulling related pneumonia- can I emphasize “extremely” any more?! This MD is clearly looking to make a name for himself and make waves




            3
          2. People have been following all sorts of dietary and health practices like cannibalism, tattooing and drinking urine (and alcohol) for thousands of years . That doesn’t mean that these practices must therefore be healthy or beneficial, This argument is what is known as the appeal to antiquity or appeal to tradition fallacy. it is why i don’t automatically accept that ancient practices are necessarily correct.

            And just where is the money supposedly driving the research demonstrating oil pulling has few benefits but some serious risks? Conspiracy theiries are entertaining but where is the evidence for them? I am not aware of any papers that indicate a risk to oil pulling, that were funded by pharmacutical companies. However, if you look at the studies, among those showing benefits, quite a few were conducted by reaerchers from countries where oil manufacturing and exporting are big business. Why not “follow the money” in the case of those studies to critically analyse the findings? This sort of vague and unsubstantiated argument seems very one-sided to me since it could just as easily be made about oil-pulling claims.

            But, sure, you have to critically analyse all evidence – that’s how science advances. But then, why don’t we critically analyse traditions that are thousands of years old also? Perhaps oil pulling began thousands of years ago as a marketing strategy by oil producers. Who knows? But what’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. Being highly sceptical about the side of the argument we don’t like but appafently uncritically accepting the side of the argument we do like, is not healthy scepticism.

            Evidence is not discussion. It sounds like it is just a matter of people’s differing opinions when we use the term “discussion’. That misrepresents what is going on here. Greger found that oil pulling does have some benefits but may also have some serious risks. He found evidence for the benefits and evidence for the risks. Personally, I think that it is better to critically analyse that evidence than it is to rely on logical fallacies, unsubstantiated conspiracy theories and rhetoric to assess the advantages and disadvantages of any dietary or health practice. This doesn’t just apply to alternative health claims. There is plenty of evidence that mainstream medical practices like (inappropriate) stenting and (inappropriate) antibiotic prescribing are dangerous even thogh they are of long standing and stoutly defended by some practitioners.

            I am all for healthy sceupticism but let’s keep it even-handed. Oil pulling is probably significantly safer and just as effective as standard mouthwashes but lets not pretend that it is entirely without risk. Personally, I just rely upon brushing and flossing but if I were to go down the rinsing/swooshing route, I’d probably opt for green tea instead of oil.
            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4911733/




            14
            1. You make some really interesting points in your rebuttal Tom.

              I like the logic that you are using to balance the arguments for

              oil pulling or against oil pulling.

              One thing I have noticed about vegans over the last 3 years

              that a lot of them have improved their teeth, and gums by

              simply eating a whole plant food diet. Some vegans claim

              that it is due to the good bacteria that in their mouth and

              G.I. tract that fights off the bad bacteria that causes gum

              and dental problems. I notice that about myself since I have

              gone on a whole plant food diet. Sometimes I don’t even

              brush my teeth for a few days at a time and I have no

              dental problems. When I go for a check up with the dentists

              he tells me everything is fine. knock on wood. OK…thanks

              for your post it was well written and very enlightening.

              As for me oil pulling is out of the question. It takes to long.

              It is nasty. And it is expensive. Who has 20 to 30 minutes

              to stand there and swish coconut oil back and forth between

              their tonsils.




              4
  4. I’ve been oil pulling every morning for 4 years now. I have whiter, stronger teeth and healthier gums and no more bad breath. Used to have 1-2 cavities a year. Now I go to the dentist and they exclaim, wow you have really healthy teeth and gums! And I tell them, it’s cause I oil pull (they usually roll their eyes. Sigh.) My seasonal allergies and acne cleared up, too. It’s been a godsend. Everything in life has risks and effects. In the case of oil pulling, the health benefits greatly outweigh the extremely minor risks the author found above.




    5
    1. Oh yeah I used to have very sensitive teeth, to the point where I was using sensodyne at age 28. No longer. Tooth sensitivity is gone. I really love it and hope everyone tries it :))




      2
    2. Yea…oil pulling works wonders for me. Breath, gums, sensitivity…my mouth feels so good afterwords…problem is, nobody can make any money off of it…thats why it is treated with derision…better not tell anybody about though, we will run out of coconut trees.




      3
      1. Look on the internet and you find thousands of entrepeneurs making money from selling coconut and other oils.

        I am mystified. How can you say that people make money selling mouthwashes but dont make money selling oils?




        7
        1. There certainly are many, but you still have the reasonable choice to get the oil anyway you want from many sources. There is no way for coconut oil or any other oil to be co-opted by the pharmaceutical industry or the personal care industry or any other industry that sell a concoction of chemicals because they can make the most profit and they can patent it. My bias…Profit is necessary in our world, but too often industry finds something and then co-opts it into a product that can be owned and then through politics and predatory financing create an atmosphere of fear. Sadly this is exactly what is happening to CBD oil and products. The pharma industry wants it all for itself when you should be able to grow all the hemp you want and make all the oil you want without interference.
          So, to make you afraid of natural treatments, a study regarding a woman who got pneumonia from oil pulling is published and a doctor writes that you probably shouldn’t do that..what were the extenuating circumstances? Who published the study?
          Perhaps she took mouthsful of the stuff many times a day. Maybe she was a loon. Nothing can be gleaned from that article other than the fact that SHE got pneumonia from oil. One cannot construe that oil pulling will get you pneumonia.
          I will take anecdotal evidence any day as a 1st course of study, so thousands of years of it probably is a good place to start. Is it right? Is it true? Not sure, but today’s science is so biased in favor of the vested interest it is laughable and very probably criminal. (Gardasil, opiates, vaccines, chemo therapy, antibiotic proliferation, Glyphosate, herbicides, pesticides….. ) When there is choice, there is a better chance for truthful interventions. When money HAS to be made, all bets are off.




          3
          1. “I will take anecdotal evidence any day as a 1st course of study, so thousands of years of it probably is a good place to start. Is it right? Is it true?”

            Not me. I’ll stick with what the balance of evidence shows. But aren’t case studies just a fancy way of saying anecdotal evidence? You apparently don’t like those and I agree that they are a weak form of evidence. So why accept some anecdotes and reject others?

            And why choose oil pulling instead of salt water swooshing or baking soda swooshing or green tea swooshing? For that matter, why not choose swooshing with urine? That has thousands of years of use and anecdotal support too. In fact, all these techniques have a long history and anecdotal evidence behind them.

            They are probably all significantly cheaper than oil pulling too – why not ‘follow the money’ when considering all the hype behind oil pulling? If you look at the research cited to demonstrate oil pulling’s benefits, most of it comes from coconut and palm producing regions of the world. Yet producing a mouthwash from a used green tea bag is free and arguably just as healthy as oil swooshing but with no known adverse side effects.

            How do you decide which approach to follow, though? I’d argue that we need the science to test these approaches and sift the evidence for us.




            8
            1. You probably never swung on a rope swing and dropped into a river or jumped into a huge pile of leaves…. Personal profit and outside affirmations might not be all we live for. We all have strategies for how we allow knowledge to come to us. My very personal bias will not allow me to accept science without extreme skepticism. Anecdotal evidence, or knowledge through experience, is more highly valued by myself. If there is the slightest chance that science has in someway been ‘bought’ by a special interest, I am extremely prejudiced against it. So when I read a case study (a simplistic one, no details) that is published by anything pharmaceutical or health related I first try to determine agenda. Sure, there have got to be thousands of seedy coconut oil salesmen out there, but I can use whatever coconut oil I want. It is the oil, not the brand…If green tea works …fine do the tea. My question to you is, what is your bias against oil pulling? Can’t be money. The organic green tea I get is more expensive than my coconut oil. (Besides, I use the coconut oil for many things in my life) Fear of personal injury? Stop driving a car or riding a bike. I am sure their are many more car accidents than oil pulling accidents resulting in pneumonia. Or perhaps you value the the opinion of a scientist, a doctor, a technocrat, an authority, the most. Fine, no shame there. It does not, however, always dismiss the information garnered from other non-science sources. (Personal experience, intuition, spiritual insights, flipping a coin,) it is just another tool.
              Science is as prejudicial as any information. It ALWAYS depends on your frame of reference. Some science says that vaccines are the greatest health advance in our lifetimes, but the mothers and fathers who have seen the spark of life leave their child’s eyes as a result of vaccination, tell us something else.

              It comes down to this…you will believe what you want to believe. The only real question is why do I want to believe a certain thing. The bias is the outcome.

              Sent from ProtonMail mobile




              1
        2. I use coconut oil or virgin sesame. It’s a great daily habit to oil pull And if everyone did it we’d have healthier mouths and bodies.

          To me this md’s claim is like saying don’t run outside bc you could trip and twist your ankle. Is there a slim chance you could injure yourself by running? Yes. But do the daily benefits of exercise outweigh that slim risk? It’s silly to even have this discussion quite frankly. Nobody inhales the oil when they OP same as nobody inhales mouthwash when they gargle. Who is this MD anyway?




          2
          1. Spoken simply and to the point. Yes, don’t run with scissors in your hand, but continue to use scissors and continue to run. Thanks Carly.

            Sent from ProtonMail mobile




            0
          2. Did you even bother listening to the video or looking at the references cited? It doesn’t look like it from your comments.

            As for your remarks about ‘this MD’ – why not address the evidence instead of trying to attack the messenger?




            5
              1. He reports what the evidence shows.

                And the fact that you wrote ‘Nobody inhales the oil’ suggests that you didn’t understand what the studies he quotes actually found.

                I agree that the risk is relatively small but it is there and there are cheaper and, it appears, safer alternatives to oil pulling.




                4
            1. And I’m sorry I don’t mean to come off as bratty or mean online. I hate that. Enjoy your life, Tom! I for one am gonna keep oil pulling and I wish you and your teeth the very best of health!




              1
              1. Thank you. Same to you also.

                I just don’t really understand why people do this instead of green tea/salt water/baking soda pulling. But it certainly seems to be very popular lately. Brushing and water flossing work fine for me though.

                Cheers.




                3
  5. Inhaling oil could be seen as more akin to suffocating. Your airways can’t clear it out immediately. It spreads and provides a somewhat airtight seal…over the inside of your lungs. Where you absorb oxygen. How do you get the oil out of your lungs?

    Anecdotally the one time I tried coconut oil pulls I got an anaphylactic reaction 5 minutes later. But my gums seemed to be less inflamed, just the rest of me swelled up with an angry red rash LOL.




    4
    1. I would suppose that if one were allergic to coconut, then ingesting coconut oil would not be wise…. ;-] perhaps sesame oil or a couple of drops of oregano oil in some olive oil. Maybe the green tea….You have choices…




      0
  6. Oil pulling is stupid and not safe. Personally I use aloe vera mouth wash and it’s very good at keeping the gums healthy. Plenty of other rinses as some mentioned, green tea mouth wash, that work too. Oil is just gross.




    4
    1. hi Steph, I couldn’t agree more on oil pulling being grosse! Any oil would be bad, but particularly coconut oil.. twice the saturated fat of lard! eewwww!

      I do like your idea of aloe vera though and will definitly try that. I love my water flosser, and use neem toothpaste which seems to work well for me.




      2
    1. Not only is there a lot of interest in Germany about whole plant food diet for good health. But, I noticed some Russians on YouTube have stated in the YouTube comments section that they wished that this knowledge was being shared with the Russian people. Probably most people around the world are unaware of the benefits of a whole plant food diet.




      1
  7. I have known many people to aspirate food and beverages, basically anything you can put in your mouth. With aspiration there is always a risk of pneumonia involved. So would you say that perhaps we should not eat or drink for fear of aspiration followed by a risk of pneumonia? At some time in our lives, most likely all have aspirated something due to various reasons, such as trying to eat and talk at the same time or being startled for whatever reason. It’s all part of the “risks” of eating or drinking. Would it then be too risky to eat or drink? Please note that if we stop, we will die! So maybe eating and drinking would be necessary in the light of certain death if we stop, so perhaps it’s worth the risk!!!
    Every reference sighted did not test the benefits of ORGANIC, EXTRA VIRGIN coconut oil. All that was tested seems to be refined oils. Basically due to the process to refining oils, most of your nutrients are lost. To be fair, why don’t you research the organic extra virgin oil. If you downplay the benefits of all oils, refined or unrefined, would that even be fair? A good researcher would pay very close attention to exactly what was tested in the studies and never make a blanket statement discouraging the use of all forms of a product including those not tested in the research. If you truly want to be scientific, you cannot ignore this factor. This is exactly what the media does. I strongly urge that you balance the equation here.
    Information that I have read concerning oil pulling usually recommends the use of organic, extra virgin coconut oil, for the very reason that the refined oils have lost much of their nutrients in the refinement process. Refined and processed foods never do measure up to unrefined foods. The best food out there are the ones God made, no chemicals added and not refined.
    For many foods and oils etc., there tends to be so little research out there, mainly because it is not profitable enough to do the studies!!! This does not necessarily mean that anything not researched is totally useless. Most research involves pharmaceuticals, because of the tremendous potential profits to be gained. Please, you pride yourselves on researching the research. Scientific process should never allow biases to sneak in and mush be totally objective and painfully specific. Remember, theories are basically qualified opinions. Many past theories and dogma have been disproved through the years or changed due to our increasing knowledge. You need to acknowledge this.
    I just want to add that due to the nature of the internet, there is a lot of garbage out there and many unprecedented claims on just about everything you can think of. We must all be taught how to recognize sensationalistic claims and ‘theories’. No doubt, this is one of the things you are trying to accomplish. Making blanket statements can drive people away from using certain forms of a products which could possibly provide many benefits. You should not avoid being very specific in the information you put forth in order to accomplish your underlying mission.




    0
  8. Off topic, but wanted to let you know that the email I received from yourselves today regarding donations and so on … the link to Shop Now does not take me to a page where I can buy the new Daily Dozen poster.

    It might be that the website hasn’t been updated, but it takes me instead to the outreach poster.




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  9. Dear Dr. Greger
    We are very grateful for your daily posts!
    Every morning after breakfast we log in for daily tidbits of wisdom. THANK YOU!!!
    We have received sooooo many life answers so we can avoid mainstream yuck.
    Your new book arrived!!! looking forward to adding new recipes to our daily dozen retune.

    A very grateful family




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  10. Dr. Gregor, will you be doing videos about health benefits of the Moringa Olifera plant used in various ways including ingesting leaves, powder made from leaves, or rubbing mornings oil on skin. Having read about some research claiming that ingesting morning plant can counter the effects of arsenic poisoning and consequently thinking it might be good to add it to rice recipes?




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  11. I disagree with your comments on oil pulling. I have been doing oil pulling for years, and use coconut oil. I have documented results on file at my dentist to back up the benefits. I had a small ulcer caused by the improper procedure of a bone implant in preparation for a tooth implant ( previous dentist). This ulcer persisted for years, and it was when I started the oil pulling that the exterior bubble disappeared in a month. The xrays over the next year showed the interior bone clearing up . The ulcer has never returned, and that is now 6 years ago.
    Common sense should be used when doing oil pulling – who in their right mind will lay down.
    Who in their right mind will spit the oil down the sink? Obviously one has to dispose of in the trash.
    I find that my teeth and gums feel so clean after having done the procedure.
    Coconut oil is the recommended oil, due to it’s antiviral properties.
    I do for about 15 to 20 minutes then spit out. I then rinse my mouth with warm water and then brush teeth as normal.
    I always do this first thing in the morning, before eating or drinking anything.
    I will continue to oil pull, with coconut oil.




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    1. There are those on this forum who will argue that you should not do oil pulling on your own personal anecdotal testimony. You should only do oil pulling if there are hundreds of double blind scientific studies conducted around the world and paid for by the American Medical Association and other large institutes. If all of these multi million dollar double blind studies prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that oil pulling might benefit you then maybe then you should consider it. But, not until the world of SCIENCE has proven it effective. Just kidding.




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    1. Tom, maybe all of these people on this forum who make claims of healing from oil pulling are just liars, or maybe they are hallucinating. Could it be the POWER OF THE DARK SIDE…..I mean the power of the placebo effect?




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      1. Sure… anything you can’t understand or explain scientifically is either a lie or the placebo effect….couldnt be that science hasn’t caught up yet..or you’re…..I’m sorry, no name calling.




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        1. Just kidding Michael. Actually, you make a great point. When people demand that we do things only because science gives us the green light to do it they forget to ask the question…..which science? According to advanced physicists Newtonian science is being overshadowed by String Theory. According to string theory there are multiple dimensions that we cannot even see in our own 3 dimensional world. One of the basic ideas of string theory is that an object can exist in multiple places at the same time. So, when it comes to healing, which science are we suppose to bow down to – Newtonian science or string theory science which might better explain the Placebo effect, miracles, ghosts, and other supernatural things.




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