Alternate-Day Intermittent Fasting Put to the Test

Alternate-Day Intermittent Fasting Put to the Test
4.47 (89.3%) 86 votes

Does every-other-day-eating prevent the metabolic slowing that accompanies weight loss or improve compliance over constant day-to-day calorie restriction?

Discuss
Republish

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Rather than cutting calories day in and day out, what if you instead just ate as much as you wanted every other day? Or for only a few hours a day? Or fasted two days a week? Or five days a month? These are all examples of intermittent fasting regimens. That may even be the way we were built. Three meals a day may be a relatively novel behavior for our species. For millennia our ancestors may have only “consumed only one large meal a day or went several days [at a time] without food.”

Intermittent fasting is often presented as a means of stressing your body—in a good way. There is a concept in biology called hormesis, which can be thought of as the that-which-doesn’t-kill-you-makes-you-stronger principle. Exercise is the classic example, where you put stress on your heart and muscles, and as long as there’s sufficient recovery time, you are all the healthier for it. Is that the case with intermittent fasting? Mark Twain thought it was: ‘‘A little starvation can…do more for the average sick man than can the best medicines and the best doctors. [Not just] a restricted diet, [but] total abstention from food for one or two days.’’

But Twain also said, “Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” Is the craze over intermittent fasting just hype? Many diet fads have their roots in legitimate science, but over time, facts can get distorted, benefits exaggerated, and risks downplayed. In other words, “Science takes a back seat to marketing.” At the same time, you don’t want to lose out on any potential benefit by dismissing something out of hand based on the absurdist claims of overzealous promoters. You don’t want to throw the baby out with the baby fat.

Religious fasting is the most studied form of intermittent fasting—specifically Ramadan, a month-long period in which devout Muslims abstain from food and drink from sunrise to sunset. The effects are complicated by a change in sleeping patterns, and also thirst. The same dehydration issue arises with Yom Kippur, when observant Jews stop eating and drinking for about 25 hours. The most studied form of intermittent fasting that deals only with food restriction is alternate-day fasting, which involves eating every other day, alternating with days consuming little or no calories.

At rest, we burn about a 50:50 mix of carbs and fat, but we run usually out of our glycogen—our carbohydrate stores—within 12 and 36 hours of stopping eating. At that point, our body has to shift to rely more on our fat stores. This “metabolic switch” may help explain why the greatest rate of breakdown and burning of fat over a three-day fast happens between the hours of 18 and 24 of the 72-hour period. The hope is to reap some of the benefits of taking a break from eating without the risks of prolonged fasting.

One of the potential benefits of alternate-day fasting over chronic calorie restriction is that you get regular breaks from feeling constant hunger. But might people becomes so famished on their fasting day that they turn the next into a feasting day, and overeat? If you ate more than twice as much as you normally would, then that presumably would defeat the whole point of alternate-day fasting. Mice fed every other day don’t lose weight. They just eat roughly twice as much in one day than non-fasted mice would regularly eat in two. That is not, however, what happens in people.

Randomized to fast from 8 p.m. the night before to 8 a.m. the next day, fasting for 36 hours only led to people eating an average of 20 percent more the day after they broke the fast, compared to a control group that didn’t fast at all. That would leave them with a large calorie deficit, equivalent to a daily calorie restriction of nearly a thousand calories a day. This particular study involved lean men and women, but similar results have been found amongst overweight or obese subjects, typically only about a 10 to 25 percent compensatory increase in calorie intake over baseline on non-fasting days. And this seems to be the case whether the fasting day was a true zero calorie fast or a few-hundred calorie so-called “modified fast” day, which may lead to better compliance.

Some studies found study subjects appeared to eat no more or even less on days after a day-long mini-fast. Even within studies, great variability is reported. In a 24-hour fasting study, where folks ate an early dinner and then had a late dinner the next day after skipping breakfast and lunch, the degree of compensation at the second dinner ranged from 7 percent to 110 percent. This means some got so hungry by the time supper rolled around that they ate more than 24 hours’ worth of calories in a single meal. The researchers suggested that perhaps people first try “test fasts” to see how much their hunger and subsequent intake ramps up before considering an intermittent fasting regimen. Hunger levels can change over time, though, dissipating as your body habituates to the new normal.

In an eight-week study in which obese subjects were restricted to about 500 calories every other day, after approximately two weeks, they reportedly started feeling very little hunger on their slashed calorie days. This no doubt helped them lose about a dozen pounds, on average, over the duration of the study—but there was no control group with which to compare. A similar study with a control group found a similar amount of weight loss—about ten pounds—over twelve weeks in a group of normal weight (meaning overweight, on average) individuals. For these modified regimens where people are getting prescribed 500 calories on their quote-unquote “fasting” days, researchers found that from a weight loss perspective, it did not appear to matter whether those calories are divided up throughout the day or eaten in a single meal.

Instead of prescribing a set number of calories on “fasting” days, which many people find difficult to calculate outside of a study setting, a pair of Iranian researchers instead came upon a brilliant idea of unlimited above-ground vegetables. Starchy root vegetables are relatively calorie-dense, compared to other vegetables. But vegetables that grow above the ground, including stem vegetables like celery and rhubarb, flowering vegetables like cauliflower, leafy vegetables like, well, leafy vegetables, and then all the fruits we tend to think of as vegetables, like tomatoes, peppers, okra, eggplant, string beans, summer squash, and zucchini. So, instead of just prescribing a certain number of calories for their “fasting” days, subjects alternated between their regular diet and helping themselves every other day to an all-you-can-eat above-ground vegetable feast (along with naturally non-caloric beverages, like green tea or black coffee). After eight weeks, subjects lost an average of 13 pounds and two inches off their waist.

The same variability discovered for calorie compensation has also been found for weight loss, though. In a twelve-month trial in which subjects were instructed to eat only one-quarter of their calorie needs every other day, weight changes varied from a loss of about 37 pounds to a gain of about 8 pounds. The biggest factor differentiating the low-weight-loss group from the high-weight-loss group appeared to be not how much they feasted on their regular diet days, but how much they were able to comply on their fast days with the calorie restriction.

Overall, ten out of ten alternate-day fasting studies showed significant reductions in body fat. Small short-term studies show about a 4 to 8 percent drop in body weight after 3 to 12 weeks. How does that compare with continuous calorie restriction? Zero-calorie alternate-day fasting was compared head-to-head to a daily 400-calorie restriction for eight weeks. Both groups lost the same amount of weight (about 17 pounds), and in the follow-up check-in six months later, after the trial ended, both groups had maintained a similar degree of weight loss (still both down about a dozen pounds).

The hope that intermittent fasting would somehow avoid the metabolic adaptations that slow weight loss or improve compliance don’t seem to have materialized. The same compensatory reactions in terms of increased appetite and a slower metabolism plague both continuous and intermittent caloric restriction. And the largest, longest trial of alternate-day fasting found that it may even be less sustainable than more traditional approaches. By the end of a year, the drop-out rate of the alternate-day fasting group was 38 percent, compared to 29 percent in the continuous calorie-restriction group. Though to date, alternate-day fasting regimens haven’t been shown to produce superior weight loss, for the individuals that may prefer this pattern of calorie restriction, are there any downsides? We’ll find out, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Dustin Kirkpatrick. Image has been modified.

Video includes graphics from Vecteezy.com

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

Rather than cutting calories day in and day out, what if you instead just ate as much as you wanted every other day? Or for only a few hours a day? Or fasted two days a week? Or five days a month? These are all examples of intermittent fasting regimens. That may even be the way we were built. Three meals a day may be a relatively novel behavior for our species. For millennia our ancestors may have only “consumed only one large meal a day or went several days [at a time] without food.”

Intermittent fasting is often presented as a means of stressing your body—in a good way. There is a concept in biology called hormesis, which can be thought of as the that-which-doesn’t-kill-you-makes-you-stronger principle. Exercise is the classic example, where you put stress on your heart and muscles, and as long as there’s sufficient recovery time, you are all the healthier for it. Is that the case with intermittent fasting? Mark Twain thought it was: ‘‘A little starvation can…do more for the average sick man than can the best medicines and the best doctors. [Not just] a restricted diet, [but] total abstention from food for one or two days.’’

But Twain also said, “Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” Is the craze over intermittent fasting just hype? Many diet fads have their roots in legitimate science, but over time, facts can get distorted, benefits exaggerated, and risks downplayed. In other words, “Science takes a back seat to marketing.” At the same time, you don’t want to lose out on any potential benefit by dismissing something out of hand based on the absurdist claims of overzealous promoters. You don’t want to throw the baby out with the baby fat.

Religious fasting is the most studied form of intermittent fasting—specifically Ramadan, a month-long period in which devout Muslims abstain from food and drink from sunrise to sunset. The effects are complicated by a change in sleeping patterns, and also thirst. The same dehydration issue arises with Yom Kippur, when observant Jews stop eating and drinking for about 25 hours. The most studied form of intermittent fasting that deals only with food restriction is alternate-day fasting, which involves eating every other day, alternating with days consuming little or no calories.

At rest, we burn about a 50:50 mix of carbs and fat, but we run usually out of our glycogen—our carbohydrate stores—within 12 and 36 hours of stopping eating. At that point, our body has to shift to rely more on our fat stores. This “metabolic switch” may help explain why the greatest rate of breakdown and burning of fat over a three-day fast happens between the hours of 18 and 24 of the 72-hour period. The hope is to reap some of the benefits of taking a break from eating without the risks of prolonged fasting.

One of the potential benefits of alternate-day fasting over chronic calorie restriction is that you get regular breaks from feeling constant hunger. But might people becomes so famished on their fasting day that they turn the next into a feasting day, and overeat? If you ate more than twice as much as you normally would, then that presumably would defeat the whole point of alternate-day fasting. Mice fed every other day don’t lose weight. They just eat roughly twice as much in one day than non-fasted mice would regularly eat in two. That is not, however, what happens in people.

Randomized to fast from 8 p.m. the night before to 8 a.m. the next day, fasting for 36 hours only led to people eating an average of 20 percent more the day after they broke the fast, compared to a control group that didn’t fast at all. That would leave them with a large calorie deficit, equivalent to a daily calorie restriction of nearly a thousand calories a day. This particular study involved lean men and women, but similar results have been found amongst overweight or obese subjects, typically only about a 10 to 25 percent compensatory increase in calorie intake over baseline on non-fasting days. And this seems to be the case whether the fasting day was a true zero calorie fast or a few-hundred calorie so-called “modified fast” day, which may lead to better compliance.

Some studies found study subjects appeared to eat no more or even less on days after a day-long mini-fast. Even within studies, great variability is reported. In a 24-hour fasting study, where folks ate an early dinner and then had a late dinner the next day after skipping breakfast and lunch, the degree of compensation at the second dinner ranged from 7 percent to 110 percent. This means some got so hungry by the time supper rolled around that they ate more than 24 hours’ worth of calories in a single meal. The researchers suggested that perhaps people first try “test fasts” to see how much their hunger and subsequent intake ramps up before considering an intermittent fasting regimen. Hunger levels can change over time, though, dissipating as your body habituates to the new normal.

In an eight-week study in which obese subjects were restricted to about 500 calories every other day, after approximately two weeks, they reportedly started feeling very little hunger on their slashed calorie days. This no doubt helped them lose about a dozen pounds, on average, over the duration of the study—but there was no control group with which to compare. A similar study with a control group found a similar amount of weight loss—about ten pounds—over twelve weeks in a group of normal weight (meaning overweight, on average) individuals. For these modified regimens where people are getting prescribed 500 calories on their quote-unquote “fasting” days, researchers found that from a weight loss perspective, it did not appear to matter whether those calories are divided up throughout the day or eaten in a single meal.

Instead of prescribing a set number of calories on “fasting” days, which many people find difficult to calculate outside of a study setting, a pair of Iranian researchers instead came upon a brilliant idea of unlimited above-ground vegetables. Starchy root vegetables are relatively calorie-dense, compared to other vegetables. But vegetables that grow above the ground, including stem vegetables like celery and rhubarb, flowering vegetables like cauliflower, leafy vegetables like, well, leafy vegetables, and then all the fruits we tend to think of as vegetables, like tomatoes, peppers, okra, eggplant, string beans, summer squash, and zucchini. So, instead of just prescribing a certain number of calories for their “fasting” days, subjects alternated between their regular diet and helping themselves every other day to an all-you-can-eat above-ground vegetable feast (along with naturally non-caloric beverages, like green tea or black coffee). After eight weeks, subjects lost an average of 13 pounds and two inches off their waist.

The same variability discovered for calorie compensation has also been found for weight loss, though. In a twelve-month trial in which subjects were instructed to eat only one-quarter of their calorie needs every other day, weight changes varied from a loss of about 37 pounds to a gain of about 8 pounds. The biggest factor differentiating the low-weight-loss group from the high-weight-loss group appeared to be not how much they feasted on their regular diet days, but how much they were able to comply on their fast days with the calorie restriction.

Overall, ten out of ten alternate-day fasting studies showed significant reductions in body fat. Small short-term studies show about a 4 to 8 percent drop in body weight after 3 to 12 weeks. How does that compare with continuous calorie restriction? Zero-calorie alternate-day fasting was compared head-to-head to a daily 400-calorie restriction for eight weeks. Both groups lost the same amount of weight (about 17 pounds), and in the follow-up check-in six months later, after the trial ended, both groups had maintained a similar degree of weight loss (still both down about a dozen pounds).

The hope that intermittent fasting would somehow avoid the metabolic adaptations that slow weight loss or improve compliance don’t seem to have materialized. The same compensatory reactions in terms of increased appetite and a slower metabolism plague both continuous and intermittent caloric restriction. And the largest, longest trial of alternate-day fasting found that it may even be less sustainable than more traditional approaches. By the end of a year, the drop-out rate of the alternate-day fasting group was 38 percent, compared to 29 percent in the continuous calorie-restriction group. Though to date, alternate-day fasting regimens haven’t been shown to produce superior weight loss, for the individuals that may prefer this pattern of calorie restriction, are there any downsides? We’ll find out, next.

Please consider volunteering to help out on the site.

Image credit: Dustin Kirkpatrick. Image has been modified.

Video includes graphics from Vecteezy.com

Motion graphics by Avocado Video

Doctor's Note

Whoa, that was a long one; packed in a lot of good stuff. So, bottom-line: it doesn’t appear to provide an edge over traditional calorie-cutting, but if you like it better, why not give it try? Maybe you should hear my next video first, Is Alternate-Day Intermittent Fasting Safe?

Over the next couple weeks, we round out the series with:

What about total fasting? If you missed them:

I have a whole chapter on intermittent fasting in my new book How Not to Dietpre-order now! (All proceeds I receive from my books are donated to charity.)

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

65 responses to “Alternate-Day Intermittent Fasting Put to the Test

Comment Etiquette

On NutritionFacts.org, you'll find a vibrant community of nutrition enthusiasts, health professionals, and many knowledgeable users seeking to discover the healthiest diet to eat for themselves and their families. As always, our goal is to foster conversations that are insightful, engaging, and most of all, helpful – from the nutrition beginners to the experts in our community.

To do this we need your help, so here are some basic guidelines to get you started.

The Short List

To help maintain and foster a welcoming atmosphere in our comments, please refrain from rude comments, name-calling, and responding to posts that break the rules (see our full Community Guidelines for more details). We will remove any posts in violation of our rules when we see it, which will, unfortunately, include any nicer comments that may have been made in response.

Be respectful and help out our staff and volunteer health supporters by actively not replying to comments that are breaking the rules. Instead, please flag or report them by submitting a ticket to our help desk. NutritionFacts.org is made up of an incredible staff and many dedicated volunteers that work hard to ensure that the comments section runs smoothly and we spend a great deal of time reading comments from our community members.

Have a correction or suggestion for video or blog? Please contact us to let us know. Submitting a correction this way will result in a quicker fix than commenting on a thread with a suggestion or correction.

View the Full Community Guidelines

  1. I went to a restaurant last week and as the waiter came over the take the order I noticed he kept grabbing his butt.

    I said, Do you have hemorrhoids?

    And he said, No, just what’s on the menu.

    I did however notice they had soup on the menu, So I took a napkin and wiped it off.

        1. Yeah, a number of TED speakers have deplored how vested interests work to censor, block and influence who gets to talk at TED events, what they’re allowed to say, and specifically which videos get posted on YouTube. I’m delighted that Dr Greger’s truths are so overwhelmingly obvious and important that the TED czars didn’t dare block the video entirely — they just attempted to completely undermine it with a gratuitous and ridiculous warning. This is more than just TED’s legal staff covering their collective asses.

        1. Deb, Hmmm, Dr G could have starred in that music-video by ZZ Top “Sharp Dressed Man”!. I would post the Youtube link like YR, but I would be immediately admonished by Reality Bites ;-)

    1. Dr. McDougall has been saying for years that excess calories from starches are just burned off as excess body heat. Potatoes, corn meal, beans, whole grains, pumpkin, oats. “The Starch Solution” by Dr. John McDougall.

    2. It’s amazing how many commenters on the TED video call out the TED censors for bias due to their posted “warning”.. A lot of people are finally waking up to how biased news and establishment organizations really are. Thank goodness for free speech on the Internet (well, mostly) … let’s hope that we never lose that freedom!

      1. Darwin, whether you agree with the books or not, take a look at these articles as regards free speech. These remind me of the book, “Fahrenheit 451.”

        https://www.christianpost.com/voice/amazon-book-banning-censorship.html
        https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/03/18/censorship-or-social-responsibility-amazon-removes-some-books-peddling-vaccine-misinformation/
        https://www.counter-currents.com/2019/03/how-to-fight-amazon-censorship/

        You can see more by googling the topic.

        1. WFPBLiisa, Thanks for the links. Yes, it’s getting scary how these mega-companies are using censorship to influence the thinking of millions of people. They are essentially multi-national monopolies now and are accountable to no one!

  2. Those Iranian researchers had a brilliant idea! People on that study automatically cut their consumption of animal based foods and significantly increased their consumption of vegetables. Their diet became at least half time whole foods plant based.

  3. In all honesty, I know of one person who went on a fast and this what happened to them.

    They went to sleep that night and had a bad dream.

    They dreamt they were a muffler and woke up exhausted.

  4. One of the fasting seasons I did within the Christian community was more like the 5:2 and I hated that even more than fasting itself. It was every week and just caused constantly thinking about food.

    1. Honestly, what I remember was watching the clock waiting to be able to eat and it was probably when I stopped fasting altogether after years of not minding it.

  5. Why is so much about weight loss. It is frustrating. Can’t we just look at what’s healthy? I happen to be underweight by conventional standards. Maybe that’s a good thing.

    1. Mark,

      Dr. Greger just wrote a book called, “How Not To Diet” because of the obesity epidemic.

      Plus, people have been asking him questions about intermittent fasting for the past year and he is answering their questions.

      I know that a lot of his audience members already achieved an ideal weight but there are millions of people out there who haven’t yet.

    2. ‘Why is so much about weight loss.’

      It’s a big issue (excuse the pun, RB) because 40% of the US population is obese and another 30% is merely overweight. ‘Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer that are some of the leading causes of preventable, premature death.’
      https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html

      Overnutrition is clearly a relevant topic here. However, there are hundreds if not thousands of videos, blog pages etc here on other nutrition topics.

    3. It was mentioned in the video that fasting can have hormetic effects. Look up Longo and Sinclair with the term “epigenetics” to see that this is about general health.

      If you are lighter than the typical overweight person then it is a good thing. If you are truly underweight then it is a bad thing. You can search for a BMI calculator to get a number and interpretation guide for that number so you will know.

      1. I want to thank everyone for their helpful responses. I have always been suspicious that a truly healthy diet is what almost everyone needs and might be all we need to know to correct most imbalances. That has been the focus for myself for 50 years. I find it to be a constant education and find Dr. Greger’s work so helpful in that way and am very grateful.

  6. I have been doing intermittent fasting for over five years and it works for me. No more losing weight just to gain it back when calorie restriction is eased up. While it might not be for everybody, for those of us who are suited to this it works well. Yes, I sometimes get very hungry but I know that hunger comes in waves and will soon pass. I just busy myself with something and go on with the day. I love to have days when I am free to eat what I want but unless I am celebrating a holiday or birthday that day will still be just healthy food, only more of it. Some people are okay with counting calories or points everyday or whatever else they do to lose weight or maintain weight loss but the pattern of fasting and free eating suits me so I am sticking with it. My doctor was very pleased when I came back with an impressive weight loss as well as loss of body fat that had been tested. Also, by nature I do not snack; even on the days I can eat whatever I want I stick to mealtimes.

    1. yanaf,

      I’m glad that intermittent fasting works for you; to me, that means that it probably can work for some people.

      I don’t count calories or anything else. I initially lost weight by practicing portion control and making healthier choices (eg, eating a banana instead of a pastry with coffee, etc). Then, when I started eating plant based whole food (I’d been a vegetarian but I dropped dairy products and eggs, and tried to avoid processed food), I lost even more weight without trying. My husband had a similar experience.

      I think part of why I’m able to maintain my weight is that I don’t/can’t eat most of the “food” I encounter when I’m out and about. I cook most meals at home, as there are few options for eating out. And I’m learning to carry my own food when I go to parties, because I frequently discover I can’t eat any of what is served, or only a very little. Since I don’t fast well (I think I’m slightly hypoglycemic), I get very hungry sometimes. And everyone around me is eating, eating, eating. LOL!!

    2. One meal a day (dinner/WFPB) coupled with daily vigorous exercise works best for me and my schedule for the past 5+ years, maintaining a body fat average of around 10%, a RHR of 45 BPM, and BP reading of 108/69. And I’m never really hungry. In fact sometimes I feel I could easily skip dinner.

        1. Thanks Fumble,

          My daily base is 3 cups of (black) beans and 1 cup of brown rice, ground flax seed, followed with a varied assortment of fresh vegetables and fruits in a constant rotation. My ‘window’ is about 3 hours. There is some supplementation such as daily B-12, DHA-EPA, CoQ-10, K2 MK-7, and a few others. Living at the 14th parallel I get at least 20+ minutes of sunlight everyday. t wasn’t something I was trying to attain, it just sort of evolved naturally over the years. In 1991 I was an obese 225 lbs. After a one year of focus I got down to 150 lbs. and have pretty much maintained that ever since. I am convinced that in reality we don’t really need that much food to sustain ourselves. Americans are hypnotized and brainwashed (I’m American). Who in their right mind eats more than they need…?

          1. As an addendum, this is my condiment tray:
            * 5-10 fresh finely chopped medium to large size garlic cloves
            * 5- 10 meidum to large size Thai Red Chili’s
            * 4-5 tablespoons of fresh chopped Onion (preferably spring/green)
            * Finely chopped 1/3 of my small finger of fresh Turmeric root
            * A finely chopped significant chub of fresh ginger
            * Fresh ground black pepper
            * Fresh lemon juice or vinegar at hand
            * A few shakes of Thai Mushroom Soy Sauce
            * A few shakes of Thai Fish sauce (I can’t help myself, ever had real Som Tum?)

            1. LG

              Thanks. Sounds like you have all the bases covered.

              Presumably, in societies where feast alternated with famine, fattening up in the good times provided a survival advantage in the subsequent lean times.

              (I’ve been to Thailand a couple of times but as a strict vegetarian, so fish sauce was off the menu for me)..

  7. I should wish the videos where not so long and they ended up in a clear conclusion. Or make a resume and put the conclusion at the beginning, and then let those people with strong endurance skill see all of it. After 8 minutes I give up and want to go to sleep and miss the point. Please.. all of your videos and articles are so interesting.

    1. You can watch the videos at 2x speed with no loss of comprehension. Just click the spoke shaped icon after the cc on the bottom right and choose your playback speed.

  8. As I have posted i recent weeks, Dr Mirkin and his wife use a version of alternate day fasting permanently. It has become their lifestyle, and they seemed to have reaped benefits above and beyond weightloss. Risk factors for heart disease and diabetes improved quickly, and they chose to continue with the plan.http://www.drmirkin.com/nutrition/why-we-use-intermittent-fasting.html

    From my own experience I think the fasting portions are really useful… getting that ‘space’ to be hungry can strengthen resolve and build discipline, while at the same time providing insights to our addictions.

    Wonderful video…loved the presentation and the ‘artwork’.

    1. You got it right, Barb, but running did not cause me to lose any weight….
      It did, however, relieve some aches and pains of old age: in my feet, knees, rib cage… weird! So now I try to run regularly, but I’m old, so some younger people walk as fast as I run, which is okay with me.

      1. I think that’s great Liisa! According to this study published the past week there are real benefits to running even an hour per week. 30% less risk of death by heart disease and 23% less risk of death by cancer. Slow is fine !

        1. Well, I was running regularly for 25-35 minutes every other day on the street (no sidewalks–just cars) until the snow hit us with a vengeance here in Michigan. I have a treadmill in the basement, but there’s a fair amount of radon down there, too, so I’m disinclined to run on it. I also have a Y membership but that means a fair chunk out of a busy day since I’m a caregiver and all that entails so I’m stymied the last couple days. *: (*

          1. Liisa, if you like running then you may like stairs.

            Stairs are lower impact and work joints in a range outside their most common movement range if you do 2 or more steps at a time. You can take it easy at first. But after acclimation you can push to the point where you are expending energy at a similar level to sprinting. All without the constant impact of running. Stairs need warmup and cooldown so you can still run for those parts if you like. I walk for those.

            Stairs are rarely mentioned but for people who can walk they are probably the best lever to increase quality of exercise. I always maintain 3 points of contact. Two feet and a hand on the rail for safety.

            1. Jack, I like your idea, but the only stairs I have take me down to the basement which has more radon than I’d like to expose myself to. Do you have any other good ideas? *:D*

  9. I do 24 hour fasts 1-2 times per month. I do more in winter when I’m less active. I eat mostly plants and meat maybe once every 2-3 weeks. I don’t buy meat in the market ever. Fasting is not just for dieting and to be compared to eating a ton of plants since they are low in calorie density with the conclusion to just eat all the plants you want. Do both! What about the other benefits of fasting? Brain health via BDNF production and autophagy. The first time I did a 24 hour fast I was nervous and watching the clock. Hunger came and went. Being busy at work long hours makes it easy for me. It’s a good reset for the body. Dr Greger should like that there is no money in fasting. Just don’t eat, simple. There is a ton of research on the topic and most looks promising. Some stress is good for the body. Looking forward to more videos on fasting.

    1. (I tried biting my tongue but the urge to sarcasm was just too strong.)

      Perhaps he should also check out the websites of companies selling baldness ‘cures’. They have testimonies demonstrating that their products cure all types of baldness.

      Or he could be a boring old stick-in-mud and just rely on what the scientific literature tells us.

    1. Evan, just for your information, the links under Doctor’s notes describing upcoming videos are not viable until the videos are published. The links given under ‘in cased you missed it’ are all good.

  10. I hope some of these videos in the near future address blood sugar response, insulin sensitivity, fasting insulin levels and a1c . And possibly the inflammatory response. All the things Intermittent fasting is suppose to help.

  11. BUT WILL IT LAST?
    .
    Congratulations to the video preparation staff– the audio for the BOOOOM! signature opening, and Greger’s narrative are balanced, for once.

    This matters, because it spares us the need to race to the audio controls to turn down the sound to avoid the opening BOOOOM!, then return to adjust the audio level to hear Dr. Greger’s sometimes unclear delivery.

    Now that staffers appear to understand what they do with audio levels does matter to the rest of us, will this fortunate trend last? With this segment, the videos not only look professionally-done, but sound that way, as well.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This